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Sample records for quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection

  1. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of seven-transmembrane receptor signaling using full and biased agonists.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gitte L; Kelstrup, Christian D; Lyngsø, Christina; Sarwar, Uzma; Bøgebo, Rikke; Sheikh, Søren P; Gammeltoft, Steen; Olsen, Jesper V; Hansen, Jakob L

    2010-07-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) signal through the well described heterotrimeric G proteins but can also activate G protein-independent signaling pathways of which the impact and complexity are less understood. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is a prototypical 7TMR and an important drug target in cardiovascular diseases. "Biased agonists" with intrinsic "functional selectivity" that simultaneously blocks Galpha(q) protein activity and activates G protein-independent pathways of the AT(1)R confer important perspectives in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of the AT(1)R signaling network. We analyzed ligand-stimulated SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) cells by high resolution (LTQ-Orbitrap) MS and compared the phosphoproteomes of the AT(1)R agonist angiotensin II and the biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)]angiotensin II (SII angiotensin II), which only activates the Galpha(q) protein-independent signaling. We quantified more than 10,000 phosphorylation sites of which 1183 were regulated by angiotensin II or its analogue SII angiotensin II. 36% of the AT(1)R-regulated phosphorylations were regulated by SII angiotensin II. Analysis of phosphorylation site patterns showed a striking distinction between protein kinases activated by Galpha(q) protein-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and we now place protein kinase D as a key protein involved in both Galpha(q)-dependent and -independent AT(1)R signaling. This study provides substantial novel insight into angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity and quantity of Galpha(q) protein-independent signaling and uncovers novel signaling pathways. We foresee that the amount and diversity of G protein-independent signaling may be more pronounced than previously recognized for other 7TMRs as well. Quantitative mass spectrometry is a promising tool for evaluation of the signaling properties of biased agonists to other receptors in the future. PMID:20363803

  2. Peptide Labeling Using Isobaric Tagging Reagents for Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A; Hoffert, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Isobaric tagging reagents have become an invaluable tool for multiplexed quantitative proteomic analysis. These reagents can label multiple, distinct peptide samples from virtually any source material (e.g., tissue, cell line, purified proteins), allowing users the opportunity to assess changes in peptide abundances across many different time points or experimental conditions. Here, we describe the application of isobaric peptide labeling, specifically 8plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (8plex iTRAQ), for quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of cultured cells or tissue suspensions. For this particular protocol, labeled samples are pooled, fractionated by strong cation exchange chromatography, enriched for phosphopeptides, and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for both peptide identification and quantitation. PMID:26584918

  3. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wandinger, Sebastian K; Lahortiga, Idoya; Jacobs, Kris; Klammer, Martin; Jordan, Nicole; Elschenbroich, Sarah; Parade, Marc; Jacoby, Edgar; Linders, Joannes T M; Brehmer, Dirk; Cools, Jan; Daub, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) family form homo- and heterodimers which mediate ligand-specific regulation of many key cellular processes in normal and cancer tissues. While signaling through the EGFR has been extensively studied on the molecular level, signal transduction through ERBB3/ERBB4 heterodimers is less well understood. Here, we generated isogenic mouse Ba/F3 cells that express full-length and functional membrane-integrated ERBB3 and ERBB4 or ERBB4 alone, to serve as a defined cellular model for biological and phosphoproteomics analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling. ERBB3 co-expression significantly enhanced Ba/F3 cell proliferation upon neuregulin-1 (NRG1) treatment. For comprehensive signaling studies we performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) experiments to compare the basal ERBB3/ERBB4 cell phosphoproteome to NRG1 treatment of ERBB3/ERBB4 and ERBB4 cells. We employed a workflow comprising differential isotope labeling with mTRAQ reagents followed by chromatographic peptide separation and final phosphopeptide enrichment prior to MS analysis. Overall, we identified 9686 phosphorylation sites which could be confidently localized to specific residues. Statistical analysis of three replicate experiments revealed 492 phosphorylation sites which were significantly changed in NRG1-treated ERBB3/ERBB4 cells. Bioinformatics data analysis recapitulated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways, but also indicated signaling links to cytoskeletal functions and nuclear biology. Comparative assessment of NRG1-stimulated ERBB4 Ba/F3 cells revealed that ERBB3 did not trigger defined signaling pathways but more broadly enhanced phosphoproteome regulation in cells expressing both receptors. In conclusion, our data provide the first global picture of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling and provide numerous potential starting points for further mechanistic studies. PMID:26745281

  4. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kris; Klammer, Martin; Jordan, Nicole; Elschenbroich, Sarah; Parade, Marc; Jacoby, Edgar; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Brehmer, Dirk; Cools, Jan; Daub, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) family form homo- and heterodimers which mediate ligand-specific regulation of many key cellular processes in normal and cancer tissues. While signaling through the EGFR has been extensively studied on the molecular level, signal transduction through ERBB3/ERBB4 heterodimers is less well understood. Here, we generated isogenic mouse Ba/F3 cells that express full-length and functional membrane-integrated ERBB3 and ERBB4 or ERBB4 alone, to serve as a defined cellular model for biological and phosphoproteomics analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling. ERBB3 co-expression significantly enhanced Ba/F3 cell proliferation upon neuregulin-1 (NRG1) treatment. For comprehensive signaling studies we performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) experiments to compare the basal ERBB3/ERBB4 cell phosphoproteome to NRG1 treatment of ERBB3/ERBB4 and ERBB4 cells. We employed a workflow comprising differential isotope labeling with mTRAQ reagents followed by chromatographic peptide separation and final phosphopeptide enrichment prior to MS analysis. Overall, we identified 9686 phosphorylation sites which could be confidently localized to specific residues. Statistical analysis of three replicate experiments revealed 492 phosphorylation sites which were significantly changed in NRG1-treated ERBB3/ERBB4 cells. Bioinformatics data analysis recapitulated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways, but also indicated signaling links to cytoskeletal functions and nuclear biology. Comparative assessment of NRG1-stimulated ERBB4 Ba/F3 cells revealed that ERBB3 did not trigger defined signaling pathways but more broadly enhanced phosphoproteome regulation in cells expressing both receptors. In conclusion, our data provide the first global picture of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling and provide numerous potential starting points for further mechanistic studies. PMID:26745281

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of IL-33-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sneha M; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Rojas, Pamela Leal; Patil, Arun H; Manda, Srikanth S; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a novel member of the IL-1 family of cytokines that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. IL-33 exerts its effects through a heterodimeric receptor complex resulting in the production and release of proinflammatory cytokines. A detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by IL-33 is still unclear. To gain insights into the IL-33-mediated signaling mechanisms, we carried out a SILAC-based global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis that resulted in the identification of 7191 phosphorylation sites derived from 2746 proteins. We observed alterations in the level of phosphorylation in 1050 sites corresponding to 672 proteins upon IL-33 stimulation. We report, for the first time, phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases, including mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase 2 (Mapkapk2), receptor (TNFRSF) interacting serine-threonine kinase 1 (Ripk1), and NAD kinase (Nadk) that are induced by IL-33. In addition, we observed IL-33-induced phosphorylation of several protein phosphatases including protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 12 (Ptpn12), and inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase D (Inpp5d), which have not been reported previously. Network analysis revealed an enrichment of actin binding and cytoskeleton reorganization that could be important in macrophage activation induced by IL-33. Our study is the first quantitative analysis of IL-33-regulated phosphoproteome. Our findings significantly expand the understanding of IL-33-mediated signaling events and have the potential to provide novel therapeutic targets pertaining to immune-related diseases such as asthma where dysregulation of IL-33 is observed. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000984 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000984). PMID:25367039

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of IL-33 mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Rojas, Pamela Leal; Patil, Arun H.; Manda, Srikanth S.; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Chatterjee, Aditi; Keshava Prasad, T. S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a novel member of the IL-1 family of cytokines that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. IL-33 exerts its effects through a heterodimeric receptor complex resulting in the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. A detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by IL-33 is still unclear. To gain insights into the IL-33 mediated signaling mechanisms, we carried out a SILAC-based global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis that resulted in the identification of 7,191 phosphorylation sites derived from 2,746 proteins. We observed alterations in the level of phosphorylation in 1,050 sites corresponding to 672 proteins upon IL-33 stimulation. We report, for the first time, phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases, including Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (Mapkapk2), Receptor (TNFRSF)-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1 (Ripk1) and NAD kinase (Nadk) that are induced by IL-33. In addition, we observed IL-33-induced phosphorylation of several protein phosphatases including Protein tyrosine phosphatase, Non-receptor type 12 (Ptpn12) and Inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase D (Inpp5d), which have not been reported previously. Network analysis revealed an enrichment of actin binding and cytoskeleton reorganization that could be important in macrophage activation induced by IL-33. Our study is the first quantitative analysis of IL-33-regulated phosphoproteome. Our findings significantly expand the understanding of IL-33 mediated signaling events and have the potential to provide novel therapeutic targets pertaining to immune related diseases such as asthma where dysregulation of IL-33 is observed. PMID:25367039

  7. Quantitative label-free phosphoproteomics strategy for multifaceted experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Soderblom, Erik J; Philipp, Melanie; Thompson, J Will; Caron, Marc G; Moseley, M Arthur

    2011-05-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulator of signaling in nearly all eukaryotic cellular pathways and dysregulated phosphorylation has been implicated in an array of diseases. The majority of MS-based quantitative phosphorylation studies are currently performed from transformed cell lines because of the ability to generate large amounts of starting material with incorporated isotopically labeled amino acids during cell culture. Here we describe a general label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic strategy capable of directly analyzing relatively small amounts of virtually any biological matrix, including human tissue and biological fluids. The strategy utilizes a TiO(2) enrichment protocol in which the selectivity and recovery of phosphopeptides were optimized by assessing a twenty-point condition matrix of binding modifier concentrations and peptide-to-resin capacity ratios. The quantitative reproducibility of the TiO(2) enrichment was determined to be 16% RSD through replicate enrichments of a wild-type Danio rerio (zebrafish) lysate. Measured phosphopeptide fold-changes from alpha-casein spiked into wild-type zebrafish lysate backgrounds were within 5% of the theoretical value. Application to a morpholino induced knock-down of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) in zebrafish embryos resulted in the quantitation of 719 phosphorylated peptides corresponding to 449 phosphorylated proteins from 200 μg of zebrafish embryo lysates. PMID:21491946

  8. Quantitative Label-Free Phosphoproteomics Strategy for Multifaceted Experimental Designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulator of signaling in nearly all eukaryotic cellular pathways and dysregulated phosphorylation has been implicated in an array of diseases. The majority of MS-based quantitative phosphorylation studies are currently performed from transformed cell lines because of the ability to generate large amounts of starting material with incorporated isotopically labeled amino acids during cell culture. Here we describe a general label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic strategy capable of directly analyzing relatively small amounts of virtually any biological matrix, including human tissue and biological fluids. The strategy utilizes a TiO2 enrichment protocol in which the selectivity and recovery of phosphopeptides were optimized by assessing a twenty-point condition matrix of binding modifier concentrations and peptide-to-resin capacity ratios. The quantitative reproducibility of the TiO2 enrichment was determined to be 16% RSD through replicate enrichments of a wild-type Danio rerio (zebrafish) lysate. Measured phosphopeptide fold-changes from alpha-casein spiked into wild-type zebrafish lysate backgrounds were within 5% of the theoretical value. Application to a morpholino induced knock-down of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) in zebrafish embryos resulted in the quantitation of 719 phosphorylated peptides corresponding to 449 phosphorylated proteins from 200 μg of zebrafish embryo lysates. PMID:21491946

  9. The current state of the art of quantitative phosphoproteomics and its applications to diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Yuet X'avia; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a fundamental regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes and aberrant perturbation of phosphorylation has been implicated in various human diseases. Kinases and their cognate inhibitors have been considered as hotspots for drug development. Therefore, the emerging tools, which enable a system-wide quantitative profiling of phosphoproteome, would offer a powerful impetus in unveiling novel signaling pathways, drug targets and/or biomarkers for diseases of interest. This review highlights recent advances in phosphoproteomics, the current state of the art of the technologies and the challenges and future perspectives of this research area. Finally, some exemplary applications of phosphoproteomics in diabetes research are underscored. PMID:26960075

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of cytotoxic T cells to reveal protein kinase d 2 regulated networks.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María N; Goebel, Juergen; Hukelmann, Jens L; Cantrell, Doreen A

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the present study was to characterize the phosphoproteome of cytotoxic T cells and to explore the role of the serine threonine kinase PKD2 (Protein Kinase D2) in the phosphorylation networks of this key lymphocyte population. We used Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) combined with phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative mass-spectrometry to determine the impact of PKD2 loss on the cytotoxic T cells phosphoproteome. We identified 15,871 phosphorylations on 3505 proteins in cytotoxic T cells. 450 phosphosites on 281 proteins were down-regulated and 300 phosphosites on 196 proteins were up-regulated in PKD2 null cytotoxic T cells. These data give valuable new insights about the protein phosphorylation networks operational in effector T cells and reveal that PKD2 regulates directly and indirectly about 5% of the cytotoxic T-cell phosphoproteome. PKD2 candidate substrates identified in this study include proteins involved in two distinct biological functions: regulation of protein sorting and intracellular vesicle trafficking, and control of chromatin structure, transcription, and translation. In other cell types, PKD substrates include class II histone deacetylases such as HDAC7 and actin regulatory proteins such as Slingshot. The current data show these are not PKD substrates in primary T cells revealing that the functional role of PKD isoforms is different in different cell lineages. PMID:25266776

  11. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of Cytotoxic T Cells to Reveal Protein Kinase D 2 Regulated Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, María N.; Goebel, Juergen; Hukelmann, Jens L.; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to characterize the phosphoproteome of cytotoxic T cells and to explore the role of the serine threonine kinase PKD2 (Protein Kinase D2) in the phosphorylation networks of this key lymphocyte population. We used Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) combined with phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative mass-spectrometry to determine the impact of PKD2 loss on the cytotoxic T cells phosphoproteome. We identified 15,871 phosphorylations on 3505 proteins in cytotoxic T cells. 450 phosphosites on 281 proteins were down-regulated and 300 phosphosites on 196 proteins were up-regulated in PKD2 null cytotoxic T cells. These data give valuable new insights about the protein phosphorylation networks operational in effector T cells and reveal that PKD2 regulates directly and indirectly about 5% of the cytotoxic T-cell phosphoproteome. PKD2 candidate substrates identified in this study include proteins involved in two distinct biological functions: regulation of protein sorting and intracellular vesicle trafficking, and control of chromatin structure, transcription, and translation. In other cell types, PKD substrates include class II histone deacetylases such as HDAC7 and actin regulatory proteins such as Slingshot. The current data show these are not PKD substrates in primary T cells revealing that the functional role of PKD isoforms is different in different cell lineages. PMID:25266776

  12. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Satchwell, Timothy J.; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C.; Heesom, Kate J.; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite – the merozoite – induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  13. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S; Satchwell, Timothy J; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C; Heesom, Kate J; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite - the merozoite - induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  14. Quantitative analysis of the TNF-α-induced phosphoproteome reveals AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC as an IKKβ substrate

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramesh K.; Nolte, Hendrik; Sun, Tianliang; Kaur, Harmandeep; Sreenivasan, Krishnamoorthy; Looso, Mario; Offermanns, Stefan; Krüger, Marcus; Swiercz, Jakub M.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitor of the nuclear factor-κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex is a key regulator of the canonical NF-κB signalling cascade and is crucial for fundamental cellular functions, including stress and immune responses. The majority of IKK complex functions are attributed to NF-κB activation; however, there is increasing evidence for NF-κB pathway-independent signalling. Here we combine quantitative mass spectrometry with random forest bioinformatics to dissect the TNF-α-IKKβ-induced phosphoproteome in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In total, we identify over 20,000 phosphorylation sites, of which ∼1% are regulated up on TNF-α stimulation. We identify various potential novel IKKβ substrates including kinases and regulators of cellular trafficking. Moreover, we show that one of the candidates, AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC, is directly phosphorylated by IKKβ on serine 298. We provide evidence that IKKβ-mediated AEG-1 phosphorylation is essential for IκBα degradation as well as NF-κB-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation, which correlate with cancer patient survival in vivo. PMID:25849741

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Nitric Oxide–Responsive Phosphoproteins in Cotton Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Song, Meizhen; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Ji; Zhan, Xianjin; Lan, Jiayang; Feng, Changhui; Zhang, Shengxi; Yu, Shuxun

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of phosphorylation events and their regulation is crucial to understanding the functional biology of plant proteins, but very little is currently known about nitric oxide–responsive phosphorylation in plants. Here, we report the first large-scale, quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) treated with sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor) by utilizing the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method. A total of 1315 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1528 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1020 cotton phosphoproteins. Among them, 183 phosphopeptides corresponding to 167 phosphoproteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated in response to sodium nitroprusside. Several of the phosphorylation sites that we identified, including RQxS, DSxE, TxxxxSP and SPxT, have not, to our knowledge, been reported to be protein kinase sites in other species. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, RNA metabolism, intracellular transport and so on. This study reveals unique features of the cotton phosphoproteome and provides new insight into the biochemical pathways that are regulated by nitric oxide. PMID:24714030

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of early seed development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiehua; Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Lin, Haiyan; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Zhiyong; Nallamilli, Babi R; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed serves as a major food source for over half of the global population. Though it has been long recognized that phosphorylation plays an essential role in rice seed development, the phosphorylation events and dynamics in this process remain largely unknown so far. Here, we report the first large scale identification of rice seed phosphoproteins and phosphosites by using a quantitative phosphoproteomic approach. Thorough proteomic studies in pistils and seeds at 3, 7 days after pollination resulted in the successful identification of 3885, 4313 and 4135 phosphopeptides respectively. A total of 2487 proteins were differentially phosphorylated among the three stages, including Kip related protein 1, Rice basic leucine zipper factor 1, Rice prolamin box binding factor and numerous other master regulators of rice seed development. Moreover, differentially phosphorylated proteins may be extensively involved in the biosynthesis and signaling pathways of phytohormones such as auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and brassinosteroid. Our results strongly indicated that protein phosphorylation is a key mechanism regulating cell proliferation and enlargement, phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, grain filling and grain quality during rice seed development. Overall, the current study enhanced our understanding of the rice phosphoproteome and shed novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of rice seed development. PMID:26613898

  17. Glycoprotein capture and quantitative phosphoproteomics indicate coordinated regulation of cell migration upon lysophosphatidic acid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mäusbacher, Nina; Schreiber, Thiemo B; Daub, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    The lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a serum component that regulates cellular functions such as proliferation, migration, and survival via specific G protein-coupled receptors. The underlying signaling mechanisms are still incompletely understood, including those that operate at the plasma membrane to modulate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in LPA-promoted cell migration. To explore LPA-evoked phosphoregulation with a focus on cell surface proteins, we combined glycoproteome enrichment by immobilized lectins with SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics. We performed biological replicate analyses in SCC-9 squamous cell carcinoma cells and repeatedly quantified the effect of 1.5- and 5-min LPA treatment on more than 700 distinct phosphorylations in lectin-purified proteins. We detected many regulated phosphorylation events on various types of plasma membrane proteins such as cell adhesion molecules constituting adherens junctions, desmosomes, and hemidesmosomes. Several of these LPA-regulated phosphorylation sites have been characterized in a biological context other than G protein-coupled receptor signaling, and the transfer of this functional information suggests coordinated and multifactorial cell adhesion control in LPA-induced cell migration. Additionally, we identified LPA-mediated activation loop phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase Wnk1 and verified a role of Wnk1 for LPA-induced cell migration in knock-down experiments. In conclusion, the glycoproteome phosphoproteomics strategy described here sheds light on incompletely understood mechanisms in LPA-induced cell migratory behavior. PMID:20639409

  18. A quantitative map of the liver mitochondrial phosphoproteome reveals post-translational control of ketogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Carson, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alex S.; Hubler, Shane L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Bailey, Derek J.; Jochem, Adam; Stapleton, Donald S.; Keller, Mark P.; Westphall, Michael S.; Yandell, Brian S.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.; Pagliarini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that play a central role in a diverse array of metabolic processes. Elucidating mitochondrial adaptations to changing metabolic demands and the pathogenic alterations that underlie metabolic disorders represent principal challenges in cell biology. Here, we performed multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to chart the remodeling of the mouse liver mitochondrial proteome and phosphoproteome during both acute and chronic physiological transformations in more than 50 mice. Our analyses reveal that reversible phosphorylation is widespread in mitochondria, and is a key mechanism for regulating ketogenesis during the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, we have demonstrated that phosphorylation of a conserved serine on Hmgcs2 (S456) significantly enhances its catalytic activity in response to increased ketogenic demand. Collectively, our work describes the plasticity of this organelle at high resolution and provides a framework for investigating the roles of proteome restructuring and reversible phosphorylation in mitochondrial adaptation. PMID:23140645

  19. Developmentally-Dynamic Murine Brain Proteomes and Phosphoproteomes Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Doubleday, Peter F.; Ballif, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are governed by a diverse suite of signaling pathways employing reversible phosphorylation. Recent advances in large-scale phosphoproteomic methodologies have made possible the identification and quantification of hundreds to thousands of phosphorylation sites from primary tissues. Towards a global characterization of proteomic changes across brain development, we present the results of a large-scale quantitative mass spectrometry study comparing embryonic, newborn and adult murine brain. Using anti-phosphotyrosine immuno-affinity chromatography and strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography, coupled to immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), we identified and quantified over 1,750 phosphorylation sites and over 1,300 proteins between three developmental states. Bioinformatic analyses highlight functions associated with the identified proteins and phosphoproteins and their enrichment at distinct developmental stages. These results serve as a primary reference resource and reveal dynamic developmental profiles of proteins and phosphoproteins from the developing murine brain. PMID:25177544

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling of PINK1-deficient cells identifies phosphorylation changes in nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Chaoya; Yates, John R.; Liao, Lujian

    2014-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease (PD) associated gene PINK1 encodes a protein kinase that mediates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. The broader downstream signaling events mediated by PINK1 kinase activity have not been well documented. We combine quantitative phosphoproteomic strategies with siRNA mediated PINK1 knock down in mammalian cells to identify alterations of phosphorylation events downstream of PINK1. Although down-regulation of PINK1 has no major effect on the proteome expression in these cells, phosphorylation of over one hundred proteins was reduced reflecting basal levels of phosphorylation signaling events downstream of PINK1. Motif analysis of the residues flanking the phosphorylation sites indicates proline-directed kinase specificity. Surprisingly, we found that the downstream signaling nodes included many transcription factors, as well as nuclear proteins involved in DNA and RNA metabolism. Thus, PINK1 dependent phosphorylation signaling may regulate nuclear activities. PMID:24626860

  1. Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on serial tumor biopsies from a sorafenib-treated HCC patient.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Eva; Colombi, Marco; Boldanova, Tujana; Moes, Suzette; Adametz, David; Quagliata, Luca; Roth, Volker; Terracciano, Luigi; Heim, Markus H; Jenoe, Paul; Hall, Michael N

    2016-02-01

    Compensatory signaling pathways in tumors confer resistance to targeted therapy, but the pathways and their mechanisms of activation remain largely unknown. We describe a procedure for quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on snap-frozen biopsies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and matched nontumor liver tissue. We applied this procedure to monitor signaling pathways in serial biopsies taken from an HCC patient before and during treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. At diagnosis, the patient had an advanced HCC. At the time of the second biopsy, abdominal imaging revealed progressive disease despite sorafenib treatment. Sorafenib was confirmed to inhibit MAPK signaling in the tumor, as measured by reduced ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation. Hierarchical clustering and enrichment analysis revealed pathways broadly implicated in tumor progression and resistance, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell adhesion pathways. Thus, we describe a protocol for quantitative analysis of oncogenic pathways in HCC biopsies and obtained first insights into the effect of sorafenib in vivo. This protocol will allow elucidation of mechanisms of resistance and enable precision medicine. PMID:26787912

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis reveals broad regulatory role of heparan sulfate on endothelial signaling.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Jiang, Jun-Lin; Liu, Miao; Huang, Xin; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Lianchun

    2013-08-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a linear, abundant, highly sulfated polysaccharide that expresses in the vasculature. Recent genetic studies documented that HS critically modulates various endothelial cell functions. However, elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism has been challenging because of the presence of a large number of HS-binding ligands found in the examined experimental conditions. In this report, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to examine the global HS-dependent signaling by comparing wild type and HS-deficient endothelial cells that were cultured in a serum-containing medium. A total of 7222 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 1179 proteins, were identified. Functional correlation analysis identified 25 HS-dependent functional networks, and the top five are related to cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, cellular function and maintenance, cell-to-cell communication, inflammatory response and disorder, cell growth and proliferation, cell movement, and cellular survival and death. This is consistent with cell function studies showing that HS deficiency altered endothelial cell growth and mobility. Mining for the underlying molecular mechanisms further revealed that HS modulates signaling pathways critically related to cell adhesion, migration, and coagulation, including ILK, integrin, actin cytoskeleton organization, tight junction and thrombin signaling. Intriguingly, this analysis unexpectedly determined that the top HS-dependent signaling is the IGF-1 signaling pathway, which has not been known to be modulated by HS. In-depth analysis of growth factor signaling identified 22 HS-dependent growth factor/cytokine/growth hormone signaling pathways, including those both previously known, such as HGF and VEGF, and those unknown, such as IGF-1, erythropoietin, angiopoietin/Tie, IL-17A and growth hormones. Twelve of the identified 22 growth factor/cytokine/growth hormone signaling pathways, including IGF-1 and angiopoietin/Tie signaling, were alternatively confirmed in phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array analysis. In summary, our SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis confirmed previous findings and also uncovered novel HS-dependent functional networks and signaling, revealing a much broader regulatory role of HS on endothelial signaling. PMID:23649490

  3. Research Resource: Identification of Novel Growth Hormone-Regulated Phosphorylation Sites by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Bridgette N.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Fingar, Diane C.; Andrews, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    GH and GH receptors are expressed throughout life, and GH elicits a diverse range of responses, including growth and altered metabolism. It is therefore important to understand the full spectrum of GH signaling pathways and cellular responses. We applied mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics combined with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to identify proteins rapidly phosphorylated in response to GH in 3T3-F442A preadipocytes. We identified 132 phosphosites in 95 proteins that exhibited rapid (5 or 15 min) GH-dependent statistically significant increases in phosphorylation by more than or equal to 50% and 96 phosphosites in 46 proteins that were down-regulated by GH by more than or equal to 30%. Several of the GH-stimulated phosphorylation sites were known (e.g. regulatory Thr/Tyr in Erks 1 and 2, Tyr in signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 5a and 5b, Ser939 in tuberous sclerosis protein (TSC) 2 or tuberin). The remaining 126 GH-stimulated sites were not previously associated with GH. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis of GH-stimulated sites indicated enrichment in proteins associated with the insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesions. Akt/protein kinase A consensus sites (RXRXXS/T) were the most commonly phosphorylated consensus sites. Immunoblotting confirmed GH-stimulated phosphorylation of all seven novel GH-dependent sites tested [regulatory sites in proline-rich Akt substrate, 40 kDA (PRAS40), regulatory associated protein of mTOR, ATP-citrate lyase, Na+/H+ exchanger-1, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1, and Shc]). The immunoblot results suggest that many, if not most, of the GH-stimulated phosphosites identified in this large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, including sites in multiple proteins in the Akt/ mTOR complex 1 pathway, are phosphorylated in response to GH. Their identification significantly broadens our thinking of GH-regulated cell functions. PMID:22570334

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Rusin, Scott F; Schlosser, Kate A; Adamo, Mark E; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2015-10-13

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c-dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. PMID:26462736

  5. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood. PMID:26112267

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  7. QUANTITATIVE PHOSPHOPROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF T CELL RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN DIABETES PRONE AND RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Leo K.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; White, Forest M

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes, in human patients and NOD mice, results from immune attack on insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas by autoreactive T lymphocytes. In NOD mice, genetically-controlled perturbations in the signaling pathways downstream of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) may be instrumental in the altered responses of T cells, manifest as inefficient induction of apoptosis after recognition of self-antigens in the thymus, or as perturbed reactivity of mature T cells in peripheral organs. To map this signaling difference(s), we have used mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to compare the activation of primary CD4+ T cells of diabetes-prone NOD and -resistant B6.H2g7 mice. Immunoprecipitation and IMAC purification of tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides, combined with a stable-isotope iTRAQ labeling, enabled us to identify and quantify over 77 phosphorylation events in 54 different proteins downstream of TCR stimulation of primary CD4+ T cells. This analysis showed a generally higher level of phosphotyrosine in activated NOD cells, as well as several phosphorylation sites that appeared to be differentially regulated in these two strains (involving TXK, CD5, PAG1, and ZAP-70). These data highlight the differences in signaling between CD4+ T cell compartments of NOD and B6g7 mice, and may underlie the dysregulation of T cells in NOD mice. PMID:20438120

  8. Global Analysis of Muscle-specific Kinase Signaling by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Dürnberger, Gerhard; Camurdanoglu, Bahar Z.; Tomschik, Matthias; Schutzbier, Michael; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Herbst, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The development of the neuromuscular synapse depends on signaling processes that involve protein phosphorylation as a crucial regulatory event. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is the key signaling molecule at the neuromuscular synapse whose activity is required for the formation of a mature and functional synapse. However, the signaling cascade downstream of MuSK and the regulation of the different components are still poorly understood. In this study we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to study the phosphorylation events and their temporal regulation downstream of MuSK. We identified a total of 10,183 phosphopeptides, of which 203 were significantly up- or down-regulated. Regulated phosphopeptides were classified into four different clusters according to their temporal profiles. Within these clusters we found an overrepresentation of specific protein classes associated with different cellular functions. In particular, we found an enrichment of regulated phosphoproteins involved in posttranscriptional mechanisms and in cytoskeletal organization. These findings provide novel insights into the complex signaling network downstream of MuSK and form the basis for future mechanistic studies. PMID:24899341

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomics using acetone-based peptide labeling: method evaluation and application to a cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Aruna B; Manning, Janet R; Schultz, Jo El J; Greis, Kenneth D

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) techniques to globally profile protein phosphorylation in cellular systems that are relevant to physiological or pathological changes have been of significant interest in biological research. An MS-based strategy utilizing an inexpensive acetone-based peptide-labeling technique known as reductive alkylation by acetone (RABA) for quantitative phosphoproteomics was explored to evaluate its capacity. Because the chemistry for RABA labeling for phosphorylation profiling had not been previously reported, it was first validated using a standard phosphoprotein and identical phosphoproteomes from cardiac tissue extracts. A workflow was then utilized to compare cardiac tissue phosphoproteomes from mouse hearts not expressing FGF2 versus hearts expressing low-molecular-weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2) to relate low-molecular-weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2)-mediated cardioprotective phenomena induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury of hearts, with downstream phosphorylation changes in LMW FGF2 signaling cascades. Statistically significant phosphorylation changes were identified at 14 different sites on 10 distinct proteins, including some with mechanisms already established for LMW FGF2-mediated cardioprotective signaling (e.g., connexin-43), some with new details linking LMW FGF2 to the cardioprotective mechanisms (e.g., cardiac myosin binding protein C or cMyBPC), and also several new downstream effectors not previously recognized for cardio-protective signaling by LMW FGF2. Additionally, one of the phosphopeptides, cMyBPC/pSer-282, identified was further verified with site-specific quantification using an SRM (selected reaction monitoring)-based approach that also relies on isotope labeling of a synthetic phosphopeptide with deuterated acetone as an internal standard. Overall, this study confirms that the inexpensive acetone-based peptide labeling can be used in both exploratory and targeted quantification phosphoproteomic studies to identify and verify biologically relevant phosphorylation changes in whole tissues. PMID:24016359

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics using acetone-based peptide labeling: Method evaluation and application to a cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratne, Aruna B.; Manning, Janet R.; Schultz, Jo El J.; Greis, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) techniques to globally profile protein phosphorylation in cellular systems that are relevant to physiological or pathological changes have been of significant interest in biological research. In this report, an MS-based strategy utilizing an inexpensive acetone-based peptide labeling technique known as reductive alkylation by acetone (RABA) for quantitative phosphoproteomics was explored to evaluate its capacity. Since the chemistry for RABA-labeling for phosphorylation profiling had not been previously reported, it was first validated using a standard phosphoprotein and identical phosphoproteomes from cardiac tissue extracts. A workflow was then utilized to compare cardiac tissue phosphoproteomes from mouse hearts not expressing FGF2 vs. hearts expressing low molecular weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2) to relate low molecular weight fibroblast growth factor-2 (LMW FGF2) mediated cardioprotective phenomena induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury of hearts, with downstream phosphorylation changes in LMW FGF2 signaling cascades. Statistically significant phosphorylation changes were identified at 14 different sites on 10 distinct proteins including some with mechanisms already established for LMW FGF2-mediated cardioprotective signaling (e.g. connexin-43), some with new details linking LMW FGF2 to the cardioprotective mechanisms (e.g. cardiac myosin binding protein C or cMyBPC), and also several new downstream effectors not previously recognized for cardio-protective signaling by LMW FGF2. Additionally, one of the phosphopeptides, cMyBPC/pSer-282, identified was further verified with site-specific quantification using an SRM (selected reaction monitoring)-based approach that also relies on isotope labeling of a synthetic phosphopeptide with deuterated acetone as an internal standard. Overall, this study confirms that the inexpensive acetone-based peptide labeling can be used in both exploratory and targeted quantification phosphoproteomic studies to identify and verify biologically-relevant phosphorylation changes in whole tissues. PMID:24016359

  11. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Profiling of Iron-Deficient Arabidopsis Roots1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ping; Li, Wenfeng; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, but often it is not available in sufficient quantities to sustain optimal growth. To gain insights into adaptive processes to low Fe availability at the posttranslational level, we conducted a quantitative analysis of Fe deficiency-induced changes in the phosphoproteome profile of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-labeled phosphopeptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on an LTQ-Orbitrap with collision-induced dissociation and high-energy collision dissociation capabilities. Using a combination of titanium dioxide and immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides, we extracted 849 uniquely identified phosphopeptides corresponding to 425 proteins and identified several not previously described phosphorylation motifs. A subset of 45 phosphoproteins was defined as being significantly changed in abundance upon Fe deficiency. Kinase motifs in Fe-responsive proteins matched to protein kinase A/calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II, casein kinase II, and proline-directed kinase, indicating a possible critical function of these kinase classes in Fe homeostasis. To validate our analysis, we conducted site-directed mutagenesis on IAA-CONJUGATE-RESISTANT4 (IAR4), a protein putatively functioning in auxin homeostasis. iar4 mutants showed compromised root hair formation and developed shorter primary roots. Changing serine-296 in IAR4 to alanine resulted in a phenotype intermediate between mutant and wild type, whereas acidic substitution to aspartate to mimic phosphorylation was either lethal or caused an extreme dwarf phenotype, supporting the critical importance of this residue in Fe homeostasis. Our analyses further disclose substantial changes in the abundance of phosphoproteins involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism upon Fe deficiency, complementing the picture derived from previous proteomic and transcriptomic profiling studies. PMID:22438062

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-04-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 (K48M) ) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5-3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 (K48M) under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 (K48M) mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 (K48M) , mpk6, and PTP1 (S7AS8A) under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 K48M) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5–3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 K48M under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 K48M mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 K48M, mpk6, and PTP1 S7AS8A under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  14. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals crosstalk between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAc in the DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Martinez, Marissa; Sengupta, Srona; Lee, Albert; Wu, Xinyan; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chatterjee, Aditi; O'Meally, Robert N; Cole, Robert N; Pandey, Akhilesh; Zachara, Natasha E

    2015-01-01

    The modification of intracellular proteins by monosaccharides of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is an essential and dynamic PTM of metazoans. The addition and removal of O-GlcNAc is catalyzed by the O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase, respectively. One mechanism by which O-GlcNAc is thought to mediate proteins is by regulating phosphorylation. To provide insight into the pathways regulated by O-GlcNAc, we have utilized SILAC-based quantitative proteomics to carry out comparisons of site-specific phosphorylation in OGT wild-type and Null cells. Quantitation of the phosphoproteome demonstrated that of 5529 phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine sites, 232 phosphosites were upregulated and 133 downregulated in the absence of O-GlcNAc. Collectively, these data suggest that deletion of OGT has a profound effect on the phosphorylation of cell cycle and DNA damage response proteins. Key events were confirmed by biochemical analyses and demonstrate an increase in the activating autophosphorylation event on ATM (Ser1987) and on ATM's downstream targets p53, H2AX, and Chk2. Together, these data support widespread changes in the phosphoproteome upon removal of O-GlcNAc, suggesting that O-GlcNAc regulates processes such as the cell cycle, genomic stability, and lysosomal biogenesis. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001153 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001153). PMID:25263469

  15. Dissecting the architecture of a quantitative trait locus in yeast.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Lars M; Sinha, Himanshu; Richards, Dan R; Spiegelman, Jamie I; Oefner, Peter J; McCusker, John H; Davis, Ronald W

    2002-03-21

    Most phenotypic diversity in natural populations is characterized by differences in degree rather than in kind. Identification of the actual genes underlying these quantitative traits has proved difficult. As a result, little is known about their genetic architecture. The failures are thought to be due to the different contributions of many underlying genes to the phenotype and the ability of different combinations of genes and environmental factors to produce similar phenotypes. This study combined genome-wide mapping and a new genetic technique named reciprocal-hemizygosity analysis to achieve the complete dissection of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A QTL architecture was uncovered that was more complex than expected. Functional linkages both in cis and in trans were found between three tightly linked quantitative trait genes that are neither necessary nor sufficient in isolation. This arrangement of alleles explains heterosis (hybrid vigour), the increased fitness of the heterozygote compared with homozygotes. It also demonstrates a deficiency in current approaches to QTL dissection with implications extending to traits in other organisms, including human genetic diseases. PMID:11907579

  16. Quantitative Label-Free Phosphoproteomics Reveals Differentially Regulated Protein Phosphorylation Involved in West Nile Virus-Induced Host Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jun; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Chen, Zheng; Zhu, Bibo; He, Wen; Xu, Qiuping; Wei, Yanming; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Liu, Rong; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) can cause neuro-invasive and febrile illness that may be fatal to humans. The production of inflammatory cytokines is key to mediating WNV-induced immunopathology in the central nervous system. Elucidating the host factors utilized by WNV for productive infection would provide valuable insights into the evasion strategies used by this virus. Although attempts have been made to determine these host factors, proteomic data depicting WNV-host protein interactions are limited. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events induced by WNV infection. Quantifiable changes to 1,657 phosphoproteins were found; of these, 626 were significantly upregulated and 227 were downregulated at 12 h postinfection. The phosphoproteomic data were subjected to gene ontology enrichment analysis, which returned the inflammation-related spliceosome, ErbB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways. We used short interfering RNAs to decrease the levels of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, bifunctional polynucleotide phosphatase/kinase, and retinoblastoma 1 and found that the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) is significantly decreased in WNV-infected U251 cells, which in turn led to markedly reduced inflammatory cytokine production. Our results provide a better understanding of the host response to WNV infection and highlight multiple targets for the development of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26485063

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Novel Phosphorylation Events in Insulin Signaling Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulatory Subunit 12A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Ma, Danjun; Caruso, Michael; Lewis, Monique; Qi, Yue; Yi, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A) modulates the activity and specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1, regulating various cellular processes via dephosphorylation. Nonetheless, little is known about phosphorylation events controlled by PPP1R12A in skeletal muscle insulin signaling. Here, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to generate a global picture of phosphorylation events regulated by PPP1R12A in a L6 skeletal muscle cell line, which were engineered for inducible PPP1R12A knockdown. Phosphoproteomics revealed 3876 phosphorylation sites (620 were novel) in these cells. Furthermore, PPP1R12A knockdown resulted in increased overall phosphorylation in L6 cells at the basal condition, and changed phosphorylation levels for 698 sites (assigned to 295 phosphoproteins) at the basal and/or insulin-stimulated conditions. Pathway analysis on the 295 phosphoproteins revealed multiple significantly enriched pathways related to insulin signaling, such as mTOR signaling and RhoA signaling. Moreover, phosphorylation levels for numerous regulatory sites in these pathways were significantly changed due to PPP1R12A knockdown. These results indicate that PPP1R12A indeed plays a role in skeletal muscle insulin signaling, providing novel insights into the biology of insulin action. This new information may facilitate the design of experiments to better understand mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24972320

  18. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, Ren Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 ?g of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research. PMID:25619855

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of neuronal intermediate filament proteins (NF-M/H) in Alzheimer's disease by iTRAQ

    PubMed Central

    Rudrabhatla,*, Parvathi; Grant,*, Philip; Jaffe, Howard; Strong, Michael J.; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins is one of the major pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Human NF-M/H display a large number of multiple KSP repeats in the carboxy-terminal tail domain, which are phosphorylation sites of proline-directed serine/threonine (pSer/Thr-Pro, KS/T-P) kinases. The phosphorylation sites of NF-M/H have not been characterized in AD brain. Here, we use quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), for the characterization of NF-M/H phosphorylation sites in AD brain. We identified 13 hyperphosphorylated sites of NF-M; 9 Lys-Ser-Pro (KSP) sites; 2 variant motifs, Glu-Ser-Pro (ESP) Ser-736 and Leu-Ser-Pro (LSP) Ser-837; and 2 non-S/T-P motifs, Ser-783 and Ser-788. All the Ser/Thr residues are phosphorylated at significantly greater abundance in AD brain compared with control brain. Ten hyperphosphorylated KSP sites have been identified on the C-terminal tail domain of NF-H, with greater abundance of phosphorylation in AD brain compared with control brain. Our data provide the direct evidence that NF-M/H are hyperphosphorylated in AD compared with control brain and suggest the role of both proline-directed and non-proline-directed protein kinases in AD. This study represents the first comprehensive iTRAQ analyses and quantification of phosphorylation sites of human NF-M and NF-H from AD brain and suggests that aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal intermediate filament proteins is involved in AD.—Rudrabhatla, P., Grant, P., Jaffe, H., Strong, M. J., Pant, H. C. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of neuronal intermediate filament proteins (NF-M/H) in Alzheimer's disease by iTRAQ. PMID:20624930

  20. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tran Hong Nha; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese R.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e. roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag eight-plex iTRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nanoRPLC-MS/MS1 analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1659 nonredundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5-fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation. PMID:22843990

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  2. Identification of novel protein functions and signaling mechanisms by genetics and quantitative phosphoproteomics in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fredens, Julius; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Færgeman, Nils J

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids combined with mass spectrometry is a widely used methodology for measuring relative changes in protein and phosphorylation levels at a global level. We have applied this method to the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in combination with RNAi-mediated gene knockdown by feeding the nematode on pre-labeled lysine auxotroph Escherichia coli. In this chapter, we describe in details the generation of the E. coli strain, incorporation of heavy isotope-labeled lysine in C. elegans, and the procedure for a comprehensive global phosphoproteomic experiment. PMID:25059608

  3. Quantitative analysis of changes in the phosphoproteome of maize induced by the plant hormone salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Shunxi; Tian, Lei; Pang, Yanjie; Han, Zanping; Wu, Liancheng; Chen, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in regulating various physiological and biochemical processes. Our previous study identified several protein kinases responsive to SA, suggesting that phosphorylation events play an important role in the plant response to SA. In this study, we characterized the phosphoproteome of maize in response to SA using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology and TiO2 enrichment method. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, we found a total of 858 phosphoproteins among 1495 phosphopeptides. Among them, 291 phosphopeptides corresponding to 244 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed after SA treatment. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of biological processes, which indicate that the response to SA encompasses a reformatting of major cellular processes. Furthermore, some of the phosphoproteins which were not previously known to be involved with SA were found to have significantly changed phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that other currently unknown SA signaling pathways that result in decreased phosphorylation of downstream targets must be involved. Our study represents the first attempt at global phosphoproteome profiling in response to SA, and provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulated by SA. PMID:26659305

  4. Quantitative analysis of changes in the phosphoproteome of maize induced by the plant hormone salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Shunxi; Tian, Lei; Pang, Yanjie; Han, Zanping; Wu, Liancheng; Chen, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in regulating various physiological and biochemical processes. Our previous study identified several protein kinases responsive to SA, suggesting that phosphorylation events play an important role in the plant response to SA. In this study, we characterized the phosphoproteome of maize in response to SA using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology and TiO2 enrichment method. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, we found a total of 858 phosphoproteins among 1495 phosphopeptides. Among them, 291 phosphopeptides corresponding to 244 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed after SA treatment. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of biological processes, which indicate that the response to SA encompasses a reformatting of major cellular processes. Furthermore, some of the phosphoproteins which were not previously known to be involved with SA were found to have significantly changed phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that other currently unknown SA signaling pathways that result in decreased phosphorylation of downstream targets must be involved. Our study represents the first attempt at global phosphoproteome profiling in response to SA, and provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulated by SA. PMID:26659305

  5. Global quantitative SILAC phosphoproteomics reveals differential phosphorylation is widespread between the procyclic and bloodstream form lifecycle stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Michael D; Martin, David M A; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2013-05-01

    We report a global quantitative phosphoproteomic study of bloodstream and procyclic form Trypanosoma brucei using SILAC labeling of each lifecycle stage. Phosphopeptide enrichment by SCX and TiO2 led to the identification of a total of 10096 phosphorylation sites on 2551 protein groups and quantified the ratios of 8275 phosphorylation sites between the two lifecycle stages. More than 9300 of these sites (92%) have not previously been reported. Model-based gene enrichment analysis identified over representation of Gene Ontology terms relating to the flagella, protein kinase activity, and the regulation of gene expression. The quantitative data reveal that differential protein phosphorylation is widespread between bloodstream and procyclic form trypanosomes, with significant intraprotein differential phosphorylation. Despite a lack of dedicated tyrosine kinases, 234 phosphotyrosine residues were identified, and these were 3-4 fold over-represented among site changing >10-fold between the two lifecycle stages. A significant proportion of the T. brucei kinome was phosphorylated, with evidence that MAPK pathways are functional in both lifecycle stages. Regulation of gene expression in T. brucei is exclusively post-transcriptional, and the extensive phosphorylation of RNA binding proteins observed may be relevant to the control of mRNA stability in this organism. PMID:23485197

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals link between Helicobacter pylori infection and RNA splicing modulation in host cells.

    PubMed

    Holland, Carsten; Schmid, Monika; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Rohloff, John; Stein, Robert; Jungblut, Peter R; Meyer, Thomas F

    2011-07-01

    The Gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that causes chronic inflammation of the human gastric mucosa, leading to peptic ulceration and/or gastric cancer. Here, we analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome of gastric epithelial cells (AGS) upon infection with H. pylori using a combination of SILAC, phosphoprotein enrichment, 2-DE, and MALDI TOF/TOF-MS. From a total of 526 spots we identified 391 protein species (143 proteins) and quantified 332 (127 proteins). Nearly, one-third of the identified proteins (40/143) were associated with the spliceosome or RNA splicing. The abundance of 20 proteins was altered by H. pylori infection, in particular, a number of serine arginine-rich (SR) proteins involved in the regulation and control of alternative splicing. Importantly, the combined methodologies enabled the detection of infection-dependent protein species-specific regulation, suggesting functional modulation of individual protein species. These findings reveal unexpected new insights into the mechanisms of host cell manipulation by H. pylori, which are likely associated with gastric pathologies, including gastric cancer. PMID:21717572

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analyses of the inferior parietal lobule from three different pathological stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Swomley, Aaron M; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is clinically characterized by progressive neuronal loss resulting in loss of memory and dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the extensive distribution of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and synapse loss. Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is generally accepted to be an early stage of AD. MCI subjects have pathology and symptoms that fall on the scale intermediately between 'normal' cognition with little or no pathology and AD. A rare number of individuals, who exhibit normal cognition on psychometric tests but whose brains show widespread postmortem AD pathology, are classified as 'asymptomatic' or 'preclinical' AD (PCAD). In this study, we evaluated changes in protein phosphorylation states in the inferior parietal lobule of subjects with AD, MCI, PCAD, and control brain using a 2-D PAGE proteomics approach in conjunction with Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining. Statistically significant changes in phosphorylation levels were found in 19 proteins involved in energy metabolism, neuronal plasticity, signal transduction, and oxidative stress response. Changes in the disease state phosphoproteome may provide insights into underlying mechanisms for the preservation of memory with expansive AD pathology in PCAD and the progressive memory loss in amnestic MCI that escalates to the dementia and the characteristic pathology of AD brain. PMID:26444780

  8. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals system-wide signaling pathways downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Zhai, Bo; Yu, Yonghao; Kiyotsugu, Yoshikawa; Raschle, Thomas; Etzkorn, Manuel; Seo, Hee-Chan; Nagiec, Michal; Luna, Rafael E.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Blenis, John; Gygi, Steven P.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide, with an estimated 1.7 million new cases and 522,000 deaths around the world in 2012 alone. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are essential for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis which is the major source of cancer lethality. G protein-coupled receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is critical for tumor metastasis. However, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXCR4–mediated signaling pathways in breast CSCs are largely unknown. Using isotope reductive dimethylation and large-scale MS-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis, we examined protein phosphorylation induced by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We quantified more than 11,000 phosphorylation sites in 2,500 phosphoproteins. Of these phosphosites, 87% were statistically unchanged in abundance in response to SDF-1/CXCR4 stimulation. In contrast, 545 phosphosites in 266 phosphoproteins were significantly increased, whereas 113 phosphosites in 74 phosphoproteins were significantly decreased. SDF-1/CXCR4 increases phosphorylation in 60 cell migration- and invasion-related proteins, of them 43 (>70%) phosphoproteins are unrecognized. In addition, SDF-1/CXCR4 upregulates the phosphorylation of 44 previously uncharacterized kinases, 8 phosphatases, and 1 endogenous phosphatase inhibitor. Using computational approaches, we performed system-based analyses examining SDF-1/CXCR4–mediated phosphoproteome, including construction of kinase–substrate network and feedback regulation loops downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We identified a previously unidentified SDF-1/CXCR4-PKA-MAP2K2-ERK signaling pathway and demonstrated the feedback regulation on MEK, ERK1/2, δ-catenin, and PPP1Cα in SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. This study gives a system-wide view of phosphorylation events downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs, providing a resource for the study of CSC-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:24782546

  9. Quantitative analysis of a phosphoproteome readily altered by the protein kinase CK2 inhibitor quinalizarin in HEK-293T cells.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Cinzia; Cesaro, Luca; Salvi, Mauro; Millioni, Renato; Iori, Elisabetta; Cifani, Paolo; James, Peter; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Pinna, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    CK2 is an extremely pleiotropic Ser/Thr protein kinase, responsible for the generation of a large proportion of the human phosphoproteome and implicated in a wide variety of biological functions. CK2 plays a global role as an anti-apoptotic agent, a property which is believed to partially account for the addiction of many cancer cells to high CK2 levels. To gain information about the CK2 targets whose phosphorylation is primarily implicated in its pro-survival signaling advantage has been taken of quinalizarin (QZ) a cell permeable fairly specific CK2 inhibitor, previously shown to be able to block endogenous CK2 triggering an apoptotic response. HEK-293T cells either treated or not for 3h with 50μM QZ were exploited to perform a quantitative SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis of phosphosites readily responsive to QZ treatment. Our analysis led to the identification of 4883 phosphosites, belonging to 1693 phosphoproteins. 71 phosphosites (belonging to 47 proteins) underwent a 50% or more decreased occupancy upon QZ treatment. Almost 50% of these fulfilled the typical consensus sequence recognized by CK2 (S/T-x-x-E/D/pS) and in several cases were validated as bona fide substrates of CK2 either based on data in the literature or by performing in vitro phosphorylation experiments with purified proteins. The majority of the remaining phosphosites drastically decreased upon QZ treatment display the pS/T-P motif typical of proline directed protein kinases and a web logo extracted from them differentiates from the web logo extracted from all the proline directed phosphosites quantified during our analysis (1151 altogether). A paradoxical outcome of our study was the detection of 116 phosphosites (belonging to 92 proteins altogether) whose occupancy is substantially increased (50% or more), rather than decreased by QZ treatment: 40% of these display the typical motif recognized by proline directed kinases, while about 25% fulfill the CK2 consensus. Collectively taken our data on one side have led to the disclosure of a subset of CK2 targets which are likely to be implicated in the early steps of CK2 signaling counteracting apoptosis, on the other they provide evidence for the existence of side and off-target effects of the CK2 inhibitor quinalizarin, paving the road toward the detection of other kinases susceptible to this compound. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. PMID:25278378

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics revealed interplay between Syk and Lyn in the resistance to nilotinib in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Romain; Leroy, Cédric; Drullion, Claire; Lagarde, Valérie; Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lippert, Eric; Roche, Serge; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pasquet, Jean-Max

    2011-08-25

    In this study, we have addressed how Lyn kinase signaling mediates nilotinib-resistance by quantitative phospho-proteomics using Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acid in Cell culture. We have found an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of 2 additional tyrosine kinases in nilotinib-resistant cells: the spleen tyrosine kinase Syk and the UFO family receptor tyrosine kinase Axl. This increased tyrosine phosphorylation involved an interaction of these tyrosine kinases with Lyn. Inhibition of Syk by the inhibitors R406 or BAY 61-3606 or by RNA interference restored the capacity of nilotinib to inhibit cell proliferation. Conversely, coexpression of Lyn and Syk were required to fully induce resistance to nilotinib in drug-sensitive cells. Surprisingly, the knockdown of Syk also strongly decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Axl, thus uncovering interplay between Syk and Lyn. We have shown the involvement of the adaptor protein CDCP-1 in resistance to nilotinib. Interestingly, the expression of Axl and CDCP1 were found increased both in a nilotinib-resistant cell line and in nilotinib-resistant CML patients. We conclude that an oncogenic signaling mediated by Lyn and Syk can bypass the need of Bcr-Abl in CML cells. Thus, targeting these kinases may be of therapeutic value to override imatinib or nilotinib resistance in CML. PMID:21730355

  11. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:25168779

  12. Integrative Network Analysis Combined with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a Novel Regulator of Glioblastoma Stem Cell Properties.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Yuta; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with poor prognosis and their development and progression are known to be driven by glioblastoma stem cells. Although glioblastoma stem cells lose their cancer stem cell properties during cultivation in serum-containing medium, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating signaling alteration in relation to reduction of stem cell-like characteristics. To elucidate the global phosphorylation-related signaling events, we performed a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of serum-induced dynamics in glioblastoma stem cells established from the tumor tissues of the patient. Among a total of 2876 phosphorylation sites on 1584 proteins identified in our analysis, 732 phosphorylation sites on 419 proteins were regulated through the alteration of stem cell-like characteristics. The integrative computational analyses based on the quantified phosphoproteome data revealed the relevant changes of phosphorylation levels regarding the proteins associated with cytoskeleton reorganization such as Rho family GTPase and Intermediate filament signaling, in addition to transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a prominent upstream regulator involved in the serum-induced phosphoproteome regulation. The functional association of transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 with stem cell-like properties was experimentally validated through signaling perturbation using the corresponding inhibitors, which indicated that transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 could play an important role as a novel cell fate determinant in glioblastoma stem cell regulation. PMID:26670566

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in response to hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists, which underlies their distinct capacity to desensitize the receptor. PMID:24637012

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of the 5-HT2A receptor in response to hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists, which underlies their distinct capacity to desensitize the receptor. PMID:24637012

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomics identifies SnRK2 protein kinase substrates and reveals the effectors of abscisic acid action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Xue, Liang; Batelli, Giorgia; Lee, Shinyoung; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Van Oosten, Michael J.; Zhang, Huiming; Tao, W. Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s) are central components of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathways. The snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple-mutant plants are nearly completely insensitive to ABA, suggesting that most of the molecular actions of ABA are triggered by the SnRK2s-mediated phosphorylation of substrate proteins. Only a few substrate proteins of the SnRK2s are known. To identify additional substrate proteins of the SnRK2s and provide insight into the molecular actions of ABA, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to compare the global changes in phosphopeptides in WT and snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant seedlings in response to ABA treatment. Among the 5,386 unique phosphorylated peptides identified in this study, we found that ABA can increase the phosphorylation of 166 peptides and decrease the phosphorylation of 117 peptides in WT seedlings. In the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant, 84 of the 166 peptides, representing 58 proteins, could not be phosphorylated, or phosphorylation was not increased under ABA treatment. In vitro kinase assays suggest that most of the 58 proteins can serve as substrates of the SnRK2s. The SnRK2 substrates include proteins involved in flowering time regulation, RNA and DNA binding, miRNA and epigenetic regulation, signal transduction, chloroplast function, and many other cellular processes. Consistent with the SnRK2 phosphorylation of flowering time regulators, the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant flowered significantly earlier than WT. These results shed new light on the role of the SnRK2 protein kinases and on the downstream effectors of ABA action, and improve our understanding of plant responses to adverse environments. PMID:23776212

  16. Phosphoproteomics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harsha, H. C.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2010-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation serves as a basis for regulating a number of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of kinase signaling pathways is commonly associated with several cancers. Recent developments in phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment strategies and quantitative mass spectrometry have resulted in robust pipelines for high-throughput characterization of phosphorylation in a global fashion. Today, it is possible to profile site-specific phosphorylation events on thousands of proteins in a single experiment. The potential of this approach is already being realized to characterize signaling pathways that govern oncogenesis. In addition, chemical proteomic strategies have been used to unravel targets of kinase inhibitors, which are otherwise difficult to characterize. This review summarizes various approaches used for analysis of the phosphoproteome in general, and protein kinases in particular, highlighting key cancer phosphoproteomic studies. PMID:20937571

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  18. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed. PMID:26689635

  19. Identification of Mediator Kinase Substrates in Human Cells using Cortistatin A and Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Poss, Zachary C; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Odell, Aaron T; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Lee, Thomas; Pelish, Henry E; Shair, Matthew D; Dowell, Robin D; Old, William M; Taatjes, Dylan J

    2016-04-12

    Cortistatin A (CA) is a highly selective inhibitor of the Mediator kinases CDK8 and CDK19. Using CA, we now report a large-scale identification of Mediator kinase substrates in human cells (HCT116). We identified over 16,000 quantified phosphosites including 78 high-confidence Mediator kinase targets within 64 proteins, including DNA-binding transcription factors and proteins associated with chromatin, DNA repair, and RNA polymerase II. Although RNA-seq data correlated with Mediator kinase targets, the effects of CA on gene expression were limited and distinct from CDK8 or CDK19 knockdown. Quantitative proteome analyses, tracking around 7,000 proteins across six time points (0-24 hr), revealed that CA selectively affected pathways implicated in inflammation, growth, and metabolic regulation. Contrary to expectations, increased turnover of Mediator kinase targets was not generally observed. Collectively, these data support Mediator kinases as regulators of chromatin and RNA polymerase II activity and suggest their roles extend beyond transcription to metabolism and DNA repair. PMID:27050516

  20. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Jiang, N; Hjorth-Jensen, K; Hekmat, O; Iglesias-Gato, D; Kruse, T; Wang, C; Wei, W; Ke, B; Yan, B; Niu, Y; Olsen, J V; Flores-Morales, A

    2015-05-21

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide owing to our inability to treat effectively castration-resistant tumors. To understand the signaling mechanisms sustaining castration-resistant growth, we implemented a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic approach and use it to compare protein phosphorylation in orthotopic xenograft tumors grown in either intact or castrated mice. This investigation identified changes in phosphorylation of signaling proteins such as MEK, LYN, PRAS40, YAP1 and PAK2, indicating the concomitant activation of several oncogenic pathways in castration-resistant tumors, a notion that was confirmed by tumor transcriptome analysis. Further analysis demonstrated that the activation of mTORC1, PAK2 and the increased levels of YAP1 in castration-resistant tumors can be explained by the loss of androgen inhibitory actions. The analysis of clinical samples demonstrated elevated levels of PAK2 and YAP1 in castration-resistant tumors, whereas knockdown experiments in androgen-independent cells demonstrated that both YAP1 and PAK2 regulate cell colony formation and cell invasion activity. PAK2 also influenced cell proliferation and mitotic timing. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes occur in the absence of obvious alterations in the activity of AKT, MAPK or mTORC1 pathways, suggesting that PAK2 and YAP1 may represent novel targets for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Pharmacologic inhibitors of PAK2 (PF-3758309) and YAP1 (Verteporfin) were able to inhibit the growth of androgen-independent PC3 xenografts. This work demonstrates the power of applying high-resolution mass spectrometry in the proteomic profiling of tumors grown in vivo for the identification of novel and clinically relevant regulatory proteins. PMID:25065596

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Phosphoproteome Response to Osmotic Stress in Arabidopsis Based on Library-Assisted eXtracted Ion Chromatogram (LAXIC)*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Lianshui; Renzi, Emily; Radivojac, Predrag; Tang, Haixu; Arnold, Randy; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2013-01-01

    Global phosphorylation changes in plants in response to environmental stress have been relatively poorly characterized to date. Here we introduce a novel mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitation method that facilitates systematic profiling plant phosphoproteome changes with high efficiency and accuracy. This method employs synthetic peptide libraries tailored specifically as internal standards for complex phosphopeptide samples and accordingly, a local normalization algorithm, LAXIC, which calculates phosphopeptide abundance normalized locally with co-eluting library peptides. Normalization was achieved in a small time frame centered to each phosphopeptide to compensate for the diverse ion suppression effect across retention time. The label-free LAXIC method was further treated with a linear regression function to accurately measure phosphoproteome responses to osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. Among 2027 unique phosphopeptides identified and 1850 quantified phosphopeptides in Arabidopsis samples, 468 regulated phosphopeptides representing 497 phosphosites have shown significant changes. Several known and novel components in the abiotic stress pathway were identified, illustrating the capability of this method to identify critical signaling events among dynamic and complex phosphorylation. Further assessment of those regulated proteins may help shed light on phosphorylation response to osmotic stress in plants. PMID:23660473

  2. Quantitative Genetic Dissection of Shoot Architecture Traits in Maize: Towards a Functional Genomics Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the total number of leaves (TNOL) made prior to flowering and the number of leaves below the ear (NLBE) were mapped and characterized in order to dissect the genetic regulatory components of these agronomically important traits of corn. The full set of interm...

  3. Dissection Dissected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, William

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of dissection in science courses, examining essential lessons students can learn (such as developing an abiding respect for all forms of life, including the animal being dissected). Also presents a list of tips related to classroom dissection and comments on formaldehyde and formalin substitutes. (JN)

  4. Dissection of a Synthesized Quantitative Trait to Characterize Transgene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nap, J. P.; Conner, A. J.; Mlynarova, L.; Stiekema, W. J.; Jansen, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Six transgenic tobacco lines, each homozygous for the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene at a different locus, and wild type were selfed and intercrossed to evaluate GUS activity in all possible hemizygous, homozygous and dihybrid combinations of GUS alleles. The transgenic lines are characterized by their GUS activity (two low, three intermediate, one high), T-DNA complexity (four single-copy, two more complex single-locus) and the presence of the chicken lysozyme matrix-associated region (MAR) around the full T-DNA (two lines). Gene action and interaction was analyzed by weighted linear regression with parameters for additivity, dominance and epistasis. The analysis showed that each of the four single-copy lines acted fully additively. In contrast, the two complex single-locus lines showed classical single-locus overdominance and were epistatic dominant over all other GUS alleles. The latter is manifested in severe suppression of GUS activity in dihybrid lines, irrespective of the presence of MAR elements around the GUS gene. Such elements apparently do not protect against epistatic dominance. The quantitative data suggested that the epistatic dominance and overdominance are based on the same molecular mechanism. Our approach of a genetic analysis of quantitative variation in well-characterized transgenic lines provides a powerful tool to gain insight into complex plant traits. PMID:9286691

  5. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays. PMID:26278961

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of the Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) and Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) Dependent DNA Damage Response in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and rad3-related (ATR) dependent DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-03-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  8. Quantitative expression proteomics and phosphoproteomics profile of brain from PINK1 knockout mice: insights into mechanisms of familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Sultana, Rukhsana; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Büeler, Hansruedi; Butterfield, David Allan

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, neurodegenerative motor disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and presence of α-synuclein-containing protein aggregates. Mutations in the mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are associated with an autosomal recessive familial form of early-onset PD. Recent studies have suggested that PINK1 plays important neuroprotective roles against mitochondrial dysfunction by phosphorylating and recruiting Parkin, a cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase, to facilitate elimination of damaged mitochondria via autophagy-lysosomal pathways. Loss of PINK1 in cells and animals leads to various mitochondrial impairments and oxidative stress, culminating in dopaminergic neuronal death in humans. Using a 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proteomics approach, the differences in expressed brain proteome and phosphoproteome between 6-month-old PINK1-deficient mice and wild-type mice were identified. The observed changes in the brain proteome and phosphoproteome of mice lacking PINK1 suggest that defects in signaling networks, energy metabolism, cellular proteostasis, and neuronal structure and plasticity are involved in the pathogenesis of familial PD. Mutations in PINK1 are associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examines changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of the PINK1 knockout mouse brain. Alterations were noted in several key proteins associated with: increased oxidative stress, aberrant cellular signaling, altered neuronal structure, decreased synaptic plasticity, reduced neurotransmission, diminished proteostasis networks, and altered metabolism. 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3 protein epsilon; 3-PGDH, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase; ALDOA, aldolase A; APT1, acyl-protein thioesterase 1; CaM, calmodulin; CBR3, carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 3; ENO2, gamma-enolase; HPRT, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase; HSP70, heat-shock-related 70 kDa protein 2; IDHc, cytoplasmic isocitrate dehydrogenase [NADP+]; MAPK1, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1; MEK1, MAP kinase kinase 1; MDHc, cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase; NFM, neurofilament medium polypeptide; NSF, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein; PHB, prohibitin; PINK1, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1; PPIaseA, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A; PSA2, proteasome subunit alpha type-2; TK, transketolase; VDAC-2, voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2. PMID:25626353

  9. Dissecting Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AV Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This journal features articles covering various aspects of dissection. "Biology--The Study of Life" (George Russell) offers students experiments that do not require using invasive procedures. "Animal Cruelty--Behind the Scenes" (Zoe Weil) describes sources of laboratory animals. "Doing without Dissection" (Juliana Texley) discusses objections over…

  10. Label-free quantitative analysis of the casein kinase 2-responsive phosphoproteome of the marine minimal model species Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Thierry; Hindle, Matthew; Martin, Sarah F; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Krahmer, Johanna; Kis, Katalin; Millar, Andrew J; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2015-12-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a protein kinase that phosphorylates a plethora of cellular target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle control, and circadian timekeeping. CK2 is functionally conserved across eukaryotes, although the substrate proteins identified in a range of complex tissues are often different. The marine alga Ostreococcus tauri is a unicellular eukaryotic model organism ideally suited to efficiently study generic roles of CK2 in the cellular circadian clock. Overexpression of CK2 leads to a slow circadian rhythm, verifying functional conservation of CK2 in timekeeping. The proteome was analysed in wild-type and CK2-overexpressing algae at dawn and dusk, revealing that differential abundance of the global proteome across the day is largely unaffected by overexpression. However, CK2 activity contributed more strongly to timekeeping at dusk than at dawn. The phosphoproteome of a CK2 overexpression line and cells treated with CK2 inhibitor was therefore analysed and compared to control cells at dusk. We report an extensive catalogue of 447 unique CK2-responsive differential phosphopeptide motifs to inform future studies into CK2 activity in the circadian clock of more complex tissues. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000975 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000975). PMID:25930153

  11. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling downstream of the prostaglandin e2/g-protein coupled receptor in human synovial fibroblasts: potential antifibrotic networks.

    PubMed

    Gerarduzzi, Casimiro; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2014-11-01

    The Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling mechanism within fibroblasts is of growing interest as it has been shown to prevent numerous fibrotic features of fibroblast activation with limited evidence of downstream pathways. To understand the mechanisms of fibroblasts producing tremendous amounts of PGE2 with autocrine effects, we apply a strategy of combining a wide-screening of PGE2-induced kinases with quantitative phosphoproteomics. Our large-scale proteomic approach identified a PKA signal transmitted through phosphorylation of its substrates harboring the R(R/X)X(S*/T*) motif. We documented 115 substrates, of which 72 had 89 sites with a 2.5-fold phosphorylation difference in PGE2-treated cells than in untreated cells, where approximately half of such sites were defined as being novel. They were compiled by networking software to focus on highlighted activities and to associate them with a functional readout of fibroblasts. The substrates were associated with a variety of cellular functions including cytoskeletal structures (migration/motility), regulators of G-protein coupled receptor function, protein kinases, and transcriptional/translational regulators. For the first time, we extended the PGE2 pathway into an elaborate network of interconnecting phosphoproteins, providing vital information to a once restricted signalosome. These data provide new insights into eicosanoid-initiated cell signaling with regards to the regulation of fibroblast activation and the identification of new targets for evidenced-based pharmacotherapy against fibrosis. PMID:25223752

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiangyu; Huang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  15. Quantitative Tools for Dissection of Hydrogen-Producing Metabolic Networks-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Dismukes, G.Charles.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2012-10-19

    During this project we have pioneered the development of integrated experimental-computational technologies for the quantitative dissection of metabolism in hydrogen and biofuel producing microorganisms (i.e. C. acetobutylicum and various cyanobacteria species). The application of these new methodologies resulted in many significant advances in the understanding of the metabolic networks and metabolism of these organisms, and has provided new strategies to enhance their hydrogen or biofuel producing capabilities. As an example, using mass spectrometry, isotope tracers, and quantitative flux-modeling we mapped the metabolic network structure in C. acetobutylicum. This resulted in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of central carbon metabolism that could not have been obtained using genomic data alone. We discovered that biofuel production in this bacterium, which only occurs during stationary phase, requires a global remodeling of central metabolism (involving large changes in metabolite concentrations and fluxes) that has the effect of redirecting resources (carbon and reducing power) from biomass production into solvent production. This new holistic, quantitative understanding of metabolism is now being used as the basis for metabolic engineering strategies to improve solvent production in this bacterium. In another example, making use of newly developed technologies for monitoring hydrogen and NAD(P)H levels in vivo, we dissected the metabolic pathways for photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. This investigation led to the identification of multiple targets for improving hydrogen production. Importantly, the quantitative tools and approaches that we have developed are broadly applicable and we are now using them to investigate other important biofuel producers, such as cellulolytic bacteria.

  16. Quantitative and Functional Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals that Ethylene Regulates Water Transport via the C-Terminal Phosphorylation of Aquaporin PIP2;1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Dongjin; Yang, Zhu; Li, Mingzhe; Wong, Wai Shing; Guo, Guangyu; Liu, Shichang; Guo, Hongwei; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene participates in the regulation of numerous cellular events and biological processes, including water loss, during leaf and flower petal wilting. The diverse ethylene responses may be regulated via dynamic interplays between protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation and protease cleavage. To address how ethylene alters protein phosphorylation through multi-furcated signaling pathways, we performed a (15)N stable isotope labelling-based, differential, and quantitative phosphoproteomics study on air- and ethylene-treated ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis double loss-of-function mutant ein3-1/eil1-1. Among 535 non-redundant phosphopeptides identified, two and four phosphopeptides were up- and downregulated by ethylene, respectively. Ethylene-regulated phosphorylation of aquaporin PIP2;1 is positively correlated with the water flux rate and water loss in leaf. Genetic studies in combination with quantitative proteomics, immunoblot analysis, protoplast swelling/shrinking experiments, and leaf water loss assays on the transgenic plants expressing both the wild-type and S280A/S283A-mutated PIP2;1 in the both Col-0 and ein3eil1 genetic backgrounds suggest that ethylene increases water transport rate in Arabidopsis cells by enhancing S280/S283 phosphorylation at the C terminus of PIP2;1. Unknown kinase and/or phosphatase activities may participate in the initial up-regulation independent of the cellular functions of EIN3/EIL1. This finding contributes to our understanding of ethylene-regulated leaf wilting that is commonly observed during post-harvest storage of plant organs. PMID:26476206

  17. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Saxena, Maneesha S; Bajaj, Deepak; Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world's food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of highyielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern -omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties. PMID:24296899

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 as a central effector of olfactory receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Heike; Gelis, Lian; Wiese, Sebastian; Reichenbach, Christa; Jovancevic, Nikolina; Osterloh, Markus; Meyer, Helmut E; Neuhaus, Eva M; Hatt, Hanns H; Radziwill, Gerald; Warscheid, Bettina

    2015-06-01

    The prostate-specific G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (PSGR1) is an olfactory receptor specifically expressed in the prostate gland. PSGR1 expression is elevated both in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue and in prostate cancer. Stimulation of PSGR1 by the odorant β-ionone leads to an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and a decrease in prostate cancer cell proliferation. To further extend our knowledge about PSGR1 signaling in prostate cancer cells, we performed a quantitative phosphoproteomics study using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and mass spectrometry. We report 51 differentially regulated phosphorylation sites in 24 proteins with functions in cytoskeletal remodeling, signaling and ion transport. Activation of PSGR1 evoked an increase in intracellular pH mediated by the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHE1. Furthermore, we report the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 as a central effector of PSGR1 signaling cascades in LNCaP cells. Our data show that phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase is triggered by Pyk2. In addition, we confirmed dephosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) at Ser330 downstream of Pyk2. Since NDRG1 impacts oncogenic signaling pathways interfering with tumor progression, we suggest that the Pyk2-NDRG1 axis is possibly involved in conveying the anti-proliferative effect of β-ionone in prostate cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. PMID:25219547

  19. The Lottia gigantea shell matrix proteome: re-analysis including MaxQuant iBAQ quantitation and phosphoproteome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the importance of proteins of the biomineral organic matrix and their posttranslational modifications for biomineralization is generally recognized, the number of published matrix proteomes is still small. This is mostly due to the lack of comprehensive sequence databases, usually derived from genomic sequencing projects. However, in-depth mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis, which critically depends on high-quality sequence databases, is a very fast tool to identify candidates for functional biomineral matrix proteins and their posttranslational modifications. Identification of such candidate proteins is facilitated by at least approximate quantitation of the identified proteins, because the most abundant ones may also be the most interesting candidates for further functional analysis. Results Re-quantification of previously identified Lottia shell matrix proteins using the intensity-based absolute quantification (iBAQ) method as implemented in the MaxQuant identification and quantitation software showed that only 57 of the 382 accepted identifications constituted 98% of the total identified matrix proteome. This group of proteins did not contain obvious intracellular proteins, such as cytoskeletal components or ribosomal proteins, invariably identified as minor components of high-throughput biomineral matrix proteomes. Fourteen of these major proteins were phosphorylated to a variable extent. All together we identified 52 phospho sites in 20 of the 382 accepted proteins with high confidence. Conclusions We show that iBAQ quantitation may be a useful tool to narrow down the group of functional biomineral matrix protein candidates for further research in cell biology, genetics or materials research. Knowledge of posttranslational modifications in these major proteins could be a valuable addition to previously published proteomes. This is true especially for phosphorylation, because this modification was already shown to modify mineralization processes in some instances. PMID:25018669

  20. Quantitative Mitochondrial Phosphoproteomics Using iTRAQ on an LTQ-Orbitrap with High Energy Collision Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Boja, Emily S.; Phillips, Darci; French, Stephanie A.; Harris, Robert A.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Using iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry on an LTQ-Orbitrap with HCD capability, we assessed relative changes in protein phosphorylation in the mitochondria upon physiological perturbation. As a reference reaction, we monitored the well-characterized regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity via phosphorylation/dephosphorylation by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase/pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase in response to dichloroacetate, de-energization and Ca2+. Relative quantification of phosphopeptides of PDH-E1α subunit from porcine heart revealed dephosphorylation at three serine sites (Ser231, Ser292 and Ser299). Dephosphorylation at Ser292 (i.e., the inhibitory site) with DCA correlated with an activation of PDH activity as previously reported, consistent with our de-energization data. Calcium also dephosphorylated (i.e., activated) PDH thus confirming calcium activation of PDP. With this approach, we successfully monitored other phosphorylation sites of mitochondrial proteins including adenine nucleotide translocase, malate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial creatine kinase, etc. Among them four proteins exhibited phosphorylation changes with these physiological stimuli: (1) BCKDH-E1α subunit increased phosphorylation at Ser337 with DCA and de-energization; (2) apoptosis-inducing factor phosphorylation was elevated at Ser345 with calcium; (3) ATP synthase F1 complex α subunit and (4) mitofilin dephosphorylated at Ser65 and Ser264 upon de-energization. This screening validated the iTRAQ/HCD technology as a method for functional quantitation of mitochondrial protein phosphorylation as well as providing insights into the regulation of mitochondria via phosphorylation. PMID:19694452

  1. Comprehensive Quantitative Comparison of the Membrane Proteome, Phosphoproteome, and Sialiome of Human Embryonic and Neural Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Schulz, Melanie; Liu, Qiuyue; Swistowski, Andrzej; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Jakobsen, Lene; Zeng, Xianmin; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into neural stem cells (NSCs), which can further be differentiated into neurons and glia cells. Therefore, these cells have huge potential as source for treatment of neurological diseases. Membrane-associated proteins are very important in cellular signaling and recognition, and their function and activity are frequently regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. To obtain information about membrane-associated proteins and their modified amino acids potentially involved in changes of hESCs and NSCs as well as to investigate potential new markers for these two cell stages, we performed large-scale quantitative membrane-proteomic of hESCs and NSCs. This approach employed membrane purification followed by peptide dimethyl labeling and peptide enrichment to study the membrane subproteome as well as changes in phosphorylation and sialylation between hESCs and NSCs. Combining proteomics and modification specific proteomics we identified a total of 5105 proteins whereof 57% contained transmembrane domains or signal peptides. The enrichment strategy yielded a total of 10,087 phosphorylated peptides in which 78% of phosphopeptides were identified with ≥99% confidence in site assignment and 1810 unique formerly sialylated N-linked glycopeptides. Several proteins were identified as significantly regulated in hESCs and NSC, including proteins involved in the early embryonic and neural development. In the latter group of proteins, we could identify potential NSC markers as Crumbs 2 and several novel proteins. A motif analysis of the altered phosphosites showed a sequence consensus motif (R-X-XpS/T) significantly up-regulated in NSC. This motif is among other kinases recognized by the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-2, emphasizing a possible importance of this kinase for this cell stage. Collectively, this data represent the most diverse set of post-translational modifications reported for hESCs and NSCs. This study revealed potential markers to distinguish NSCs from hESCs and will contribute to improve our understanding on the differentiation process. PMID:24173317

  2. Targeted Phosphoproteome Analysis Using Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has been rapidly spread based on the advancement of mass spectrometry and development of efficient enrichment techniques for phosphorylated proteins or peptides. Non-targeted approach has been employed in most of the studies for phosphoproteome analysis. However, targeted approach using selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) is an indispensible technique used for the quantitation of known targets especially when we have many samples to quantitate phosphorylation events on proteins in biological or clinical samples. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM-based quantitation for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:26700043

  3. Dynamic changes of the phosphoproteome in postmortem mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tsutomu; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is deeply involved in the pathological mechanism of various neurodegenerative disorders. However, in human pathological samples, phosphorylation can be modified during preservation by postmortem factors such as time and temperature. Postmortem changes may also differ among proteins. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive database that could support the analysis of protein phosphorylation in human brain samples from the standpoint of postmortem changes. As a first step toward addressing the issue, we performed phosphoproteome analysis with brain tissue dissected from mouse bodies preserved under different conditions. Quantitative whole proteome mass analysis showed surprisingly diverse postmortem changes in phosphoproteins that were dependent on temperature, time and protein species. Twelve hrs postmortem was a critical time point for preservation at room temperature. At 4°C, after the body was cooled down, most phosphoproteins were stable for 72 hrs. At either temperature, increase greater than 2-fold was exceptional during this interval. We found several standard proteins by which we can calculate the postmortem time at room temperature. The information obtained in this study will be indispensable for evaluating experimental data with human as well as mouse brain samples. PMID:21731734

  4. The phosphoproteomics data explosion.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Heck, Albert J R

    2009-10-01

    There are likely more than 500000 potential phosphorylation sites in a cellular proteome. This dynamic phosphorylation is under tight control of a variety of kinases and phosphatases. In recent years significant progress has been made in the large-scale analysis of these in vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation events. Much of this data have been deposited in public depositories, which have described so far about 25000 phosphorylation sites on about 7000 human proteins. However, the amount of phosphoproteomics data generated is now growing tremendously at a rate of about 10000 sites per reported study. The major advances made in global phosphoproteomics analyses originate from technological advances, whereby the largest contributions are from more selective phosphopeptide affinity enrichment technologies and from faster, and more sensitive mass spectrometers. PMID:19620020

  5. Phosphoproteomics of vasopressin signaling in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in the signaling pathways regulating water and solute transport in the distal renal tubule (i.e., renal collecting duct). A central mediator in this process is the antidiuretic peptide hormone arginine vasopressin, which regulates a number of transport proteins including water channel aquaporin-2 and urea transporters (UT-A1 and UT-A3). Within the past few years, tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics has played a pivotal role in revealing global changes in the phosphoproteome in response to vasopressin signaling in the renal collecting duct. This type of large-scale ‘shotgun’ approach has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of phosphoproteins known to be regulated by vasopressin and has expanded on the established signaling mechanisms and kinase pathways regulating collecting duct physiology. This article will provide a brief background on vasopressin action, will highlight a number of recent quantitative phosphoproteomic studies in both native rat kidney and cultured collecting duct cells, and will conclude with a perspective focused on emerging trends in the field of phosphoproteomics. PMID:21501009

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals γ-bisabolene inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma via HDAC2 inhibition and ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Jou, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Way, Tzong-Der; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hua, Chun-Hung; Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, Su-Hua; Kao, Jung-Yie; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-10-01

    γ-Bisabolene, one of main components in cardamom, showed potent in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative activities against human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). γ-Bisabolene activated caspases-3/9 and decreased mitochondrial memebrane potential, leading to apoptosis of OSCC cell lines (Ca9-22 and SAS), but not normal oral fibroblast cells. Phosphoproteome profiling of OSCC cells treated with γ-bisabolene was identified using TiO2-PDMS plate and LC-MS/MS, then confirmed using Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR assays. Phosphoproteome profiling revealed that γ-bisabolene increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, protein phosphatases 1 (PP1), and p53, as well as decreased the phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the process of apoptosis induction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis proposed the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. Subsequent assays indicated γ-bisabolene eliciting p53 acetylation that enhanced the expression of p53-regulated apoptotic genes. PP1 inhibitor-2 restored the status of HDAC2 phosphorylation, reducing p53 acetylation and PUMA mRNA expression in γ-bisabolene-treated Ca9-22 and SAS cells. Meanwhile, MEK and ERK inhibitors significantly decreased γ-bisabolene-induced PUMA expression in both cancer cell lines. Notably, the results ascertained the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of γ-bisabolene-treated cells. This study demonstrated γ-bisabolene displaying potent anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities against OSCC in vitro and in vivo, elucidating molecular mechanisms of γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. The novel insight could be useful for developing anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26194454

  7. Neck dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Radical neck dissection; Modified radical neck dissection; Selective neck dissection; Lymph node removal - neck ... spread. There are three main types of neck dissection surgery: Radical neck dissection: All the tissue on the side of ...

  8. Label‐free quantitative analysis of the casein kinase 2‐responsive phosphoproteome of the marine minimal model species Ostreococcus tauri

    PubMed Central

    Le Bihan, Thierry; Hindle, Matthew; Martin, Sarah F.; Barrios‐Llerena, Martin E.; Krahmer, Johanna; Kis, Katalin; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a protein kinase that phosphorylates a plethora of cellular target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle control, and circadian timekeeping. CK2 is functionally conserved across eukaryotes, although the substrate proteins identified in a range of complex tissues are often different. The marine alga Ostreococcus tauri is a unicellular eukaryotic model organism ideally suited to efficiently study generic roles of CK2 in the cellular circadian clock. Overexpression of CK2 leads to a slow circadian rhythm, verifying functional conservation of CK2 in timekeeping. The proteome was analysed in wild‐type and CK2‐overexpressing algae at dawn and dusk, revealing that differential abundance of the global proteome across the day is largely unaffected by overexpression. However, CK2 activity contributed more strongly to timekeeping at dusk than at dawn. The phosphoproteome of a CK2 overexpression line and cells treated with CK2 inhibitor was therefore analysed and compared to control cells at dusk. We report an extensive catalogue of 447 unique CK2‐responsive differential phosphopeptide motifs to inform future studies into CK2 activity in the circadian clock of more complex tissues. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000975 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000975). PMID:25930153

  9. Stable isotope metabolic labeling-based quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants reveals ethylene-regulated time-dependent phosphoproteins and putative substrates of constitutive triple response 1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Guo, Guangyu; Zhang, Manyu; Liu, Claire Y; Hu, Qin; Lam, Henry; Cheng, Han; Xue, Yu; Li, Jiayang; Li, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates numerous cellular processes and stress responses. The mode of action of ethylene is both dose- and time-dependent. Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in ethylene signaling, which is mediated by the activities of ethylene receptors, constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1) kinase, and phosphatase. To address how ethylene alters the cellular protein phosphorylation profile in a time-dependent manner, differential and quantitative phosphoproteomics based on (15)N stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis was performed on both one-minute ethylene-treated Arabidopsis ethylene-overly-sensitive loss-of-function mutant rcn1-1, deficient in PP2A phosphatase activity, and a pair of long-term ethylene-treated wild-type and loss-of-function ethylene signaling ctr1-1 mutants, deficient in mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase activity. In total, 1079 phosphopeptides were identified, among which 44 were novel. Several one-minute ethylene-regulated phosphoproteins were found from the rcn1-1. Bioinformatic analysis of the rcn1-1 phosphoproteome predicted nine phosphoproteins as the putative substrates for PP2A phosphatase. In addition, from CTR1 kinase-enhanced phosphosites, we also found putative CTR1 kinase substrates including plastid transcriptionally active protein and calcium-sensing receptor. These regulatory proteins are phosphorylated in the presence of ethylene. Analysis of ethylene-regulated phosphosites using the group-based prediction system with a protein-protein interaction filter revealed a total of 14 kinase-substrate relationships that may function in both CTR1 kinase- and PP2A phosphatase-mediated phosphor-relay pathways. Finally, several ethylene-regulated post-translational modification network models have been built using molecular systems biology tools. It is proposed that ethylene regulates the phosphorylation of arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 41, plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2A, light harvesting chlorophyll A/B binding protein 1.1, and flowering bHLH 3 proteins in a dual-and-opposing fashion. PMID:24043427

  10. Stable Isotope Metabolic Labeling-based Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Reveals Ethylene-regulated Time-dependent Phosphoproteins and Putative Substrates of Constitutive Triple Response 1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Guo, Guangyu; Zhang, Manyu; Liu, Claire Y.; Hu, Qin; Lam, Henry; Cheng, Han; Xue, Yu; Li, Jiayang; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates numerous cellular processes and stress responses. The mode of action of ethylene is both dose- and time-dependent. Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in ethylene signaling, which is mediated by the activities of ethylene receptors, constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1) kinase, and phosphatase. To address how ethylene alters the cellular protein phosphorylation profile in a time-dependent manner, differential and quantitative phosphoproteomics based on 15N stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis was performed on both one-minute ethylene-treated Arabidopsis ethylene-overly-sensitive loss-of-function mutant rcn1-1, deficient in PP2A phosphatase activity, and a pair of long-term ethylene-treated wild-type and loss-of-function ethylene signaling ctr1-1 mutants, deficient in mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase activity. In total, 1079 phosphopeptides were identified, among which 44 were novel. Several one-minute ethylene-regulated phosphoproteins were found from the rcn1-1. Bioinformatic analysis of the rcn1-1 phosphoproteome predicted nine phosphoproteins as the putative substrates for PP2A phosphatase. In addition, from CTR1 kinase-enhanced phosphosites, we also found putative CTR1 kinase substrates including plastid transcriptionally active protein and calcium-sensing receptor. These regulatory proteins are phosphorylated in the presence of ethylene. Analysis of ethylene-regulated phosphosites using the group-based prediction system with a protein–protein interaction filter revealed a total of 14 kinase–substrate relationships that may function in both CTR1 kinase- and PP2A phosphatase-mediated phosphor-relay pathways. Finally, several ethylene-regulated post-translational modification network models have been built using molecular systems biology tools. It is proposed that ethylene regulates the phosphorylation of arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 41, plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2A, light harvesting chlorophyll A/B binding protein 1.1, and flowering bHLH 3 proteins in a dual-and-opposing fashion. PMID:24043427

  11. Impact of digestion conditions on phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Dickhut, Clarissa; Feldmann, Ingo; Lambert, Jörg; Zahedi, René P

    2014-06-01

    In the past few years, the focus of phosphoproteomics has shifted from merely qualitative to quantitative and targeted studies. Tryptic digestion is a critical step that directly affects quantification and that can be impaired by phosphorylation. Therefore, we systematically characterized the digestion efficiency of 19 nonmodified and phosphorylated model peptides. Whereas we quantified a strong reduction of tryptic cleavage within phosphorylated PKA motifs (R)-R-X-pS/pT and also R-X-X-pT sequences, (R)-R-X-pY sequences were almost unaffected. Structural prediction implied the formation of salt bridges between R/K cleavage sites and phosphoamino acids pS/pT as the main reason for impaired tryptic digestion. We evaluated different conditions to optimize the digestion of such "resistant" phosphopeptides, yielding a substantial improvement of digestion efficiency. We performed a quantitative large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis of human platelets to validate our findings in a complex biological sample. Here, increasing trypsin concentrations up to a trypsin to peptide ratio of 1:10 led to a significant gain (i) in the overall number of phosphorylation sites (up to 9%) and (ii) in the intensities of individual phosphopeptides, thereby improving the sensitivity of phosphopeptide quantification. Still, for certain sequences, the negative impact of phosphorylation on digestion efficiency will further complicate the analysis of phosphorylation stoichiometry. PMID:24724590

  12. Enrichment Strategies in Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive study of the phosphoproteome is heavily dependent on appropriate enrichment strategies that are most often, but not exclusively, carried out on the peptide level. In this chapter, I give an overview of the most widely used techniques. In addition to dedicated antibodies, phosphopeptides are enriched by their selective interaction with metals in the form of chelated metal ions or metal oxides. The negative charge of the phosphate group is also exploited in a variety of chromatographic fractionation methods that include different types of ion exchange chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and electrostatic repulsion HILIC (ERLIC) chromatography. Selected examples from the literature will demonstrate how a combination of these techniques with current high-performance mass spectrometry enables the identification of thousands of phosphorylation sites from various sample types. PMID:26584921

  13. Dissecting Quantitative Trait Loci for Boron Efficiency across Multiple Environments in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zunkang; Wu, Likun; Nian, Fuzhao; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Taoxiong; Zhang, Didi; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    High yield is the most important goal in crop breeding, and boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for plants. However, B deficiency, leading to yield decreases, is an agricultural problem worldwide. Brassica napus is one of the most sensitive crops to B deficiency, and considerable genotypic variation exists among different cultivars in response to B deficiency. To dissect the genetic basis of tolerance to B deficiency in B. napus, we carried out QTL analysis for seed yield and yield-related traits under low and normal B conditions using the double haploid population (TNDH) by two-year and the BQDH population by three-year field trials. In total, 80 putative QTLs and 42 epistatic interactions for seed yield, plant height, branch number, pod number, seed number, seed weight and B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were identified under low and normal B conditions, singly explaining 4.15–23.16% and 0.53–14.38% of the phenotypic variation. An additive effect of putative QTLs was a more important controlling factor than the additive-additive effect of epistatic interactions. Four QTL-by-environment interactions and 7 interactions between epistatic interactions and the environment contributed to 1.27–4.95% and 1.17–3.68% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The chromosome region on A2 of SYLB-A2 for seed yield under low B condition and BEC-A2 for BEC in the two populations was equivalent to the region of a reported major QTL, BE1. The B. napus homologous genes of Bra020592 and Bra020595 mapped to the A2 region and were speculated to be candidate genes for B efficiency. These findings reveal the complex genetic basis of B efficiency in B. napus. They provide a basis for the fine mapping and cloning of the B efficiency genes and for breeding B-efficient cultivars by marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23028855

  14. Phosphoproteomic profiling of the myocyte.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Cordwell, Stuart J; White, Melanie Y

    2011-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation underpins major cellular processes including energy metabolism, signal transduction, excitation-contraction coupling, apoptosis, and cell survival mechanisms and is thus critical to the myocyte. Targeted approaches, whereby a handful of phosphoproteins are investigated, can suffer from a relatively narrow view of cellular phosphorylation. In contrast, recent technical advances have allowed for the comprehensive documentation of phosphorylation events in complex biological environments, providing a deeper view of the "phosphoproteome." A global, high-throughput characterization of the myocardial phosphoproteome, however, has not yet been achieved. Efficient analysis of phosphorylated proteins and their roles in a dynamic cellular environment requires high-resolution strategies that can identify, localize, and quantify many thousands of phosphorylation sites in a single experiment. Such an approach requires specific enrichment and purification techniques, developed to align with high-end instrumentation for analysis. Cutting-edge phosphoproteomics is no longer restricted to gel-based technology, instead focusing on affinity enrichment prior to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. We will describe the best current methods and how they can be applied, as well as the challenges associated with them. We also present current phosphoproteomic investigations in the myocyte and its subcompartments. Although the techniques and instrumentation required to achieve the goal of a myocardial phosphoprotein catalog in physiological and diseased states are highly specialized, the potential biological insight provided by such an approach makes phosphoproteomics an important new avenue of investigation for the cardiovascular researcher. PMID:22010164

  15. Clinical and Technical Phosphoproteomic Research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An encouraging approach for the diagnosis and effective therapy of immunological pathologies, which would include cancer, is the identification of proteins and phosphorylated proteins. Disease proteomics, in particular, is a potentially useful method for this purpose. A key role is played by protein phosphorylation in the regulation of normal immunology disorders and targets for several new cancer drugs and drug candidates are cancer cells and protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a highly dynamic process. The functioning of new drugs is of major importance as is the selection of those patients who would respond best to a specific treatment regime. In all major aspects of cellular life signalling networks are key elements which play a major role in inter- and intracellular communications. They are involved in diverse processes such as cell-cycle progression, cellular metabolism, cell-cell communication and appropriate response to the cellular environment. A whole range of networks that are involved in the regulation of cell development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and immunologic responses is contained in the latter. It is so necessary to understand and monitor kinase signalling pathways in order to understand many immunology pathologies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as immunoproteomic techniques, phosphoenrichments and mass spectrometry (MS) is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites in order to advance in clinical research. Pharmacodynamic readouts of disease states and cellular drug responses in tumour samples will be provided as the field develops. We aim to detail the current and most useful techniques with research examples to isolate and carry out clinical phosphoproteomic studies which may be helpful for immunology and cancer research. Different phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative techniques need to be combined to achieve good phosphopeptide recovery and good up- and-down phospho-regulation protein studies. PMID:21635771

  16. Challenges in plasma membrane phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Orsburn, Benjamin C; Stockwin, Luke H; Newton, Dianne L

    2011-01-01

    The response to extracellular stimuli often alters the phosphorylation state of plasma membrane-associated proteins. In this regard, generation of a comprehensive membrane phosphoproteome can significantly enhance signal transduction and drug mechanism studies. However, analysis of this subproteome is regarded as technically challenging, given the low abundance and insolubility of integral membrane proteins, combined with difficulties in isolating, ionizing and fragmenting phosphopeptides. In this article, we highlight recent advances in membrane and phosphoprotein enrichment techniques resulting in improved identification of these elusive peptides. We also describe the use of alternative fragmentation techniques, and assess their current and future value to the field of membrane phosphoproteomics. PMID:21819303

  17. The Interplay of Light and Oxygen in the Reactive Oxygen Stress Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dissected by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Johannes; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Schulze, Stefan; Scholz, Martin; Fufezan, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Light and oxygen are factors that are very much entangled in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress response network in plants, algae and cyanobacteria. The first obligatory step in understanding the ROS network is to separate these responses. In this study, a LC-MS/MS based quantitative proteomic approach was used to dissect the responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ROS, light and oxygen employing an interlinked experimental setup. Application of novel bioinformatics tools allow high quality retention time alignment to be performed on all LC-MS/MS runs increasing confidence in protein quantification, overall sequence coverage and coverage of all treatments measured. Finally advanced hierarchical clustering yielded 30 communities of co-regulated proteins permitting separation of ROS related effects from pure light effects (induction and repression). A community termed redoxII was identified that shows additive effects of light and oxygen with light as the first obligatory step. Another community termed 4-down was identified that shows repression as an effect of light but only in the absence of oxygen indicating ROS regulation, for example, possibly via product feedback inhibition because no ROS damage is occurring. In summary the data demonstrate the importance of separating light, O2 and ROS responses to define marker genes for ROS responses. As revealed in this study, an excellent candidate is DHAR with strong ROS dependent induction profiles. PMID:24482124

  18. Quantitative proteomic dissection of a native 14-3-3ε interacting protein complex associated with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen; Tang, Siwei; Bai, Chen; Chen, Xian

    2014-04-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins regulate diverse biological processes that are implicated in cancer development, and seven 14-3-3 isoforms were identified with isoform-specific roles in different human tumors. In our previous work, we dissected the interactome of 14-3-3ε formed during the DNA damage response in a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell using an AACT/SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach. In this study, we used a similar proteomic approach to profile/identify the 14-3-3ε interactome formed in native HCC cells. Functional categorization and data-dependent network analysis of the native HCC-specific 14-3-3ε interactome revealed that 14-3-3ε is involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes (BPs)/pathways, including cell cycle control, apoptosis, signal transduction, transport, cell adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, and nucleic acid metabolism. Biological validation further supports that 14-3-3ε, via association with multiple BP/pathway-specific proteins, coordinates the regulation of proliferation, survival, and metastasis of HCC. The findings in this study, together with those of our previous study, provide an extensive profile of the 14-3-3ε interaction network in HCC cells, which should be valuable for understanding the pathology of HCC and HCC therapy. PMID:24363202

  19. Quantitative dissection of hydrogen bond-mediated proton transfer in the ketosteroid isomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Schwans, Jason P.; Fried, Stephen D.; Fenn, Timothy D.; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Pybus, Brandon; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bond networks are key elements of protein structure and function but have been challenging to study within the complex protein environment. We have carried out in-depth interrogations of the proton transfer equilibrium within a hydrogen bond network formed to bound phenols in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase. We systematically varied the proton affinity of the phenol using differing electron-withdrawing substituents and incorporated site-specific NMR and IR probes to quantitatively map the proton and charge rearrangements within the network that accompany incremental increases in phenol proton affinity. The observed ionization changes were accurately described by a simple equilibrium proton transfer model that strongly suggests the intrinsic proton affinity of one of the Tyr residues in the network, Tyr16, does not remain constant but rather systematically increases due to weakening of the phenol–Tyr16 anion hydrogen bond with increasing phenol proton affinity. Using vibrational Stark spectroscopy, we quantified the electrostatic field changes within the surrounding active site that accompany these rearrangements within the network. We were able to model these changes accurately using continuum electrostatic calculations, suggesting a high degree of conformational restriction within the protein matrix. Our study affords direct insight into the physical and energetic properties of a hydrogen bond network within a protein interior and provides an example of a highly controlled system with minimal conformational rearrangements in which the observed physical changes can be accurately modeled by theoretical calculations. PMID:23798390

  20. Quantitative dissection of hydrogen bond-mediated proton transfer in the ketosteroid isomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Sigala, Paul A; Fafarman, Aaron T; Schwans, Jason P; Fried, Stephen D; Fenn, Timothy D; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Pybus, Brandon; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A; Boxer, Steven G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen bond networks are key elements of protein structure and function but have been challenging to study within the complex protein environment. We have carried out in-depth interrogations of the proton transfer equilibrium within a hydrogen bond network formed to bound phenols in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase. We systematically varied the proton affinity of the phenol using differing electron-withdrawing substituents and incorporated site-specific NMR and IR probes to quantitatively map the proton and charge rearrangements within the network that accompany incremental increases in phenol proton affinity. The observed ionization changes were accurately described by a simple equilibrium proton transfer model that strongly suggests the intrinsic proton affinity of one of the Tyr residues in the network, Tyr16, does not remain constant but rather systematically increases due to weakening of the phenol-Tyr16 anion hydrogen bond with increasing phenol proton affinity. Using vibrational Stark spectroscopy, we quantified the electrostatic field changes within the surrounding active site that accompany these rearrangements within the network. We were able to model these changes accurately using continuum electrostatic calculations, suggesting a high degree of conformational restriction within the protein matrix. Our study affords direct insight into the physical and energetic properties of a hydrogen bond network within a protein interior and provides an example of a highly controlled system with minimal conformational rearrangements in which the observed physical changes can be accurately modeled by theoretical calculations. PMID:23798390

  1. Genetic dissection of fruiting body-related traits using quantitative trait loci mapping in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wen-Bing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Yan; Bian, Yin-Bing; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Man-Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    To provide a better understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation of Lentinula edodes, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping was employed to uncover the loci underlying seven fruiting body-related traits (FBRTs). An improved L. edodes genetic linkage map, comprising 572 markers on 12 linkage groups with a total map length of 983.7 cM, was constructed by integrating 82 genomic sequence-based insertion-deletion (InDel) markers into a previously published map. We then detected a total of 62 QTLs for seven target traits across two segregating testcross populations, with individual QTLs contributing 5.5 %-30.2 % of the phenotypic variation. Fifty-three out of the 62 QTLs were clustered in six QTL hotspots, suggesting the existence of main genomic regions regulating the morphological characteristics of fruiting bodies in L. edodes. A stable QTL hotspot on MLG2, containing QTLs for all investigated traits, was identified in both testcross populations. QTLs for related traits were frequently co-located on the linkage groups, demonstrating the genetic basis for phenotypic correlation of traits. Meta-QTL (mQTL) analysis was performed and identified 16 mQTLs with refined positions and narrow confidence intervals (CIs). Nine genes, including those encoding MAP kinase, blue-light photoreceptor, riboflavin-aldehyde-forming enzyme and cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase, and cytochrome P450s, were likely to be candidate genes controlling the shape of fruiting bodies. The study has improved our understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation in L. edodes. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide QTL detection of FBRTs in L. edodes. The improved genetic map, InDel markers and QTL hotspot regions revealed here will assist considerably in the conduct of future genetic and breeding studies of L. edodes. PMID:26875873

  2. Combining Quantitative Genetics Approaches with Regulatory Network Analysis to Dissect the Complex Metabolism of the Maize Kernel1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weiwei; Liu, Haijun; Yang, Ning; Luo, Jie; Xiao, Yingjie; Pan, Qingchun; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Yan, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies have allowed us to better understand the genetic architecture underlying naturally occurring plant metabolic variance. Here, we use two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations to dissect the genetic architecture of natural variation of 155 metabolites measured in the mature maize (Zea mays) kernel. Overall, linkage mapping identified 882 metabolic QTLs in both RIL populations across two environments, with an average of 2.1 QTLs per metabolite. A large number of metabolic QTLs (more than 65%) were identified with moderate effects (r2 = 2.1%–10%), while a small portion (less than 35%) showed major effects (r2 > 10%). Epistatic interactions between these identified loci were detected for more than 30% of metabolites (with the proportion of phenotypic variance ranging from 1.6% to 37.8%), implying that genetic epistasis is not negligible in determining metabolic variation. In total, 57 QTLs were validated by our previous genome-wide association study on the same metabolites that provided clues for exploring the underlying genes. A gene regulatory network associated with the flavonoid metabolic pathway was constructed based on the transcriptional variations of 28,769 genes in kernels (15 d after pollination) of 368 maize inbred lines. A large number of genes (34 of 58) in this network overlapped with previously defined genes controlled by maize PERICARP COLOR1, while three of them were identified here within QTL intervals for multiple flavonoids. The deeply characterized RIL populations, elucidation of metabolic phenotypes, and identification of candidate genes lay the foundation for maize quality improvement. PMID:26556794

  3. Dissecting the Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hisham M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection remains one of the most devastating diseases. Current practice guidelines provide diagnostic and therapeutic interventions based primarily on the aortic diameter. The level of evidence supporting these recommendations is Level C or “Expert Opinion” Since aortic dissection is a catastrophic structural failure, its investigation along the guidelines of accident investigation may offer a useful alternative, utilizing process mapping and root-cause analysis methodology. Since the objective of practice guidelines is to address the risk of serious events, on the utilization of a probabilistic predictive modeling methodology, using bioinformatics tools, may offer a more comprehensive risk assessment. PMID:27069940

  4. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. The Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 3 of Toxoplasma Influences Basal Calcium Levels and Functions beyond Egress as Revealed by Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Treeck, Moritz; Sanders, John L.; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y.; LaFavers, Kacie A.; Child, Matthew A.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo; Elias, Joshua E.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are conserved in plants and apicomplexan parasites. In Toxoplasma gondii, TgCDPK3 regulates parasite egress from the host cell in the presence of a calcium-ionophore. The targets and the pathways that the kinase controls, however, are not known. To identify pathways regulated by TgCDPK3, we measured relative phosphorylation site usage in wild type and TgCDPK3 mutant and knock-out parasites by quantitative mass-spectrometry using stable isotope-labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). This revealed known and novel phosphorylation events on proteins predicted to play a role in host-cell egress, but also a novel function of TgCDPK3 as an upstream regulator of other calcium-dependent signaling pathways, as we also identified proteins that are differentially phosphorylated prior to egress, including proteins important for ion-homeostasis and metabolism. This observation is supported by the observation that basal calcium levels are increased in parasites where TgCDPK3 has been inactivated. Most of the differential phosphorylation observed in CDPK3 mutants is rescued by complementation of the mutants with a wild type copy of TgCDPK3. Lastly, the TgCDPK3 mutants showed hyperphosphorylation of two targets of a related calcium-dependent kinase (TgCDPK1), as well as TgCDPK1 itself, indicating that this latter kinase appears to play a role downstream of TgCDPK3 function. Overexpression of TgCDPK1 partially rescues the egress phenotype of the TgCDPK3 mutants, reinforcing this conclusion. These results show that TgCDPK3 plays a pivotal role in regulating tachyzoite functions including, but not limited to, egress. PMID:24945436

  6. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Lpez, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  7. Phosphoproteomics: new insights into cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Marc; Brekken, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Developments in the field of phosphoproteomics have been fueled by the need simultaneously to monitor many different phosphoproteins within the signaling networks that coordinate responses to changes in the cellular environment. This article presents a brief review of phosphoproteomics with an emphasis on the biological insights that have been derived so far. PMID:16168091

  8. Phosphoproteomics for the masses

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Beauchene, Nicole A.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation serves as a primary mechanism of signal transduction in the cells of biological organisms. Technical advancements over the last several years in mass spectrometry now allow for the large-scale identification and quantitation of in vivo phosphorylation at unprecedented levels. These developments have occurred in the areas of sample preparation, instrumentation, quantitative methodology, and informatics so that today, ten to twenty thousand phosphorylation sites can be identified and quantified within a few weeks. With the rapid development and widespread availability of such data, its translation into biological insight and knowledge is a current obstacle. Here we present an overview of how this technology came to be and is currently applied, as well as future challenges for the field. PMID:20047291

  9. Identification of Direct Kinase Substrates via Kinase Assay-Linked Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V; Tao, W Andy

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in the regulation of various cellular functions. Dysregulation of phosphorylation is implicated in the pathogenesis of certain cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and central nervous system disorders. As a result, protein kinases have become potential drug targets for treating a wide variety of diseases. Identification of kinase substrates is vital not only for dissecting signaling pathways, but also for understanding disease pathologies and identifying novel therapeutic targets. However, identification of bona fide kinase substrates has remained challenging, necessitating the development of new methods and techniques. The kinase assay linked phosphoproteomics (KALIP) approach integrates in vitro kinase assays with global phosphoproteomics experiments to identify the direct substrates of protein kinases. This strategy has demonstrated outstanding sensitivity and a low false-positive rate for kinase substrate screening. PMID:26584932

  10. Chemical visualization of phosphoproteomes on membrane.

    PubMed

    Iliuk, Anton; Liu, X Shawn; Xue, Liang; Liu, Xiaoqi; Tao, W Andy

    2012-09-01

    With new discoveries of important roles of phosphorylation on a daily basis, phospho-specific antibodies, as the primary tool for on-membrane detection of phosphoproteins, face enormous challenges. To address an urgent need for convenient and reliable analysis of phosphorylation events, we report a novel strategy for sensitive phosphorylation analysis in the Western blotting format. The chemical reagent, which we termed pIMAGO, is based on a multifunctionalized soluble nanopolymer and is capable of selectively binding to phosphorylated residues independent of amino acid microenvironment, thus offering great promise as a universal tool in biological analyses where the site of phosphorylation is not known or its specific antibody is not available. The specificity and sensitivity of the approach was first examined using a mixture of standard proteins. The method was then applied to monitor phosphorylation changes in in vitro kinase and phosphatase assays. Finally, to demonstrate the unique ability of pIMAGO to measure endogenous phosphorylation, we used it to visualize and determine the differences in phosphorylated proteins that interact with wild-type and kinase dead mutant of Polo-like kinase 1 during mitosis, the results of which were further confirmed by a quantitative phosphoproteomics experiment. PMID:22593177

  11. Global Analysis of Neuronal Phosphoproteome Regulation by Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Panpan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Rong; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Gucek, Marjan; Knepper, Mark A.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2013-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are major components of the extracellular matrix which mediate inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). Several neuronal receptors for CSPGs have recently been identified; however, the signaling pathways by which CSPGs restrict axonal growth are still largely unknown. In this study, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the global changes in protein phosphorylation induced by CSPGs in primary neurons. In combination with isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX) fractionation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and LC-MS/MS, we identified and quantified 2214 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 1118 phosphoproteins, with 118 changing significantly in abundance with CSPG treatment. The proteins that were regulated by CSPGs included key components of synaptic vesicle trafficking, axon guidance mediated by semaphorins, integrin signaling, cadherin signaling and EGF receptor signaling pathways. A significant number of the regulated proteins are cytoskeletal and related proteins that have been implicated in regulating neurite growth. Another highly represented protein category regulated by CSPGs is nucleic acid binding proteins involved in RNA post-transcriptional regulation. Together, by screening the overall phosphoproteome changes induced by CSPGs, this data expand our understanding of CSPG signaling, which provides new insights into development of strategies for overcoming CSPG inhibition and promoting axonal regeneration after CNS injury. PMID:23527152

  12. Comparative phosphoproteomics of zebrafish Fyn/Yes morpholino knockdown embryos.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Jopling, Chris; Gouw, Joost; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2008-11-01

    The coordinated movement of cells is indispensable for normal vertebrate gastrulation. Several important players and signaling pathways have been identified in convergence and extension (CE) cell movements during gastrulation, including non-canonical Wnt signaling. Fyn and Yes, members of the Src family of kinases, are key regulators of CE movements as well. Here we investigated signaling pathways in early development by comparison of the phosphoproteome of wild type zebrafish embryos with Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos that display specific CE cell movement defects. For quantitation we used differential stable isotope labeling by reductive amination of peptides. Equal amounts of labeled peptides from wild type and Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos were mixed and analyzed by on-line reversed phase TiO(2)-reversed phase LC-MS/MS. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides were quantified, and significant changes in protein expression and/or phosphorylation were detected. We identified 348 phosphoproteins of which 69 showed a decrease in phosphorylation in Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos and 72 showed an increase in phosphorylation. Among these phosphoproteins were known regulators of cell movements, including Adducin and PDLIM5. Our results indicate that quantitative phosphoproteomics combined with morpholino-mediated knockdowns can be used to identify novel signaling pathways that act in zebrafish development in vivo. PMID:18550893

  13. Debating Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlans, F. Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Argues the pros, cons, and alternatives to animal dissection. Discusses several cases involving student objections and the enactment of a California state law which upholds the right of a student to conscientious objection to dissection involving the harmful or destructive use of animals. (RT)

  14. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Signaling Pathways That Facilitate Lytic Gammaherpesvirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, James A.; Chavan, Shweta S.; Sifford, Jeffrey M.; MacLeod, Veronica; Voth, Daniel E.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Forrest, J. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Lytic gammaherpesvirus (GHV) replication facilitates the establishment of lifelong latent infection, which places the infected host at risk for numerous cancers. As obligate intracellular parasites, GHVs must control and usurp cellular signaling pathways in order to successfully replicate, disseminate to stable latency reservoirs in the host, and prevent immune-mediated clearance. To facilitate a systems-level understanding of phosphorylation-dependent signaling events directed by GHVs during lytic replication, we utilized label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to interrogate the lytic replication cycle of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV68). Compared to controls, MHV68 infection regulated by 2-fold or greater ca. 86% of identified phosphopeptides – a regulatory scale not previously observed in phosphoproteomic evaluations of discrete signal-inducing stimuli. Network analyses demonstrated that the infection-associated induction or repression of specific cellular proteins globally altered the flow of information through the host phosphoprotein network, yielding major changes to functional protein clusters and ontologically associated proteins. A series of orthogonal bioinformatics analyses revealed that MAPK and CDK-related signaling events were overrepresented in the infection-associated phosphoproteome and identified 155 host proteins, such as the transcription factor c-Jun, as putative downstream targets. Importantly, functional tests of bioinformatics-based predictions confirmed ERK1/2 and CDK1/2 as kinases that facilitate MHV68 replication and also demonstrated the importance of c-Jun. Finally, a transposon-mutant virus screen identified the MHV68 cyclin D ortholog as a viral protein that contributes to the prominent MAPK/CDK signature of the infection-associated phosphoproteome. Together, these analyses enhance an understanding of how GHVs reorganize and usurp intracellular signaling networks to facilitate infection and replication. PMID:24068923

  15. Refined phosphopeptide enrichment by phosphate additive and the analysis of human brain phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Haiyan; Wu, Zhiping; Wang, Hong; Bai, Bing; Li, Yuxin; Wang, Xusheng; Zhai, Bo; Beach, Thomas G.; Peng, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function. One of the pathological hallmarks of AD is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles composed of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but global deregulation of protein phosphorylation in AD is not well analyzed. Here we report a pilot investigation of AD phosphoproteome by titanium dioxide enrichment coupled with high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). During the optimization of the enrichment method, we found that phosphate ion at a low concentration (e.g. 1 mM) worked efficiently as a non-phosphopeptide competitor to reduce background. The procedure was further tuned with respect to peptide-to-bead ratio, phosphopeptide recovery and purity. Using this refined method and 9 h LC-MS/MS, we analyzed phosphoproteome in one milligram of digested AD brain lysate, identifying 5,243 phosphopeptides containing 3,715 non-redundant phosphosites on 1,455 proteins, including 31 phosphosites on the tau protein. This modified enrichment method is simple and highly efficient. The AD case study demonstrates its feasibility of dissecting phosphoproteome in a limited amount of postmortem human brain. PMID:25307156

  16. Phosphoproteomics in translational research: a sarcoma perspective.

    PubMed

    Noujaim, J; Payne, L S; Judson, I; Jones, R L; Huang, P H

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoproteomics has been extensively used as a preclinical research tool to characterize the phosphorylated components of the cancer proteome. Advances in the field have yielded insights into new drug targets, mechanisms of disease progression and drug resistance, and biomarker discovery. However, application of this technology to clinical research has been challenging because of practical issues relating to specimen integrity and tumour heterogeneity. Beyond these limitations, phosphoproteomics has the potential to play a pivotal role in translational studies and contribute to advances in different tumour groups, including rare disease sites like sarcoma. In this review, we propose that deploying phosphoproteomic technologies in translational research may facilitate the identification of better defined predictive biomarkers for patient stratification, inform drug selection in umbrella trials and identify new combinations to overcome drug resistance. We provide an overview of current phosphoproteomic technologies, such as affinity-based assays and mass spectrometry-based approaches, and discuss their advantages and limitations. We use sarcoma as an example to illustrate the current challenges in evaluating targeted kinase therapies in clinical trials. We then highlight useful lessons from preclinical studies in sarcoma biology to demonstrate how phosphoproteomics may address some of these challenges. Finally, we conclude by offering a perspective and list the key measures required to translate and benchmark a largely preclinical technology into a useful tool for translational research. PMID:26802162

  17. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5′-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea. PMID:25504138

  18. Virtual reality haptic dissection.

    PubMed

    Erolin, Caroline; Wilkinson, Caroline; Soames, Roger

    2011-12-01

    This project aims to create a three-dimensional digital model of the human hand and wrist which can be virtually 'dissected' through a haptic interface. Tissue properties will be added to the various anatomical structures to replicate a realistic look and feel. The project will explore the role of the medical artist, and investigate cross-discipline collaborations in the field of virtual anatomy. The software will be used to train anatomy students in dissection skills, before experience on a real cadaver. The effectiveness of the software will be evaluated and assessed both quantitatively as well as qualitatively. PMID:22229585

  19. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the back Can move to the shoulder, neck, arm, jaw, abdomen, or hips Changes position, often moving to the arms and legs as the aortic dissection gets worse Symptoms are caused by a decrease ...

  20. Technical phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic tools useful in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is one of the most important forms of cellular regulation. Thus, phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation in cells is a powerful tool to evaluate cell functional status. The importance of protein kinase-regulated signal transduction pathways in human cancer has led to the development of drugs that inhibit protein kinases at the apex or intermediary levels of these pathways. Phosphoproteomic analysis of these signalling pathways will provide important insights for operation and connectivity of these pathways to facilitate identification of the best targets for cancer therapies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as phosphoenrichments, mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to bioinformatics tools is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites for advancing in such relevant clinical research. A combination of different phosphopeptide enrichments, quantitative techniques and bioinformatic tools is necessary to achieve good phospho-regulation data and good structural analysis of protein studies. The current and most useful proteomics and bioinformatics techniques will be explained with research examples. Our aim in this article is to be helpful for cancer research via detailing proteomics and bioinformatic tools. PMID:21967744

  1. Temporal Dynamics of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea Phosphoproteome*

    PubMed Central

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Lim, SooA; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycetes undergo a dramatic reorganization of metabolic and cellular machinery during a brief period of growth arrest (“metabolic switch”) preceding mycelia differentiation and the onset of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. This study explores the role of phosphorylation in coordinating the metabolic switch in the industrial actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A total of 109 phosphopeptides from 88 proteins were detected across a 150-h fermentation using open-profile two-dimensional LC-MS proteomics and TiO2 enrichment. Quantitative analysis of the phosphopeptides and their unphosphorylated cognates was possible for 20 pairs that also displayed constant total protein expression. Enzymes from central carbon metabolism such as putative acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, isocitrate lyase, and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase changed dramatically in the degree of phosphorylation during the stationary phase, suggesting metabolic rearrangement for the reutilization of substrates and the production of polyketide precursors. In addition, an enzyme involved in cellular response to environmental stress, trypsin-like serine protease (SACE_6340/NC_009142_6216), decreased in phosphorylation during the growth arrest stage. More important, enzymes related to the regulation of protein synthesis underwent rapid phosphorylation changes during this stage. Whereas the degree of phosphorylation of ribonuclease Rne/Rng (SACE_1406/NC_009142_1388) increased during the metabolic switch, that of two ribosomal proteins, S6 (SACE_7351/NC_009142_7233) and S32 (SACE_6101/NC_009142_5981), dramatically decreased during this stage of the fermentation, supporting the hypothesis that ribosome subpopulations differentially regulate translation before and after the metabolic switch. Overall, we show the great potential of phosphoproteomic studies to explain microbial physiology and specifically provide evidence of dynamic protein phosphorylation events across the developmental cycle of actinomycetes. PMID:24615062

  2. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Cell-Based Resistance to BRAF Inhibitor Therapy in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert; Vella, Laura J.; Xavier, Dylan; Amirkhani, Ardeshir; Parker, Jimmy; Cebon, Jonathan; Molloy, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of melanoma by targeted inhibition of the mutated kinase BRAF with small molecules only temporarily suppresses metastatic disease. In the face of chemical inhibition tumor plasticity, both innate and adaptive, promotes survival through the biochemical and genetic reconfiguration of cellular pathways that can engage proliferative and migratory systems. To investigate this process, high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to characterize the phosphoproteome of this transition in vitro. A simple and accurate, label-free quantitative method was used to localize and quantitate thousands of phosphorylation events. We also correlated changes in the phosphoproteome with the proteome to more accurately determine changes in the activity of regulatory kinases determined by kinase landscape profiling. The abundance of phosphopeptides with sites that function in cytoskeletal regulation, GTP/GDP exchange, protein kinase C, IGF signaling, and melanosome maturation were highly divergent after transition to a drug resistant phenotype. PMID:26029660

  3. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog

    PubMed Central

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G.; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Soares, Nelson C.; Wiker, Harald G.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Warren, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis. PMID:25713560

  4. From Phosphoproteome to Modeling of Plant Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic experiments in recent years became almost routine in many aspects of biology. Particularly the quantification of peptides and corresponding phosphorylated counterparts from a single experiment is highly important for understanding of dynamics of signaling pathways. We developed an analytical method to quantify phosphopeptides (pP) in relation to the quantity of the corresponding non-phosphorylated parent peptides (P). We used mixed-mode solid-phase extraction to purify total peptides from tryptic digest and separated them from most of the phosphorous-containing compounds (e.g., phospholipids, nucleotides) which enhances pP enrichment on TiO2 beads. Phosphoproteomic data derived with this designed method allows quantifying pP/P stoichiometry, and qualifying experimental data for mathematical modeling. PMID:26700054

  5. Polyomino Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Tiina; Liu, Andy

    2012-01-01

    One of Gardner's passions was to introduce puzzles into the classroom. From this point of view, polyomino dissections are an excellent topic. They require little background, provide training in geometric visualization, and mostly they are fun. In this article, we put together a large collection of such puzzles, introduce a new approach in solving…

  6. Polyomino Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Tiina; Liu, Andy

    2012-01-01

    One of Gardner's passions was to introduce puzzles into the classroom. From this point of view, polyomino dissections are an excellent topic. They require little background, provide training in geometric visualization, and mostly they are fun. In this article, we put together a large collection of such puzzles, introduce a new approach in solving

  7. TSLP Signaling Network Revealed by SILAC-Based Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Wu, Xinyan; Huang, Tai-Chung; Getnet, Derese; Mitchell, Christopher J.; Palapetta, Shyam M.; Sharma, Jyoti; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Yoda, Akinori; Moritz, Albrecht; Loriaux, Marc M.; Rush, John; Weinstock, David M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. TSLP requires a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-7 receptor ? subunit and its unique TSLP receptor (gene symbol CRLF2) to transmit signals in cells. Abnormal TSLP signaling (e.g. overexpression of TSLP or its unique receptor TSLPR) contributes to the development of a number of diseases including asthma and leukemia. However, a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by TSLP remains elusive. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling network using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. By employing titanium dioxide in addition to antiphosphotyrosine antibodies as enrichment methods, we identified 4164 phosphopeptides on 1670 phosphoproteins. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation, we determined that the phosphorylation status of 226 proteins was modulated by TSLP stimulation. Our analysis identified activation of several members of the Src and Tec families of kinases including Btk, Lyn, and Tec by TSLP for the first time. In addition, we report TSLP-induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatases such as Ptpn6 (SHP-1) and Ptpn11 (Shp2), which has also not been reported previously. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Shp2 binds to the adapter protein Gab2 in a TSLP-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of an inducible protein complex in TSLP signaling. A kinase inhibitor screen revealed that pharmacological inhibition of PI-3 kinase, Jak family kinases, Src family kinases or Btk suppressed TSLP-dependent cellular proliferation making them candidate therapeutic targets in diseases resulting from aberrant TSLP signaling. Our study is the first phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling pathway that greatly expands our understanding of TSLP signaling and provides novel therapeutic targets for TSLP/TSLPR-associated diseases in humans. PMID:22345495

  8. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone receptor gene showed strong association with milk, fat, and protein yields. In HOL, the highest peaks for milk yield and susceptibility to mastitis were separated by over 3.5 Mb (3.8 Mb by haplotype analysis, 3.6 Mb by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis), suggesting separate genetic variants for the traits. Further analysis yielded 2 candidate mutations for the mastitis QTL, at 33,642,072 bp (rs378947583) in an intronic region of the caspase recruitment domain protein 6 gene and 35,969,994 bp (rs133596506) in an intronic region of the leukemia-inhibitory factor receptor gene. These findings suggest that it may be possible to separate these beneficial and detrimental genetic factors through targeted selective breeding. PMID:26409972

  9. Neck dissection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radical neck dissection - discharge; Modified radical neck dissection - discharge; Selective neck dissection - discharge ... Neck dissection is surgery to remove the lymph nodes in your neck. Cells from cancers in the mouth ...

  10. 15N-labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C; Farnum, John B; Vanderklish, Peter W; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R

    2012-02-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using (15)N-labeled brain tissue as an internal standard and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  11. Computational phosphoproteomics: From identification to localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dave C H; Jones, Andrew R; Hubbard, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the phosphoproteome by MS has become a key technology for the characterization of dynamic regulatory processes in the cell, since kinase and phosphatase action underlie many major biological functions. However, the addition of a phosphate group to a suitable side chain often confounds informatic analysis by generating product ion spectra that are more difficult to interpret (and consequently identify) relative to unmodified peptides. Collectively, these challenges have motivated bioinformaticians to create novel software tools and pipelines to assist in the identification of phosphopeptides in proteomic mixtures, and help pinpoint or “localize” the most likely site of modification in cases where there is ambiguity. Here we review the challenges to be met and the informatics solutions available to address them for phosphoproteomic analysis, as well as highlighting the difficulties associated with using them and the implications for data standards. PMID:25475148

  12. Systems Analysis for Interpretation of Phosphoproteomics Data.

    PubMed

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Global phosphoproteomics investigations yield overwhelming datasets with up to tens of thousands of quantified phosphosites. The main challenge after acquiring such large-scale data is to extract the biological meaning and relate this to the experimental question at hand. Systems level analysis provides the best means for extracting functional insights from such types of datasets, and this has primed a rapid development of bioinformatics tools and resources over the last decade. Many of these tools are specialized databases that can be mined for annotation and pathway enrichment, whereas others provide a platform to generate functional protein networks and explore the relations between proteins of interest. The use of these tools requires careful consideration with regard to the input data, and the interpretation demands a critical approach. This chapter provides a summary of the most appropriate tools for systems analysis of phosphoproteomics datasets, and the considerations that are critical for acquiring meaningful output. PMID:26584937

  13. Sample Preparation for Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Circadian Time Series in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krahmer, Johanna; Hindle, Matthew M.; Martin, Sarah F.; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biological approaches to study the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock have mainly focused on transcriptomics while little is known about the proteome, and even less about posttranslational modifications. Evidence has emerged that posttranslational protein modifications, in particular phosphorylation, play an important role for the clock and its output. Phosphoproteomics is the method of choice for a large-scale approach to gain more knowledge about rhythmic protein phosphorylation. Recent plant phosphoproteomics publications have identified several thousand phosphopeptides. However, the methods used in these studies are very labor-intensive and therefore not suitable to apply to a well-replicated circadian time series. To address this issue, we present and compare different strategies for sample preparation for phosphoproteomics that are compatible with large numbers of samples. Methods are compared regarding number of identifications, variability of quantitation, and functional categorization. We focus on the type of detergent used for protein extraction as well as methods for its removal. We also test a simple two-fraction separation of the protein extract. PMID:25662467

  14. Sample preparation for phosphoproteomic analysis of circadian time series in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Krahmer, Johanna; Hindle, Matthew M; Martin, Sarah F; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biological approaches to study the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock have mainly focused on transcriptomics while little is known about the proteome, and even less about posttranslational modifications. Evidence has emerged that posttranslational protein modifications, in particular phosphorylation, play an important role for the clock and its output. Phosphoproteomics is the method of choice for a large-scale approach to gain more knowledge about rhythmic protein phosphorylation. Recent plant phosphoproteomics publications have identified several thousand phosphopeptides. However, the methods used in these studies are very labor-intensive and therefore not suitable to apply to a well-replicated circadian time series. To address this issue, we present and compare different strategies for sample preparation for phosphoproteomics that are compatible with large numbers of samples. Methods are compared regarding number of identifications, variability of quantitation, and functional categorization. We focus on the type of detergent used for protein extraction as well as methods for its removal. We also test a simple two-fraction separation of the protein extract. PMID:25662467

  15. Phosphoproteomics data classify hematological cancer cell lines according to tumor type and sensitivity to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor classification based on their predicted responses to kinase inhibitors is a major goal for advancing targeted personalized therapies. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate biological heterogeneity across hematological cancer cell lines including acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Results Mass spectrometry was used to quantify 2,000 phosphorylation sites across three acute myeloid leukemia, three lymphoma, and three multiple myeloma cell lines in six biological replicates. The intensities of the phosphorylation sites grouped these cancer cell lines according to their tumor type. In addition, a phosphoproteomic analysis of seven acute myeloid leukemia cell lines revealed a battery of phosphorylation sites whose combined intensities correlated with the growth-inhibitory responses to three kinase inhibitors with remarkable correlation coefficients and fold changes (> 100 between the most resistant and sensitive cells). Modeling based on regression analysis indicated that a subset of phosphorylation sites could be used to predict response to the tested drugs. Quantitative analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that resistant and sensitive cells differed in their patterns of kinase activities, but, interestingly, phosphorylations correlating with responses were not on members of the pathway being targeted; instead, these mainly were on parallel kinase pathways. Conclusion This study reveals that the information on kinase activation encoded in phosphoproteomics data correlates remarkably well with the phenotypic responses of cancer cells to compounds that target kinase signaling and could be useful for the identification of novel markers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs that target the signaling network. PMID:23628362

  16. Phosphoproteomics by Mass Spectrometry: insights, implications, applications, and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mayya, Viveka; Han, David K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation of proteins is a predominant reversible post-translational modification. It is central to a wide variety of physiological responses and signaling mechanisms. Recent advances have allowed the global scope of phosphorylation to be addressed by mass spectrometry using phosphoproteomic approaches. In this perspective we discuss four aspects of phosphoproteomics; namely insights and implications from recently published phosphoproteomic studies, and applications and limitations of current phosphoproteomic strategies. As about 50,000 known phosphorylation sites do not yet have any ascribed function, we present our perspectives on a major function of protein phosphorylation that may be of predictive value in hypothesis based investigations. Finally we discuss strategies to measure stoichiometry of phosphorylation in a proteome-wide manner which is not provided by current phosphoproteomic approaches. PMID:19929607

  17. Biology teachers' dissection practices and the influences that lead to their adoption: An exploratory research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Regina Nicole

    The lack of resolution in the on-going animal dissection debate inspired this mixed methods study to identify Connecticut secondary biology teachers' dissection practices and the influences that lead to their adoption. Qualitative findings indicate past experiences, managing objections to dissection, school culture, goals of biology teaching and ethics as major influences on dissection practices with 58.4% (n=7) of the sample dissecting and 41.6% not dissecting (n=5). Quantitative findings reveal gender, standards and curriculum, advantages of dissection and experiences as a student as major influences on dissection practices with 71.9% (n=92) of the sample dissecting and 28.1% (n=36) not dissecting. The study concludes that dissection policies are necessary and imminent in Connecticut school districts. Furthermore, it advises teacher-initiated, qualitative and quantitative assessments to expose disparities between student dissection perspectives and their own, prior to conducting dissection. Finally, it provides suggestions for addressing potential differences including administrative involvement.

  18. Analysis of the Candida albicans Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Willger, S. D.; Liu, Z.; Olarte, R. A.; Adamo, M. E.; Myers, L. C.; Kettenbach, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important human fungal pathogen in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans regulation has been studied in many contexts, including morphological transitions, mating competence, biofilm formation, stress resistance, and cell wall synthesis. Analysis of kinase- and phosphatase-deficient mutants has made it clear that protein phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of these pathways. In this study, to further our understanding of phosphorylation in C. albicans regulation, we performed a deep analysis of the phosphoproteome in C. albicans. We identified 19,590 unique peptides that corresponded to 15,906 unique phosphosites on 2,896 proteins. The ratios of serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphosites were 80.01%, 18.11%, and 1.81%, respectively. The majority of proteins (2,111) contained at least two detected phosphorylation sites. Consistent with findings in other fungi, cytoskeletal proteins were among the most highly phosphorylated proteins, and there were differences in Gene Ontology (GO) terms for proteins with serine and threonine versus tyrosine phosphorylation sites. This large-scale analysis identified phosphosites in protein components of Mediator, an important transcriptional coregulatory protein complex. A targeted analysis of the phosphosites in Mediator complex proteins confirmed the large-scale studies, and further in vitro assays identified a subset of these phosphorylations that were catalyzed by Cdk8 (Ssn3), a kinase within the Mediator complex. These data represent the deepest single analysis of a fungal phosphoproteome and lay the groundwork for future analyses of the C. albicans phosphoproteome and specific phosphoproteins. PMID:25750214

  19. Two Birds with One Stone: Parallel Quantification of Proteome and Phosphoproteome Using iTRAQ.

    PubMed

    Solari, Fiorella A; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2016-01-01

    Altered and abnormal levels of proteins and their phosphorylation states are associated with many disorders. Detection and quantification of such perturbations may provide a better understanding of pathological conditions and help finding candidates for treatment or biomarkers. Over the years, isobaric mass tags for relative quantification of proteins and protein phosphorylation by mass spectrometry have become increasingly popular. One of the most commonly used isobaric chemical tags is iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation). In a typical iTRAQ-8plex experiment, a multiplexed sample amounts for up to 800 μg of peptides. Using state-of-the-art LC-MS approaches, only a fraction (~5 %) of such a sample is required to generate comprehensive quantitative data on the global proteome level, so that the bulk of the sample can be simultaneously used for quantitative phosphoproteomics. Here, we provide a simple and straightforward protocol to perform quantitative analyses of both proteome and phosphoproteome from the same sample using iTRAQ. PMID:26700039

  20. Phosphoproteomics technologies and applications in plant biology research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinna; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has long been recognized as an essential mechanism to regulate many important processes of plant life. However, studies on phosphorylation mediated signaling events in plants are challenged with low stoichiometry and dynamic nature of phosphorylated proteins. Significant advances in mass spectrometry based phosphoproteomics have taken place in recent decade, including phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment, detection and quantification, and phosphorylation site localization. This review describes a variety of separation and enrichment methods for phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides, the applications of technological innovations in plant phosphoproteomics, and highlights significant achievement of phosphoproteomics in the areas of plant signal transduction, growth and development. PMID:26136758

  1. Virtual reality haptic human dissection.

    PubMed

    Needham, Caroline; Wilkinson, Caroline; Soames, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This project aims to create a three-dimensional digital model of the human hand and wrist which can be virtually 'dissected' through a haptic interface. Tissue properties will be added to the various anatomical structures to replicate a realistic look and feel. The project will explore the role of the medical artist and investigate the cross-discipline collaborations required in the field of virtual anatomy. The software will be used to train anatomy students in dissection skills before experience on a real cadaver. The effectiveness of the software will be evaluated and assessed both quantitatively as well as qualitatively. PMID:21335827

  2. Variable Digestion Strategies for Phosphoproteomics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonczarowska-Jorge, Humberto; Dell'Aica, Margherita; Dickhut, Clarissa; Zahedi, René P

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has propelled our knowledge about the regulation of cellular pathways. Nevertheless, typically applied bottom-up strategies have several limitations. Trypsin, the preferentially used proteolytic enzyme shows impaired cleavage efficiency in the vicinity of phosphorylation sites. Moreover, depending on the frequency and distribution of tryptic cleavage sites (Arg/Lys), generated peptides can be either too short or too long for confident identification using standard LC-MS approaches. To overcome these limitations, we introduce an alternative and simple approach based on the usage of the nonspecific serine protease subtilisin, which enables a fast and reproducible digestion and provides access to "hidden" areas of the proteome. Thus, in a single LC-MS experiment >1800 phosphopeptides were confidently identified and localized from 125 μg of HeLa digest, compared to >2100 sites after tryptic digestion. While the overlap was less than 20 %, subtilisin allowed the identification of many phosphorylation sites that are theoretically not accessible via tryptic digestion, thus considerably increasing the coverage of the phosphoproteome. PMID:26584929

  3. Investigation of phosphoproteome in RAGE signaling.

    PubMed

    Batkulwar, Kedar B; Bansode, Sneha B; Patil, Gouri V; Godbole, Rashmi K; Kazi, Rubina S; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one of the most important proteins implicated in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. It is a pattern recognition receptor by virtue of its ability to interact with multiple ligands, RAGE activates several signal transduction pathways through involvement of various kinases that phosphorylate their respective substrates. Only few substrates have been known to be phosphorylated in response to activation by RAGE (e.g., nuclear factor kappa B); however, it is possible that these kinases can phosphorylate multiple substrates depending upon their expression and localization, leading to altered cellular responses in different cell types and conditions. One such example is, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta which is known to phosphorylate glycogen synthase, acts downstream to RAGE, and hyperphosphorylates microtubule-associated protein tau causing neuronal damage. Thus, it is important to understand the role of various RAGE-activated kinases and their substrates. Therefore, we have reviewed here the details of RAGE-activated kinases in response to different ligands and their respective phosphoproteome. Furthermore, we discuss the analysis of the data mined for known substrates of these kinases from the PhosphoSitePlus (http://www.phosphosite.org) database, and the role of some of the important substrates involved in cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. In summary, this review provides information on RAGE-activated kinases and their phosphoproteome, which will be helpful in understanding the possible role of RAGE and its ligands in progression of diseases. PMID:25315903

  4. Integrating Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome Reveals New Determinants of Macrophage Multinucleation*

    PubMed Central

    Rotival, Maxime; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Kerloc'h, Audrey; Montoya, Alex; Mauro, Claudio; Faull, Peter; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Petretto, Enrico; Behmoaras, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage multinucleation (MM) is essential for various biological processes such as osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and multinucleated giant cell-associated inflammatory reactions. Here we study the molecular pathways underlying multinucleation in the rat through an integrative approach combining MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics (LC-MS/MS) and transcriptome (high-throughput RNA-sequencing) to identify new regulators of MM. We show that a strong metabolic shift toward HIF1-mediated glycolysis occurs at transcriptomic level during MM, together with modifications in phosphorylation of over 50 proteins including several ARF GTPase activators and polyphosphate inositol phosphatases. We use shortest-path analysis to link differential phosphorylation with the transcriptomic reprogramming of macrophages and identify LRRFIP1, SMARCA4, and DNMT1 as novel regulators of MM. We experimentally validate these predictions by showing that knock-down of these latter reduce macrophage multinucleation. These results provide a new framework for the combined analysis of transcriptional and post-translational changes during macrophage multinucleation, prioritizing essential genes, and revealing the sequential events leading to the multinucleation of macrophages. PMID:25532521

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the response of maize leaves to drought, heat and their combination stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiuli; Wu, Liuji; Zhao, Feiyun; Zhang, Dayong; Li, Nana; Zhu, Guohui; Li, Chaohao; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Drought and heat stress, especially their combination, greatly affect crop production. Many studies have described transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome changes in response of plants to drought or heat stress. However, the study about the phosphoproteomic changes in response of crops to the combination stress is scare. To understand the mechanism of maize responses to the drought and heat combination stress, phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on maize leaves by using multiplex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and LC-MS/MS methods. Five-leaf-stage maize was subjected to drought, heat or their combination, and the leaves were collected. Globally, heat, drought and the combined stress significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of 172, 149, and 144 phosphopeptides, respectively. These phosphopeptides corresponded to 282 proteins. Among them, 23 only responded to the combined stress and could not be predicted from their responses to single stressors; 30 and 75 only responded to drought and heat, respectively. Notably, 19 proteins were phosphorylated on different sites in response to the single and combination stresses. Of the seven significantly enriched phosphorylation motifs identified, two were common for all stresses, two were common for heat and the combined stress, and one was specific to the combined stress. The signaling pathways in which the phosphoproteins were involved clearly differed among the three stresses. Functional characterization of the phosphoproteins and the pathways identified here could lead to new targets for the enhancement of crop stress tolerance, which will be particularly important in the face of climate change and the increasing prevalence of abiotic stressors. PMID:25999967

  6. Dissecting Classroom Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities that lead to values clarification. Issues such as dissection, bioengineering, birth control, medical resources, and death are discussed. Included is a student questionnaire on the subject of dissection and the use of animals in laboratories. (KR)

  7. The phosphoproteome of human Jurkat T cell clones upon costimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Dung; Carrascal, Montserrat; Vidal-Cortes, Oriol; Gallardo, Oscar; Casas, Vanessa; Gay, Marina; Phan, Van Chi; Abian, Joaquin

    2016-01-10

    Phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification, playing a vital role in protein function. In T cells, protein phosphorylation is the key mechanism regulating T cell receptor-driven signaling pathways. In order to gain insights into the phosphoproteome evolution of T cell activation, we performed a large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics study of Jurkat E6.1 (wild type) and Jurkat gamma1 (Phospholipase gamma1 null) cell clones upon costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies at times ranging from 15min to as long as 120min. In total, we identified 5585 phosphopeptides belonging to 2008 phosphoproteins from both cell clones. We detected 130 and 114 novel phosphopeptides in Jurkat E6.1 and Jurkat gamma1 clones, respectively. A significantly lower number of proteins containing regulated phosphorylation sites were identified in Jurkat gamma1 in comparison to Jurkat E6.1, reflecting the vital role of Phospholipase gamma1 in T cell signaling. Several new phosphorylation sites from lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) were identified. Of these, serine-121 showed significant changes in JE6.1 while only small changes in the Jgamma1 clone. Our data may contribute to the current human T cell phosphoproteome and provide a better understanding on T cell receptor signaling. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002871. PMID:26546556

  8. The Problems of Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Describes some problems of classroom dissection including the cruelty that animals destined for the laboratory suffer. Discusses the multilevel approach that the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) has developed to address the problems of animal dissection such as offering a dissection hotline, exhibiting at science teacher conferences, and…

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  10. Dynamic Adipocyte Phosphoproteome Reveals that Akt Directly Regulates mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Sean J.; Yang, Guang; Yang, Pengyi; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Yang, Jean Y.; James, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge of the post-genomics era is to define the connectivity of protein phosphorylation networks. Here, we quantitatively delineate the insulin signaling network in adipocytes by high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These data reveal the complexity of intracellular protein phosphorylation. We identified 37,248 phosphorylation sites on 5,705 proteins in this single-cell type, with approximately 15% responding to insulin. We integrated these large-scale phosphoproteomics data using a machine learning approach to predict physiological substrates of several diverse insulin-regulated kinases. This led to the identification of an Akt substrate, SIN1, a core component of the mTORC2 complex. The phosphorylation of SIN1 by Akt was found to regulate mTORC2 activity in response to growth factors, revealing topological insights into the Akt/mTOR signaling network. The dynamic phosphoproteome described here contains numerous phosphorylation sites on proteins involved in diverse molecular functions and should serve as a useful functional resource for cell biologists. PMID:23684622

  11. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals compensatory effects in the piriform cortex of VX nerve agent exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Wright, James D; Manda, Srikanth S; Zhong, Jun; Na, Chan Hyun; Meyerhoff, James; Benton, Bernard; Jabbour, Rabih; Willis, Kristen; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the toxicity induced by the nerve agent VX, an MS-based phosphoproteomic analysis was carried out on the piriform cortex region of brains from VX-treated rats. Using isobaric tag based TMT labeling followed by titanium dioxide enrichment strategy, we identified 9975 unique phosphosites derived from 3287 phosphoproteins. Temporal changes in the phosphorylation status of peptides were observed over a time period of 24 h in rats exposed to a 1× LD50, intravenous (i.v.) dose with the most notable changes occurring at the 1 h postexposure time point. Five major functional classes of proteins exhibited changes in their phosphorylation status: (i) ion channels/transporters, including ATPases, (ii) kinases/phosphatases, (iii) GTPases, (iv) structural proteins, and (v) transcriptional regulatory proteins. This study is the first quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of VX toxicity in the brain. Understanding the toxicity and compensatory signaling mechanisms will improve the understanding of the complex toxicity of VX in the brain and aid in the elucidation of novel molecular targets that would be important for development of improved countermeasures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001184 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001184). PMID:25403869

  12. ProteoConnections: a bioinformatics platform to facilitate proteome and phosphoproteome analyses.

    PubMed

    Courcelles, Mathieu; Lemieux, Sébastien; Voisin, Laure; Meloche, Sylvain; Thibault, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Novel and improved computational tools are required to transform large-scale proteomics data into valuable information of biological relevance. To this end, we developed ProteoConnections, a bioinformatics platform tailored to address the pressing needs of proteomics analyses. The primary focus of this platform is to organize peptide and protein identifications, evaluate the quality of the acquired data set, profile abundance changes, and accelerate data interpretation. Peptide and protein identifications are stored into a relational database to facilitate data mining and to evaluate the quality of data sets using graphical reports. We integrated databases of known PTMs and other bioinformatics tools to facilitate the analysis of phosphoproteomics data sets and to provide insights for subsequent biological validation experiments. Phosphorylation sites are also annotated according to kinase consensus motifs, contextual environment, protein domains, binding motifs, and evolutionary conservation across different species. The practical application of ProteoConnections is further demonstrated for the analysis of the phosphoproteomics data sets from rat intestinal IEC-6 cells where we identified 9615 phosphorylation sites on 2108 phosphoproteins. Combined proteomics and bioinformatics analyses revealed valuable biological insights on the regulation of phosphoprotein functions via the introduction of new binding sites on scaffold proteins or the modulation of protein-protein, protein-DNA, or protein-RNA interactions. Quantitative proteomics data can be integrated into ProteoConnections to determine the changes in protein phosphorylation under different cell stimulation conditions or kinase inhibitors, as demonstrated here for the MEK inhibitor PD184352. PMID:21630457

  13. Parallel Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analyses of Successive Stages of Maize Leaf Development[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Facette, Michelle R.; Shen, Zhouxin; Björnsdóttir, Fjola R.; Briggs, Steven P.; Smith, Laurie G.

    2013-01-01

    We performed large-scale, quantitative analyses of the maize (Zea mays) leaf proteome and phosphoproteome at four developmental stages. Exploiting the developmental gradient of maize leaves, we analyzed protein and phosphoprotein abundance as maize leaves transition from proliferative cell division to differentiation to cell expansion and compared these developing zones to one another and the mature leaf blade. Comparison of the proteomes and phosphoproteomes suggests a key role for posttranslational regulation in developmental transitions. Analysis of proteins with cell wall– and hormone-related functions illustrates the utility of the data set and provides further insight into maize leaf development. We compare phosphorylation sites identified here to those previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. We also discuss instances where comparison of phosphorylated and unmodified peptides from a particular protein indicates tissue-specific phosphorylation. For example, comparison of unmodified and phosphorylated forms of PINFORMED1 (PIN1) suggests a tissue-specific difference in phosphorylation, which correlates with changes in PIN1 polarization in epidermal cells during development. Together, our data provide insights into regulatory processes underlying maize leaf development and provide a community resource cataloging the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of maize proteins at four leaf developmental stages. PMID:23933881

  14. Localization of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in dissected organs of its psyllid vector Diaphorina citri using fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vector interactions of huanglongbing (HLB) disease with its psyllid vectors, particularly at the organ and cellular levels, are poorly understood. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) for the localization of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), associat...

  15. Versatile nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics: a review.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Fahmida; Hussain, Dilshad; Saeed, Adeela; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2012-10-17

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. Phosphorylated peptides are present in low abundance in blood serum but play a vital role in regulatory mechanisms and may serve as casual factors in diseases. The enrichment and analysis of phosphorylated peptides directly from human serum and mapping the phosphorylation sites is a challenging task. Versatile nanocomposites of different materials have been synthesized using simple but efficient methodologies for their enrichment. The nanocomposites include magnetic, coated, embedded as well as chemically derivatized materials. Different base materials such as polymers, carbon based and metal oxides are used. The comparison of nanocomposites with respective nanoparticles provides sufficient facts about their efficiency in terms of loading capacity and capture efficiency. The cost for preparing them is low and they hold great promise to be used as chromatographic materials for phosphopeptide enrichment. This review gives an overview of different nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics, discussing the improved efficiency than the individual counterparts and highlighting their significance in phosphopeptide enrichment. PMID:22986130

  16. Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Endometrium in Women with or without Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Mei; Deng, Hai-Teng; Liu, Chong-Dong; Chen, Yu-Ling; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The molecular mechanisms underlying the endometriosis are still not completely understood. In order to test the hypothesis that the approaches in phosphoproteomics might contribute to the identification of key biomarkers to assess disease pathogenesis and drug targets, we carried out a phosphoproteomics analysis of human endometrium. Methods: A large-scale differential phosphoproteome analysis, using peptide enrichment of titanium dioxide purify and sequential elution from immobilized metal affinity chromatography with linear trap quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry, was performed in endometrium tissues from 8 women with or without endometriosis. Results: The phosphorylation profiling of endometrium from endometriosis patients had been obtained, and found that identified 516 proteins were modified at phosphorylation level during endometriosis. Gene ontology annotation analysis showed that these proteins were enriched in cellular processes of binding and catalytic activity. Further pathway analysis showed that ribosome pathway and focal adhesion pathway were the top two pathways, which might be deregulated during the development of endometriosis. Conclusions: That large-scale phosphoproteome quantification has been successfully identified in endometrium tissues of women with or without endometriosis will provide new insights to understand the molecular mechanisms of the development of endometriosis. PMID:26415800

  17. High-throughput phosphoproteomics reveals in vivo insulin signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Sean J; Azimifar, S Babak; Mann, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Mass spectrometry has enabled the study of cellular signaling on a systems-wide scale, through the quantification of post-translational modifications, such as protein phosphorylation. Here we describe EasyPhos, a scalable phosphoproteomics platform that now allows rapid quantification of hundreds of phosphoproteomes in diverse cells and tissues at a depth of >10,000 sites. We apply this technology to generate time-resolved maps of insulin signaling in the mouse liver. Our results reveal that insulin affects ~10% of the liver phosphoproteome and that many known functional phosphorylation sites, and an even larger number of unknown sites, are modified at very early time points (<15 s after insulin delivery). Our kinetic data suggest that the flow of signaling information from the cell surface to the nucleus can occur on very rapid timescales of less than 1 min in vivo. EasyPhos facilitates high-throughput phosphoproteomics studies, which should improve our understanding of dynamic cell signaling networks and how they are regulated and dysregulated in disease. PMID:26280412

  18. Hippocampal phosphoproteomics of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Hu, Shijie; Huang, Hanlin; Ichihara, Gaku

    2015-01-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and human. To identify phosphorylated modification on the unrecognized post-translational modifications of proteins and investigate their role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, changes in hippocampal phosphoprotein expression levels were analyzed quantitatively in male F344 rats exposed to 1-BP inhalation at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks. Hippocampal protein extracts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by Pro-Q Diamond gel staining and SYPRO Ruby staining coupled with two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively, as well as by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify phosphoproteins. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by Manganese II (Mn{sup 2+})-Phos-tag SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Bax and cytochrome c protein levels were determined by western blotting. Pro-Q Diamond gel staining combined with 2D-DIGE identified 26 phosphoprotein spots (p < 0.05), and MALDI-TOF/MS identified 18 up-regulated proteins and 8 down-regulated proteins. These proteins are involved in the biological process of response to stimuli, metabolic processes, and apoptosis signaling. Changes in the expression of phosphorylated 14-3-3 θ were further confirmed by Mn{sup 2+}-Phos-tag SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed overexpression of Bax protein in the mitochondria with down-regulation in the cytoplasm, whereas cytochrome c expression was high in the cytoplasm but low in the mitochondria after 1-BP exposure. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process. Phosphoproteins identified in this study can potentially serve as biomarkers for 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • 1-BP modified hippocampal phosphoproteome in rat and 23 altered proteins were identified. • 1-BP changed phosphorylation of GRP78, 14-3-3 θ, PSMC3, ST13, PURA, GNB2, APOE, PEA15 and ATP5H. • 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process.

  19. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  20. Battle through signaling between wheat and the fungal pathogen Septoria tritici revealed by proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fen; Melo-Braga, Marcella N; Larsen, Martin R; Jørgensen, Hans J L; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    The fungus Septoria tritici causes the disease septoria tritici blotch in wheat, one of the most economically devastating foliar diseases in this crop. To investigate signaling events and defense responses in the wheat-S. tritici interaction, we performed a time-course study of S. tritici infection in resistant and susceptible wheat using quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics, with special emphasis on the initial biotrophic phase of interactions. Our study revealed an accumulation of defense and stress-related proteins, suppression of photosynthesis, and changes in sugar metabolism during compatible and incompatible interactions. However, differential regulation of the phosphorylation status of signaling proteins, transcription and translation regulators, and membrane-associated proteins was observed between two interactions. The proteomic data were correlated with a more rapid or stronger accumulation of signal molecules, including calcium, H2O2, NO, and sugars, in the resistant than in the susceptible cultivar in response to the infection. Additionally, 31 proteins and 5 phosphoproteins from the pathogen were identified, including metabolic proteins and signaling proteins such as GTP-binding proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and calcium-binding proteins. Quantitative PCR analysis showed the expression of fungal signaling genes and genes encoding a superoxide dismutase and cell-wall degrading enzymes. These results indicate roles of signaling, antioxidative stress mechanisms, and nutrient acquisition in facilitating the initial symptomless growth. Taken in its entirety, our dataset suggests interplay between the plant and S. tritici through complex signaling networks and downstream molecular events. Resistance is likely related to several rapidly and intensively triggered signal transduction cascades resulting in a multiple-level activation of transcription and translation processes of defense responses. Our sensitive approaches and model provide a comprehensive (phospho)proteomics resource for studying signaling from the point of view of both host and pathogen during a plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:23722186

  1. Genetic Dissection of Quantitative Trait Loci for Hemostasis and Thrombosis on Mouse Chromosomes 11 and 5 Using Congenic and Subcongenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Sa, Qila; Huang, Menggui; Grondolsky, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility to thrombosis varies in human populations as well as many inbred mouse strains. Only a small portion of this variation has been identified, suggesting that there are unknown modifier genes. The objective of this study was to narrow the quantitative trait locus (QTL) intervals previously identified for hemostasis and thrombosis on mouse distal chromosome 11 (Hmtb6) and on chromosome 5 (Hmtb4 and Hmtb5). In a tail bleeding/rebleeding assay, a reporter assay for hemostasis and thrombosis, subcongenic strain (6A-2) had longer clot stability time than did C57BL/6J (B6) mice but a similar time to the B6-Chr11A/J consomic mice, confirming the Hmtb6 phenotype. Six congenic and subcongenic strains were constructed for chromosome 5, and the congenic strain, 2A-1, containing the shortest A/J interval (16.6 cM, 26.6 Mbp) in the Hmtb4 region, had prolonged clot stability time compared to B6 mice. In the 3A-2 and CSS-5 mice bleeding time was shorter than for B6, mice confirming the Hmtb5 QTL. An increase in bleeding time was identified in another congenic strain (3A-1) with A/J interval (24.8 cM, 32.9 Mbp) in the proximal region of chromosome 5, confirming a QTL for bleeding previously mapped to that region and designated as Hmtb10. The subcongenic strain 4A-2 with the A/J fragment in the proximal region had a long occlusion time of the carotid artery after ferric chloride injury and reduced dilation after injury to the abdominal aorta compared to B6 mice, suggesting an additional locus in the proximal region, which was designated Hmtb11 (5 cM, 21.4 Mbp). CSS-17 mice crossed with congenic strains, 3A-1 and 3A-2, modified tail bleeding. Using congenic and subcongenic analysis, candidate genes previously identified and novel genes were identified as modifiers of hemostasis and thrombosis in each of the loci Hmtb6, Hmtb4, Hmtb10, and Hmtb11. PMID:24147020

  2. Data set from a comprehensive phosphoproteomic analysis of rice variety IRBB5 in response to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Qiu, Jiehua; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Shiwen; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) has become one of the most devastating diseases for rice, a major food source for over half of the world populations. To investigate the roles of protein phosphorylation in rice bacterial blight resistance, a quantitative phosphoproteomic study was conducted in rice variety IRBB5 at 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection. 2367 and 2223 phosphosites on 1334 and 1297 representative proteins were identified in 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection, respectively, out of which 762 proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated. In associated with the published article "A comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of rice in response to bacterial blight" in BMC Plant Biology (Hou et al., 2015) [1], this dataset article provided the detailed information of experimental designing, methods, features as well as the raw data of mass spectrometry (MS) identification. The MS proteomics data could be fully accessed from the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD002222. PMID:26862573

  3. Technologies and challenges in large-scale phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Larsen, Martin R

    2013-03-01

    Phosphorylation, the reversible addition of a phosphate group to amino acid side chains of proteins, is a fundamental regulator of protein activity, stability, and molecular interactions. Most cellular processes, such as inter- and intracellular signaling, protein synthesis, degradation, and apoptosis, rely on phosphorylation. This PTM is thus involved in many diseases, rendering localization and assessment of extent of phosphorylation of major scientific interest. MS-based phosphoproteomics, which aims at describing all phosphorylation sites in a specific type of cell, tissue, or organism, has become the main technique for discovery and characterization of phosphoproteins in a nonhypothesis driven fashion. In this review, we describe methods for state-of-the-art MS-based analysis of protein phosphorylation as well as the strategies employed in large-scale phosphoproteomic experiments with focus on the various challenges and limitations this field currently faces. PMID:23404676

  4. Phosphoproteomics Study Based on In Vivo Inhibition Reveals Sites of Calmodulin‐Dependent Protein Kinase II Regulation in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Arjen; Preisinger, Christian; Corradini, Eleonora; Bourgonje, Vincent J.; Hennrich, Marco L.; van Veen, Toon A. B.; Swaminathan, Paari D.; Joiner, Mei‐Ling; Vos, Marc A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The multifunctional Ca2+‐ and calmodulin‐dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a crucial mediator of cardiac physiology and pathology. Increased expression and activation of CaMKII has been linked to elevated risk for arrhythmic events and is a hallmark of human heart failure. A useful approach to determining CaMKII's role therein is large‐scale analysis of phosphorylation events by mass spectrometry. However, current large‐scale phosphoproteomics approaches have proved inadequate for high‐fidelity identification of kinase‐specific roles. The purpose of this study was to develop a phosphoproteomics approach to specifically identify CaMKII's downstream effects in cardiac tissue. Methods and Results To identify putative downstream CaMKII targets in cardiac tissue, animals with myocardial‐delimited expression of the specific peptide inhibitor of CaMKII (AC3‐I) or an inactive control (AC3‐C) were compared using quantitative phosphoproteomics. The hearts were isolated after isoproterenol injection to induce CaMKII activation downstream of β‐adrenergic receptor agonist stimulation. Enriched phosphopeptides from AC3‐I and AC3‐C mice were differentially quantified using stable isotope dimethyl labeling, strong cation exchange chromatography and high‐resolution LC‐MS/MS. Phosphorylation levels of several hundred sites could be profiled, including 39 phosphoproteins noticeably affected by AC3‐I‐mediated CaMKII inhibition. Conclusions Our data set included known CaMKII substrates, as well as several new candidate proteins involved in functions not previously implicated in CaMKII signaling. PMID:23926118

  5. Global impact of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-secreted effectors on the host phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Imami, Koshi; Bhavsar, Amit P; Yu, Hongbing; Brown, Nat F; Rogers, Lindsay D; Finlay, B Brett; Foster, Leonard J

    2013-06-01

    During the late stages of infection, Salmonella secretes numerous effectors through a type III secretion system that is encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2). Despite the importance of SPI2 as a major virulence factor leading to the systemic spread of the bacteria and diseases, a global view of its effects on host responses is still lacking. Here, we measured global impacts of SPI2 effectors on the host phosphorylation and protein expression levels in RAW264.7 and in HeLa cells, as macrophage and nonphagocytic models of infection. We observe that SPI2 effectors differentially modulate the host phosphoproteome and cellular processes (e.g. protein trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation, and immune signaling) in a host cell-dependent manner. Our unbiased approach reveals the involvement of many previously unrecognized proteins, including E3 ligases (HERC4, RanBP2, and RAD18), kinases (CDK, SIK3, and WNK1), and histones (H2B1F, H4, and H15), in late stages of Salmonella infection. Furthermore, from this phosphoproteome analysis and other quantitative screens, we identified HSP27 as a direct in vitro and in vivo molecular target of the only type III secreted kinase, SteC. Using biochemical and cell biological assays, we demonstrate that SteC phosphorylates multiple sites in HSP27 and induces actin rearrangement through this protein. Together, these results provide a broader landscape of host players contributing to specific processes/pathways mediated by SPI2 effectors than was previously appreciated. PMID:23459991

  6. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Early Signaling Events in the Osmotic Stress Response1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    E. Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating how plants sense and respond to water loss is important for identifying genetic and chemical interventions that may help sustain crop yields in water-limiting environments. Currently, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initial perception and response to dehydration are not well understood. Modern mass spectrometric methods for quantifying changes in the phosphoproteome provide an opportunity to identify key phosphorylation events involved in this process. Here, we have used both untargeted and targeted isotope-assisted mass spectrometric methods of phosphopeptide quantitation to characterize proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) whose degree of phosphorylation is rapidly altered by hyperosmotic treatment. Thus, protein phosphorylation events responsive to 5 min of 0.3 m mannitol treatment were first identified using 15N metabolic labeling and untargeted mass spectrometry with a high-resolution ion-trap instrument. The results from these discovery experiments were then validated using targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry with a triple quadrupole. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring experiments were conducted with plants treated under nine different environmental perturbations to determine whether the phosphorylation changes were specific for osmosignaling or involved cross talk with other signaling pathways. The results indicate that regulatory proteins such as members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family are specifically phosphorylated in response to osmotic stress. Proteins involved in 5′ messenger RNA decapping and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate synthesis were also identified as targets of dehydration-induced phosphoregulation. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of targeted phosphoproteomic analysis in understanding protein regulation networks and provide new insight into cellular processes involved in the osmotic stress response. PMID:24808101

  7. The use of elemental mass spectrometry in phosphoproteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Maes, Evelyne; Tirez, Kristof; Baggerman, Geert; Valkenborg, Dirk; Schoofs, Liliane; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Mertens, Inge

    2016-05-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications in mammalian cells. Because this molecular switch is an important mechanism that diversifies and regulates proteins in cellular processes, knowledge about the extent and quantity of phosphorylation is very important to understand the complex cellular interplay. Although phosphoproteomics strategies are applied worldwide, they mainly include only molecular mass spectrometry (like MALDI or ESI)-based experiments. Although identification and relative quantification of phosphopeptides is straightforward with these techniques, absolute quantification is more complex and usually requires for specific isotopically phosphopeptide standards. However, the use of elemental mass spectrometry, and in particular inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in phosphoproteomics-based experiments, allow one to absolutely quantify phosphopeptides. Here, these phosphoproteomic applications with ICP-MS as elemental detector are reviewed. Pioneering work and recent developments in the field are both described. Additionally, the advantage of the parallel use of molecular and elemental mass spectrometry is stressed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:350-360, 2016. PMID:25139451

  8. Improvement of phosphoproteome analyses using FAIMS and decision tree fragmentation. application to the insulin signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bridon, Gaëlle; Bonneil, Eric; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    This report examines the analytical benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) coupled to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for phosphoproteomics analyses. The ability of FAIMS to separate multiply charged peptide ions from chemical interferences confers a unique advantage in phosphoproteomics by enhancing the detection of low abundance phosphopeptides. LC-FAIMS-MS experiments performed on TiO(2)-enriched tryptic digests from Drosophila melanogaster provided a 50% increase in phosphopeptide identification compared to conventional LC-MS analysis. Also, FAIMS can be used to select different population of multiply charged phosphopeptide ions prior to their activation with either collision activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Importantly, FAIMS enabled the resolution of coeluting phosphoisomers of different abundances to facilitate their unambiguous identification using conventional database search engines. The benefits of FAIMS in large-scale phosphoproteomics of D. melanogaster are further investigated using label-free quantitation to identify differentially regulated phosphoproteins in response to insulin stimulation. PMID:22059388

  9. Development of a Tandem Affinity Phosphoproteomic Method with Motif Selectivity and its Application in Analysis of Signal Transduction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Laura E.; Grant, Kyle G.; Blackburn, Kevin; Haugh, Jason M.; Goshe, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is involved in regulating many signaling pathways. Of particular interest are the growth factor mediated Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways which, if misregulated, can contribute to the progression of cancer. Phosphoproteomic methods have been developed to study regulation of signaling pathways; however, due to the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation, understanding these pathways is still a challenge. In this study, we have developed a multi-dimensional method incorporating electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with tandem IMAC-TiO2 enrichment for subsequent phosphopeptide identification by LC/MS/MS. We applied this method to PDGF-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells to provide over 11,000 unique phosphopeptide identifications. Upon motif analysis, IMAC was found to enrich for basophilic kinase substrates while the subsequent TiO2 step enriched for acidophilic kinase substrates, suggesting that both enrichment methods are necessary to capture the full complement of kinase substrates. Biological functions that were over-represented at each PDGF stimulation time point, together with the phosphorylation dynamics of several phosphopeptides containing known kinase phosphorylation sites illustrate the feasibility of this approach in quantitative phosphoproteomic studies. PMID:25777480

  10. Phosphoproteome Profiling of the Macrophage Response to Different Toll-Like Receptor Ligands Identifies Differences in Global Phosphorylation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are among the first sensors that detect infection and drive immune response. Macrophages encountering a pathogen are usually stimulated not by one TLR, but by a combination of TLRs engaged by distinct microbe ligands. To understand the integrated signaling under complex conditions, we investigated the differences in the phosphoprotein signaling cascades triggered by TLR2, TLR4, and TLR7 ligands using a single responding cell population. We performed a global, quantitative, early poststimulation kinetic analysis of the mouse macrophage phosphoproteome using stable isotope labeling with amino acids coupled to phosphopeptide enrichment and high-resolution mass spectrometry. For each TLR ligand, we found marked elevation of phosphorylation of cytoskeleton components, GTPases of the Rho family, and phospholipase C signaling pathway proteins. Phosphorylation of proteins involved in phagocytosis was only seen in response to TLR2 and TLR4 but not to TLR7 activation. Changes in the phosphorylation of proteins involved in endocytosis were delayed in response to TLR2 as compared to TLR4 ligands. These findings reveal that the phosphoproteomic response to stimulation of distinct TLRs varies both in the major modification targets and the phosphorylation dynamics. These results advance the understanding of how macrophages sense and respond to a diverse set of TLR stimuli. PMID:24941444

  11. Phosphoproteome exploration reveals a reformatting of cellular processes in response to low sterol biosynthetic capacity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Dimitri; Gallien, Sebastien; Compagnon, Vincent; Berna, Anne; Suzuki, Masashi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schaeffer, Christine; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2012-02-01

    Sterols are membrane-bound isoprenoid lipids that are required for cell viability and growth. In plants, it is generally assumed that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA-reductase (HMGR) is a key element of their biosynthesis, but the molecular regulation of that pathway is largely unknown. In an attempt to identify regulators of the biosynthetic flux from acyl-CoA toward phytosterols, we compared the membrane phosphoproteome of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and of a mutant being deficient in HMGR1. We performed a N-terminal labeling of microsomal peptides with a trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) derivative, followed by a quantitative assessment of phosphopeptides with a spectral counting method. TMPP derivatization of peptides resulted in an improved LC-MS/MS detection due to increased hydrophobicity in chromatography and ionization efficiency in electrospray. The phosphoproteome coverage was 40% higher with this methodology. We further found that 31 proteins were in a different phosphorylation state in the hmgr1-1 mutant as compared with the wild-type. One-third of these proteins were identified based on novel phosphopeptides. This approach revealed that phosphorylation changes in the Arabidopsis membrane proteome targets major cellular processes such as transports, calcium homeostasis, photomorphogenesis, and carbohydrate synthesis. A reformatting of these processes appears to be a response of a genetically reduced sterol biosynthesis. PMID:22182420

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis of induced resistance reveals activation of signal transduction processes by beneficial and pathogenic interaction in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Perazzolli, Michele; Palmieri, Maria Cristina; Matafora, Vittoria; Bachi, Angela; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-05-20

    Protein phosphorylation regulates several key processes of the plant immune system. Protein kinases and phosphatases are pivotal regulators of defense mechanisms elicited by resistance inducers. However, the phosphorylation cascades that trigger the induced resistance mechanisms in plants have not yet been deeply investigated. The beneficial fungus Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) induces resistance against grapevine downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola), but its efficacy could be further improved by a better understanding of the cellular regulations involved. We investigated quantitative changes in the grapevine phosphoproteome during T39-induced resistance to get an overview of regulatory mechanisms of downy mildew resistance. Immunodetection experiments revealed activation of the 45 and 49kDa kinases by T39 treatment both before and after pathogen inoculation, and the phosphoproteomic analysis identified 103 phosphopeptides that were significantly affected by the phosphorylation cascades during T39-induced resistance. Peptides affected by T39 treatment showed comparable phosphorylation levels after P. viticola inoculation, indicating activation of the microbial recognition machinery before pathogen infection. Phosphorylation profiles of proteins related to photosynthetic processes and protein ubiquitination indicated a partial overlap of cellular responses in T39-treated and control plants. However, phosphorylation changes of proteins involved in response to stimuli, signal transduction, hormone signaling, gene expression regulation, and RNA metabolism were exclusively elicited by P. viticola inoculation in T39-treated plants. These results highlighted the relevance of phosphorylation changes during T39-induced resistance and identified key regulator candidates of the grapevine defense against downy mildew. PMID:27010348

  13. Parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Crockett, Thomas W.; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Binary dissection is widely used to partition non-uniform domains over parallel computers. This algorithm does not consider the perimeter, surface area, or aspect ratio of the regions being generated and can yield decompositions that have poor communication to computation ratio. Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm in which each cut is chosen to minimize load + lambda x(shape). In a 2 (or 3) dimensional problem, load is the amount of computation to be performed in a subregion and shape could refer to the perimeter (respectively surface) of that subregion. Shape is a measure of communication overhead and the parameter permits us to trade off load imbalance against communication overhead. When A is zero, the algorithm reduces to plain binary dissection. This algorithm can be used to partition graphs embedded in 2 or 3-d. Load is the number of nodes in a subregion, shape the number of edges that leave that subregion, and lambda the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. An algorithm is presented that finds the depth d parametric dissection of an embedded graph with n vertices and e edges in O(max(n log n, de)) time, which is an improvement over the O(dn log n) time of plain binary dissection. Parallel versions of this algorithm are also presented; the best of these requires O((n/p) log(sup 3)p) time on a p processor hypercube, assuming graphs of bounded degree. How PBD is applied to 3-d unstructured meshes and yields partitions that are better than those obtained by plain dissection is described. Its application to the color image quantization problem is also discussed, in which samples in a high-resolution color space are mapped onto a lower resolution space in a way that minimizes the color error.

  14. Is dissection humane?

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tabinda

    2011-01-01

    Dissection is being jeopardized in the modern medical education. It has unrelentingly faced the lashes of time and has been the scapegoat for numerous convenient curricula reforms and subjective biases. The cadaver is unparallel in establishing core knowledge among the medical community and it needs to be appreciated in a new light in the cyber anatomy realm of today. This article elucidates the medical and ethical validity of continuing human body dissection in medicine which outweighs all the prejudices associated with it. PMID:23908746

  15. Is dissection humane?

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tabinda

    2011-01-01

    Dissection is being jeopardized in the modern medical education. It has unrelentingly faced the lashes of time and has been the scapegoat for numerous convenient curricula reforms and subjective biases. The cadaver is unparallel in establishing core knowledge among the medical community and it needs to be appreciated in a new light in the "cyber anatomy" realm of today. This article elucidates the medical and ethical validity of continuing human body dissection in medicine which outweighs all the prejudices associated with it. PMID:23908746

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Tissue Samples by Combining iTRAQ Isobaric Labeling with Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is an indispensible technique used in the discovery and quantification of phosphorylation events on proteins in biological samples. The application of this technique to tissue samples is especially useful for the discovery of biomarkers as well as biological studies. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM/MRM-based quantitation to develop a strategy for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers using tissue samples. PMID:26584920

  17. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  18. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American

  19. Doing without Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    1992-01-01

    Both the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) have issued position statements on the use of animals in the classroom. Dissection has not become extinct, but its role is far smaller than it used to be. (MLF)

  20. Discovery of O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate Modified Proteins in Large-scale Phosphoproteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylated O-GlcNAc is a novel post-translational modification that has so far only been found on the neuronal protein AP180 from the rat (Graham et al., J. Proteome Res. 2011, 10, 2725–2733). Upon collision induced dissociation, the modification generates a highly mass deficient fragment ion (m/z 284.0530) that can be used as a reporter for the identification of phosphorylated O-GlcNAc. Using a publically available mouse brain phosphoproteome data set, we employed our recently developed Oscore software to re-evaluate high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectra and discovered the modification on 23 peptides corresponding to 11 mouse proteins. The systematic analysis of 220 candidate phosphoGlcNAc tandem mass spectra as well as a synthetic standard enabled the dissection of the major phosphoGlcNAc fragmentation pathways, suggesting that the modification is O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate. We find that the classical O-GlcNAc modification often exists on the same peptides indicating that O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate may biosynthetically arise in two steps involving the O-GlcNAc transferase and a currently unknown kinase. Many of the identified proteins are involved in synaptic transmission and for Ca2+/calmodulin kinase IV, the O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate modification was found in the vicinity of two autophosphorylation sites required for full activation of the kinase suggesting a potential regulatory role for O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate. By re-analyzing mass spectrometric data from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, our study also identified Zinc finger protein 462 (ZNF462) as the first human O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate modified protein. Collectively, the data suggests that O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate is a general post-translation modification of mammalian proteins with a variety of possible cellular functions. PMID:22826440

  1. Systematic Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Networks From Phosphoproteomic Data*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunxia; Ye, Mingliang; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Jiang, Xinning; Han, Guanghui; Songyang, Zhou; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, hundreds of protein kinases (PKs) specifically and precisely modify thousands of substrates at specific amino acid residues to faithfully orchestrate numerous biological processes, and reversibly determine the cellular dynamics and plasticity. Although over 100,000 phosphorylation sites (p-sites) have been experimentally identified from phosphoproteomic studies, the regulatory PKs for most of these sites still remain to be characterized. Here, we present a novel software package of iGPS for the prediction of in vivo site-specific kinase-substrate relations mainly from the phosphoproteomic data. By critical evaluations and comparisons, the performance of iGPS is satisfying and better than other existed tools. Based on the prediction results, we modeled protein phosphorylation networks and observed that the eukaryotic phospho-regulation is poorly conserved at the site and substrate levels. With an integrative procedure, we conducted a large-scale phosphorylation analysis of human liver and experimentally identified 9719 p-sites in 2998 proteins. Using iGPS, we predicted a human liver protein phosphorylation networks containing 12,819 potential site-specific kinase-substrate relations among 350 PKs and 962 substrates for 2633 p-sites. Further statistical analysis and comparison revealed that 127 PKs significantly modify more or fewer p-sites in the liver protein phosphorylation networks against the whole human protein phosphorylation network. The largest data set of the human liver phosphoproteome together with computational analyses can be useful for further experimental consideration. This work contributes to the understanding of phosphorylation mechanisms at the systemic level, and provides a powerful methodology for the general analysis of in vivo post-translational modifications regulating sub-proteomes. PMID:22798277

  2. Neck dissections: radical to conservative

    PubMed Central

    Harish, K

    2005-01-01

    Background Neck dissection is an important surgical procedure for the management of metastatic nodal disease in the neck. The gold standard of neck nodal management has been the radical neck dissection. Any modification in the neck dissection is always compared with this standard. Over the last few decades, in order to alleviate the morbidity of radical neck dissection, several modifications and conservative procedures have been advocated. These procedures retain certain lymphatic or non-lymphatic structures and have been shown not to compromise oncological safety. Methods A literature search of the Medline was carried out for all articles on neck dissections. The articles were systematically reviewed to analyze and trace the evolution of neck dissection. These were then categorized to address the nomenclature, management of node positive and node negative neck including those who had received chemoradiation. Results The present article discusses the neck nodal nomenclature, the radical neck dissection, its modifications and migration to more conservative procedures and possible advances in the near future. Conclusion Radical neck dissection is now replaced with modified radical neck dissections in most situations. Attempts are being made to replace modified radical neck dissections with selective neck dissections for early node positivity. Sentinel node biopsy is being studied to address the issue of node negative neck. More conservative surgeries are likely to replace the 'radical' surgeries of bygone era. This process is facilitated by earlier detection of the disease and better understanding of cancer biology. PMID:15836786

  3. A shotgun phosphoproteomics analysis of embryos in germinated maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Cong; Meng, Ling-Bo; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Liu, Gui-Feng; Liu, Guan-Jun; Ma, Wei; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2008-11-01

    To better understand the role that reversible protein phosphorylation plays in seed germination, we initiated a phosphoproteomic investigation of embryos of germinated maize seeds. A total of 776 proteins including 39 kinases, 16 phosphatases, and 33 phosphoproteins containing 36 precise in vivo phosphorylation sites were identified. All the phosphorylation sites identified, with the exception of the phosphorylation site on HSP22, have not been reported previously (Lund et al. in J Biol Chem, 276, 29924-29929, 2001). Assayed with QRT-PCR, the transcripts of ten kinase genes were found to be dramatically up-regulated during seed germination and those of four phosphatase genes were up-regulated after germination, which indicated that reversible protein phosphorylation occurred and complex regulating networks were activated during this period. At least one-third of these phosphoproteins are key components involved in biological processes which relate to seed germination, such as DNA repair, gene transcription, RNA splicing and protein translation, suggesting that protein phosphorylation plays an important role in seed germination. As far as we know, this is the first phosphoproteomic study on a monocot and it will lay a solid foundation for further study of the molecular mechanisms of seed germination and seedling development. PMID:18726113

  4. Phosphopeptide enrichment using offline titanium dioxide columns for phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Identification of phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides as cancer biomarkers is an emerging field in phosphoproteomics. Owing to the low stoichiometric nature of protein phosphorylation, phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides must be enriched prior to downstream mass spectrometry analysis. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been prevalently used to enrich phosphopeptides from complex proteome samples due to its high affinity for phosphopeptides, and the method is straightforward. In this protocol, an offline phosphopeptide enrichment procedure using TiO2 columns is described. Peptides from a proteome lysate are loaded onto a TiO2 column in an acidic environment, followed by column washing with aqueous, organic, and ammonium glutamate (NH4Glu) buffers at acidic conditions. Phosphopeptides are eluted using an ammonia solution at high pH. Use of NH4Glu significantly reduces nonspecific bindings while a high recovery rate (84 %) of phosphopeptides is retained. The method is optimized for large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis and phosphoprotein biomarker discovery starting from sub-milligram or milligrams of proteome samples. PMID:23625397

  5. Search Databases and Statistics: Pitfalls and Best Practices in Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Refsgaard, Jan C; Munk, Stephanie; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometric instrumentation in the past 15 years have resulted in an explosion in the raw data yield from typical phosphoproteomics workflows. This poses the challenge of confidently identifying peptide sequences, localizing phosphosites to proteins and quantifying these from the vast amounts of raw data. This task is tackled by computational tools implementing algorithms that match the experimental data to databases, providing the user with lists for downstream analysis. Several platforms for such automated interpretation of mass spectrometric data have been developed, each having strengths and weaknesses that must be considered for the individual needs. These are reviewed in this chapter. Equally critical for generating highly confident output datasets is the application of sound statistical criteria to limit the inclusion of incorrect peptide identifications from database searches. Additionally, careful filtering and use of appropriate statistical tests on the output datasets affects the quality of all downstream analyses and interpretation of the data. Our considerations and general practices on these aspects of phosphoproteomics data processing are presented here. PMID:26584936

  6. Breast Cancer Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  7. Plug-and-play analysis of the human phosphoproteome by targeted high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Robert T; Searle, Brian C; Llovet, Ariadna; Villén, Judit

    2016-05-01

    Systematic approaches to studying cellular signaling require phosphoproteomic techniques that reproducibly measure the same phosphopeptides across multiple replicates, conditions, and time points. Here we present a method to mine information from large-scale, heterogeneous phosphoproteomics data sets to rapidly generate robust targeted mass spectrometry (MS) assays. We demonstrate the performance of our method by interrogating the IGF-1/AKT signaling pathway, showing that even rarely observed phosphorylation events can be consistently detected and precisely quantified. PMID:27018578

  8. Phosphoproteome dynamics upon changes in plant water status reveal early events associated with rapid growth adjustment in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Ludovic; Valot, Benoît; Tardieu, François; Zivy, Michel

    2012-10-01

    Plant growth adjustment during water deficit is a crucial adaptive response. The rapid fine-tuned control achieved at the post-translational level is believed to be of considerable importance for regulating early changes in plant growth reprogramming. Aiming at a better understanding of early responses to contrasting plant water statuses, we carried out a survey of the protein phosphorylation events in the growing zone of maize leaves upon a range of water regimes. In this study, the impact of mild and severe water deficits were evaluated in comparison with constant optimal watering and with recovery periods lasting 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min. Using four biological replicates per treatment and a robust quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology based on stable-isotope labeling, we identified 3664 unique phosphorylation sites on 2496 proteins. The abundance of nearly 1250 phosphorylated peptides was reproducibly quantified and profiled with high confidence among treatments. A total of 138 phosphopeptides displayed highly significant changes according to water regimes and enabled to identify specific patterns of response to changing plant water statuses. Further quantification of protein amounts emphasized that most phosphorylation changes did not reflect protein abundance variation. During water deficit and recovery, extensive changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators directly or indirectly involved in plant growth and development. These included proteins influencing epigenetic control, gene expression, cell cycle-dependent processes and phytohormone-mediated responses. Some of the changes depended on stress intensity whereas others depended on rehydration duration, including rapid recoveries that occurred as early as 5 or 10 mins after rewatering. By combining a physiological approach and a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis, this work provides new insights into the in vivo early phosphorylation events triggered by rapid changes in plant water status, and their possible involvement in plant growth-related processes. PMID:22787273

  9. Mechanisms of Soybean Roots' Tolerances to Salinity Revealed by Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparisons Between Two Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pi, Erxu; Qu, Liqun; Hu, Jianwen; Huang, Yingying; Qiu, Lijuan; Lu, Hongfei; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Cong; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Huizhong; Tsai, Sau-Na; Ngai, Saiming; Du, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying plant salinity tolerance provides valuable knowledgebase for effective crop improvement through genetic engineering. Current proteomic technologies, which support reliable and high-throughput analyses, have been broadly used for exploring sophisticated molecular networks in plants. In the current study, we compared phosphoproteomic and proteomic changes in roots of different soybean seedlings of a salt-tolerant cultivar (Wenfeng07) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (Union85140) induced by salt stress. The root samples of Wenfeng07 and Union85140 at three-trifoliate stage were collected at 0 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 4 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after been treated with 150 mm NaCl. LC-MS/MS based phosphoproteomic analysis of these samples identified a total of 2692 phosphoproteins and 5509 phosphorylation sites. Of these, 2344 phosphoproteins containing 3744 phosphorylation sites were quantitatively analyzed. Our results showed that 1163 phosphorylation sites were differentially phosphorylated in the two compared cultivars. Among them, 10 MYB/MYB transcription factor like proteins were identified with fluctuating phosphorylation modifications at different time points, indicating that their crucial roles in regulating flavonol accumulation might be mediated by phosphorylated modifications. In addition, the protein expression profiles of these two cultivars were compared using LC MS/MS based shotgun proteomic analysis, and expression pattern of all the 89 differentially expressed proteins were independently confirmed by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, the enzymes involved in chalcone metabolic pathway exhibited positive correlations with salt tolerance. We confirmed the functional relevance of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes using soybean composites and Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, and found that their salt tolerance were positively regulated by chalcone synthase, but was negatively regulated by chalcone isomerase and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase. A novel salt tolerance pathway involving chalcone metabolism, mostly mediated by phosphorylated MYB transcription factors, was proposed based on our findings. (The mass spectrometry raw data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002856). PMID:26407991

  10. In-depth phosphoproteomic analysis of royal jelly derived from western and eastern honeybee species.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Lu, Xiaoshan; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2014-12-01

    The proteins in royal jelly (RJ) play a pivotal role in the nutrition, immune defense, and cast determination of honeybee larvae and have a wide range of pharmacological and health-promoting functions for humans as well. Although the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in protein function is known, investigation of protein phosphorylation of RJ proteins is still very limited. To this end, two complementary phosphopeptide enrichment materials (Ti(4+)-IMAC and TiO2) and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry were applied to establish a detailed phosphoproteome map and to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the phosphoproteomes of RJ produced by Apis mellifera ligustica (Aml) and Apis cerana cerana (Acc). In total, 16 phosphoproteins carrying 67 phosphorylation sites were identified in RJ derived from western bees, and nine proteins phosphorylated on 71 sites were found in RJ produced by eastern honeybees. Of which, eight phosphorylated proteins were common to both RJ samples, and the same motif ([S-x-E]) was extracted, suggesting that the function of major RJ proteins as nutrients and immune agents is evolutionary preserved in both of these honeybee species. All eight overlapping phosphoproteins showed significantly higher abundance in Acc-RJ than in Aml-RJ, and the phosphorylation of Jelleine-II (an antimicrobial peptide, TPFKLSLHL) at S(6) in Acc-RJ had stronger antimicrobial properties than that at T(1) in Aml-RJ even though the overall antimicrobial activity of Jelleine-II was found to decrease after phosphorylation. The differences in phosphosites, peptide abundance, and antimicrobial activity of the phosphorylated RJ proteins indicate that the two major honeybee species employ distinct phosphorylation strategies that align with their different biological characteristics shaped by evolution. The phosphorylation of RJ proteins are potentially driven by the activity of extracellular serine/threonine protein kinase FAM20C-like protein (FAM20C-like) through the [S-x-E] motif, which is supported by evidence that mRNA and protein expression of FAM20C-like protein kinase are both found in the highest level in the hypopharyngeal gland of nurse bees. Our data represent the first comprehensive RJ phosphorylation atlas, recording patterns of phosphorylated RJ protein abundance and antibacterial activity of some RJ proteins in two major managed honeybee species. These data constitute a firm basis for future research to better understand the biological roles of each RJ protein for honeybee biology and human health care. PMID:25265229

  11. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals evolutionary and functional conservation of phosphorylation across eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Boekhorst, Jos; van Breukelen, Bas; Heck, Albert JR; Snel, Berend

    2008-01-01

    Background Reversible phosphorylation of proteins is involved in a wide range of processes, ranging from signaling cascades to regulation of protein complex assembly. Little is known about the structure and evolution of phosphorylation networks. Recent high-throughput phosphoproteomics studies have resulted in the rapid accumulation of phosphopeptide datasets for many model organisms. Here, we exploit these novel data for the comparative analysis of phosphorylation events between different species of eukaryotes. Results Comparison of phosphoproteomics datasets of six eukaryotes yields an overlap ranging from approximately 700 sites for human and mouse (two large datasets of closely related species) to a single site for fish and yeast (distantly related as well as two of the smallest datasets). Some conserved events appear surprisingly old; those shared by plant and animals suggest conservation over the time scale of a billion years. In spite of the hypothesized incomprehensive nature of phosphoproteomics datasets and differences in experimental procedures, we show that the overlap between phosphoproteomes is greater than expected by chance and indicates increased functional relevance. Despite the dynamic nature of the evolution of phosphorylation, the relative overlap between the different datasets is identical to the phylogeny of the species studied. Conclusion This analysis provides a framework for the generation of biological insights by comparative analysis of high-throughput phosphoproteomics datasets. We expect the rapidly growing body of data from high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis to make comparative phosphoproteomics a powerful tool for elucidating the evolutionary and functional dynamics of reversible phosphorylation. PMID:18828897

  12. Phosphoproteomic network analysis in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus reveals new candidates in egg activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana Elisa; Isserlin, Ruth; Lugowski, Andrew; Morada, Anthony; Sun, Alex; Miao, Yishen; Kuzmanov, Uros; Wan, Cuihong; Ma, Hongyue; Foltz, Kathy; Emili, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Fertilization triggers a dynamic symphony of molecular transformations induced by a rapid rise in intracellular calcium. Most prominent are surface alterations, metabolic activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell-cycle reentry. While the activation process appears to be broadly evolutionarily conserved, and protein phosphorylation is known to play a key role, the signaling networks mediating the response to fertilization are not well described. To address this gap, we performed a time course phosphoproteomic analysis of egg activation in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a system that offers biochemical tractability coupled with exquisite synchronicity. By coupling large-scale phosphopeptide enrichment with unbiased quantitative MS, we identified striking changes in global phosphoprotein patterns at 2- and 5-min postfertilization as compared to unfertilized eggs. Overall, we mapped 8796 distinct phosphosite modifications on 2833 phosphoproteins, of which 15% were differentially regulated in early egg activation. Activated kinases were identified by phosphosite mapping, while enrichment analyses revealed conserved signaling cascades not previously associated with egg activation. This work represents the most comprehensive study of signaling associated with egg activation to date, suggesting novel mechanisms that can be experimentally tested and providing a valuable resource for the broader research community. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002239 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002239). PMID:26227301

  13. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Tobacco Mature Pollen and Pollen Activated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fíla, Jan; Radau, Sonja; Matros, Andrea; Hartmann, Anja; Scholz, Uwe; Feciková, Jana; Mock, Hans-Peter; Čapková, Věra; Zahedi, René Peiman; Honys, David

    2016-04-01

    Tobacco mature pollen has extremely desiccated cytoplasm, and is metabolically quiescent. Upon re-hydration it becomes metabolically active and that results in later emergence of rapidly growing pollen tube. These changes in cytoplasm hydration and metabolic activity are accompanied by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we subjected mature pollen, 5-min-activated pollen, and 30-min-activated pollen to TCA/acetone protein extraction, trypsin digestion and phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. The enriched fraction was subjected to nLC-MS/MS. We identified 471 phosphopeptides that carried 432 phosphorylation sites, position of which was exactly matched by mass spectrometry. These 471 phosphopeptides were assigned to 301 phosphoproteins, because some proteins carried more phosphorylation sites. Of the 13 functional groups, the majority of proteins were put into these categories: transcription, protein synthesis, protein destination and storage, and signal transduction. Many proteins were of unknown function, reflecting the fact that male gametophyte contains many specific proteins that have not been fully functionally annotated. The quantitative data highlighted the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during pollen activation; the identified phosphopeptides were divided into seven groups based on the regulatory trends. The major group comprised mature pollen-specific phosphopeptides that were dephosphorylated during pollen activation. Several phosphopeptides representing the same phosphoprotein had different regulation, which pinpointed the complexity of protein phosphorylation and its clear functional context. Collectively, we showed the first phosphoproteomics data on activated pollen where the position of phosphorylation sites was clearly demonstrated and regulatory kinetics was resolved. PMID:26792808

  14. Phosphoproteome dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under heat shock and cold stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Kubiniok, Peter; Thattikota, Yogitha; D'Amours, Damien; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells and organisms to survive and function through changes in temperature evolved from their specific adaptations to nonoptimal growth conditions. Responses to elevated temperatures have been studied in yeast and other model organisms using transcriptome profiling and provided valuable biological insights on molecular mechanisms involved in stress tolerance and adaptation to adverse environment. In contrast, little is known about rapid signaling events associated with changes in temperature. To gain a better understanding of global changes in protein phosphorylation in response to heat and cold, we developed a high temporal resolution phosphoproteomics protocol to study cell signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method allowed for quantitative analysis of phosphodynamics on 2,777 phosphosites from 1,228 proteins. The correlation of kinetic profiles between kinases and their substrates provided a predictive tool to identify new putative substrates for kinases such as Cdc28 and PKA. Cell cycle analyses revealed that the increased phosphorylation of Cdc28 at its inhibitory site Y19 during heat shock is an adaptive response that delays cell cycle progression under stress conditions. The cellular responses to heat and cold were associated with extensive changes in phosphorylation on proteins implicated in transcription, protein folding and degradation, cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis. PMID:26040289

  15. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals Interconnected System-Wide Responses to Perturbations of Kinases and Phosphatases in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Wanka, Stefanie; Kraft, Claudine; Urban, Jörg; Campbell, David; Pedrioli, Patrick G.; Gerrits, Bertran; Picotti, Paola; Lam, Henry; Vitek, Olga; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Roschitzki, Bernd; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Schlapbach, Ralph; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro; Nolan, Garry P.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Peter, Matthias; Loewith, Robbie; von Mering, Christian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins by kinases and phosphatases constitute an essential regulatory network in eukaryotic cells. This network supports the flow of information from sensors through signaling systems to effector molecules, and ultimately drives the phenotype and function of cells, tissues, and organisms. Dysregulation of this process has severe consequences and is one of the main factors in the emergence and progression of diseases, including cancer. Thus, major efforts have been invested in developing specific inhibitors that modulate the activity of individual kinases or phosphatases; however, it has been difficult to assess how such pharmacological interventions would affect the cellular signaling network as a whole. Here, we used label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics in a systematically perturbed model organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to determine the relationships between 97 kinases, 27 phosphatases, and more than 1000 phosphoproteins. We identified 8814 regulated phosphorylation events, describing the first system-wide protein phosphorylation network in vivo. Our results show that, at steady state, inactivation of most kinases and phosphatases affected large parts of the phosphorylation-modulated signal transduction machinery, and not only the immediate downstream targets. The observed cellular growth phenotype was often well maintained despite the perturbations, arguing for considerable robustness in the system. Our results serve to constrain future models of cellular signaling and reinforce the idea that simple linear representations of signaling pathways might be insufficient for drug development and for describing organismal homeostasis. PMID:21177495

  16. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  17. Phosphoproteome dynamics reveal novel ERK1/2 MAP kinase substrates with broad spectrum of functions

    PubMed Central

    Courcelles, Mathieu; Frmin, Christophe; Voisin, Laure; Lemieux, Sbastien; Meloche, Sylvain; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling module that controls many fundamental physiological processes. Deregulated activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases is associated with developmental syndromes and several human diseases. Despite the importance of this pathway, a comprehensive picture of the natural substrate repertoire and biochemical mechanisms regulated by ERK1/2 is still lacking. In this study, we used large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics and bioinformatics analyses to identify novel candidate ERK1/2 substrates based on their phosphorylation signature and kinetic profiles in epithelial cells. We identified a total of 7936 phosphorylation sites within 1861 proteins, of which 155 classify as candidate ERK1/2 substrates, including 128 new targets. Candidate ERK1/2 substrates are involved in diverse cellular processes including transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA splicing, cytoskeleton dynamics, cellular junctions and cell signaling. Detailed characterization of one newly identified substrate, the transcriptional regulator JunB, revealed that ERK1/2 phosphorylate JunB on a serine adjacent to the DNA-binding domain, resulting in increased DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity. Our study expands the spectrum of cellular functions controlled by ERK1/2 kinases. PMID:23712012

  18. Large Scale Phosphoproteome Profiles Comprehensive Features of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-Run; Xing, Xiao-Bin; Chen, Tao-Tao; Li, Rong-Xia; Dai, Jie; Sheng, Quan-Hu; Xin, Shun-Mei; Zhu, Li-Li; Jin, Ying; Pei, Gang; Kang, Jiu-Hong; Li, Yi-Xue; Zeng, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent and capable of unlimited self-renewal. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism may contribute to the advancement of cell-based regenerative medicine. In the present work, we performed a large scale analysis of the phosphoproteome in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. Using multiplex strategies, we detected 4581 proteins and 3970 high confidence distinct phosphosites in 1642 phosphoproteins. Notably, 22 prominent phosphorylated stem cell marker proteins with 39 novel phosphosites were identified for the first time by mass spectrometry, including phosphorylation sites in NANOG (Ser-65) and RE1 silencing transcription factor (Ser-950 and Thr-953). Quantitative profiles of NANOG peptides obtained during the differentiation of mES cells revealed that the abundance of phosphopeptides and non-phosphopeptides decreased with different trends. To our knowledge, this study presents the largest global characterization of phosphorylation in mES cells. Compared with a study of ultimately differentiated tissue cells, a bioinformatics analysis of the phosphorylation data set revealed a consistent phosphorylation motif in human and mouse ES cells. Moreover, investigations into phosphorylation conservation suggested that phosphoproteins were more conserved in the undifferentiated ES cell state than in the ultimately differentiated tissue cell state. However, the opposite conclusion was drawn from this conservation comparison with phosphosites. Overall, this work provides an overview of phosphorylation in mES cells and is a valuable resource for the future understanding of basic biology in mES cells. PMID:21149613

  19. Phosphoproteome dynamics reveal heat-shock protein complexes specific to the Leishmania donovani infectious stage

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Watanabe, Reiko; Dacher, Mariko; Chafey, Philippe; Osorio y Fortéa, José; Scott, David A.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Ommen, Gabi; Clos, Joachim; Hem, Sonia; Lenormand, Pascal; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Namane, Abdelkader; Späth, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania is exposed to a sudden increase in environmental temperature during the infectious cycle that triggers stage differentiation and adapts the parasite phenotype to intracellular survival in the mammalian host. The absence of classical promoter-dependent mechanisms of gene regulation and constitutive expression of most of the heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in these human pathogens raise important unresolved questions as to regulation of the heat-shock response and stage-specific functions of Leishmania HSPs. Here we used a gel-based quantitative approach to assess the Leishmania donovani phosphoproteome and revealed that 38% of the proteins showed significant stage-specific differences, with a strong focus of amastigote-specific phosphoproteins on chaperone function. We identified STI1/HOP-containing chaperone complexes that interact with ribosomal client proteins in an amastigote-specific manner. Genetic analysis of STI1/HOP phosphorylation sites in conditional sti1−/− null mutant parasites revealed two phosphoserine residues essential for parasite viability. Phosphorylation of the major Leishmania chaperones at the pathogenic stage suggests that these proteins may be promising drug targets via inhibition of their respective protein kinases. PMID:20404152

  20. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D.; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  1. Phosphoproteomics reveals malaria parasite Protein Kinase G as a signalling hub regulating egress and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mahmood M.; Solyakov, Lev; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Flueck, Christian; Siddiqui, Faiza A.; Singh, Shailja; Mistry, Sharad; Viskaduraki, Maria; Lee, Kate; Hopp, Christine S.; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Doerig, Christian; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baker, David A.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the key phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rudimentary. Here we address this issue for the essential cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PfPKG. By employing chemical and genetic tools in combination with quantitative global phosphoproteomics, we identify the phosphorylation sites on 69 proteins that are direct or indirect cellular targets for PfPKG. These PfPKG targets include proteins involved in cell signalling, proteolysis, gene regulation, protein export and ion and protein transport, indicating that cGMP/PfPKG acts as a signalling hub that plays a central role in a number of core parasite processes. We also show that PfPKG activity is required for parasite invasion. This correlates with the finding that the calcium-dependent protein kinase, PfCDPK1, is phosphorylated by PfPKG, as are components of the actomyosin complex, providing mechanistic insight into the essential role of PfPKG in parasite egress and invasion. PMID:26149123

  2. Aortic dissection and dissecting aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, E S; Svensson, L G; Coselli, J S; Safi, H J; Hess, K R

    1988-01-01

    Operation was employed in the treatment of 546 patients for complications of aortic dissection during the 32-year period of 1956-1988. Current concepts and operative techniques evolved during this period. Fortunately, about half the patients were treated during the latter 4 years, as modern therapy became standardized. The cumulative survival rate was 86% for all patients and 94% for those treated during recent years. Pathologic processes and requirements of operation became clearer by treating 174 patients who had had 198 previous operations by the time of referral. Reoperation was required for complications of operations now considered outdated, heart operations in patients with ascending aortic dilatation, and progressive dilatation of residual segments of the aorta. The 546 patients were followed, and a total of 838 operations were finally employed, resulting in total aortic replacement in 18, near total replacement in 41, entire thoracic aorta in 22, near total thoracic aorta in 33, and the entire thoracoabdominal aorta in 148 patients. Long-term survival in 439 patients after final operation was 66% and 44% at 5 and 10 years, respectively, despite the fact that the median age at first admission was 59. Operative treatment appears to be well-established for this disease. Images Figs. 12A-C. Figs. 12A-C. Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 2A and B. Fig. 3. Figs. 4A-D. Figs. 5A-C. Figs. 5A-C. Figs. 6A and B. Figs. 7A and B. Figs. 8A and B. Figs. 9A and B. Figs. 10A and B.,Figs. 11A and B. PMID:3421752

  3. Targeted phosphoproteomics of insulin signaling using data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parker, Benjamin L; Yang, Guang; Humphrey, Sean J; Chaudhuri, Rima; Ma, Xiuquan; Peterman, Scott; James, David E

    2015-06-01

    A major goal in signaling biology is the establishment of high-throughput quantitative methods for measuring changes in protein phosphorylation of entire signal transduction pathways across many different samples comprising temporal or dose data or patient samples. Data-independent acquisition (DIA) mass spectrometry (MS) methods, which involve tandem MS scans that are collected independently of precursor ion information and then are followed by targeted searching for known peptides, may achieve this goal. We applied DIA-MS to systematically quantify phosphorylation of components in the insulin signaling network in response to insulin as well as in stimulated cells exposed to a panel of kinase inhibitors targeting key downstream effectors in the network. We accurately quantified the effect of insulin on phosphorylation of 86 protein targets in the insulin signaling network using either stable isotope standards (SIS) or label-free quantification (LFQ) and mapped signal transmission through this network. By matching kinases to specific phosphorylation events (based on linear consensus motifs and temporal phosphorylation) to the quantitative phosphoproteomic data from cells exposed to inhibitors, we investigated predicted kinase-substrate relationships of AKT and mTOR in a targeted fashion. Furthermore, we applied this approach to show that AKT2-dependent phosphorylation of GAB2 promoted insulin signaling but inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in a manner dependent on 14-3-3 binding. Because DIA-MS can increase throughput and improve the reproducibility of peptide detection across multiple samples, this approach should facilitate more accurate, comprehensive, and quantitative assessment of signaling networks under various experimental conditions than are possible using other MS proteomic methods. PMID:26060331

  4. J incision in neck dissections.

    PubMed

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  5. Characterization of the phosphoproteome of mature Arabidopsis pollen.

    PubMed

    Mayank, Pururawa; Grossman, Jonas; Wuest, Samuel; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Roschitzki, Bernd; Nanni, Paolo; Nühse, Thomas; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-10-01

    Successful pollination depends on cell-cell communication and rapid cellular responses. In Arabidopsis, the pollen grain lands on a dry stigma, where it hydrates, germinates and grows a pollen tube that delivers the sperm cells to the female gametophyte to effect double fertilization. Various studies have emphasized that a mature, dehydrated pollen grain contains all the transcripts and proteins required for germination and initial pollen tube growth. Therefore, it is important to explore the role of post-translational modifications (here phosphorylation), through which many processes induced by pollination are probably controlled. We report here a phosphoproteomic study conducted on mature Arabidopsis pollen grains with the aim of identifying potential targets of phosphorylation. Using three enrichment chromatographies, a broad coverage of pollen phosphoproteins with 962 phosphorylated peptides corresponding to 598 phosphoproteins was obtained. Additionally, 609 confirmed phosphorylation sites were successfully mapped. Two hundred and seven of 240 phosphoproteins that were absent from the PhosPhAt database containing the empirical Arabidopsis phosphoproteome showed highly enriched expression in pollen. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of these 240 phosphoproteins shows an over-representation of GO categories crucial for pollen tube growth, suggesting that phosphorylation regulates later processes of pollen development. Moreover, motif analyses of pollen phosphopeptides showed an over-representation of motifs specific for Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and binding motifs for 14-3-3 proteins. Lastly, one tyrosine phosphorylation site was identified, validating the TDY dual phosphorylation motif of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPK8/MPK15). This study provides a solid basis to further explore the role of phosphorylation during pollen development. PMID:22631563

  6. Functional Divergence and Evolutionary Turnover in Mammalian Phosphoproteomes

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Osseni, Mazid; Landry, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a key mechanism to regulate protein functions. However, the contribution of this protein modification to species divergence is still largely unknown. Here, we studied the evolution of mammalian phosphoregulation by comparing the human and mouse phosphoproteomes. We found that 84% of the positions that are phosphorylated in one species or the other are conserved at the residue level. Twenty percent of these conserved sites are phosphorylated in both species. This proportion is 2.5 times more than expected by chance alone, suggesting that purifying selection is preserving phosphoregulation. However, we show that the majority of the sites that are conserved at the residue level are differentially phosphorylated between species. These sites likely result from false-negative identifications due to incomplete experimental coverage, false-positive identifications and non-functional sites. In addition, our results suggest that at least 5% of them are likely to be true differentially phosphorylated sites and may thus contribute to the divergence in phosphorylation networks between mouse and humans and this, despite residue conservation between orthologous proteins. We also showed that evolutionary turnover of phosphosites at adjacent positions (in a distance range of up to 40 amino acids) in human or mouse leads to an over estimation of the divergence in phosphoregulation between these two species. These sites tend to be phosphorylated by the same kinases, supporting the hypothesis that they are functionally redundant. Our results support the hypothesis that the evolutionary turnover of phosphorylation sites contributes to the divergence in phosphorylation profiles while preserving phosphoregulation. Overall, our study provides advanced analyses of mammalian phosphoproteomes and a framework for the study of their contribution to phenotypic evolution. PMID:24465218

  7. Cervicocerebral artery dissections.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, H A; Gerraty, R P; Davis, S M; Cameron, P A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the aetiology, frequency, presentation, and outcome of blunt cervicocerebral arterial dissection presentations. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cases were retrospectively identified through the stroke registers at Royal Melbourne Hospital (a tertiary teaching hospital) and Geelong Hospital (a regional referral centre). Medical notes were then reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 18 cases were identified, with ages ranging from 28 to 53 years. Fifty five per cent of the injuries sustained were to the internal carotid artery and 45% to the vertebral artery. The majority of the injuries were either spontaneous or associated with trivial forces. Other causes included motor vehicle accidents, falls, and cervical manipulations. Fifty five per cent of patients complained of significant neck pain before presentation. Most patients had delayed presentations, with only 39% presenting on the day of the incident. Seventy eight per cent presented with a neurological deficit. Initial computed tomography was normal in 71% of patients. The majority of patients were managed with anticoagulation, and had minimal functional deficit on discharge. Other treatment modalities included surgery (one patient) and thrombolysis (two patients). One patient was managed conservatively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of blunt cervicocerebral arterial dissection is unknown; however it is an uncommon diagnosis. The most common presentation is that of a delayed neurological event. Initial brain computed tomography is usually normal. Minimal adverse outcomes at discharge were noted in patients treated with anticoagulation only. PMID:10572814

  8. Biomarkers in aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dan; Zhou, Xian-Liang; Li, Jian-Jun; Hui, Ru-Tai

    2011-04-11

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a severe cardiovascular disease with high mortality and morbidity, which is characterized by acute onset and rapid progress. Mechanically, it has been considered that circulating blood flows into the media of the aorta through the rupture of the intima forming true and false lumens. Generally, its pathologic process is considered as follows: initially, inflammatory reaction, inflammatory cells infiltration in aortic wall, and then apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells, degenerating of aortic media, elastin fracture, and degradation. At last, the ingredients of the aorta are destroyed and lead to aortic dilatation, aneurysm formation, dissection and rupture. Currently, several biomarkers in peripheral blood including C-reactive protein (CRP), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), soluble elastin fragments (sELAF), D-dimer, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, calponin, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), genetic markers and so on, have been demonstrated to play a major role in evaluation of AD, for example, making early diagnosis and classifying of AD. Additionally, those markers may also guide our treatment therapies and predict the prognosis. The aims of this review mainly focus on the clinical implications of the biomarkers in AD. PMID:21237193

  9. Dissecting the unspeakable: a fatal case of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Dherange, Parinita A; Patel, Sarah; Singh, Nirmal; Suryanarayana, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with diabetes and hypertension presented with sudden onset of chest pain and subsequently developed expressive aphasia. Brain imaging revealed multiple areas of ischaemic infarcts. Transoesophageal echocardiogram revealed aortic dissection with a free-floating thrombus on the dissection flap, which was the source of emboli. Given the poor prognosis, surgical intervention was not pursued and artificial support was withdrawn. Aortic dissection is a highly fatal condition with varied presentation including heart failure, myocardial infarction, neurological deficits, abdominal pain or acute renal failure. Aortic dissection is a relatively uncommon but catastrophic condition. A high degree of clinical suspicion is required for early and accurate diagnosis since mortality is high and increases by the hour. The mechanism for stroke in our case was due to an artery-to-artery embolism from a thrombus, which developed on the intimal surface of the dissected artery. This is an infrequent complication with a very unique mechanism. PMID:26077807

  10. "Dissection" of a Hair Dryer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenstein, Stan; Simpson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    The electrical design of the common hair dryer is based almost entirely on relatively simple principles learned in introductory physics classes. Just as biology students dissect a frog to see the principles of anatomy in action, physics students can "dissect" a hair dryer to see how principles of electricity are used in a real system. They can

  11. "Dissection" of a Hair Dryer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenstein, Stan; Simpson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    The electrical design of the common hair dryer is based almost entirely on relatively simple principles learned in introductory physics classes. Just as biology students dissect a frog to see the principles of anatomy in action, physics students can "dissect" a hair dryer to see how principles of electricity are used in a real system. They can…

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Judith Z; Halperin, Jonathan L; Marin, Michael L; Stewart, Allan S; Eagle, Kim A; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-10-21

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating complication of thoracic aortic disease. In the more than 250 years since thoracic aortic dissection was first described, much has been learned about diseases of the thoracic aorta. In this review, we describe normal thoracic aortic size; risk factors for dissection, including genetic and inflammatory conditions; the underpinnings of genetic diseases associated with aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome and the role of transforming growth factor beta signaling; data on the role for medical therapies in aneurysmal disease, including beta-blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; prophylactic surgery for aneurysm; surgical techniques for the aortic root; and surgical and endovascular management of aneurysm and dissection for different aortic segments. PMID:25323262

  13. Automatic Dissection Of Plantlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, B. G.; Harris, I. P.; Marchant, J. A.; Tillett, R. D.

    1989-03-01

    Micropropagation is a technique used in horticulture for generating a monoclonal colony of plants. A tiny plantlet is cut into several parts, each of which is then replanted. At the moment, the cutting is performed manually. Automating this task would have significant economic benefits. A robot designed to dissect plants would need to be equipped with intelligent visual sensing. This article is concerned with the image acquisition and processing techniques which such a machine might use. A program, which can calculate where to cut a plant with an "open" structure, is presented. This is expressed in the ProVision language, which is described in another article presented at this conference. (Article 1002-65)

  14. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  15. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module. PMID:23221999

  16. Brachial plexus endoscopic dissection and correlation with open dissection.

    PubMed

    Lafosse, T; Masmejean, E; Bihel, T; Lafosse, L

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder endoscopy is evolving and becoming extra-articular. More and more procedures are taking place in the area of the brachial plexus (BP). We carried out an anatomical study to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the BP and the technique used to dissect and expose the BP endoscopically. Thirteen fresh cadavers were dissected. We first performed an endoscopic dissection of the BP, using classical extra-articular shoulder arthroscopy portals. Through each portal, we dissected as many structures as possible and identified them. We then did an open dissection to corroborate the endoscopic findings and to look for damage to the neighboring structures. In the supraclavicular area, we were able to expose the C5, C6 and C7 roots, and the superior and middle trunks in 11 of 13 specimens through two transtrapezial portals by following the suprascapular nerve. The entire infraclavicular portion of the BP (except the medial cord and its branches) was exposed in 11 of 13 specimens. The approach to the infraclavicular portion of the BP led directly to the lateral and posterior cords, but the axillary artery hid the medial cord. The musculocutaneous nerve was the first nerve encountered when dissecting medially from the anterior aspect of the coracoid process. The axillary nerve was the first nerve encountered when following the anterior border of the subscapularis medially from the posterior aspect of the coracoid process. Knowledge of the endoscopic anatomy of the BP is mandatory to expose and protect this structure while performing advanced arthroscopic shoulder procedures. PMID:26585998

  17. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  19. Titchener's ⊥ dissected.

    PubMed

    Landwehr, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    In three experiments, two independent samples of 12 observers each visually inspected modified versions of Titchener's ⊥ from which the T-junctions had been deleted. For Experiment 1, the ⊥'s two lines had been replaced by dashed lines not meeting in a common point; for Experiment 2, the ⊥ had been reduced to five dots, representing the original lines' end- and midpoints; and for Experiment 3 (in which the second sample of observers served), the ⊥ had been dissected into two separate lines, differently spaced from each other. Observers haptically indicated the lengths of the two orthogonal lines of the modified ⊥s and verbally judged their relative lengths or the distances between the corresponding dots. The common perceptual illusions persisted in Experiments 1 and 2, but were markedly weakened in Experiment 3. Implications for a neurophysiological account of the illusions in terms of bottom-up, long-range interactions between orientation-sensitive mechanisms versus top-down activation of a figural schema are spelled out. PMID:25893471

  20. Biomedicine: an ontological dissection.

    PubMed

    Baronov, David

    2008-01-01

    Though ubiquitous across the medical social sciences literature, the term "biomedicine" as an analytical concept remains remarkably slippery. It is argued here that this imprecision is due in part to the fact that biomedicine is comprised of three interrelated ontological spheres, each of which frames biomedicine as a distinct subject of investigation. This suggests that, depending upon one's ontological commitment, the meaning of biomedicine will shift. From an empirical perspective, biomedicine takes on the appearance of a scientific enterprise and is defined as a derivative category of Western science more generally. From an interpretive perspective, biomedicine represents a symbolic-cultural expression whose adherence to the principles of scientific objectivity conceals an ideological agenda. From a conceptual perspective, biomedicine represents an expression of social power that reflects structures of power and privilege within capitalist society. No one perspective exists in isolation and so the image of biomedicine from any one presents an incomplete understanding. It is the mutually-conditioning interrelations between these ontological spheres that account for biomedicine's ongoing development. Thus, the ontological dissection of biomedicine that follows, with particular emphasis on the period of its formal crystallization in the latter nineteenth and early twentieth century, is intended to deepen our understanding of biomedicine as an analytical concept across the medical social sciences literature. PMID:18802784

  1. Recent advances in enrichment and separation strategies for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenxi; Zhong, Xuefei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the significance of protein phosphorylation in various biological processes and signaling events, new analytical techniques for enhanced phosphoproteomics have been rapidly introduced in recent years. The combinatorial use of the phospho-specific enrichment techniques and prefractionation methods prior to MS analysis enables comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteome and facilitates deciphering the critical roles that phosphorylation plays in signaling pathways in various biological systems. This review places special emphasis on the recent five-year (2009–2013) advances for enrichment and separation techniques that have been utilized for phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis. PMID:24687451

  2. Experience with parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm that can be used for partitioning graphs embedded in 2- or 3-dimensional space. It partitions explicitly on the basis of nodes + (lambda)x(edges cut), where lambda is the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. The new algorithm is faster than the original binary dissection algorithm and attempts to obtain better partitions than the older algorithm, which only takes nodes into account. The performance of parametric dissection with plain binary dissection on 3 large unstructured 3-d meshes obtained from computational fluid dynamics and on 2 random graphs were compared. It was showm that the new algorithm can usually yield partitions that are substantially superior, but that its performance is heavily dependent on the input data.

  3. Carotid artery dissection following adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun; Singh, Yeeshu; Singh, Pankaj; Goel, Gaurav; Bhuyan, Susant

    2016-03-01

    Carotid dissection and cerebral infarction are extremely rare complications of adenoidectomy. We describe the case of seven year old girl, who suffered from left internal carotid artery dissection following adenoidectomy, leading to right hemiplegia with global aphasia. A CT angiogram confirmed a loop in contralateral right internal carotid artery. It is presumed that a similar loop also existed in left internal carotid artery, which possibly extended medially close to posterior pharyngeal wall and was injured during the course of surgery. PMID:26857324

  4. The Plk1-dependent Phosphoproteome of the Early Mitotic Spindle*

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Anna; Wang, Bin; Elowe, Sabine; Malik, Rainer; Zhang, Feng; Bauer, Manuel; Schmidt, Alexander; Silljé, Herman H. W.; Körner, Roman; Nigg, Erich A.

    2011-01-01

    Polo-like kinases regulate many aspects of mitotic and meiotic progression from yeast to man. In early mitosis, mammalian Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) controls centrosome maturation, spindle assembly, and microtubule attachment to kinetochores. However, despite the essential and diverse functions of Plk1, the full range of Plk1 substrates remains to be explored. To investigate the Plk1-dependent phosphoproteome of the human mitotic spindle, we combined stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with Plk1 inactivation or depletion followed by spindle isolation and mass spectrometry. Our study identified 358 unique Plk1-dependent phosphorylation sites on spindle proteins, including novel substrates, illustrating the complexity of the Plk1-dependent signaling network. Over 100 sites were validated by in vitro phosphorylation of peptide arrays, resulting in a broadening of the Plk1 consensus motif. Collectively, our data provide a rich source of information on Plk1-dependent phosphorylation, Plk1 docking to substrates, the influence of phosphorylation on protein localization, and the functional interaction between Plk1 and Aurora A on the early mitotic spindle. PMID:20860994

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Syk kinase signaling in human cancer cells reveals its role in cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Larive, R M; Urbach, S; Poncet, J; Jouin, P; Mascré, G; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P H; Coopman, P J; Bettache, N

    2009-06-18

    The spleen tyrosine kinase Syk has predominantly been studied in hematopoietic cells in which it is involved in immunoreceptor-mediated signaling. Recently, Syk expression was evidenced in numerous nonhematopoietic cells and shown to be involved in tumor formation and progression. The Syk downstream signaling effectors in nonhematopoietic cells remain, however, to be uncovered, and were investigated using MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics. Two strategies, based on the inhibition of the Syk catalytic activity and on the loss of Syk expression were employed to identify phosphotyrosine-dependent complexes. Quantitative measurements were obtained on 350 proteins purified with phosphotyrosine affinity columns using the SILAC method. Forty-one proteins are dependent on both Syk expression and catalytic activity and were selected as signaling effectors. They are involved in a variety of biological processes such as signal transduction, cell-cell adhesion and cell polarization. We investigated the functional involvement of Syk in cell-cell adhesion and demonstrated the phosphorylation of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. In addition, Syk is localized at cell-cell contacts, and Syk-mediated phosphorylation of E-cadherin seems to be important for the proper localization of p120-catenin at adherens junctions. Identification of the biochemical pathways regulated by Syk in human cancer cells will help to uncover its role in tumor formation and progression. PMID:19421152

  6. Laparoscopic condom dissection: new technique of retroperitoneoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaur, D D; Agarwal, D K; Purohit, K C; Darshane, A S

    1994-04-01

    The laparoscopic condom dissection is an advancement on the recently described balloon dissection technique of retroperitoneoscopy. It allows a simultaneous balloon dissection and retroperitoneal laparoscopic dissection using a telescope placed inside a condom balloon. In spite of a mild masking effect by the balloon, the clarity of vision was satisfactory, and adequate dissection could be carried out in all five patients in whom the condom was placed deep to the fascia transversalis or Gerota's fascia. PMID:8061674

  7. Analytical challenges translating mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics from discovery to clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Iliuk, Anton B.; Arrington, Justine V.; Tao, Weiguo Andy

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoproteomics is the systematic study of one of the most common protein modifications in high throughput with the aim of providing detailed information of the control, response, and communication of biological systems in health and disease. Advances in analytical technologies and strategies, in particular the contributions of high-resolution mass spectrometers, efficient enrichments of phosphopeptides, and fast data acquisition and annotation, have catalyzed dramatic expansion of signaling landscapes in multiple systems during the past decade. While phosphoproteomics is an essential inquiry to map high-resolution signaling networks and to find relevant events among the apparently ubiquitous and widespread modifications of proteome, it presents tremendous challenges in separation sciences to translate it from discovery to clinical practice. In this mini-review, we summarize the analytical tools currently utilized for phosphoproteomic analysis (with focus on MS), progresses made on deciphering clinically relevant kinase-substrate networks, MS uses for biomarker discovery and validation, and the potential of phosphoproteomics for disease diagnostics and personalized medicine. PMID:24890697

  8. Knowledge-Based Analysis for Detecting Key Signaling Events from Time-Series Phosphoproteomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pengyi; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Jayaswal, Vivek; Hu, Guang; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa; Jothi, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling underlies transcription/epigenetic control of a vast majority of cell-fate decisions. A key goal in cell signaling studies is to identify the set of kinases that underlie key signaling events. In a typical phosphoproteomics study, phosphorylation sites (substrates) of active kinases are quantified proteome-wide. By analyzing the activities of phosphorylation sites over a time-course, the temporal dynamics of signaling cascades can be elucidated. Since many substrates of a given kinase have similar temporal kinetics, clustering phosphorylation sites into distinctive clusters can facilitate identification of their respective kinases. Here we present a knowledge-based CLUster Evaluation (CLUE) approach for identifying the most informative partitioning of a given temporal phosphoproteomics data. Our approach utilizes prior knowledge, annotated kinase-substrate relationships mined from literature and curated databases, to first generate biologically meaningful partitioning of the phosphorylation sites and then determine key kinases associated with each cluster. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach on two time-series phosphoproteomics datasets and identify key kinases associated with human embryonic stem cell differentiation and insulin signaling pathway. The proposed approach will be a valuable resource in the identification and characterizing of signaling networks from phosphoproteomics data. PMID:26252020

  9. Knowledge-Based Analysis for Detecting Key Signaling Events from Time-Series Phosphoproteomics Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyi; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Jayaswal, Vivek; Hu, Guang; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa; Jothi, Raja

    2015-08-01

    Cell signaling underlies transcription/epigenetic control of a vast majority of cell-fate decisions. A key goal in cell signaling studies is to identify the set of kinases that underlie key signaling events. In a typical phosphoproteomics study, phosphorylation sites (substrates) of active kinases are quantified proteome-wide. By analyzing the activities of phosphorylation sites over a time-course, the temporal dynamics of signaling cascades can be elucidated. Since many substrates of a given kinase have similar temporal kinetics, clustering phosphorylation sites into distinctive clusters can facilitate identification of their respective kinases. Here we present a knowledge-based CLUster Evaluation (CLUE) approach for identifying the most informative partitioning of a given temporal phosphoproteomics data. Our approach utilizes prior knowledge, annotated kinase-substrate relationships mined from literature and curated databases, to first generate biologically meaningful partitioning of the phosphorylation sites and then determine key kinases associated with each cluster. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach on two time-series phosphoproteomics datasets and identify key kinases associated with human embryonic stem cell differentiation and insulin signaling pathway. The proposed approach will be a valuable resource in the identification and characterizing of signaling networks from phosphoproteomics data. PMID:26252020

  10. Quantitative analysis of phosphorylation-based protein signaling networks in the immune system by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic modification of cell proteins with phosphate is one of the key regulators of the cellular response to external stimuli. Phosphorylation-based signaling networks mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and their dysregulation is the basis of multiple diseases. However, the transient nature of the regulatory protein phosphorylation and low site occupancy mean that only a fraction of the protein is phosphorylated at a given time, and it is a challenge to measure the degree and dynamics of phosphorylation using traditional biochemical means. Technological advances in the field of mass spectrometry (MS) made it possible to generate large sets of phosphoproteomics data, probing the phosphoproteome with great depth, sensitivity, and accuracy. Therefore, quantitative phosphoproteomics emerged as one of the essential components of the systems biology approach for profiling of complex biological networks. Nowadays, the challenge lies in validation of the information and in its integration into the comprehensive models of cell decision processes. This article reviews the role of phosphoproteomics in systems biology, the MS-based approach, and technical details of the methods. Recent examples of quantitative measurements and methodologies as well as applications to the studies of the immune system and infectious diseases are presented and discussed. PMID:20836078

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of in Vivo Phosphoproteome of Mouse Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, JuHee; Kim, Sun Ju; Sung, Eunji; Kim, Jin Young; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Sangkyu

    2015-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are some of the most widespread reversible post-translational modifications. Microsomes are vesicle-like bodies, not ordinarily present within living cells, which form from pieces of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plasma membrane, mitochondria, or Golgi apparatus of broken eukaryotic cells. Here we investigated the total phosphoproteome of mouse liver microsomes (MLMs) using TiO2 enrichment of phosphopeptides coupled to on-line 2D-LC-MS/MS. In total, 699 phosphorylation sites in 527 proteins were identified in MLMs. When compared with the current phosphoSitePlus database, 155 novel phosphoproteins were identified in MLM. The distributions of phosphosites were 89.4, 8.0, and 2.6% for phosphoserine, phosphotheronine, and phosphotyrosine, respectively. By Motif-X analysis, eight Ser motifs and one Thr motif were found, and five acidic, two basophilic-, and two proline-directed motifs were assigned. The potential functions of phosphoproteins in MLM were assigned by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In GO annotation, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were involved in mRNA processing, mRNA metabolic processes, and RNA splicing. In the KEGG pathway analysis, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were highly enriched in ribosome protein processing in ER and ribosomes and in RNA transport. Furthermore, we determined that 52 and 23 phosphoproteins were potential substrates of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and casein kinase II, respectively, many of which are 40S/60S ribosomal proteins. Overall, our results provide an overview of features of protein phosphorylation in MLMs that should be a valuable resource for the future understanding of protein synthesis or translation involving phosphorylation. PMID:26487105

  12. Phosphoproteomic profiling of selenate-treated Alzheimer's disease model cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Lixiang; Wang, Yong; Li, Shuiming; Shen, Liming; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jiazuan

    2014-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins regulates most biological processes, while abnormal phosphorylation is a cause or consequence of many diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the hallmarks of AD is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which is composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Sodium selenate has been recently found to reduce tau hyperphosphorylation and NFTs formation, and to improve spatial learning and motor performance in AD mice. In the current study, the phosphoproteomics of N2aSW cells treated with selenate were investigated. To avoid missing low-abundance phosphoproteins, both the total proteins of cells and the phosphor-enriched proteins were extracted and subjected to the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with Pro-Q diamond staining and then LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 65 proteins were altered in phosphorylation level, of which 39 were up-regulated and 26 were down-regulated. All identified phosphoproteins were bioinformatically annotated according to their physiochemical features, subcellular location, and biological function. Most of these significantly changed phosphoproteins are involved in crucial neural processes such as protesome activity, oxidative stress, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and energy metabolism. Furthermore, decreases were found in homocysteine, phosphor-tau and amyloid β upon selenate treatment. Our results suggest that selenate may intervene in the pathological process of AD by altering the phosphorylation of some key proteins involved in oxidative stress, energy metabolism and protein degradation, thus play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis, generating ATP, and clearing misfolded proteins and aggregates. The present paper provides some new clues to the mechanism of selenate in AD prevention. PMID:25485856

  13. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Selenate-Treated Alzheimer's Disease Model Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Shuiming; Shen, Liming; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jiazuan

    2014-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins regulates most biological processes, while abnormal phosphorylation is a cause or consequence of many diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the hallmarks of AD is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which is composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Sodium selenate has been recently found to reduce tau hyperphosphorylation and NFTs formation, and to improve spatial learning and motor performance in AD mice. In the current study, the phosphoproteomics of N2aSW cells treated with selenate were investigated. To avoid missing low-abundance phosphoproteins, both the total proteins of cells and the phosphor-enriched proteins were extracted and subjected to the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with Pro-Q diamond staining and then LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 65 proteins were altered in phosphorylation level, of which 39 were up-regulated and 26 were down-regulated. All identified phosphoproteins were bioinformatically annotated according to their physiochemical features, subcellular location, and biological function. Most of these significantly changed phosphoproteins are involved in crucial neural processes such as protesome activity, oxidative stress, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and energy metabolism. Furthermore, decreases were found in homocysteine, phosphor-tau and amyloid β upon selenate treatment. Our results suggest that selenate may intervene in the pathological process of AD by altering the phosphorylation of some key proteins involved in oxidative stress, energy metabolism and protein degradation, thus play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis, generating ATP, and clearing misfolded proteins and aggregates. The present paper provides some new clues to the mechanism of selenate in AD prevention. PMID:25485856

  14. Wrangling Phosphoproteomic Data to Elucidate Cancer Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Mark L.; Lee, Wan-Jui; van der Maaten, Laurens; Shannon, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of biological data sets is essential for generating hypotheses that guide research, yet modern methods of global analysis challenge our ability to discern meaningful patterns and then convey results in a way that can be easily appreciated. Proteomic data is especially challenging because mass spectrometry detectors often miss peptides in complex samples, resulting in sparsely populated data sets. Using the R programming language and techniques from the field of pattern recognition, we have devised methods to resolve and evaluate clusters of proteins related by their pattern of expression in different samples in proteomic data sets. We examined tyrosine phosphoproteomic data from lung cancer samples. We calculated dissimilarities between the proteins based on Pearson or Spearman correlations and on Euclidean distances, whilst dealing with large amounts of missing data. The dissimilarities were then used as feature vectors in clustering and visualization algorithms. The quality of the clusterings and visualizations were evaluated internally based on the primary data and externally based on gene ontology and protein interaction networks. The results show that t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) followed by minimum spanning tree methods groups sparse proteomic data into meaningful clusters more effectively than other methods such as k-means and classical multidimensional scaling. Furthermore, our results show that using a combination of Spearman correlation and Euclidean distance as a dissimilarity representation increases the resolution of clusters. Our analyses show that many clusters contain one or more tyrosine kinases and include known effectors as well as proteins with no known interactions. Visualizing these clusters as networks elucidated previously unknown tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathways that drive cancer. Our approach can be applied to other data types, and can be easily adopted because open source software packages are employed. PMID:23300999

  15. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:25795261

  16. Interrogating cAMP-dependent Kinase Signaling in Jurkat T Cells via a Protein Kinase A Targeted Immune-precipitation Phosphoproteomics Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Piero; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Scholten, Arjen; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, mass-spectrometry-based methods have emerged for the quantitative profiling of dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation, allowing the behavior of thousands of phosphorylation sites to be monitored in a single experiment. However, when one is interested in specific signaling pathways, such shotgun methodologies are not ideal because they lack selectivity and are not cost and time efficient with respect to instrument and data analysis time. Here we evaluate and explore a peptide-centric antibody generated to selectively enrich peptides containing the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) consensus motif. This targeted phosphoproteomic strategy is used to profile temporal quantitative changes of potential PKA substrates in Jurkat T lymphocytes upon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulation, which increases intracellular cAMP, activating PKA. Our method combines ultra-high-specificity motif-based immunoaffinity purification with cost-efficient stable isotope dimethyl labeling. We identified 655 phosphopeptides, of which 642 (i.e. 98%) contained the consensus motif [R/K][R/K/X]X[pS/pT]. When our data were compared with a large-scale Jurkat T-lymphocyte phosphoproteomics dataset containing more than 10,500 phosphosites, a minimal overlap of 0.2% was observed. This stresses the need for such targeted analyses when the interest is in a particular kinase. Our data provide a resource of likely substrates of PKA, and potentially some substrates of closely related kinases. Network analysis revealed that about half of the observed substrates have been implicated in cAMP-induced signaling. Still, the other half of the here-identified substrates have been less well characterized, representing a valuable resource for future research. PMID:23882029

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM-dependence for translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These data provide new insights into the activation of ATM by oxidative stress through identification of novel substrates for ATM in the cytoplasm. PMID:26699800

  18. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners. PMID:26841317

  19. Combination of chemical genetics and phosphoproteomics for kinase signaling analysis enables confident identification of cellular downstream targets.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Felix S; Grundner-Culemann, Kathrin; Kumar, Chanchal; Gruss, Oliver J; Jallepalli, Prasad V; Daub, Henrik

    2012-04-01

    Delineation of phosphorylation-based signaling networks requires reliable data about the underlying cellular kinase-substrate interactions. We report a chemical genetics and quantitative phosphoproteomics approach that encompasses cellular kinase activation in combination with comparative replicate mass spectrometry analyses of cells expressing either inhibitor-sensitive or resistant kinase variant. We applied this workflow to Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) in mitotic cells and induced cellular Plk1 activity by wash-out of the bulky kinase inhibitor 3-MB-PP1, which targets a mutant kinase version with an enlarged catalytic pocket while not interfering with wild-type Plk1. We quantified more than 20,000 distinct phosphorylation sites by SILAC, approximately half of which were measured in at least two independent experiments in cells expressing mutant and wild-type Plk1. Based on replicate phosphorylation site quantifications in both mutant and wild-type Plk1 cells, our chemical genetic proteomics concept enabled stringent comparative statistics by significance analysis of microarrays, which unveiled more than 350 cellular downstream targets of Plk1 validated by full concordance of both statistical and experimental data. Our data point to hitherto poorly characterized aspects in Plk1-controlled mitotic progression and provide a largely extended resource for functional studies. We anticipate the described strategies to be of general utility for systematic and confident identification of cellular protein kinase substrates. PMID:22199227

  20. Characterization of the rapamycin-sensitive phosphoproteome reveals that Sch9 is a central coordinator of protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Alexandre; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Uotila, Aino; Stahl, Michael; Wanka, Stefanie; Gerrits, Bertran; Aebersold, Ruedi; Loewith, Robbie

    2009-01-01

    The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is an essential multiprotein complex conserved from yeast to humans. Under favorable growth conditions, and in the absence of the macrolide rapamycin, TORC1 is active, and influences virtually all aspects of cell growth. Although two direct effectors of yeast TORC1 have been reported (Tap42, a regulator of PP2A phosphatases and Sch9, an AGC family kinase), the signaling pathways that couple TORC1 to its distal effectors were not well understood. To elucidate these pathways we developed and employed a quantitative, label-free mass spectrometry approach. Analyses of the rapamycin-sensitive phosphoproteomes in various genetic backgrounds revealed both documented and novel TORC1 effectors and allowed us to partition phosphorylation events between Tap42 and Sch9. Follow-up detailed characterization shows that Sch9 regulates RNA polymerases I and III, the latter via Maf1, in addition to translation initiation and the expression of ribosomal protein and ribosome biogenesis genes. This demonstrates that Sch9 is a master regulator of protein synthesis. PMID:19684113

  1. Phosphoproteomic profiling of tumor tissues identifies HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation as a robust marker of early ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Wu, Xinyan; Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Fetics, Barry; Philip, Mathew; Barnes, Sheri R.; Godfrey, Beverly; Gabrielson, Edward; Nevo, Erez; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Delays between tissue collection and tissue fixation result in ischemia and ischemia-associated changes in protein phosphorylation levels, which can misguide the examination of signaling pathway status. To identify a biomarker that serves as a reliable indicator of ischemic changes that tumor tissues undergo, we subjected harvested xenograft tumors to room temperature for 0, 2, 10 and 30 minutes before freezing in liquid nitrogen. Multiplex TMT-labeling was conducted to achieve precise quantitation, followed by TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and high resolution mass spectrometry profiling. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed phosphorylation level changes of a number of phosphosites in the ischemic samples. The phosphorylation of one of these sites, S82 of the heat shock protein 27 kDa (HSP27), was especially abundant and consistently upregulated in tissues with delays in freezing as short as 2 minutes. In order to eliminate effects of ischemia, we employed a novel cryogenic biopsy device which begins freezing tissues in situ before they are excised. Using this device, we showed that the upregulation of phosphorylation of S82 on HSP27 was abrogated. We thus demonstrate that our cryogenic biopsy device can eliminate ischemia-induced phosphoproteome alterations, and measurements of S82 on HSP27 can be used as a robust marker of ischemia in tissues. PMID:26329039

  2. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyan; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Renuse, Santosh; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S; Stearns, Vered; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor-α (ER) antagonist, is an important agent for the treatment of breast cancer. However, this therapy is complicated by the fact that a substantial number of patients exhibit either de novo or acquired resistance. To characterize the signaling mechanisms underlying this resistance, we treated the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with tamoxifen for over six months and showed that this cell line acquired resistance to tamoxifen in vitro and in vivo. We performed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling on the tamoxifen resistant and vehicle-treated sensitive cell lines to quantify the phosphorylation alterations associated with tamoxifen resistance. From >5600 unique phosphopeptides identified, 1529 peptides exhibited hyperphosphorylation and 409 peptides showed hypophosphorylation in the tamoxifen resistant cells. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that focal adhesion pathway was one of the most enriched signaling pathways activated in tamoxifen resistant cells. Significantly, we showed that the focal adhesion kinase FAK2 was not only hyperphosphorylated but also transcriptionally up-regulated in tamoxifen resistant cells. FAK2 suppression by specific siRNA knockdown or a small molecule inhibitor repressed cellular proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. More importantly, our survival analysis revealed that high expression of FAK2 is significantly associated with shorter metastasis-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Our studies suggest that FAK2 is a potential therapeutic target for the management of hormone-refractory breast cancers. PMID:26330541

  3. Exploring the phosphoproteome profiles during Xenopus egg activation by calcium stimulation using a fully automated phosphopeptide purification system.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takuma; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi

    2016-04-01

    To explore the phosphoproteome profiles duringXenopusegg activation by Ca(2+)-stimulation, an automated phosphopeptide purification system involving a titania column was improved by introducing 4-step elution with phosphate buffers. The number of detected phosphopeptides in the tryptic digest of aXenopusegg cytosol fraction on mass spectrometry (MS) was increased 1.5-fold and the percentage of multiply phosphorylated peptides increased from 17 to 24% with introduction of the 4-step elution method. Phosphopeptides were purified by the improved method from tryptic digests of cytosol fractions ofXenopuseggs without and with a Ca(2+)-stimulus, and then, analysed by MS. One thousand three hundred and seventy-five and 994 phosphopeptides were reproducibly detected on duplicate MS, respectively. They included 818 and 437 phosphopeptides specific to each digest, respectively. A method involving isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) was also applied to compare the phosphorylation levels inXenopuseggs without and with a Ca(2+)-stimulus, the ratios for 112 phosphopeptides in tryptic digests of these egg cytosol fractions being obtained. It was suggested from all the results that the phosphorylation sites and levels change duringXenopusegg activation for many known and unknown sites on structural proteins, signalling related proteins, cell cycle-related proteins and others. PMID:26530081

  4. Gallium localization in dissecting aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Haden, H.T.; Lippman, H.R.

    1988-08-01

    Gallium concentration was demonstrated in a dissecting aneurysm of the aortic arch, imaged approximately 2 weeks after dissection. Concentration of gallium was apparently due to the inflammatory reaction associated with the organizing intramural hematoma.

  5. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  6. Animal Rights Activism Threatens Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Constance

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the movement against the use of dissections in science laboratories. Examples of protests across the United States are included. Compared is the plight of using animals in a biology classroom and the demise of the teaching of evolution in some areas. (KR)

  7. Dissection & Science Fairs. [Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    This collection of pamphlets and articles reprinted from other National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) publications was compiled to address the issues of classroom laboratory dissection and the use of animals in science fair projects. Three of the pamphlets contained in this packet are student handbooks designed to help students of elementary,…

  8. Cutting Edge Controversy: The Politics of Animal Dissection and Responses to Student Objection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Jan

    2011-12-01

    This mixed methods study investigated the experiences and perspectives of former Ontario high school students and current Ontario science and biology teachers toward animal dissection, objection to dissection, and choice policies that grant students the right to opt out of dissection and use an alternative instead. Data was collected via a student questionnaire (n=311), a teacher questionnaire (n=153), and interviews with eight students and nine teachers. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses and reporting techniques were employed within a humane education and critical pedagogy framework to explore the experiences and perspectives of both groups.

  9. Morphological Variation in Leaf Dissection of Rheum palmatum Complex (Polygonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu-Mei; Hou, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Yu-Qu; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Rheum palmatum complex comprises all taxa within section Palmata in the genus Rheum, including R. officinale, R. palmatum, R. tanguticum, R. tanguticum var. liupanshanense and R. laciniatum. The identification of the taxa in section Palmata is based primarily on the degree of leaf blade dissection and the shape of the lobes; however, difficulties in species identification may arise from their significant variation. The aim of this study is to analyze the patterns of variation in leaf blade characteristics within and among populations through population-based sampling covering the entire distribution range of R. palmatum complex. Methods Samples were taken from 2340 leaves from 780 individuals and 44 populations representing the four species, and the degree of leaf blade dissection and the shape of the lobe were measured to yield a set of quantitative data. Furthermore, those data were statistically analyzed. Important Findings The statistical analysis showed that the degree of leaf blade dissection is continuous from lobed to parted, and the shape of the lobe is also continuous from broadly triangular to lanceolate both within and between populations. We suggested that taxa in section Palmata should be considered as one species. Based on the research on the R. palmatum complex, we considered that the quantitative characteristics were greatly influenced by the environment. Therefore, it is not reliable to delimitate the species according to the continuously quantitative vegetative characteristics. PMID:25349989

  10. Evaluation of Educator & Student Use of & Attitudes toward Dissection & Dissection Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osenkowski, Pamela; Green, Che; Tjaden, Anne; Cunniff, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Animal dissection has been routinely practiced in American biology classrooms for decades. With technological advancements, more states adopting student choice measures, and increased awareness about ethical concerns surrounding dissection, many useful dissection alternatives have been developed. To understand the current use of animal dissection

  11. Hi-Tech Alternatives to Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Richard T.; Kinzie, Mable B.

    1991-01-01

    The debate on the educational value of dissection versus the value of animal life is examined. Interactive videodisc (IVD) technology is described in light of its potential for laboratory simulations. The design of the IVD-based dissection simulation, The Interactive Frog Dissection, is presented. (KR)

  12. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  13. Confident and sensitive phosphoproteomics using combinations of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation☆

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mark O.; Wright, James C.; Jones, Matthew; Rayner, Julian C.; Choudhary, Jyoti S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a workflow using an ETD-optimised version of Mascot Percolator and a modified version of SLoMo (turbo-SLoMo) for analysis of phosphoproteomic data. We have benchmarked this against several database searching algorithms and phosphorylation site localisation tools and show that it offers highly sensitive and confident phosphopeptide identification and site assignment with PSM-level statistics, enabling rigorous comparison of data acquisition methods. We analysed the Plasmodium falciparum schizont phosphoproteome using for the first time, a data-dependent neutral loss-triggered-ETD (DDNL) strategy and a conventional decision-tree method. At a posterior error probability threshold of 0.01, similar numbers of PSMs were identified using both methods with a 73% overlap in phosphopeptide identifications. The false discovery rate associated with spectral pairs where DDNL CID/ETD identified the same phosphopeptide was < 1%. 72% of phosphorylation site assignments using turbo-SLoMo without any score filtering, were identical and 99.8% of these cases are associated with a false localisation rate of < 5%. We show that DDNL acquisition is a useful approach for phosphoproteomics and results in an increased confidence in phosphopeptide identification without compromising sensitivity or duty cycle. Furthermore, the combination of Mascot Percolator and turbo-SLoMo represents a robust workflow for phosphoproteomic data analysis using CID and ETD fragmentation. Biological significance Protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification that regulates protein function. Mass spectrometry-based approaches have revolutionised its analysis on a large-scale but phosphorylation sites are often identified by single phosphopeptides and therefore require more rigorous data analysis to unsure that sites are identified with high confidence for follow-up experiments to investigate their biological significance. The coverage and confidence of phosphoproteomic experiments can be enhanced by the use of multiple complementary fragmentation methods. Here we have benchmarked a data analysis pipeline for analysis of phosphoproteomic data generated using CID and ETD fragmentation and used it to demonstrate the utility of a data-dependent neutral loss triggered ETD fragmentation strategy for high confidence phosphopeptide identification and phosphorylation site localisation. PMID:24657495

  14. Phosphoproteomic screening identifies Rab GTPases as novel downstream targets of PINK1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Kondapalli, Chandana; Lehneck, Ronny; Procter, James B; Dill, Brian D; Woodroof, Helen I; Gourlay, Robert; Peggie, Mark; Macartney, Thomas J; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, David G; Itzen, Aymelt; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are causative of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). We have previously reported that PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphorylates serine 65 (Ser65) of the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate Parkin E3 ligase activity. Here, we have employed quantitative phosphoproteomics to search for novel PINK1-dependent phosphorylation targets in HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cells stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. This led to the identification of 14,213 phosphosites from 4,499 gene products. Whilst most phosphosites were unaffected, we strikingly observed three members of a sub-family of Rab GTPases namely Rab8A, 8B and 13 that are all phosphorylated at the highly conserved residue of serine 111 (Ser111) in response to PINK1 activation. Using phospho-specific antibodies raised against Ser111 of each of the Rabs, we demonstrate that Rab Ser111 phosphorylation occurs specifically in response to PINK1 activation and is abolished in HeLa PINK1 knockout cells and mutant PINK1 PD patient-derived fibroblasts stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. We provide evidence that Rab8A GTPase Ser111 phosphorylation is not directly regulated by PINK1 in vitro and demonstrate in cells the time course of Ser111 phosphorylation of Rab8A, 8B and 13 is markedly delayed compared to phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65. We further show mechanistically that phosphorylation at Ser111 significantly impairs Rab8A activation by its cognate guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Rabin8 (by using the Ser111Glu phosphorylation mimic). These findings provide the first evidence that PINK1 is able to regulate the phosphorylation of Rab GTPases and indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Rab8A/8B/13 at Ser111 may represent novel biomarkers of PINK1 activity in vivo. Our findings also suggest that disruption of Rab GTPase-mediated signalling may represent a major mechanism in the neurodegenerative cascade of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26471730

  15. Phosphoproteomic screening identifies Rab GTPases as novel downstream targets of PINK1.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Kondapalli, Chandana; Lehneck, Ronny; Procter, James B; Dill, Brian D; Woodroof, Helen I; Gourlay, Robert; Peggie, Mark; Macartney, Thomas J; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, David G; Itzen, Aymelt; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul Mk

    2015-11-12

    Mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are causative of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). We have previously reported that PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphorylates serine 65 (Ser(65)) of the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate Parkin E3 ligase activity. Here, we have employed quantitative phosphoproteomics to search for novel PINK1-dependent phosphorylation targets in HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cells stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. This led to the identification of 14,213 phosphosites from 4,499 gene products. Whilst most phosphosites were unaffected, we strikingly observed three members of a sub-family of Rab GTPases namely Rab8A, 8B and 13 that are all phosphorylated at the highly conserved residue of serine 111 (Ser(111)) in response to PINK1 activation. Using phospho-specific antibodies raised against Ser(111) of each of the Rabs, we demonstrate that Rab Ser(111) phosphorylation occurs specifically in response to PINK1 activation and is abolished in HeLa PINK1 knockout cells and mutant PINK1 PD patient-derived fibroblasts stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. We provide evidence that Rab8A GTPase Ser(111) phosphorylation is not directly regulated by PINK1 in vitro and demonstrate in cells the time course of Ser(111) phosphorylation of Rab8A, 8B and 13 is markedly delayed compared to phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65). We further show mechanistically that phosphorylation at Ser(111) significantly impairs Rab8A activation by its cognate guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Rabin8 (by using the Ser111Glu phosphorylation mimic). These findings provide the first evidence that PINK1 is able to regulate the phosphorylation of Rab GTPases and indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Rab8A/8B/13 at Ser(111) may represent novel biomarkers of PINK1 activity in vivo. Our findings also suggest that disruption of Rab GTPase-mediated signalling may represent a major mechanism in the neurodegenerative cascade of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26471730

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of Alzheimer's Disease Reveals Crosstalk between Kinases and Small Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Duc M.; Gearing, Marla; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer Disease (AD), but may play other signaling roles during AD pathogenesis. In this study, we employed immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify phosphopeptides from 8 individual AD and 8 age-matched control postmortem human brain tissues. Using this approach, we identified 5,569 phosphopeptides in frontal cortex across all 16 cases in which phosphopeptides represented 80 percent of all peptide spectral counts collected following IMAC enrichment. Marker selection identified 253 significantly altered phosphopeptides by precursor intensity, changed by at least 1.75 fold relative to controls, with an empirical false discovery rate below 7 percent. Approximately 21 percent of all significantly altered phosphopeptides in AD tissue were derived from tau. Of the other 142 proteins hyperphosphorylated in AD, membrane, synapse, cell junction, and alternatively spliced proteins were overrepresented. Of these, we validated differential phosphorylation of heat-shock protein-beta-1 (HSPB1) and crystallin-alpha-B (CRYAB) as hyperphosphorylated by western blotting. We further identified a network of phosphorylated kinases, which co-enriched with phosphorylated small heat shock proteins. This supports a hypothesis that a number of kinases are regulating and/or regulated by the small heat shock protein folding network. PMID:25332170

  17. Triple quad ICPMS (ICPQQQ) as a new tool for absolute quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Diez Fernández, Silvia; Sugishama, Naoki; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2012-07-17

    It is clear that sensitive and interference-free quantification of ICP-detectable elements naturally present in proteins will boost the role of ICPMS in proteomics. In this study, a completely new way of polyatomic interference removal in ICPMS for detection of sulfur (present in the majority of proteins as methionine or cysteine) and phosphorus (present in phosphorylated proteins) is presented. It is based on the concept of tandem mass spectrometry (QQQ) typically used in molecular MS. Briefly, the first quadrupole can be operated as 1 amu window band-pass mass filter to select target analyte ions ((31)P, (32)S, and their on-mass polyatomic interferences). In this way, only selected ions enter the cell and react with O(2), reducing the interferences produced by matrix ions as well as background noise. After optimization of the cell conditions, product ions formed for the targets, (47)PO(+) and (48)SO(+), could be detected with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. The coupling to capillary HPLC allowed analysis of S- and P-containing species with the lowest detection limits ever published (11 and 6.6 fmol, respectively). The potential of the approach for proteomics studies was demonstrated for the highly sensitive simultaneous absolute quantification of different S-containing peptides and phosphopeptides. PMID:22725632

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of Alzheimer's disease reveals cross-talk between kinases and small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Dammer, Eric B; Lee, Andrew K; Duong, Duc M; Gearing, Marla; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but may play other signaling roles during AD pathogenesis. In this study, we employed IMAC followed by LC-MS/MS to identify phosphopeptides from eight individual AD and eight age-matched control postmortem human brain tissues. Using this approach, we identified 5569 phosphopeptides in frontal cortex across all 16 cases in which phosphopeptides represented 80% of all peptide spectral counts collected following IMAC enrichment. Marker selection identified 253 significantly altered phosphopeptides by precursor intensity, changed by at least 1.75-fold relative to controls, with an empirical false discovery rate below 7%. Approximately 21% of all significantly altered phosphopeptides in AD tissue were derived from tau. Of the other 142 proteins hyperphosphorylated in AD, membrane, synapse, cell junction, and alternatively spliced proteins were overrepresented. Of these, we validated differential phosphorylation of HSP 27 (HSPB1) and crystallin-alpha-B (CRYAB) as hyperphosphorylated by Western blotting. We further identified a network of phosphorylated kinases, which coenriched with phosphorylated small HSPs. This supports a hypothesis that a number of kinases are regulating and/or regulated by the small HSP folding network. PMID:25332170

  19. Simple and Reproducible Sample Preparation for Single-Shot Phosphoproteomics with High Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Sultan, Abida; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The traditional sample preparation workflow for mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics is time consuming and usually requires multiple steps, e.g., lysis, protein precipitation, reduction, alkylation, digestion, fractionation, and phosphopeptide enrichment. Each step can introduce chemical artifacts, in vitro protein and peptide modifications, and contaminations. Those often result in sample loss and affect the sensitivity, dynamic range and accuracy of the mass spectrometric analysis. Here we describe a simple and reproducible phosphoproteomics protocol, where lysis, denaturation, reduction, and alkylation are performed in a single step, thus reducing sample loss and increasing reproducibility. Moreover, unlike standard cell lysis procedures the cell harvesting is performed at high temperatures (99 °C) and without detergents and subsequent need for protein precipitation. Phosphopeptides are enriched using TiO2 beads and the orbitrap mass spectrometer is operated in a sensitive mode with higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD). PMID:26584931

  20. A protocol on the use of titanium dioxide chromatography for phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Pinkse, Martijn W H; Lemeer, Simone; Heck, Albert J R

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade phosphoproteomics has become an emerging discipline within proteomics research, focusing on detection of the reversible modification of proteins by phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues. For successful analysis, phosphopeptide enrichment is often a prerequisite due to their low stoichiometry, heterogeneity, and low abundance. The enrichment of phosphopeptides is often performed manually, which is inherently labor intensive and a major hindrance in large-scale analyses. Automation of the enrichment method would vastly improve reproducibility and thereby facilitate "high-throughput" phosphoproteomics research. Here, we describe the setup of a simple, robust, and automated online TiO(2)-based nanoscale chromatographic approach to selectively enrich and separate phosphorylated peptides from proteolytic digests of moderate and high complexity. PMID:21604125

  1. Phosphoproteomic analysis identifies activated MET-axis PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK in lapatinib-resistant cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Yook; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Kang, Min Jueng; Cho, Byoung-Kyu; Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Tae-You; Yi, Eugene C

    2013-01-01

    Lapatinib, a dual inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) tyrosine kinases, has shown promising results as a growth inhibitor of HER2-positive cancer cells in vitro. However, similar to other EGFR-targeting drugs, acquired resistance to lapatinib by HER2-positive cancer cells remains a major clinical challenge. To elucidate resistance mechanisms to EGFR/HER2-targeting agents, we performed a systematic quantitative comparison of the phosphoproteome of lapatinib-resistant (LR) human gastric cancer cells (SNU216-LR) versus parental cells (SNU216) using a titanium dioxide (TiO2) phosphopeptide enrichment method and analysis with a Q-Exactive hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Biological network analysis of differentially expressed phosphoproteins revealed apparent constitutive activation of the MET-axis phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/α-serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in SNU216-LR. Inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways in SNU216-LR also leads to cell cycle arrest, confirming the biological network analysis. Lapatinib sensitivity was restored when cells were treated with several molecular targeting agents in combination with lapatinib. Thus, by integrating phosphoproteomic data, protein networks and effects of signaling pathway modulation on cell proliferation, we found that SNU216-LR maintains constitutive activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways in a MET-dependent manner. These findings suggest that pathway activation is a key compensatory intracellular phospho-signaling event that may govern gastric cancer cell resistance to drug treatment. PMID:24263233

  2. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation

    PubMed Central

    Spät, Philipp; Maček, Boris; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth's biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signaling, adaptation, and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry toward the detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labeling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phospho)proteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 h. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signaling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria. PMID:25873915

  3. Genetic dissection of rice grain shape using a recombinant inbred line population derived from two contrasting parents and fine mapping a pleiotropic quantitative trait locus qGL7

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The three-dimensional shape of grain, measured as grain length, width, and thickness (GL, GW, and GT), is one of the most important components of grain appearance in rice. Determining the genetic basis of variations in grain shape could facilitate efficient improvements in grain appearance. In this study, an F7:8 recombinant inbred line population (RIL) derived from a cross between indica and japonica cultivars (Nanyangzhan and Chuan7) contrasting in grain size was used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed with 164 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The major aim of this study was to detect a QTL for grain shape and to fine map a minor QTL, qGL7. Results Four QTLs for GL were detected on chromosomes 3 and 7, and 10 QTLs for GW and 9 QTLs for GT were identified on chromosomes 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 10, respectively. A total of 28 QTLs were identified, of which several are reported for the first time; four major QTLs and six minor QTLs for grain shape were also commonly detected in both years. The minor QTL, qGL7, exhibited pleiotropic effects on GL, GW, GT, 1000-grain weight (TGW), and spikelets per panicle (SPP) and was further validated in a near isogenic F2 population (NIL-F2). Finally, qGL7 was narrowed down to an interval between InDel marker RID711 and SSR marker RM6389, covering a 258-kb region in the Nipponbare genome, and cosegregated with InDel markers RID710 and RID76. Conclusion Materials with very different phenotypes were used to develop mapping populations to detect QTLs because of their complex genetic background. Progeny tests proved that the minor QTL, qGL7, could display a single mendelian characteristic. Therefore, we suggested that minor QTLs for traits with high heritability could be isolated using a map-based cloning strategy in a large NIL-F2 population. In addition, combinations of different QTLs produced diverse grain shapes, which provide the ability to breed more varieties of rice to satisfy consumer preferences. PMID:20184774

  4. Searching for novel Cdk5 substrates in brain by comparative phosphoproteomics of wild type and Cdk5-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C; Kulkarni, Ashok B; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5-/- embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5-/- brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate. PMID:24658276

  5. Spontaneous dissection of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, A N; Rao, D Seshagiri

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous dissection of coronary arteries is an uncommon entity with varied presentation. It is commoner in young patients, specially females. We present three cases encountered by us in recent past. There were two males and the only female was in her post-partum period. All the three had diverse lines of management based on the angiographic picture, clinical background and myocardium at risk. PMID:16350685

  6. Large-scale comparative phosphoproteomics identifies conserved phosphorylation sites in plants.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hirofumi; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Mochida, Keiichi; Daudi, Arsalan; Yoshida, Yuko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Tomita, Masaru; Ishihama, Yasushi; Shirasu, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Knowledge of phosphorylation events and their regulation is crucial to understand the functional biology of plants. Here, we report a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis in the model monocot rice (Oryza sativa japonica 'Nipponbare'), an economically important crop. Using unfractionated whole-cell lysates of rice cells, we identified 6,919 phosphopeptides from 3,393 proteins. To investigate the conservation of phosphoproteomes between plant species, we developed a novel phosphorylation-site evaluation method and performed a comparative analysis of rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The ratio of tyrosine phosphorylation in the phosphoresidues of rice was equivalent to those in Arabidopsis and human. Furthermore, despite the phylogenetic distance and the use of different cell types, more than 50% of the phosphoproteins identified in rice and Arabidopsis, which possessed ortholog(s), had an orthologous phosphoprotein in the other species. Moreover, nearly half of the phosphorylated orthologous pairs were phosphorylated at equivalent sites. Further comparative analyses against the Medicago phosphoproteome also showed similar results. These data provide direct evidence for conserved regulatory mechanisms based on phosphorylation in plants. We also assessed the phosphorylation sites on nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat proteins and identified novel conserved phosphorylation sites that may regulate this class of proteins. PMID:20466843

  7. Directed analysis of cyanobacterial membrane phosphoproteome using stained phosphoproteins and titanium-enriched phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Gi; Kwon, Joseph; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kang, Young-Moon; Roh, Seong Woon; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2015-04-01

    Gel-free shotgun phosphoproteomics of unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has not been reported up to now. The purpose of this study is to develop directed membrane phosphoproteomic method in Synechocystis sp. Total Synechocystis membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and phosphoprotein-stained gel bands were selectively subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion. The phosphorylation sites of the resulting peptides were determined by assigning the neutral loss of [M-H(3)PO(4)] to Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues using nano-liquid chromatography 7 Tesla Fourier transform mass spectrometry. As an initial application, 111 proteins and 33 phosphoproteins were identified containing 11 integral membrane proteins. Identified four unknown phosphoproteins with transmembrane helices were suggested to be involved in membrane migration or transporters based on BLASTP search annotations. The overall distribution of hydrophobic amino acids in pTyr was lower in frequency than that of pSer or pThr. Positively charged amino acids were abundantly revealed in the surrounding amino acids centered on pTyr. A directed shotgun membrane phosphoproteomic strategy provided insight into understanding the fundamental regulatory processes underlying Ser, Thr, and Tyr phosphorylation in multi-layered membranous cyanobacteria. PMID:25845541

  8. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  9. A dissecting competition for medical students.

    PubMed

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year, representing about 20-25% of the total class. Material is standardized to distal upper or lower limb specimens, each of which is dissected by one or two students during a single weekend day. Participants are required to complete their dissection in about six hours and present an appropriately labeled display together with a 300 word abstract, emphasizing clinical relevance. Dissections are judged on presentation, accuracy of identification and labeling, and relevance to the clinical abstract, taking into account the technical difficulty of the particular dissection. Judging from successive annual uptake of places and informal feedback, this is not only a popular event allowing students to focus creatively on producing a clinically relevant dissection in a relaxed learning environment but also of educational value. An unexpected outcome has been the production of many specimens suitable as prosections for future classes. A dissecting competition may be a useful method of stimulating learning for medical students interested in undertaking further dissection but it requires appropriate staff commitment and a supply of suitable cadaver specimens. PMID:22213677

  10. On marathons and Sprints: an integrated quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics analysis of differences between slow and fast muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hannes C A; Ruhs, Aaron; Konzer, Anne; Mendler, Luca; Bruckskotten, Mark; Looso, Mario; Günther, Stefan; Boettger, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue contains slow as well as fast twitch muscle fibers that possess different metabolic and contractile properties. Although the distribution of individual proteins in fast and slow fibers has been investigated extensively, a comprehensive proteomic analysis, which is key for any systems biology approach to muscle tissues, is missing. Here, we compared the global protein levels and gene expression profiles of the predominantly slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles using the principle of in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids based on a fully lysine-6 labeled SILAC-mouse. We identified 551 proteins with significant quantitative differences between slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus fibers out of >2000 quantified proteins, which greatly extends the repertoire of proteins differentially regulated between both muscle types. Most of the differentially regulated proteins mediate cellular contraction, ion homeostasis, glycolysis, and oxidation, which reflect the major functional differences between both muscle types. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data uncovered the existence of fiber-type specific posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms resulting in differential accumulation of Myosin-8 and α-protein kinase 3 proteins and mRNAs among others. Phosphoproteome analysis of soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles identified 2573 phosphosites on 973 proteins including 1040 novel phosphosites. The in vivo stable isotope labeling with amino acids-mouse approach used in our study provides a comprehensive view into the protein networks that direct fiber-type specific functions and allows a detailed dissection of the molecular composition of slow and fast muscle tissues with unprecedented resolution. PMID:22210690

  11. A mill based instrument and software system for dissecting slide-mounted tissue that provides digital guidance and documentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dissection of specific Areas Of Interest (AOIs) of slide-mounted tumor samples is often used to enrich for cancer cells in order to generate better signal to noise ratios in subsequent biochemical characterization. Most clinical laboratories utilize manual dissection for practical reasons and to avoid the expense and difficulties of laser microdissection systems. Unfortunately, manual methods often lack resolution and process documentation. The goal of this project was to design a dissection system for slide-mounted tissue with better precision than manual methods that also provides digital image guidance and electronic process documentation. Methods An instrument that is essentially a micro tissue mill was developed. It employs a specialized disposable mill bit that simultaneously dispenses liquid, cuts tissue from the slide surface, and aspirates the liquid along with the displaced tissue fragments. A software package was also developed that is capable of transferring digitally annotated AOIs between images of serially cut tissue sections to guide dissection and generate an electronic record of the process. Results The performance of this “meso” dissection system was tested using post dissection visual examination for resolution and accuracy, fluorescence based DNA quantitation for recovery efficiency, and dissection of closely situated mouse-human tissue sections followed by PCR amplification for purity determination. The minimum resolution is a dissected circle smaller than 200 microns in diameter, edge dissection accuracy is tighter than 100 microns, recovery efficiency appears greater than 95%, and recovery purity is greater than 99% relative to a different tissue located 100 microns from the dissection boundary. The system can dissect from both paraffinized and deparaffinized FFPE tissue sections that are mounted on plain glass slides, and it is compatible with DNA, RNA, and protein isolation. Conclusions The mesodissection system is an effective alternative to manual dissection methods and is applicable for biomarker analysis of anatomical pathology samples, where enrichment of AOIs from the tissue section is helpful, but pure cell populations are not required. PMID:24188417

  12. Aortic dissection presenting as pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Somasamudra, Pramod; Smith, Ed; Tandan, Ronja

    2011-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening emergency. This case illustrates the unusual way an aortic dissection can present. This patient presented with sharp, left interscapular pain, which subsided after a while and left-sided pleural effusion. Further investigations revealed that this was a case of thoracic aortic dissection with a leak into pleural space. She underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stent graft insertion. PMID:22692486

  13. Phosphoproteomics of Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044 reveals a tight link between tyrosine phosphorylation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao-Hsia; Hsu, Tung-Li; Lin, Shu-Yu; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Wang, Jin-Town; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-12-01

    Encapsulated Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant causative agent of pyogenic liver abscess, an emerging infectious disease that often complicates metastatic meningitis or endophthalmitis. The capsular polysaccharide on K. pneumoniae surface was determined as the key to virulence. Although the regulation of capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis is largely unclear, it was found that protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are involved. Therefore, the identification and characterization of such kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates would advance our knowledge of the underlying mechanism in capsule formation and could contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we analyzed the phosphoproteome of K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044 with a shotgun approach and identified 117 unique phosphopeptides along with 93 in vivo phosphorylated sites corresponding to 81 proteins. Interestingly, three of the identified tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, namely protein-tyrosine kinase (Wzc), phosphomannomutase (ManB), and undecaprenyl-phosphate glycosyltransferase (WcaJ), were found to be distributed in the cps locus and thus were speculated to be involved in the converging signal transduction of capsule biosynthesis. Consequently, we decided to focus on the lesser studied ManB and WcaJ for mutation analysis. The capsular polysaccharides of WcaJ mutant (WcaJY5F) were dramatically reduced quantitatively, and the LD(50) increased by 200-fold in a mouse peritonitis model compared with the wild-type strain. However, the capsular polysaccharides of ManB mutant (ManBY26F) showed no difference in quantity, and the LD(50) increased by merely 6-fold in mice test. Our study provided a clear trend that WcaJ tyrosine phosphorylation can regulate the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides and result in the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044. PMID:19696081

  14. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells Reveals Pathways and Proteins Affected by Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. Principal Findings We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health. PMID:21152398

  15. Evaluation of Educator & Student Use of & Attitudes toward Dissection & Dissection Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osenkowski, Pamela; Green, Che; Tjaden, Anne; Cunniff, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Animal dissection has been routinely practiced in American biology classrooms for decades. With technological advancements, more states adopting student choice measures, and increased awareness about ethical concerns surrounding dissection, many useful dissection alternatives have been developed. To understand the current use of animal dissection…

  16. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host

  17. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  18. Beyond Dissection: Innovative Tools for Biology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sandra, Ed.

    This catalog lists resources available for classroom use in teaching about anatomy and physiology which are alternatives to dissection. The entries are provided under three main categories: (1) Whole Animal Dissection/Vivisection; (2) Animal Organ or System Anatomy and Physiology; and (3) Other, including animal behavior, biotechnology,…

  19. Biomarkers in descending thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Shalhub, Sherene; Dua, Anahita; Brooks, Jared

    2014-12-01

    The clinical application of serum biomarkers (d-dimer, C-reactive protein) to predict the natural history of descending thoracic aortic dissection remains elusive. In this review, our current understanding of biomarkers in descending thoracic aortic dissection detection, predicting complications, and aiding in patient management is discussed. PMID:26073830

  20. Neck Dissection Through a Facelift Incision

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N.; Eliades, Steven J.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John M.; Califano, Joseph A.; Blanco, Ray G. F.

    2013-01-01

    Obectives/Hypothesis To determine the feasibility and safety of neck dissection through a facelift incision. Study Design Prospective case series. Methods Cadavers and live subjects underwent neck dissection using a facelift incision with and without endoscopic assistance. In the live facelift neck dissection (FLND), the preoperative surgical indications, staging, adjuvant therapy, intraoperative technical procedure, pathology reports on lymph nodes, and short-term outcomes were reviewed. Results FLND was successfully performed in four cadavers and four live subjects, including selective (less than five neck levels removed) and comprehensive (levels I–V removed) neck dissections. All levels were accessible through this approach, with additional retraction required for levels I and IV. Endoscopic assistance was required in one neck dissection for adequate visualization. Short-term complications and number of excised lymph nodes were comparable to those from traditional neck dissection approaches. Conclusions Open neck dissection through a facelift incision is feasible and offers an alternate approach to traditional incisions. This can be performed without requiring robotic assistance and with endoscopic assistance only in certain cases. Endoscopic assistance can offer enhanced visualization of the surgical field and complement open direct approaches in neck dissection. Although FLND offers improved cosmetic outcomes when compared to those of traditional neck incisions, further study is required to determine its efficacy and indications. PMID:23023877

  1. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  2. Quick Dissection of the Segmental Bronchi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional anatomy of the bronchopulmonary segments is essential for respiratory medicine. This report describes a quick guide for dissecting the segmental bronchi in formaldehyde-fixed human material. All segmental bronchi are easy to dissect, and thus, this exercise will help medical students to better understand the…

  3. Objecting To Dissection: A College Student's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    In a number of states, students from kindergarten through high school have won the right to refuse to dissect or kill animals and the right to substitute an alternative project. This booklet was designed to help college science students take an ethical stand by refusing to participate in dissection exercises. The booklet begins with an overview of…

  4. Quick Dissection of the Segmental Bronchi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional anatomy of the bronchopulmonary segments is essential for respiratory medicine. This report describes a quick guide for dissecting the segmental bronchi in formaldehyde-fixed human material. All segmental bronchi are easy to dissect, and thus, this exercise will help medical students to better understand the

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the Chlamydia caviae elementary body and reticulate body forms.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Adams, Nancy E; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for significant diseases in humans and economically important domestic animals. These pathogens undergo a unique biphasic developmental cycle transitioning between the environmentally stable elementary body (EB) and the replicative intracellular reticulate body (RB), a conversion that appears to require extensive regulation of protein synthesis and function. However, Chlamydia possess a limited number of canonical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation of proteins in bacteria has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of post-translational control of protein function. We utilized 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with phosphoprotein staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis to map the phosphoproteome of the EB and RB forms of Chlamydia caviae. Forty-two non-redundant phosphorylated proteins were identified (some proteins were present in multiple locations within the gels). Thirty-four phosphorylated proteins were identified in EBs, including proteins found in central metabolism and protein synthesis, Chlamydia-specific hypothetical proteins and virulence-related proteins. Eleven phosphorylated proteins were identified in RBs, mostly involved in protein synthesis and folding and a single virulence-related protein. Only three phosphoproteins were found in both EB and RB phosphoproteomes. Collectively, 41 of 42 C. caviae phosphoproteins were present across Chlamydia species, consistent with the existence of a conserved chlamydial phosphoproteome. The abundance of stage-specific phosphoproteins suggests that protein phosphorylation may play a role in regulating the function of developmental-stage-specific proteins and/or may function in concert with other factors in directing EB-RB transitions. PMID:25998263

  6. Early cytokinin response proteins and phosphoproteins of Arabidopsis thaliana identified by proteome and phosphoproteome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Černý, Martin; Dyčka, Filip; Bobál'ová, Janette; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones involved in regulation of diverse developmental and physiological processes in plants whose molecular mechanisms of action are being intensely researched. However, most rapid responses to cytokinin signals at the proteomic and phosphoproteomic levels are unknown. Early cytokinin responses were investigated through proteome-wide expression profiling based on image and mass spectrometric analysis of two-dimensionally separated proteins and phosphoproteins. The effects of 15 min treatments of 7-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings with four main cytokinins representing hydroxyisopentenyl, isopentenyl, aromatic, and urea-derived type cytokinins were compared to help elucidate their common and specific function(s) in regulating plant development. In proteome and phosphoproteome maps, significant differences were reproducibly observed for 53 and 31 protein spots, respectively. In these spots, 96 proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS), providing a snapshot of early links in cytokinin-regulated signalling circuits and cellular processes, including light signalling and photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, the CLAVATA pathway, and protein and gene expression regulation, in accordance with previously described cytokinin functions. Furthermore, they indicate novel links between temperature and cytokinin signalling, and an involvement of calcium ions in cytokinin signalling. Most of the differentially regulated proteins and phosphoproteins are located in chloroplasts, suggesting an as yet uncharacterized direct signalling chain responsible for cytokinin action in chloroplasts. Finally, first insights into the degree of specificity of cytokinin receptors on phosphoproteomic effects were obtained from analyses of cytokinin action in a set of cytokinin receptor double mutants. PMID:20974740

  7. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the Chlamydia caviae elementary body and reticulate body forms

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nancy E.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for significant diseases in humans and economically important domestic animals. These pathogens undergo a unique biphasic developmental cycle transitioning between the environmentally stable elementary body (EB) and the replicative intracellular reticulate body (RB), a conversion that appears to require extensive regulation of protein synthesis and function. However, Chlamydia possess a limited number of canonical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation of proteins in bacteria has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of post-translational control of protein function. We utilized 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with phosphoprotein staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis to map the phosphoproteome of the EB and RB forms of Chlamydia caviae. Forty-two non-redundant phosphorylated proteins were identified (some proteins were present in multiple locations within the gels). Thirty-four phosphorylated proteins were identified in EBs, including proteins found in central metabolism and protein synthesis, Chlamydia-specific hypothetical proteins and virulence-related proteins. Eleven phosphorylated proteins were identified in RBs, mostly involved in protein synthesis and folding and a single virulence-related protein. Only three phosphoproteins were found in both EB and RB phosphoproteomes. Collectively, 41 of 42 C. caviae phosphoproteins were present across Chlamydia species, consistent with the existence of a conserved chlamydial phosphoproteome. The abundance of stage-specific phosphoproteins suggests that protein phosphorylation may play a role in regulating the function of developmental-stage-specific proteins and/or may function in concert with other factors in directing EB–RB transitions. PMID:25998263

  8. Occurrence and detection of phosphopeptide isomers in large-scale phosphoproteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Courcelles, Mathieu; Bridon, Gaëlle; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has been marked by the emergence of selective affinity media and sensitive mass spectrometry instrumentation that facilitated large-scale phosphoproteome analyses and expanded the repertoire of protein phosphorylation. Despite these remarkable advances, the precise location of the phosphorylation site still represents a sizable challenge in view of the labile nature of the phosphoester bond and the presence of neighboring phosphorylatable residues within the same peptide. This difficulty is exacerbated by the combinatorial distribution of phosphorylated residues giving rise to different phosphopeptide isomers. These peptides have similar physicochemical properties, and their separation by LC is often problematic. Few studies have described the frequency and distribution of phosphoisomers in large-scale phosphoproteomics experiments, and no convenient informatics tools currently exist to facilitate their detection. To address this analytical challenge, we developed two algorithms to detect separated and co-eluting phosphopeptide isomers and target their subsequent identification using an inclusion list in LC-MS/MS experiments. Using these algorithms, we determined that the proportion of isomers present in phosphoproteomics studies from mouse, rat, and fly cell extracts represents 3-6% of all identified phosphopeptides. While conventional analysis can identify chromatographically separated phosphopeptides, targeted LC-MS/MS analyses using inclusion lists provided complementary identification and expanded the number of phosphopeptide isomers by at least 52%. Interestingly, these analyses revealed that the occurrence of phosphopeptides isomers can also correlate with the presence of extended phosphorylatable amino acids that can act as a "phosphorylation switch" to bind complementary domains such as those present in SR proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes. PMID:22668510

  9. Picking the right tool for the job-Phosphoproteomics of egg activation.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Gary M

    2015-12-01

    Eggs are the rarest cell in the human body, yet their study is essential for the fields of fertility, reproduction, and fetal health. Guo et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 4080-4095) use a "surrogate" animal to discover the phosphoproteomic pathways involved in egg activation. With datasets of several thousand phosphosites on 2500 different proteins, these investigators have defined new pathways, connections to pathways, and priorities in searches for how eggs are activated at fertilization. These results in a sea urchin are now transposable to mammals for testing on a per candidate strategy. PMID:26573262

  10. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets.

    PubMed

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P; Pawson, Tony

    2015-07-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific 'network wiring'. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib-a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  11. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O.; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P.; Pawson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific ‘network wiring’. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib—a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)—in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  12. An optimized platform for hydrophilic interaction chromatography-immobilized metal affinity chromatography enables deep coverage of the rat liver phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, Francesca; Scott, Gilbert F; Huddleston, Michael J; Annan, Roland S

    2015-02-01

    While analysis of the phosphoproteome has become an important component of understanding how cells function, it remains a nontrivial task in terms of the number of sample preparation steps and instrument time needed to achieve sufficient depth of coverage to produce meaningful results. We previously described a multidimensional method that uses hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) followed by Fe(3+) immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) to reduce complexity, improve selectivity, and increase phosphopeptide identifications. Here we present refinements to our overall protocol that make it simpler and more efficient, while they provide greater coverage of the phosphoproteome. We introduce filter-aided sample prep (FASP) for cell lysis and trypsin digestion. Following HILIC separation, fractions are IMAC enriched using a 96-well filter plate. Finally, enriched samples are analyzed using an LC-MS strategy optimized for the fractionation scheme. The optimized protocol improves protein recovery, simplifies phosphopeptide enrichment, and optimizes instrument time, while it maintains deep coverage of the phosphoproteome. By using the refined protocol, we identified more than 16,000 unique phosphosites from rat liver in a single experiment, which used approximately 1 day of instrument time. All together, we present evidence for 24,485 rat liver phosphosites that represents the deepest coverage of a tissue phosphoproteome to date. PMID:25575281

  13. Large scale phosphoproteome analysis of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jae-Kyung; Sadar, Marianne D

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the western world. The androgen receptor, a phosphoprotein, is suspected to be involved in all stages of the prostate cancer. Androgen receptor activity can be modulated by various kinases such as PKA, MAPK, AKT, and Src. Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification and serves as a molecular on/off switch to regulate signaling. Disruptions of cellular phosphorylation are associated with various diseases such as cancer and kinases provide important drug targets. Here we present an analysis of the phosphoproteome in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. The analytical strategy employed used proteomics based methodologies with a combination of detergent and chaotropic reagent during trypsin digestion followed by titanium dioxide enrichment of phosphopeptides. Over the course of multiple analyses by mass spectrometry we identified a total of 746 phosphorylation sites in 540 phosphopeptides corresponding to 116 phosphoproteins, of which 56 have not been previously reported. Phosphoproteins identified included transcription factors, co-regulators of the androgen receptor, and cancer-related proteins that include β-catenin, USP10, and histone deacetylase-2. The information of signaling pathways, motifs of phosphorylated peptides, biological processes, molecular functions, cellular components, and protein interactions from the identified phosphoproteins established a map of phosphoproteome and signaling pathways in LNCaP cells. PMID:22699815

  14. The global phosphoproteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals complex organellar phosphorylation in the flagella and thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Gau, Brian; Slade, William O; Juergens, Matthew; Li, Ping; Hicks, Leslie M

    2014-09-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most intensively-studied and well-developed model for investigation of a wide-range of microalgal processes ranging from basic development through understanding triacylglycerol production. Although proteomic technologies permit interrogation of these processes at the protein level and efforts to date indicate phosphorylation-based regulation of proteins in C. reinhardtii is essential for its underlying biology, characterization of the C. reinhardtii phosphoproteome has been limited. Herein, we report the richest exploration of the C. reinhardtii proteome to date. Complementary enrichment strategies were used to detect 4588 phosphoproteins distributed among every cellular component in C. reinhardtii. Additionally, we report 18,160 unique phosphopeptides at <1% false discovery rate, which comprise 15,862 unique phosphosites - 98% of which are novel. Given that an estimated 30% of proteins in a eukaryotic cell are subject to phosphorylation, we report the majority of the phosphoproteome (23%) of C. reinhardtii. Proteins in key biological pathways were phosphorylated, including photosynthesis, pigment production, carbon assimilation, glycolysis, and protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and it is noteworthy that hyperphosphorylation was observed in flagellar proteins. This rich data set is available via ProteomeXchange (ID: PXD000783) and will significantly enhance understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular process and will serve as a critical resource for the microalgal community. PMID:24917610

  15. The Global Phosphoproteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveals Complex Organellar Phosphorylation in the Flagella and Thylakoid Membrane *

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Gau, Brian; Slade, William O.; Juergens, Matthew; Li, Ping; Hicks, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most intensively-studied and well-developed model for investigation of a wide-range of microalgal processes ranging from basic development through understanding triacylglycerol production. Although proteomic technologies permit interrogation of these processes at the protein level and efforts to date indicate phosphorylation-based regulation of proteins in C. reinhardtii is essential for its underlying biology, characterization of the C. reinhardtii phosphoproteome has been limited. Herein, we report the richest exploration of the C. reinhardtii proteome to date. Complementary enrichment strategies were used to detect 4588 phosphoproteins distributed among every cellular component in C. reinhardtii. Additionally, we report 18,160 unique phosphopeptides at <1% false discovery rate, which comprise 15,862 unique phosphosites - 98% of which are novel. Given that an estimated 30% of proteins in a eukaryotic cell are subject to phosphorylation, we report the majority of the phosphoproteome (23%) of C. reinhardtii. Proteins in key biological pathways were phosphorylated, including photosynthesis, pigment production, carbon assimilation, glycolysis, and protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and it is noteworthy that hyperphosphorylation was observed in flagellar proteins. This rich data set is available via ProteomeXchange (ID: PXD000783) and will significantly enhance understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular process and will serve as a critical resource for the microalgal community. PMID:24917610

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Networks in the Hypopharyngeal Gland of Honeybee Workers (Apis mellifera ligustica).

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuping; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Cui, Ziyou; Li, Jianke

    2015-11-01

    The hypopharyngeal gland (HG) in honeybee workers changes functions according to physiological age in the bee colony from producing royal jelly (RJ) in nurse bees to digestive enzymes in foragers. The same set of secretory cells expresses different genes or proteins to create these age-dependent changes; however, it is unknown precisely how the phosphorylation network regulates physiological differences across the development of the adult worker HG. We employed high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to survey phosphoproteome changes in the newly emerged, nurse, and forager bees. Overall, 941, 1322, and 1196 phosphorylation sites matching 1007, 1353, and 1199 phosphopeptides from 549, 720, and 698 phosphoproteins were identified in the three ages of the HG, respectively. Specialized, interconnected phosphorylation networks within each age were found by comparing protein abundance and phosphorylation levels. This illustrates that many proteins are regulated by phosphorylation independent of their expression levels. Furthermore, proteins in key biological processes and pathways were dynamically phosphorylated with age development, including the centrosome cycle, mitotic spindle elongation, macromolecular complex disassembly, and ribosome, indicating that phosphorylation tunes protein activity to optimize cellular behavior of the HG over time. Moreover, complementary protein and phosphoprotein expression is required to support the unique physiology of secretory activity in the HG. This reported data set of the honeybee phosphoproteome significantly improves our understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular processes and will serve as a valuable resource for those studying the honeybee and other insects. PMID:26384081

  17. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  18. GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit - Duration: 38 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit Animation revealing a swath of NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory GMI precipitation rates over Typhoon Hagupit. A...

  19. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  20. Acute aortic dissection in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaohua; Yang, Shouguo; Wang, Fangshun; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic dissection occurring during pregnancy represents a lethal risk to both the mother and fetus. Management of parturient with acute aortic dissection is complex. We report our experience of two pregnancies with type A acute aortic dissection. One patient is a 31-year-old pregnant woman (33rd gestational week) with a bicuspid aortic valve and the other is a 32-year-old pregnant woman (30th gestational week) with the Marfan syndrome. In both cases, a combined emergency operation consisting of Cesarean section, total hysterectomy prior to corrective surgery for aortic dissection was successfully performed within a relatively short period of time after the onset. Both patients' postoperative recovery was uneventful, and we achieved a favorable maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:25085319

  1. A New Idea for Dissecting Tray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branham, Arthur

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing a special dissecting tray to be used with transmitted light as well as reflected light is presented. It may also be used with an overhead projector to illustrate some skeletal structures in vertebrates. (Author/EB)

  2. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair. PMID:15640303

  3. Thrombolytic therapy in spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Behnam, R; Tillinghast, S

    1991-07-01

    A 42-year-old female with no cardiac risk factors had an acute anterolateral myocardial infarction treated with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Selective coronary cineangiography a week later revealed extensive dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and its second diagonal branch. Sixteen months later, she is asymptomatic. This is the fifth reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection treated with thrombolytic therapy during the acute event with uneventful recovery. PMID:1747972

  4. Dissecting Genetic Networks Underlying Complex Phenotypes: The Theoretical Framework

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhai, Hu-Qu; Paterson, Andrew H.; Xu, Jian-Long; Gao, Yong-Ming; Zheng, Tian-Qing; Wu, Rong-Ling; Fu, Bin-Ying; Ali, Jauhar; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Great progress has been made in genetic dissection of quantitative trait variation during the past two decades, but many studies still reveal only a small fraction of quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and epistasis remains elusive. We integrate contemporary knowledge of signal transduction pathways with principles of quantitative and population genetics to characterize genetic networks underlying complex traits, using a model founded upon one-way functional dependency of downstream genes on upstream regulators (the principle of hierarchy) and mutual functional dependency among related genes (functional genetic units, FGU). Both simulated and real data suggest that complementary epistasis contributes greatly to quantitative trait variation, and obscures the phenotypic effects of many ‘downstream’ loci in pathways. The mathematical relationships between the main effects and epistatic effects of genes acting at different levels of signaling pathways were established using the quantitative and population genetic parameters. Both loss of function and “co-adapted” gene complexes formed by multiple alleles with differentiated functions (effects) are predicted to be frequent types of allelic diversity at loci that contribute to the genetic variation of complex traits in populations. Downstream FGUs appear to be more vulnerable to loss of function than their upstream regulators, but this vulnerability is apparently compensated by different FGUs of similar functions. Other predictions from the model may account for puzzling results regarding responses to selection, genotype by environment interaction, and the genetic basis of heterosis. PMID:21283795

  5. The Effect of Animal Dissections on Student Acquisition of Knowledge of and Attitudes toward the Animals Dissected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Terry L.

    A conflict exists over the use of animals in the classroom. One aspect of this use involved the dissection of animals. Animal protection advocates report that dissections constitute abuse of the animals dissected. The advocates state that what is learned by dissection could be more effectively learned by other means. Some science educators state…

  6. Molecular Dissection of Phage Endolysin

    PubMed Central

    Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Joshi, Himanshu; Jain, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has always been recognized as one of the most successful pathogens. Bacteriophages that attack and kill mycobacteria offer an alternate mechanism for the curtailment of this bacterium. Upon infection, mycobacteriophages produce lysins that catalyze cell wall peptidoglycan hydrolysis and mycolic acid layer breakdown of the host resulting in bacterial cell rupture and virus release. The ability to lyse bacterial cells make lysins extremely significant. We report here a detailed molecular dissection of the function and regulation of mycobacteriophage D29 Lysin A. Several truncated versions of Lysin A were constructed, and their activities were analyzed by zymography and by expressing them in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Our experiments establish that Lysin A harbors two catalytically active domains, both of which show E. coli cell lysis upon their expression exclusively in the periplasmic space. However, the expression of only one of these domains and the full-length Lysin A caused M. smegmatis cell lysis. Interestingly, full-length protein remained inactive in E. coli periplasm. Our data suggest that the inactivity is ensued by a C-terminal domain that interacts with the N-terminal domain. This interaction was affirmed by surface plasmon resonance. Our experiments also demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of Lysin A selectively binds to M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis peptidoglycans. Our methodology of studying E. coli cell lysis by Lysin A and its truncations after expressing these proteins in the bacterial periplasm with the help of signal peptide paves the way for a large scale identification and analysis of such proteins obtained from other bacteriophages. PMID:24627486

  7. Dissection and dissection-associated required experiences improve student performance in gross anatomy: Differences among quartiles.

    PubMed

    Pizzimenti, Marc A; Pantazis, Nicholas; Sandra, Alexander; Hoffmann, Darren S; Lenoch, Susan; Ferguson, Kristi J

    2016-05-01

    To promote student learning, educational strategies should provide multiple levels of engagement with the subject matter. This study investigated examination data from five first year medical gross anatomy class cohorts (692 students) to determine if enhanced student performance was correlated with learning through dissection in a course that used a rotating dissection schedule coupled with peer teaching and other associated experiences. When students performed two of five weekly dissections for a given unit, their average scores on both laboratory and written examinations tended to increase as compared to when they had completed only one week of dissection (P < 0.01). However, these performance gains differed across the class strata and were related to the amount of dissection completed. Students in the upper quartile (UQS) of the class benefited when they had dissected once (92.8%) or twice (92.4%), and these scores were significantly higher than those attained when learning from peers (90.3%, P < 0.01). Students in the lower quartile (LQS) benefited most from the dissection experiences, where practical examination performance was better (77.8% and 80.5%) than when these students learned material from their peers (73.7%, P < 0.01). Although UQS benefited from dissection, LQS benefited to a greater extent in both the practical and written examinations with dissection. Although limited, these data suggest that dissection, coupled with associated educational activities, is an effective pedagogical strategy for learning. Further investigation is required to evaluate the concomitant benefits of peer teaching that are associated with the dissection experience. Anat Sci Educ 9: 238-246. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26536279

  8. Predicting flow in aortic dissection: comparison of computational model with PC-MRI velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Juli, C; Wood, N B; Gibbs, R G J; Xu, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening process in which the weakened wall develops a tear, causing separation of wall layers. The dissected layers separate the original true aortic lumen and a newly created false lumen. If untreated, the condition can be fatal. Flow rate in the false lumen is a key feature for false lumen patency, which has been regarded as one of the most important predictors of adverse early and later outcomes. Detailed flow analysis in the dissected aorta may assist vascular surgeons in making treatment decisions, but computational models to simulate flow in aortic dissections often involve several assumptions. The purpose of this study is to assess the computational models adopted in previous studies by comparison with in vivo velocity data obtained by means of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). Aortic dissection geometry was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, while PC-MRI velocity data were used to define inflow conditions and to provide distal velocity components for comparison with the simulation results. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation incorporated a laminar-turbulent transition model, which is necessary for adequate flow simulation in aortic conditions. Velocity contours from PC-MRI and CFD in the two lumens at the distal plane were compared at four representative time points in the pulse cycle. The computational model successfully captured the complex regions of flow reversal and recirculation qualitatively, although quantitative differences exist. With a rigid wall assumption and exclusion of arch branches, the CFD model over-predicted the false lumen flow rate by 25% at peak systole. Nevertheless, an overall good agreement was achieved, confirming the physiological relevance and validity of the computational model for type B aortic dissection with a relatively stiff dissection flap. PMID:25070022

  9. Acute type B aortic dissection: insights from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Kim A.; Vaishnava, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Acute type B aortic dissection comprises approximately one-third of all aortic dissection cases. Although this catastrophic cardiovascular condition was first described in the medical literature over two centuries ago, data on the optimal diagnostic and treatment modalities for type B dissection was slow to evolve throughout the latter half of the twentieth century, even as newer diagnostic techniques and management strategies became commonplace. To further elucidate contemporary practice patterns and outcomes of aortic dissection, the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) was established in 1996. Over the past two decades, IRAD publications have steadily increased our knowledge and understanding about aortic dissection. Specifically in recent years, analyses of IRAD data have gone beyond simply characterizing the patient with acute type B aortic dissection and have attempted to identify the means by which the outcome of such a patient could be improved. Thus, we present herein three areas in which IRAD data has recently advanced our understanding of acute type B aortic dissection: temporal classification especially for the subacute time period, risk stratification for identifying complicated cases, and thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). PMID:25133099

  10. Science Teachers and the Dissection Debate: Perspectives on Animal Dissection and Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated Ontario science and biology teachers' practices and attitudes toward animal dissection and dissection alternatives. The data was collected through a mixed methods approach involving online surveys (n = 153) and subsequent telephone interviews (n = 9) with secondary school science and biology teachers. The findings indicate…

  11. Recent findings and technological advances in phosphoproteomics for cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    von Stechow, Louise; Francavilla, Chiara; Olsen, Jesper V

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific phosphorylation is a fast and reversible covalent post-translational modification that is tightly regulated in cells. The cellular machinery of enzymes that write, erase and read these modifications (kinases, phosphatases and phospho-binding proteins) is frequently deregulated in different diseases, including cancer. Large-scale studies of phosphoproteins – termed phosphoproteomics – strongly rely on the use of high-performance mass spectrometric instrumentation. This powerful technology has been applied to study a great number of phosphorylation-based phenotypes. Nevertheless, many technical and biological challenges have to be overcome to identify biologically relevant phosphorylation sites in cells and tissues. This review describes different technological strategies to identify and quantify phosphorylation sites with high accuracy, without significant loss of analysis speed and reproducibility in tissues and cells. Moreover, computational tools for analysis, integration and biological interpretation of phosphorylation events are discussed. PMID:26400465

  12. Unbiased phosphoproteomic method identifies the initial effects of a methacrylic acid copolymer on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Michael Dean; Wells, Laura A; Lisovsky, Alexandra; Guo, Hongbo; Isserlin, Ruth; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Mahou, Redouan; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V

    2015-08-25

    An unbiased phosphoproteomic method was used to identify biomaterial-associated changes in the phosphorylation patterns of macrophage-like cells. The phosphorylation differences between differentiated THP1 (dTHP1) cells treated for 10, 20, or 30 min with a vascular regenerative methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer or a control methyl methacrylate (MM) copolymer were determined by MS. There were 1,470 peptides (corresponding to 729 proteins) that were differentially phosphorylated in dTHP1 cells treated with the two materials with a greater cellular response to MAA treatment. In addition to identifying pathways (such as integrin signaling and cytoskeletal arrangement) that are well known to change with cell-material interaction, previously unidentified pathways, such as apoptosis and mRNA splicing, were also discovered. PMID:26261332

  13. Offline High pH Reversed-Phase Peptide Fractionation for Deep Phosphoproteome Coverage.

    PubMed

    Batth, Tanveer S; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation, a process in which kinases modify serines, threonines, and tyrosines with phosphoryl groups is of major importance in eukaryotic biology. Protein phosphorylation events are key initiators of signaling responses which determine cellular outcomes after environmental and metabolic stimuli, and are thus highly regulated. Therefore, studying the mechanism of regulation by phosphorylation, and pinpointing the exact site of phosphorylation on proteins is of high importance. This protocol describes in detail a phosphoproteomics workflow for ultra-deep coverage by fractionating peptide mixtures based on high pH (basic) reversed-phase chromatography prior to phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis. Peptides are separated on a C18 reversed-phase column under basic conditions and fractions collected in timed intervals followed by concatenation of the fractions. Each Fraction is subsequently enriched for phosphopeptides using TiO2 followed by LC/MS analysis. PMID:26584926

  14. Sample preparation and analytical strategies for large-scale phosphoproteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Michnick, Stephen; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that controls a wide range of protein functions including enzyme activity, subcellular localisation, protein degradation, intra- and inter-molecular protein interactions. Significant advances in both phosphopeptide enrichment methods and sensitive mass spectrometry instrumentation have been achieved over the past decade to facilitate the large-scale identification of protein phosphorylation in humans and different animal and microbial model systems. While mass spectrometry provides the ability to identify thousands of phosphorylation sites in a single experiment, the further understanding of the functional significance of this modification on protein substrates requires detailed information on the changes in phosphorylation stoichiometry and protein abundance across experimental paradigms. This review presents different sample preparation methods and analytical strategies used in mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics to profile protein phosphorylation and unravel the regulation of this modification on protein function. PMID:22683502

  15. Systematic profiling of the bacterial phosphoproteome reveals bacterium-specific features of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao-Hsia; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a crucial posttranslational modification for regulating cellular processes in bacteria; however, it has not been extensively studied because of technical difficulties in the enrichment of phosphopeptides. We devised an enrichment protocol that enabled the identification of >1000 phosphopeptides from a single bacterial sample. We discovered three high-confidence serine and threonine phosphorylation motifs, as well as 29 other motifs at various levels of confidence, from three distinct bacterial phosphoproteomes. We found that the proline-directed and basophilic phosphorylation motifs that are commonly enriched in eukaryotes were not observed in bacteria. Unlike eukaryotes, bacteria had a low occurrence of both phosphorylation and acetylation in N-terminal phosphopeptides. Because infection of host cells by bacterial pathogens is often accompanied by kinase-mediated phosphorylation events, the differences in phosphorylation preferences between bacteria and eukaryotes revealed by this study could be useful in identifying bacterial-specific targets for future therapies. PMID:26373674

  16. Unbiased phosphoproteomic method identifies the initial effects of a methacrylic acid copolymer on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Michael Dean; Wells, Laura A.; Lisovsky, Alexandra; Guo, Hongbo; Isserlin, Ruth; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Mahou, Redouan; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    An unbiased phosphoproteomic method was used to identify biomaterial-associated changes in the phosphorylation patterns of macrophage-like cells. The phosphorylation differences between differentiated THP1 (dTHP1) cells treated for 10, 20, or 30 min with a vascular regenerative methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer or a control methyl methacrylate (MM) copolymer were determined by MS. There were 1,470 peptides (corresponding to 729 proteins) that were differentially phosphorylated in dTHP1 cells treated with the two materials with a greater cellular response to MAA treatment. In addition to identifying pathways (such as integrin signaling and cytoskeletal arrangement) that are well known to change with cell–material interaction, previously unidentified pathways, such as apoptosis and mRNA splicing, were also discovered. PMID:26261332

  17. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  18. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  19. Characterization of the human plasma phosphoproteome using linear ion trap mass spectrometry and multiple search engines.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Montserrat; Gay, Marina; Ovelleiro, David; Casas, Vanessa; Gelp, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-02-01

    Major plasma protein families play different roles in blood physiology and hemostasis and in immunodefense. Other proteins in plasma can be involved in signaling as chemical messengers or constitute biological markers of the status of distant tissues. In this respect, the plasma phosphoproteome holds potentially relevant information on the mechanisms modulating these processes through the regulation of protein activity. In this work we describe for the first time a collection of phosphopeptides identified in human plasma using immunoaffinity separation of the seven major serum protein families from other plasma proteins, SCX fractionation, and TiO(2) purification prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. One-hundred and twenty-seven phosphosites in 138 phosphopeptides mapping 70 phosphoproteins were identified with FDR < 1%. A high-confidence collection of phosphosites was obtained using a combined search with the OMSSA, SEQUEST, and Phenyx search engines. PMID:19941383

  20. Application of metal-chelate affinity chromatography to the study of the phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Imam-Sghiouar, N; Joubert-Caron, R; Caron, M

    2005-02-01

    With the increasing importance of proteome analysis, studying the phosphoproteome is a priority for functional studies. Therefore, a rational approach to simplifying the proteome is needed. In this work, we examined the use of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) using ferric ions-chelated column for enriching crude cell extracts in phosphoproteins. The adsorption of the proteins on Fe(3+) was obtained at an acidic pH 5.6, and their elution at a more basic pH in Tris buffer. To evaluate the separation, western blots were performed with either anti-phosphotyrosine or anti-phosphoserine/threonine. The analysis of the eluates demonstrated the selectivity of the separation, particularly for proteins phosphorylated on serine or threonine. In conclusion, the advantages and the limits of this approach are discussed. PMID:15645166

  1. Single-Cell Phosphoproteomics Resolves Adaptive Signaling Dynamics and Informs Targeted Combination Therapy in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Matsutani, Tomoo; Masui, Kenta; Yang, Huijun; Ikegami, Shiro; Gu, Yuchao; Herrmann, Ken; Johnson, Dazy; Ding, Xiangming; Hwang, Kiwook; Kim, Jungwoo; Zhou, Jian; Su, Yapeng; Li, Xinmin; Bonetti, Bruno; Chopra, Rajesh; James, C David; Cavenee, Webster K; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Mischel, Paul S; Heath, James R; Gini, Beatrice

    2016-04-11

    Intratumoral heterogeneity of signaling networks may contribute to targeted cancer therapy resistance, including in the highly lethal brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM). We performed single-cell phosphoproteomics on a patient-derived in vivo GBM model of mTOR kinase inhibitor resistance and coupled it to an analytical approach for detecting changes in signaling coordination. Alterations in the protein signaling coordination were resolved as early as 2.5 days after treatment, anticipating drug resistance long before it was clinically manifest. Combination therapies were identified that resulted in complete and sustained tumor suppression in vivo. This approach may identify actionable alterations in signal coordination that underlie adaptive resistance, which can be suppressed through combination drug therapy, including non-obvious drug combinations. PMID:27070703

  2. The beginnings of crop phosphoproteomics: exploring early warning systems of stress

    PubMed Central

    Rampitsch, Christof; Bykova, Natalia V.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines why a knowledge of plant protein phosphorylation events is important in devising strategies to protect crops from both biotic and abiotic stresses, and why proteomics should be included when studying stress pathways. Most of the achievements in elucidating phospho-signaling pathways in biotic and abiotic stress are reported from model systems: while these are discussed, this review attempts mainly to focus on work done with crops, with examples of achievements reported from rice, maize, wheat, grape, Brassica, tomato, and soy bean after cold acclimation, hormonal and oxidative hydrogen peroxide treatment, salt stress, mechanical wounding, or pathogen challenge. The challenges that remain to transfer this information into a format that can be used to protect crops against biotic and abiotic stresses are enormous. The tremendous increase in the speed and ease of DNA sequencing is poised to reveal the whole genomes of many crop species in the near future, which will facilitate phosphoproteomics and phosphogenomics research. PMID:22783265

  3. The coming of age of phosphoproteomics--from large data sets to inference of protein functions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe P; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications used in signal transduction to control cell growth, proliferation, and survival in response to both intracellular and extracellular stimuli. This modification is finely coordinated by a network of kinases and phosphatases that recognize unique sequence motifs and/or mediate their functions through scaffold and adaptor proteins. Detailed information on the nature of kinase substrates and site-specific phosphoregulation is required in order for one to better understand their pathophysiological roles. Recent advances in affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) sensitivity have enabled the large-scale identification and profiling of protein phosphorylation, but appropriate follow-up experiments are required in order to ascertain the functional significance of identified phosphorylation sites. In this review, we present meaningful technical details for MS-based phosphoproteomic analyses and describe important considerations for the selection of model systems and the functional characterization of identified phosphorylation sites. PMID:24037665

  4. Identification of kinase inhibitor targets in the lung cancer microenvironment by chemical and phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gridling, Manuela; Ficarro, Scott B.; Breitwieser, Florian P.; Song, Lanxi; Parapatics, Katja; Colinge, Jacques; Haura, Eric B.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Rix, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of gene mutations, which are recognized as cancer drivers, can be successfully targeted with drugs. The redundant and dynamic nature of oncogenic signaling networks and complex interactions between cancer cells and the microenvironment, however, can cause drug resistance. Whereas these challenges can be addressed by developing drug combinations or polypharmacology drugs, this benefits greatly from a detailed understanding of the proteome-wide target profiles. Using mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics, we report the comprehensive characterization of the drug-protein interaction networks for the multikinase inhibitors dasatinib and sunitinib in primary lung cancer tissue specimens derived from patients. We observed in excess of 100 protein kinase targets plus various protein complexes involving, for instance, AMPK, TBK1 (sunitinib) and ILK (dasatinib). Importantly, comparison with lung cancer cell lines and mouse xenografts thereof showed that most targets were shared between cell lines and tissues. Several targets, however, were only present in tumor tissues. In xenografts, most of these proteins were of mouse origin suggesting that they originate from the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, intersection with subsequent global phosphoproteomic analysis identified several activated signaling pathways. These included MAPK, immune and integrin signaling, which were affected by these drugs in both cancer cells and the microenvironment. Thus, the combination of chemical and phosphoproteomics can generate a systems view of proteins, complexes and signaling pathways that are simultaneously engaged by multi-targeted drugs in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment. This may allow for the design of novel anticancer therapies that concurrently target multiple tumor compartments. PMID:25189542

  5. Plasma phosphoproteome and differential plasma phosphoproteins with opisthorchis viverrini-related cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kotawong, Kanawut; Thitapakorn, Veerachai; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Phaonakrop, Narumon; Viyanant, Vithoon; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the plasma phosphoproteome and differential plasma phosphoproteins in cases of of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV)-related cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Plasma phosphoproteomes from CCA patients (10) and non-CCA subjects (5 each for healthy subjects and OV infection) were investigated using gel-based and solution-based LC-MS/MS. Phosphoproteins in plasma samples were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. STRAP, PANTHER, iPath, and MeV programs were applied for the identification of their functions, signaling and metabolic pathways; and for the discrimination of potential biomarkers in CCA patients and non-CCA subjects, respectively. A total of 90 and 60 plasma phosphoproteins were identified by gel-based and solution-based LC-MS/MS, respectively. Most of the phosphoproteins were cytosol proteins which play roles in several cellular processes, signaling pathways, and metabolic pathways (STRAP, PANTHER, and iPath analysis). The absence of serine/arginine repetitive matrix protein 3 (A6NNA2), tubulin tyrosine ligase-like family, member 6, and biorientation of chromosomes in cell division protein 1-like (Q8NFC6) in plasma phosphoprotein were identified as potential biomarkers for the differentiation of healthy subjects from patients with CCA and OV infection. To differentiate CCA from OV infection, the absence of both serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2A 56 kDa regulatory subunit beta isoform and coiled-coil domain-containing protein 126 precursor (Q96EE4) were then applied. A combination of 5 phosphoproteins may new alternative choices for CCA diagnosis. PMID:25735322

  6. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the highly-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, MHCC97-H.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Cheng, Han; Wang, Zhiqiang; Su, Na; Liu, Zexian; Sun, Changqing; Zhen, Bei; Hong, Xuechuan; Xue, Yu; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major cause for lethal liver cancer. Signaling pathways associated with cancer progression are frequently reconfigured by aberrant phosphorylation of key proteins. To capture the key phosphorylation events in HCC metastasis, we established a methodology by an off-line high-pH HPLC separation strategy combined with multi-step IMAC and LC-MS/MS to study the phosphoproteome of a metastatic HCC cell line, MHCC97-H (high metastasis). In total, 6593 phosphopeptides with 6420 phosphorylation sites (p-sites) of 2930 phosphoproteins were identified. Statistical analysis of gene ontology (GO) categories for the identified phosphoproteins showed that several of the biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and RNA splicing, were over-represented. Further analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotations demonstrated that phosphoproteins in multiple pathways, such as spliceosome, the insulin signaling pathway and the cell cycle, were significantly enriched. In particular, we compared our dataset with a previously published phosphoproteome in a normal liver sample, and the results revealed that a number of proteins in the spliceosome pathway, such as U2 small nuclear RNA Auxiliary Factor 2 (U2AF2), Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4A-III (EIF4A3), Cell Division Cycle 5-Like (CDC5L) and Survival Motor Neuron Domain Containing 1 (SMNDC1), were exclusively identified as phosphoproteins only in the MHCC97-H cell line. These results indicated that the phosphorylation of spliceosome proteins may participate in the metastasis of HCC by regulating mRNA processing and RNA splicing. PMID:25690035

  7. Multiplexed Detection of O-GlcNAcome, Phosphoproteome, and Whole Proteome within the Same Gel

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Dupont, Erwan; Deracinois, Barbara; Lambert, Matthias; Bastide, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The cellular diversity of proteins results in part from their post-translational modifications. Among all of them, the O-GlcNAcylation is an atypical glycosylation, more similar to phosphorylation than classical glycosylations. Highly dynamic, reversible, and exclusively localized on cytosolic, nuclear, and mitochondrial proteins, O-GlcNAcylation is known to regulate almost all if not all cellular processes. Fundamental for the cell life, O-GlcNAcylation abnormalities are involved in the etiology of several inherited diseases. Assessing to O-GlcNAcylation pattern will permit to get relevant data about the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cell physiology. To get understanding about the role of O-GlcNAcylation, as also considering its interplay with phosphorylation, the O-GlcNAc profiling remains a real challenge for the community of proteomists/glycoproteomists. The development of multiplexed proteomics based on fluorescent detection of proteins permits to go further in the understanding of the proteome complexity. We propose herein a multiplexed proteomic strategy to detect O-GlcNAcylated proteins, phosphoproteins, and the whole proteome within the same bidimensional gel. In particular, we investigated the phosphoproteome through the ProQ Diamond staining, while the whole proteome was visualized through Sypro Ruby staining, or after the labeling of proteins with a T-Dye fluorophore. The O-GlcNAcome was revealed by the way of the Click chemistry and the azide–alkyne cycloaddition of a fluorophore on GlcNAc moieties. This method permits, after sequential image acquisition, the direct in-gel detection of O-GlcNAcome, phosphoproteome, and whole proteome. PMID:25389416

  8. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Myocardial Tissues Distinguishes Ischemic from Non-Ischemic End Stage Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Linda W.; Thompson, J. Will; Soderblom, Erik J.; Feger, Bryan J.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Hershberger, Kathleen A.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Nagel, Whitney L.; Landinez, Gina P.; Shah, Kishan M.; Burns, Virginia A.; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Foster, Matthew W.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure. PMID:25117565

  9. Systematic Analysis of the Phosphoproteome and Kinase-substrate Networks in the Mouse Testis*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lin; Liu, Zexian; Wang, Jing; Cui, Yiqiang; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Xue, Yu; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process closely associated with the phosphorylation-orchestrated cell cycle. Elucidating the phosphorylation-based regulations should advance our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we present an integrative study of phosphorylation events in the testis. Large-scale phosphoproteome profiling in the adult mouse testis identified 17,829 phosphorylation sites in 3955 phosphoproteins. Although only approximately half of the phosphorylation sites enriched by IMAC were also captured by TiO2, both the phosphoprotein data sets identified by the two methods significantly enriched the functional annotation of spermatogenesis. Thus, the phosphoproteome profiled in this study is a highly useful snapshot of the phosphorylation events in spermatogenesis. To further understand phosphoregulation in the testis, the site-specific kinase-substrate relations were computationally predicted for reconstructing kinase-substrate phosphorylation networks. A core sub-kinase-substrate phosphorylation networks among the spermatogenesis-related proteins was retrieved and analyzed to explore the phosphoregulation during spermatogenesis. Moreover, network-based analyses demonstrated that a number of protein kinases such as MAPKs, CDK2, and CDC2 with statistically more site-specific kinase-substrate relations might have significantly higher activities and play an essential role in spermatogenesis, and the predictions were consistent with previous studies on the regulatory roles of these kinases. In particular, the analyses proposed that the activities of POLO-like kinases (PLKs) might be dramatically higher, while the prediction was experimentally validated by detecting and comparing the phosphorylation levels of pT210, an indicator of PLK1 activation, in testis and other tissues. Further experiments showed that the inhibition of POLO-like kinases decreases cell proliferation by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. Taken together, this systematic study provides a global landscape of phosphoregulation in the testis, and should prove to be of value in future studies of spermatogenesis. PMID:25293948

  10. Prevention of complications in neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kerawala, Cyrus J; Heliotos, Manolis

    2009-01-01

    Background The neck dissection has remained a pivotal aspect of head and neck cancer management for over a century. During this time its role has expanded from a purely therapeutic option into an elective setting, in part promoted by efforts to reduce its morbidity. Objectives This review will consider the potential complications of neck dissection and on the basis of the available evidence describe both their management and prevention. Conclusion Although the neck dissection continues to provide clinicians with a method of addressing cervical disease, its reliability and safety can only be assured if surgeons remain cognisant of the potential complications and aim to minimise such morbidity by appropriate management in the peri-operative period. PMID:19822010

  11. The nature of dissection: Exploring student conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Katharine

    The model of conceptual change in science describes the process of learning as a complete restructuring of knowledge, when learners discover or are shown more plausible, intelligent alternatives to existing conceptions. Emotions have been acknowledged as part of a learner's conceptual ecology, but the effects of emotions on learning have yet to be described. This research was conducted to examine the role that emotions have on learning for thirteen high school students, as they dissected cats in a Human Anatomy and Physiology class. The project also investigated whether a student's emotional reactions may be used to develop a sense of connectedness with the nonhuman world, which is defined as ecological literacy. This study utilized a grounded theory approach, in which student responses to interviews were the primary source of data. Interviews were transcribed, and responses were coded according to a constant comparative method of analysis. Responses were compared with the four conditions necessary for conceptual change to occur, and also to five principles of ecological literacy. Students who had negative reactions to dissection participated less in the activity, and demonstrated less conceptual change. Two female students showed the strongest emotional reactions to dissection, and also the lowest amount of conceptual change. One male student also had strong negative reactions to death, and showed no conceptual change. The dissection experiences of the students in this study did not generally reflect ecological principles. The two students whose emotional reactions to dissection were the most negative demonstrated the highest degree of ecological literacy. These results provide empirical evidence of the effects that emotions have on learning, and also supports the opinions of educators who do not favor dissection, because it does not teach students to respect all forms of life.

  12. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of polyethylene glycol-induced osmotic stress in root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Walter Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress (OS) reduces cell-wall (CW) porosity and limits aluminium (Al) uptake by root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A subsequent transcriptomic study suggested that genes related to CW processes are involved in adjustment to OS. In this study, a proteomic and phosphoproteomic approach was applied to identify OS-induced protein regulation to further improve our understanding of how OS affects Al accumulation. Analysis of total soluble proteins in root tips indicated that, in total, 22 proteins were differentially regulated by OS; these proteins were functionally categorized. Seventy-seven per- cent of the total expressed proteins were involved in metabolic pathways, particularly of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. An analysis of the apoplastic proteome revealed that OS reduced the level of five proteins and increased that of seven proteins. Investigation of the total soluble phosphoproteome suggested that dehydrin responded to OS with an enhanced phosphorylation state without a change in abundance. A cellular immunolocalization analysis indicated that dehydrin was localized mainly in the CW. This suggests that dehydrin may play a major protective role in the OS-induced physical breakdown of the CW structure and thus maintenance of the reversibility of CW extensibility during recovery from OS. The proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses provided novel insights into the complex mechanisms of OS-induced reduction of Al accumulation in the root tips of common bean and highlight a key role for modification of CW structure. PMID:24123251

  13. Phosphoproteome analysis of rat L6 myotubes using reversed-phase C18 prefractionation and titanium dioxide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Hou, Junjie; Cui, Ziyou; Xie, Zhensheng; Xue, Peng; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xiulan; Li, Jing; Cai, Tanxi; Yang, Fuquan

    2010-02-01

    The rat L6 myotubes is an important in vitro model system for studying signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. Exploring phosphorylation events involved in the skeletal muscle is very significant for elucidating the kinase-substrate relationship, understanding regulatory mechanisms involved in signaling pathways and providing insights into numerous cell processes. Here, we used mass spectrometry-based proteomics to conduct global phosphoproteome profiling of rat L6 myotubes. Using an efficient phosphoproteomic strategy including prefractionation of tryptic peptide mixtures with self-packed RP C18 columns, phosphopeptide enrichment with TiO(2), and 2D-LC (SCX/RP)-MS/MS analysis, a total of 2230 unique phosphopeptides from 1195 proteins were identified with a false-discovery rate of less than 1.0% using a target/decoy database searching strategy. After determining the degree of certainty of the phosphorylation site location (Ascore value >or=19), 11 Ser motifs and one Thr motif were derived from our data set using the Motif-X algorithm. Several potential signaling pathways were found in our myotubes phosphoproteome, such as the MAPK signaling pathway and the IGF-1/Insulin signaling pathway. PMID:20028136

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals major default phosphorylation sites outside long intrinsically disordered regions of Arabidopsis plasma membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide statistics established that long intrinsically disordered regions (over 30 residues) are predicted in a large part of proteins in all eukaryotes, with a higher ratio in trans-membrane proteins. At functional level, such unstructured and flexible regions were suggested for years to favour phosphorylation events. In plants, despite increasing evidence of the regulation of transport and signalling processes by phosphorylation events, only few data are available without specific information regarding plasma membrane proteins, especially at proteome scale. Results Using a dedicated phosphoproteomic workflow, 75 novel and unambiguous phosphorylation sites were identified in Arabidopsis plasma membrane. Bioinformatics analysis showed that this new dataset concerned mostly integral proteins involved in key functions of the plasma membrane (such as transport and signal transduction, including protein phosphorylation). It thus expanded by 15% the directory of phosphosites previously characterized in signalling and transport proteins. Unexpectedly, 66% of phosphorylation sites were predicted to be located outside long intrinsically disordered regions. This result was further corroborated by analysis of publicly available data for the plasma membrane. Conclusions The new phosphoproteomics data presented here, with published datasets and functional annotation, suggest a previously unexpected topology of phosphorylation in the plant plasma membrane proteins. The significance of these new insights into the so far overlooked properties of the plant plasma membrane phosphoproteome and the long disordered regions is discussed. PMID:23110452

  15. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in puerperium.

    PubMed

    Refaie, Medhat; Alshehri, Mohammed; Gallo, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in puerperium is uncommon and most often occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. Two weeks after delivery, a 41-year-old woman presented with typical retrosternal chest pain and inverted T-waves in leads II, V5 and V6, and Q-waves in aVR. Her peak troponin I level was 16.39 µgċL(-1) Coronary angiography showed left main spiral dissection extending to the mid left anterior descending artery and involving the first diagonal branch. Urgent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed successfully. The mechanism and approach are discussed. PMID:25746424

  16. Coronary Thrombosis without Dissection following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sibel, Michael; Thomas, Peter; Burt, Francis; Cipolla, James; Puleo, Peter; Baker, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest resulting in coronary thrombosis and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a rare but well-described occurrence in adults. Angiography in such cases has generally disclosed complete epicardial coronary occlusion with thrombus, indistinguishable from the findings commonly found in spontaneous plaque rupture due to atherosclerotic disease. In all previously reported cases in which coronary interrogation with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in association with acute revascularization, coronary artery dissection was implicated as the etiology of coronary thrombosis. We present the first case report of blunt trauma-associated coronary thrombosis without underlying atherosclerosis or coronary dissection, as documented by IVUS imaging. PMID:27006836

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  18. Conservative Management of Chronic Aortic Dissection with Underlying Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf Beebeejaun, Mohammad; Malec, Aleksandra; Gupta, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most common aortic emergencies affecting around 2000 Americans each year. It usually presents in the acute state but in a small percentage of patients aortic dissections go unnoticed and these patients survive without any adequate therapy. With recent advances in medical care and diagnostic technologies, aortic dissection can be successfully managed through surgical or medical options, consequently increasing the related survival rate. However, little is known about the optimal long-term management of patients suffering from chronic aortic dissection. The purpose of the present report is to review aortic dissection, namely its pathology and the current diagnostic tools available, and to discuss the management options for chronic aortic dissection. We report a patient in which chronic aortic dissection presented with recurring episodes of vomiting and also discuss the management plan of our patient who had a chronic aortic dissection as well as an underlying aortic aneurysm. PMID:24179638

  19. Global Distribution of Dissected Duricrust on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Cooper, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence for dissected duricrust was identified in high resolution MOC images. Analysis of all available images was used to map the global distribution of this terrain. It is apparently restricted to two latitude bands: 30-60 deg. N and 30-60 deg. S.

  20. The etiology of cervical artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Haneline, Michael T.; Rosner, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The etiology of cervical artery dissection (CAD) is unclear, although a number of risk factors have been reported to be associated with the condition. On rare occasions, patients experience CAD after cervical spine manipulation, making knowledge about the cervical arteries, the predisposing factors, and the pathogenesis of the condition of interest to chiropractors. This commentary reports on the relevant anatomy of the cervical arteries, developmental features of CAD, epidemiology of the condition, and mechanisms of dissection. The analysis of CAD risk factors is confusing, however, because many people are exposed to mechanical events and known pathophysiological associations without ever experiencing dissection. No cause-and-effect relationship has been established between cervical spine manipulation and CAD, but it seems that cervical manipulation may be capable of triggering dissection in a susceptible patient or contributing to the evolution of an already existing CAD. Despite the many risk factors that have been proposed as possible causes of CAD, it is still unknown which of them actually predispose patients to CAD after cervical spine manipulation. PMID:19674705

  1. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  2. Intraoperative aortic dissection in pediatric heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Harada, Yorikazu; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Satomi, Gengi

    2006-06-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection occurred in a 3-year-old-boy undergoing repair of an atrial septal defect. Transesophageal echocardiography was useful for the diagnosis, and conservative medical treatment under close observation was feasible in this case which involved a limited intimal tear. PMID:16714685

  3. Dissecting risk haplotypes in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how genetic risk variants contribute to complex diseases is crucial for predicting disease susceptibility and developing patient-tailored therapies. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Young et al. (2015) dissect the function of common non-coding risk haplotypes in the SORL1 locus in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25842969

  4. Cow's Eye Dissection in the Physics Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.; Keenan, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Proposes the science demonstration of dissecting a cow's eye to integrate biology and physics in the study of optics and lenses. Reviews the anatomy of the eye, describes the visual process and covers topics as index of refraction of the cornea, microscopic receptors, the lens, and the retina. (MDH)

  5. Thoracoscopic left mediastinal lymph node dissection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for primary lung cancer is increasing. However, it is not easy to perform mediastinal lymph node dissection using VATS as effectively as it is performed using thoracotomy. Herein, I have presented two techniques for subcarinal lymph node dissection from the left thoracic cavity: one involves the retraction of the lower bronchus towards the visceral and cranial side before inferior pulmonary vein resection to secure the view of the right lower portion. The other involves the separation of lymph nodes from the right main bronchus before separation from the left bronchus, to prevent the lymph nodes from falling down and interrupting the right-side view. Moreover, I have also described a technique that facilitates left upper mediastinal lymph node dissection. It involves traction of a thoracic cardiac branch from the recurrent laryngeal nerve allowing visualization of the bottom of the #4L lymph node, so that it can be dissected easily. There has been no observation of recurrent nerve paralysis using this procedure. PMID:26855946

  6. Thoracoscopic left mediastinal lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for primary lung cancer is increasing. However, it is not easy to perform mediastinal lymph node dissection using VATS as effectively as it is performed using thoracotomy. Herein, I have presented two techniques for subcarinal lymph node dissection from the left thoracic cavity: one involves the retraction of the lower bronchus towards the visceral and cranial side before inferior pulmonary vein resection to secure the view of the right lower portion. The other involves the separation of lymph nodes from the right main bronchus before separation from the left bronchus, to prevent the lymph nodes from falling down and interrupting the right-side view. Moreover, I have also described a technique that facilitates left upper mediastinal lymph node dissection. It involves traction of a thoracic cardiac branch from the recurrent laryngeal nerve allowing visualization of the bottom of the #4L lymph node, so that it can be dissected easily. There has been no observation of recurrent nerve paralysis using this procedure. PMID:26855946

  7. Trace Element Changes in Thoracic Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Marie; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar; Frisk, Peter; Thelin, Stefan; Nyström-Rosander, Christina

    2016-02-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition with an incompletely understood pathogenesis. Trace elements are essential for the functioning of different processes in the body, including the immune system and associated responses to infection/inflammation. Because inflammation may be part of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic dissection, we investigated whether trace element changes associated with inflammation occur in serum and tissue samples during the disease. The study included 21 patients undergoing surgery for thoracic aortic dissection, 10 forensic autopsy specimens for tissue controls and 23 healthy blood donors for serum controls. Levels of magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), vanadium (V), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) were measured in the aortic tissue and serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In the serum, Ca, V, Cu and Zn decreased, whereas Fe increased. In the tissue, Cu and Zn decreased and Fe tended to increase. The Cu/Zn ratio in the serum, a marker of infection/inflammation, did not change in the patients. Concerning trace element changes in the serum and tissue, our data do not support the hypothesis that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic dissection. PMID:26152852

  8. Preservation of the optic radiations based on comparative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging tractography and anatomical dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nooij, Roland P.; Hoving, Eelco W.; van Hulzen, Arjen L. J.; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Renken, Remco J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Visualization of the precise course of the visual pathways is relevant to prevent damage that may inflict visual field deficits during neurosurgical resections. In particular the optic radiations (OR) are susceptible to such damage during neurosurgery. Cortical pathways can be mapped in vivo, by using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Visualization of these pathways would be potentially helpful to prevent neurosurgical visual morbidity. In this study an anatomical dissection of the visual pathways was compared to DTI fiber tractography (DTI-FT) data of four human brains. The feasibility of a definition of a Safety Zone is investigated. Methods: Four adult brains were dissected using Klingler's fiber dissection method, which allowed preparation of the OR. Measurements before and after dissection were used to establish distances from the cortex to the OR. DTI-scans were also obtained from these brains to determine the same distances. Results: Measurements from specific landmark points on the cortex to the lateral border of the OR were performed in four brains. Analysis through DTI tractography corresponded with the dissection results. Based on the combined results of both dissection and DTI-FT, we defined a quantitative surgical Safety Zone with respect to various anatomical landmarks (in particular the ventricle system). Conclusion: We conclude that there is a good correlation between the visualizations of the optic pathways based on dissection and DTI. Furthermore, we conclude that defining a neurosurgical Safety Zone which could preserve the integrity of the OR during surgery, based on the combination of DTI-FT images and dissection is feasible. PMID:26300739

  9. Improving the Phosphoproteome Coverage for Limited Sample Amounts Using TiO2-SIMAC-HILIC (TiSH) Phosphopeptide Enrichment and Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining high phosphoproteome coverage requires specific enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from the often extremely complex peptide mixtures generated by proteolytic digestion of biological samples, as well as extensive chromatographic fractionation prior to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Due to the sample loss resulting from fractionation, this procedure is mainly performed when large quantities of sample are available. To make large-scale phosphoproteomics applicable to smaller amounts of protein we have recently combined highly specific TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment with sequential elution from immobilized metal affinity chromatography (SIMAC) for fractionation of mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides prior to capillary scale hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) based fractionation of monophosphorylated peptides. In the following protocol we describe the procedure step by step to allow for comprehensive coverage of the phosphoproteome utilizing only a few hundred micrograms of protein. PMID:26584925

  10. Which Comes First: The Use of Computer Simulation of Frog Dissection or Conventional Dissection as Academic Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpan, Joseph; Strayer, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Science educators and school administrators are reexamining the educational value of animal dissection in the nation's schools and are focusing on simulation as an instructional alternative. One implication of the debate is that simulations can lead to equivalent learning to hands-on dissection. The second implication is whether dissection is…

  11. Changes in the Phosphoproteome and Metabolome Link Early Signaling Events to Rearrangement of Photosynthesis and Central Metabolism in Salinity and Oxidative Stress Response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Salinity and oxidative stress are major factors affecting and limiting the productivity of agricultural crops. The molecular and biochemical processes governing the plant response to abiotic stress have often been researched in a reductionist manner. Here, we report a systemic approach combining metabolic labeling and phosphoproteomics to capture early signaling events with quantitative metabolome analysis and enzyme activity assays to determine the effects of salt and oxidative stress on plant physiology. K(+) and Na(+) transporters showed coordinated changes in their phosphorylation pattern, indicating the importance of dynamic ion homeostasis for adaptation to salt stress. Unique phosphorylation sites were found for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SNF1 kinase homolog10 and 11, indicating their central roles in the stress-regulated responses. Seven Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinase2 kinases showed varying levels of phosphorylation at multiple serine/threonine residues in their kinase domain upon stress, showing temporally distinct modulation of the various isoforms. Salinity and oxidative stress also lead to changes in protein phosphorylation of proteins central to photosynthesis, in particular the kinase State Transition Protein7 required for state transition and light-harvesting II complex proteins. Furthermore, stress-induced changes of the phosphorylation of enzymes of central metabolism were observed. The phosphorylation patterns of these proteins were concurrent with changes in enzyme activity. This was reflected by altered levels of metabolites, such as the sugars sucrose and fructose, glycolysis intermediates, and amino acids. Together, our study provides evidence for a link between early signaling in the salt and oxidative stress response that regulates the state transition of photosynthesis and the rearrangement of primary metabolism. PMID:26471895

  12. Identification of BCAP-{sub L} as a negative regulator of the TLR signaling-induced production of IL-6 and IL-10 in macrophages by tyrosine phosphoproteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Takayuki; Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 ; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Kosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 ; Muta, Tatsushi; Semba, Kentaro; Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 ; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Twenty five tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in LPS-stimulated macrophages were determined. {yields} BCAP is a novel tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in LPS-stimulated macrophages. {yields} BCAP-{sub L} inhibits IL-6 and IL-10 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is essential for anti-pathogen responses such as cytokine production and antigen presentation. Although numerous reports suggest that protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in cytokine induction in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS; TLR4 ligand) in macrophages, the PTK-mediated signal transduction pathway has yet to be analyzed in detail. Here, we carried out a comprehensive and quantitative dynamic tyrosine phosphoproteomic analysis on the TLR4-mediated host defense system in RAW264.7 macrophages using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). We determined the temporal profiles of 25 proteins based on SILAC-encoded peptide(s). Of these, we focused on the tyrosine phosphorylation of B-cell adaptor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (BCAP) because the function of BCAP remains unknown in TLR signaling in macrophages. Furthermore, Bcap has two distinct transcripts, a full-length (Bcap-{sub L}) and an alternatively initiated or spliced (Bcap-{sub S}) mRNA, and little is known about the differential functions of the BCAP-{sub L} and BCAP-{sub S} proteins. Our study showed, for the first time, that RNAi-mediated selective depletion of BCAP-{sub L} enhanced IL-6 and IL-10 production but not TNF-{alpha} production in TLR ligand-stimulated macrophages. We propose that BCAP-{sub L} (but not BCAP-{sub S}) is a negative regulator of the TLR-mediated host defense system in macrophages.

  13. Computed tomography: the investigation of choice for aortic dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, H; Fitzgerald, E; Ruttley, M S

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has become established as complementary to aortography in the investigation of patients with suspected aortic dissection. Two cases of dissecting aneurysm are reported in which extensive aortography failed to show evidence of dissection. In both cases dissection was demonstrated by computed tomography. The diagnosis was confirmed in one case at operation and in the other case by follow up. It is suggested that computed tomography is the diagnostic method of first choice in aortic dissection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3730218

  14. Phosphoproteome profiling using a fluorescent phosphosensor dye in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Otani, Mieko; Taniguchi, Taizo; Sakai, Akiko; Seta, Jouji; Kadoyama, Keiichi; Nakamura-Hirota, Tooru; Matsuyama, Shogo; Sano, Keiji; Takano, Masaoki

    2011-07-01

    We validated the novel PhosphoQUANTI SolidBlue Complex (PQSC) dye for the sensitive fluorescent detection of phosphorylated proteins in polyacrylamide- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (PAGE and 2DE, respectively). PQSC can detect as little as 15.6 ng of ß-casein, a pentaphosphorylated protein, and 61.3 ng of ovalbumin, a diphosphorylated protein. Fluorescence intensity correlates with the number of phosphorylated residues on the protein. To demonstrate the specificity of PQSC for phosphoproteins, enzymatically dephosphorylated lysates of Swiss 3T3 cells were separated in 2DE gels and stained by PQSC. The fluorescence signals in these gels were markedly reduced following dephosphorylation. When the phosphorylated proteins in Swiss 3T3 cell lysates were concentrated using a phosphoprotein enrichment column, the majority of phosphoproteins showed fluorescence signals in the pI 4-5 range. Finally, we performed phosphoproteome analysis to study differences in the protein phosphorylation profiles of proliferating and quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. Over 135 discernible protein spots were detected, from which a selection of 15 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF-MS). The PQSC staining procedure for phosphoprotein detection is simple, reversible, and fully compatible with MALDI TOF-MS. PMID:21384102

  15. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Cate, Jamie H.; Yang, Feng; Glass, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  16. Newly fabricated magnetic lanthanide oxides core-shell nanoparticles in phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Fahmida; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Rainer, Matthias; Güzel, Yüksel; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Guenther K

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxides show high selectivity and sensitivity toward mass spectrometry based enrichment strategies. Phosphopeptides/phosphoproteins enrichment from biological samples is cumbersome because of their low abundance. Phosphopeptides are of interest in enzymes and phosphorylation pathways which lead to the clinical links of a disease. Magnetic core-shell lanthanide oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-La2O3 and Fe3O4@SiO2-Sm2O3) are fabricated, characterized by SEM, FTIR, and EDX and employed in the enrichment of phosphopeptides. The nanoparticles enrich phosphopeptides from casein variants, nonfat milk, egg yolk, human serum and HeLa cell extract. The materials and enrichment protocols are designed in a way that there are almost no nonspecific bindings. The selectivity is achieved up to 1:8500 using β-casein/BSA mixture and sensitivity down to 1 atto-mole. Batch-to-batch reproducibility is high with the reuse of core-shell nanoparticles up to four cycles. The enrichment followed by MALDI-MS analyses is carried out for the identification of phosphopeptides from serum digest and HeLa cell extract. Characteristic phosphopeptides of phosphoproteins are identified from human serum after the enrichment, which have the diagnostic potential toward prostate cancer. Thus, the lanthanide based magnetic core-shell materials offer a highly selective and sensitive workflow in phosphoproteomics. PMID:25859614

  17. Site-Specific Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphoproteome of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultative microsymbiont of alfalfa, should fine-tune its cellular processes to live saprophytically in soils characterized with limited nutrients and diverse stresses. In this study, TiO2 enrichment and LC-MS/MS were used to uncover the site-specific Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of S. meliloti in minimum medium at stationary phase. There are a total of 96 unique phosphorylated sites, with a Ser/Thr/Tyr distribution of 63:28:5, in 77 proteins. Phosphoproteins identified in S. meliloti showed a wide distribution pattern regarding to functional categories, such as replication, transcription, translation, posttranslational modification, transport and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrate, inorganic ion, succinoglycan etc. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified within the conserved motif in proteins of key cellular function indicate a crucial role of phosphorylation in modulating cellular physiology. Moreover, phosphorylation in proteins involved in processes related to rhizobial adaptation was also discussed, such as those identified in SMa0114 and PhaP2 (polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis), ActR (pH stress and microaerobic adaption), SupA (potassium stress), chaperonin GroEL2 (viability and potentially symbiosis), and ExoP (succinoglycan synthesis and secretion). These Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified herein would be helpful for our further investigation and understanding of the role of phosphorylation in rhizobial physiology. PMID:26401955

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis provides novel insights into stress responses in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a model diatom.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Ming-kun; Li, Chong-yang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dian-bing; Zhang, Xian-en; Ge, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is well established as a key regulatory posttranslational modification used in signal transduction to control cell growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, little is known about its extent and function in diatoms. Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a unicellular marine diatom that has been used as a model organism for research on diatom molecular biology. Although more than 1000 protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues have been predicted in P. tricornutum, no phosphorylation event has so far been revealed by classical biochemical approaches. Here, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis combining protein/peptide fractionation, TiO(2) enrichment, and LC-MS/MS analyses. In total, we identified 264 unique phosphopeptides, including 434 in vivo phosphorylated sites on 245 phosphoproteins. The phosphorylated proteins were implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes, including signaling, metabolic pathways, and stress responses. Six identified phosphoproteins were further validated by Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies. The functions of these proteins are discussed in the context of signal transduction networks in P. tricornutum. Our results advance the current understanding of diatom biology and will be useful for elucidating the phosphor-relay signaling networks in this model diatom. PMID:24712722

  19. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco As; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. PMID:26824392

  20. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Gossypol-Induced Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer Cell Line, HOC1a

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lixu; Chen, Yuling; Mu, Xinlin; Lian, Qingquan; Deng, Haiyun; Ge, Renshan

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a major cause for death of gynecological cancer patients. The efficacy of traditional surgery and chemotherapy is rather compromised and platinum-resistant cancer recurs. Finding new therapeutic targets is urgently needed to increase the survival rate and to improve life quality of patients with ovarian cancer. In the present work, phosphoproteomic analysis was carried out on untreated and gossypol-treated ovarian cancer cell line, HOC1a. We identified approximately 9750 phosphopeptides from 3030 phosphoproteins, which are involved in diverse cellular processes including cytoskeletal organization, RNA and nucleotide binding, and cell cycle regulation. Upon gossypol treatment, changes in phosphorylation of twenty-nine proteins including YAP1 and AKAP12 were characterized. Western blotting and qPCR analysis were used to determine expression levels of proteins in YAP1-related Hippo pathway showing that gossypol induced upregulation of LATS1, which phosphorylates YAP1 at Ser 61. Furthermore, our data showed that gossypol targets the actin cytoskeletal organization through mediating phosphorylation states of actin-binding proteins. Taken together, our data provide valuable information to understand effects of gossypol on protein phosphorylation and apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25180175

  1. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H D; Yang, Feng; Glass, N Louise

    2014-11-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi. PMID:24881580

  2. FAIMS and Phosphoproteomics of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling: Enhanced Identification of Multiply Phosphorylated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Cunningham, Debbie L; Creese, Andrew J; Heath, John K; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-12-01

    We have applied liquid chromatography high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry tandem mass spectrometry (LC-FAIMS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to the investigation of site-specific phosphorylation in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. We have combined a SILAC approach with chemical inhibition by SU5402 (an FGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and dasatinib (a Src family kinase inhibitor). The results show that incorporation of FAIMS within the workflow results in (a) an increase in the relative proportion of phosphothreonine and phosphotyrosine sites identified, (b) an increase in phosphopeptide identifications from precursors with charge states ≥ +3 (with an associated increase in peptide length), and (c) an increase in the identification of multiply phosphorylated peptides. Approximately 20% of the phosphorylation sites identified via the FAIMS workflow had not been reported previously, and over 80% of those were from multiply phosphorylated peptides. Moreover, FAIMS provided access to a distinct set of phosphorylation sites regulated in response to SU5402 and dasatinib. The enhanced identification of multiply phosphorylated peptides was particularly striking in the case of sites regulated by SU5402. In addition to providing a compelling example of the complementarity of FAIMS in phosphoproteomics, the results provide a valuable resource of phosphorylation sites for further investigation of FGF signaling and trafficking. PMID:26503514

  3. Phosphoproteomics Identifies Driver Tyrosine Kinases in Sarcoma Cell Lines and Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yun; Li, Jiannong; Fang, Bin; Edwards, Arthur; Zhang, Guolin; Bui, Marilyn; Eschrich, Steven; Altiok, Soner; Koomen, John; Haura, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Driver tyrosine kinase mutations are rare in sarcomas, and patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation are poorly understood. To better understand the signaling pathways active in sarcoma, we examined global tyrosine phosphorylation in sarcoma cell lines and human tumor samples. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies were used to purify tyrosine phosphorylated peptides, which were then identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The findings were validated with RNA interference, rescue, and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 1,936 unique tyrosine phosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 844 unique phosphotyrosine proteins. In sarcoma cells alone, peptides corresponding to 39 tyrosine kinases were found. Four of 10 cell lines showed dependence on tyrosine kinases for growth and/or survival, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α, MET, insulin receptor/insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling, and SRC family kinase signaling. Rhabdomyosarcoma samples showed overexpression of PDGFRα in 13% of examined cases, and sarcomas showed abundant tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of a number of tyrosine phosphorylated tyrosine kinases, including DDR2, EphB4, TYR2, AXL, SRC, LYN, and FAK. Together, our findings suggest that integrating global phosphoproteomics with functional analyses with kinase inhibitors can identify drivers of sarcoma growth and survival. PMID:22461510

  4. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling during diapause entrance in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis.

    PubMed

    Pavlides, Savvas C; Pavlides, Sheri A; Tammariello, Steven P

    2011-05-01

    Diapause is an alternate developmental pathway that is regulated by the neuroendocrine system in insects. To date, much of the information that has been published regarding the possible molecular events associated with diapause have been at the level of transcription. However, since transcription and translation are not linked in eukaryotic systems, a proteomics approach may represent a better tool to identify the gene products that regulate this period of developmental arrest. In this study, we performed gel-based proteomic and phospho-proteomic analyses to identify proteins that are differentially expressed or differentially phosphorylated in the brain during the initiation of pupal diapause in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis. A total of 27 proteins and phosphoproteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, including 16 that were either upregulated or phosphorylated during diapause, including proteins that function in cellular defense, cell cycle inhibition and neuronal protection. Of equal importance, 11 proteins were identified that were either downregulated at the total protein level, or from nuclear fractions. These included proteins involved in cell proliferation, adult development and aging. These data provide potentially valuable insight into the regulation of insect dormancy as well as the general phenomenon of aging in eukaryotic systems. PMID:21501620

  5. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  6. Plasmodiumfalciparum infection induces dynamic changes in the erythrocyte phospho-proteome.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Guillaume; Reininger, Luc; Ramdani, Ghania; D Phillips, Lee; Sharma, Vikram; Egee, Stephane; Langsley, Gordon; Lasonder, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    The phosphorylation status of red blood cell proteins is strongly altered during the infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We identify the key phosphorylation events that occur in the erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeleton during infection, by a comparative analysis of global phospho-proteome screens between infected (obtained at schizont stage) and uninfected RBCs. The meta-analysis of reported mass spectrometry studies revealed a novel compendium of 495 phosphorylation sites in 182 human proteins with regulatory roles in red cell morphology and stability, with about 25% of these sites specific to infected cells. A phosphorylation motif analysis detected 7 unique motifs that were largely mapped to kinase consensus sequences of casein kinase II and of protein kinase A/protein kinase C. This analysis highlighted prominent roles for PKA/PKC involving 78 phosphorylation sites. We then compared the phosphorylation status of PKA (PKC) specific sites in adducin, dematin, Band 3 and GLUT-1 in uninfected RBC stimulated or not by cAMP to their phosphorylation status in iRBC. We showed cAMP-induced phosphorylation of adducin S59 by immunoblotting and we were able to demonstrate parasite-induced phosphorylation for adducin S726, Band 3 and GLUT-1, corroborating the protein phosphorylation status in our erythrocyte phosphorylation site compendium. PMID:27067487

  7. Phosphoproteomics Identified an NS5A Phosphorylation Site Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Chong, Weng Man; Hsu, Shih-Chin; Kao, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chieh-Wen; Lee, Kuan-Ying; Shao, Jheng-Syuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Justin; Chen, Steve S-L; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2016-02-19

    The non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein indispensable for the viral life cycle. Many prior papers have pinpointed several serine residues in the low complexity sequence I region of NS5A responsible for NS5A phosphorylation; however, the functions of specific phosphorylation sites remained obscure. Using phosphoproteomics, we identified three phosphorylation sites (serines 222, 235, and 238) in the NS5A low complexity sequence I region. Reporter virus and replicon assays using phosphorylation-ablated alanine mutants of these sites showed that Ser-235 dominated over Ser-222 and Ser-238 in HCV replication. Immunoblotting using an Ser-235 phosphorylation-specific antibody showed a time-dependent increase in Ser-235 phosphorylation that correlated with the viral replication activity. Ser-235 phosphorylated NS5A co-localized with double-stranded RNA, consistent with its role in HCV replication. Mechanistically, Ser-235 phosphorylation probably promotes the replication complex formation via increasing NS5A interaction with the human homologue of the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) directly phosphorylated Ser-235 in vitro. Inhibition of CKIα reduced Ser-235 phosphorylation and the HCV RNA levels in the infected cells. We concluded that NS5A Ser-235 phosphorylated by CKIα probably promotes HCV replication via increasing NS5A interaction with the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. PMID:26702051

  8. Probing the phosphoproteome of HeLa cells using nanocast metal oxide microspheres for phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Sturm, Martin; Hudecz, Otto; Mazanek, Michael; Smått, Jan-Henrik; Lindén, Mika; Lindner, Wolfgang; Mechtler, Karl

    2010-04-01

    Metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) has become a prominent method to enrich phosphopeptides prior to their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. To overcome limitations in material design, we have previously reported the use of nanocasting as a means to generate metal oxide spheres with tailored properties. Here, we report on the application of two oxides, tin dioxide (stannia) and titanium dioxide (titania), for the analysis of the HeLa phosphoproteome. In combination with nanoflow LC-MS/MS analysis on a linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance instrument, we identified 619 phosphopeptides using the new stannia material, and 896 phosphopeptides using titania prepared in house. We also compared the newly developed materials to commercial titania material using an established enrichment protocol. Both titania materials yielded a comparable total number of phosphopeptides, but the overlap of the two data sets was less than one-third. Although fewer peptides were identified using stannia, the complementarity of SnO(2)-based MOAC could be shown as more than 140 phosphopeptides were exclusively identified by this material. PMID:20201521

  9. Human embryonic stem cell phosphoproteome revealed by electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Swaney, Danielle L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Thomson, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is central to the understanding of cellular signaling, and cellular signaling is suggested to play a major role in the regulation of human embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here, we describe the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry-based sequencing technology—collision-activated dissociation (CAD)—and the more recently developed method electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to characterize the human ES cell phosphoproteome. In total, these experiments resulted in the identification of 11,995 unique phosphopeptides, corresponding to 10,844 nonredundant phosphorylation sites, at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). Among these phosphorylation sites are 5 localized to 2 pluripotency critical transcription factors—OCT4 and SOX2. From these experiments, we conclude that ETD identifies a larger number of unique phosphopeptides than CAD (8,087 to 3,868), more frequently localizes the phosphorylation site to a specific residue (49.8% compared with 29.6%), and sequences whole classes of phosphopeptides previously unobserved. PMID:19144917

  10. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H.D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-01-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC–MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi. PMID:24881580

  11. Online automated in vivo zebrafish phosphoproteomics: from large-scale analysis down to a single embryo.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Mohammed, Shabaz; van Breukelen, Bas; den Hertog, Jeroen; Slijper, Monique; Heck, Albert J R

    2008-04-01

    In the developing embryo, as in many other biological processes, complex signaling pathways are under tight control of reversible phosphorylation, guiding cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Therefore the large-scale identification of signaling proteins and their post-translational modifications is crucial to understand the proteome biology of the developing zebrafish embryo. Here, we used an automated, robust, and sensitive online TiO 2-based LC-MS/MS setup to enrich for phosphorylated peptides from 1 day old zebrafish embryos. We identified, with high confidence, 1067 endogenous phosphorylation sites in a sample taken from 60 embryos (approximately 180 microg), 321 from 10 embryos, and 47 phosphorylation sites from a single embryo, illustrating the sensitivity of the method. This data set, representing by far the largest for zebrafish, was further exploited by searching for serine/threonine or tyrosine kinase motifs using Scansite. For one-third of the identified phosphopeptides a potential kinase motif could be predicted, where it appeared that Cdk5 kinase, p38MAPK, PKA, and Casein Kinase 2 substrates were the most predominant motifs present, underpinning the importance of these kinases in signaling pathways in embryonic development. The phosphopeptide data set was further interrogated using alignments with phosphopeptides identified in recent large-scale phosphoproteomics screens in human and mouse samples. These alignments revealed conservation of phosphorylation sites in several proteins suggesting preserved function in embryonic development. PMID:18307296

  12. Defining the phospho-adhesome through the phosphoproteomic analysis of integrin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Joseph; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Byron, Adam; Jones, Matthew C.; Warwood, Stacey; Selley, Julian N.; Knight, David; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell–extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion is a fundamental requirement for multicellular existence due to roles in positioning, proliferation and differentiation. Phosphorylation plays a major role in adhesion signalling; however, a full understanding of the phosphorylation events that occur at sites of adhesion is lacking. Here we report a proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of adhesion complexes isolated from cells spread on fibronectin. We identify 1,174 proteins, 499 of which are phosphorylated (1,109 phosphorylation sites), including both well-characterized and novel adhesion-regulated phosphorylation events. Immunoblotting suggests that two classes of phosphorylated residues are found at adhesion sites—those induced by adhesion and those constitutively phosphorylated but recruited in response to adhesion. Kinase prediction analysis identifies novel kinases with putative roles in adhesion signalling including CDK1, inhibition of which reduces adhesion complex formation. This phospho-adhesome data set constitutes a valuable resource to improve our understanding of the signalling mechanisms through which cell–ECM interactions control cell behaviour. PMID:25677187

  13. Systems-Level Overview of Host Protein Phosphorylation During Shigella flexneri Infection Revealed by Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Christoph; Ahrné, Erik; Kasper, Christoph A.; Tschon, Therese; Sorg, Isabel; Dreier, Roland F.; Schmidt, Alexander; Arrieumerlou, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    The enteroinvasive bacterium Shigella flexneri invades the intestinal epithelium of humans. During infection, several injected effector proteins promote bacterial internalization, and interfere with multiple host cell responses. To obtain a systems-level overview of host signaling during infection, we analyzed the global dynamics of protein phosphorylation by liquid chromatography-tandem MS and identified several hundred of proteins undergoing a phosphorylation change during the first hours of infection. Functional bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were mostly related to the cytoskeleton, transcription, signal transduction, and cell cycle. Fuzzy c-means clustering identified six temporal profiles of phosphorylation and a functional module composed of ATM-phosphorylated proteins related to genotoxic stress. Pathway enrichment analysis defined mTOR as the most overrepresented pathway. We showed that mTOR complex 1 and 2 were required for S6 kinase and AKT activation, respectively. Comparison with a published phosphoproteome of Salmonella typhimurium-infected cells revealed a large subset of coregulated phosphoproteins. Finally, we showed that S. flexneri effector OspF affected the phosphorylation of several hundred proteins, thereby demonstrating the wide-reaching impact of a single bacterial effector on the host signaling network. PMID:23828894

  14. Donors' attitudes towards body donation for dissection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R; Hurwitz, B

    1995-07-29

    We report a survey in the UK of potential whole-body donors for dissection. 218 people (age range 19-97 years) answered a postal questionnaire, giving information about themselves, their reasons for donation, attitudes towards the dead body, funeral preferences and medical giving and receiving. In addition to altruism, motives included the wish to avoid funeral ceremonies, to avoid waste, and in a few cases, to evade the expense of a funeral. 44% understood that their bodies would be used as teaching material, 42% for experiments. Whilst 69% believed in one or more supernatural phenomena, only 39% said they were religious. 69% requested cremation after dissection; 2% wanted to be buried. The notion of money incentives to promote donation was overwhelmingly rejected. PMID:7630248

  15. Recurrent tamponade and aortic dissection in syphilis.

    PubMed

    Stansal, Audrey; Mirault, Tristan; Rossi, Aude; Dupin, Nicolas; Bruneval, Patrick; Bel, Alain; Azarine, Arshid; Minozzi, Catherine; Deman, Anne Laure; Messas, Emmanuel

    2013-11-01

    Syphilitic cardiovascular disease has been described since the 19th century, mainly on autopsy series. Major clinical manifestations are aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, and coronary ostial stenosis. The diagnosis of syphilitic cardiovascular disease is based mainly on positive serologic tests and overt clinical manifestations. We present here a rare and unusual clinical presentation of a tertiary syphilis with recurrent tamponade and type B aortic dissection, whose positive diagnosis was made by polymerase chain reaction on pericardial fluid analysis. PMID:24182507

  16. Block data distribution for parallel nested dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, P.; Facq, L.; Roman, J.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of data partitioning for block sparse Cholesky factorization on distributed memory MIMD computers. We propose a preprocessing algorithm which computes and distributes a column block partition based on an initial partition induced by a nested dissection ordering. This preprocessing algorithm works by optimizing load balancing under precedence constraints and communication traffic. It can be performed in linear time and space complexities.

  17. Quantitative genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of economically important traits targeted for cotton improvement are quantitatively inherited. In this chapter, the current state of cotton quantitative genetics is described and separated into four components. These components include: 1) traditional quantitative inheritance analysis, ...

  18. Building mental models by dissecting physical models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to ensure focused learning; models that are too constrained require less supervision, but can be constructed mechanically, with little to no conceptual engagement. We propose "model-dissection" as an alternative to "model-building," whereby instructors could make efficient use of supervisory resources, while simultaneously promoting focused learning. We report empirical results from a study conducted with biology undergraduate students, where we demonstrate that asking them to "dissect" out specific conceptual structures from an already built 3D physical model leads to a significant improvement in performance than asking them to build the 3D model from simpler components. Using questionnaires to measure understanding both before and after model-based interventions for two cohorts of students, we find that both the "builders" and the "dissectors" improve in the post-test, but it is the latter group who show statistically significant improvement. These results, in addition to the intrinsic time-efficiency of "model dissection," suggest that it could be a valuable pedagogical tool. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:7-11, 2016. PMID:26712513

  19. Advanced endoscopic submucosal dissection with traction

    PubMed Central

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Hosoe, Naoki; Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Tai; Yahagi, Naohisa; Kanai, Takanori; Ogata, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been established as a standard treatment for early stage gastric cancer (EGC) in Japan and has spread worldwide. ESD has been used not only for EGC but also for early esophageal and colonic cancers. However, ESD is associated with several adverse events, such as bleeding and perforation, which requires more skill. Adequate tissue tension and clear visibility of the tissue to be dissected are important for effective and safe dissection. Many ESD methods using traction have been developed, such as clip-with-line method, percutaneous traction method, sinker-assisted method, magnetic anchor method, external forceps method, internal-traction method, double-channel-scope method, outerroute method, double-scope method, endoscopic-surgical-platform, and robot-assisted method. Each method has both advantages and disadvantages. Robotic endoscopy, enabling ESD with a traction method, will become more common due to advances in technology. In the near future, simple, noninvasive, and effective ESD using traction is expected to be developed and become established as a worldwide standard treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasias. PMID:25031787

  20. iPhos: a toolkit to streamline the alkaline phosphatase-assisted comprehensive LC-MS phosphoproteome investigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comprehensive characterization of the phosphoproteome in living cells is critical in signal transduction research. But the low abundance of phosphopeptides among the total proteome in cells remains an obstacle in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. To provide a solution, an alternative analytic strategy to confidently identify phosphorylated peptides by using the alkaline phosphatase (AP) treatment combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was provided. While the process is applicable, the key integration along the pipeline was mostly done by tedious manual work. Results We developed a software toolkit, iPhos, to facilitate and streamline the work-flow of AP-assisted phosphoproteome characterization. The iPhos tookit includes one assister and three modules. The iPhos Peak Extraction Assister automates the batch mode peak extraction for multiple liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) runs. iPhos Module-1 can process the peak lists extracted from the LC-MS analyses derived from the original and dephosphorylated samples to mine out potential phosphorylated peptide signals based on mass shift caused by the loss of some multiples of phosphate groups. And iPhos Module-2 provides customized inclusion lists with peak retention time windows for subsequent targeted LC-MS/MS experiments. Finally, iPhos Module-3 facilitates to link the peptide identifications from protein search engines to the quantification results from pattern-based label-free quantification tools. We further demonstrated the utility of the iPhos toolkit on the data of human metastatic lung cancer cells (CL1-5). Conclusions In the comparison study of the control group of CL1-5 cell lysates and the treatment group of dasatinib-treated CL1-5 cell lysates, we demonstrated the applicability of the iPhos toolkit and reported the experimental results based on the iPhos-facilitated phosphoproteome investigation. And further, we also compared the strategy with pure DDA-based LC-MS/MS phosphoproteome investigation. The results of iPhos-facilitated targeted LC-MS/MS analysis convey more thorough and confident phosphopeptide identification than the results of pure DDA-based analysis. PMID:25521246

  1. Peer-Assisted Learning in a Gross Anatomy Dissection Course

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Nam, Kwang-Il

    2015-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning encourages students to participate more actively in the dissection process and promotes thoughtful dissection. We implemented peer-assisted dissection in 2012 and compared its effects on students’ self-assessments of learning and their academic achievement with those of faculty-led dissection. All subjects performed dissections after a lecture about upper-limb gross anatomy. Experimental group (n = 134) dissected a cadaver while guided by peer tutors who had prepared for the dissection in advance, and control group (n = 71) dissected a cadaver after the introduction by a faculty via prosection. Self-assessment scores regarding the learning objectives related to upper limbs were significantly higher in experimental group than in control group. Additionally, experimental group received significantly higher academic scores than did control group. The students in peer-assisted learning perceived themselves as having a better understanding of course content and achieved better academic results compared with those who participated in faculty-led dissection. Peer-assisted dissection contributed to self-perception and to the ability to retain and explain anatomical knowledge. PMID:26565616

  2. Background music in the dissection laboratory: impact on stress associated with the dissection experience.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Emeka G

    2015-06-01

    Notable challenges, such as mental distress, boredom, negative moods, and attitudes, have been associated with learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory (CDL). The ability of background music (BM) to enhance the cognitive abilities of students is well documented. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of BM in the CDL and on stress associated with the dissection experience. After 8 wk of normal dissection without BM, various genres of BM were introduced into the cadaver dissection sessions of 260 medical and dental students for 3 wk. Feedback on the impact of BM on students in the CDL and students' attitude were accessed using a questionnaire. Psychological stress assessment was done using Psychological Stress Measure 9. Two batches of 30 students each were made to dissect same areas of the body for 2 h, one batch with BM playing and the other batch without. The same examination was given to both groups at the end. Over 90% of the participants expressed a desire to incorporate BM into the CDL; 87% of the sampled population that expressed love for music also reported BM to be a very useful tool that could be used to enhance learning conditions in the CDL. A strong positive relationship was established between love for music and its perception as a tool for learning in the CDL (P < 0.001). Students that studied under the influence of BM had significantly higher scores (P < 0.001) in the overall examination result. BM reduced the level of stress associated with the dissection experience by ∼33%. PMID:26031725

  3. Tissue phosphoproteomics with PolyMAC identifies potential therapeutic targets in a transgenic mouse model of HER2 positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Searleman, Adam C; Iliuk, Anton B; Collier, Timothy S; Chodosh, Lewis A; Tao, W Andy; Bose, Ron

    2014-12-01

    Altered protein phosphorylation is a feature of many human cancers that can be targeted therapeutically. Phosphopeptide enrichment is a critical step for maximizing the depth of phosphoproteome coverage by MS, but remains challenging for tissue specimens because of their high complexity. We describe the first analysis of a tissue phosphoproteome using polymer-based metal ion affinity capture (PolyMAC), a nanopolymer that has excellent yield and specificity for phosphopeptide enrichment, on a transgenic mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer. By combining phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation with PolyMAC, 411 unique peptides with 139 phosphotyrosine, 45 phosphoserine, and 29 phosphothreonine sites were identified from five LC-MS/MS runs. Combining reverse phase liquid chromatography fractionation at pH 8.0 with PolyMAC identified 1571 unique peptides with 1279 phosphoserine, 213 phosphothreonine, and 21 phosphotyrosine sites from eight LC-MS/MS runs. Linear motif analysis indicated that many of the phosphosites correspond to well-known phosphorylation motifs. Analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome with the Drug Gene Interaction database uncovered a network of potential therapeutic targets centered on Src family kinases with inhibitors that are either FDA-approved or in clinical development. These results demonstrate that PolyMAC is well suited for phosphoproteomic analysis of tissue specimens. PMID:24723360

  4. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett iron(III) stearate films and iron(III) oxide nanoparticles for bottom-up phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Gladilovich, Vladimir; Greifenhagen, Uta; Sukhodolov, Nikolai; Selyutin, Artem; Singer, David; Thieme, Domenika; Majovsky, Petra; Shirkin, Alexey; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Bonitenko, Evgeny; Podolskaya, Ekaterina; Frolov, Andrej

    2016-04-22

    Phosphorylation is the enzymatic reaction of site-specific phosphate transfer from energy-rich donors to the side chains of serine, threonine, tyrosine, and histidine residues in proteins. In living cells, reversible phosphorylation underlies a universal mechanism of intracellular signal transduction. In this context, analysis of the phosphoproteome is a prerequisite to better understand the cellular regulatory networks. Conventionally, due to the low contents of signaling proteins, selective enrichment of proteolytic phosphopeptides by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is performed prior to their LC-MS or -MS/MS analysis. Unfortunately, this technique still suffers from low selectivity and compromised analyte recoveries. To overcome these limitations, we propose IMAC systems comprising stationary phases based on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett films of iron(III) stearate (FF) or iron(III) oxide nanoparticles (FO) and mobile phases relying on ammonia, piperidine and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). Experiments with model phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein tryptic digests showed superior binding capacity, selectivity and recovery for both systems in comparison to the existing commercial analogs. As evidenced by LC-MS/MS analysis of the HeLa phosphoproteome, these features of the phases resulted in increased phosphoproteome coverage in comparison to the analogous commercially available phases, indicating that our IMAC protocol is a promising chromatographic tool for in-depth phosphoproteomic research. PMID:27016113

  5. Highly efficient enrichment of phosphopeptides by magnetic nanoparticles coated with zirconium phosphonate for phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Yangjun; Wang, Jinglan; Tan, Feng; Liu, Jinfeng; Cai, Yun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2008-04-01

    The location of phosphorylation plays a vital role for the elucidation of biological processes. The challenge of low stoichiometry of phosphoproteins and signal suppression of phosphopeptides by nonphosphopeptides in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis makes the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis necessary. Besides the immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) method, some affinity methods based on nanoparticles displayed a higher enrichment efficiency for phosphopeptides such as Fe(3)O(4)/TiO2 and Fe(3)O(4)/ZrO(2) nanoparticles. To further improve the selectivity and compatibility of the affinity methods, a novel strategy based on magnetic nanoparticles coated with zirconium phosphonate for the enrichment of phosphopeptides has been developed in this study. Under optimized experimental conditions, 1 x 10(-9) M phosphopeptides in 50 microL tryptic digest of beta-casein could be enriched and identified successfully. Reliable results were also obtained for 1 x 10(-8) M phosphopeptides in 50 microL tryptic digest of beta-casein in the presence of nonphosphopeptides from a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) over 20 times in concentration. The performance of nanoparticles for use in a real sample was further demonstrated by employing the strong cation-exchange chromatography (SCX) fraction of a tryptic digest of a protein extract from Chang liver cells as a model sample. Experimental results show that the nanoparticles can be easily and effectively used for enrichment of phosphopeptides in low concentration. Most importantly, our approach is more compatible with commonly used SCX strategies than Fe(3+)-IMAC. The proposed method thus has great potential for future studies of large-scale phosphoproteomes. PMID:18327884

  6. Phosphoproteomics reveals the effect of ethylene in soybean root under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaojian; Sakata, Katsumi; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-12-01

    Flooding has severe negative effects on soybean growth. To explore the flooding-responsive mechanisms in early-stage soybean, a phosphoproteomic approach was used. Two-day-old soybean plants were treated without or with flooding for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, and root tip proteins were then extracted and analyzed at each time point. After 3 h of flooding exposure, the fresh weight of soybeans increased, whereas the ATP content of soybean root tips decreased. Using a gel-free proteomic technique, a total of 114 phosphoproteins were identified in the root tip samples, and 34 of the phosphoproteins were significantly changed with respect to phosphorylation status after 3 h of flooding stress. Among these phosphoproteins, eukaryotic translation initiation factors were dephosphorylated, whereas several protein synthesis-related proteins were phosphorylated. The mRNA expression levels of sucrose phosphate synthase 1F and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 G were down-regulated, whereas UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase mRNA expression was up-regulated during growth but down-regulated under flooding stress. Furthermore, bioinformatic protein interaction analysis of flooding-responsive proteins based on temporal phosphorylation patterns indicated that eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 G was located in the center of the network during flooding. Soybean eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 G has homology to programmed cell death 4 protein and is implicated in ethylene signaling. The weight of soybeans was increased with treatment by an ethylene-releasing agent under flooding condition, but it was decreased when plants were exposed to an ethylene receptor antagonist. These results suggest that the ethylene signaling pathway plays an important role, via the protein phosphorylation, in mechanisms of plant tolerance to the initial stages of flooding stress in soybean root tips. PMID:25316100

  7. Phosphoproteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Mono- and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Sites from Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, is a cellular polymer implicated in DNA/RNA metabolism, cell death, and cellular stress response via its role as a post-translational modification, signaling molecule, and scaffolding element. PAR is synthesized by a family of proteins known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, or PARPs, which attach PAR polymers to various amino acids of substrate proteins. The nature of these polymers (large, charged, heterogeneous, base-labile) has made these attachment sites difficult to study by mass spectrometry. Here we propose a new pipeline that allows for the identification of mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation sites via the enzymatic product of phosphodiesterase-treated ADP-ribose, or phospho(ribose). The power of this method lies in the enrichment potential of phospho(ribose), which we show to be enriched by phosphoproteomic techniques when a neutral buffer, which allows for retention of the base-labile attachment site, is used for elution. Through the identification of PARP-1 in vitro automodification sites as well as endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites from whole cells, we have shown that ADP-ribose can exist on adjacent amino acid residues as well as both lysine and arginine in addition to known acidic modification sites. The universality of this technique has allowed us to show that enrichment of ADP-ribosylated proteins by macrodomain leads to a bias against ADP-ribose modifications conjugated to glutamic acids, suggesting that the macrodomain is either removing or selecting against these distinct protein attachments. Ultimately, the enrichment pipeline presented here offers a universal approach for characterizing the mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteome. PMID:24920161

  8. Salt-Induced Changes in Cardiac Phosphoproteome in a Rat Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed. PMID:24945867

  9. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  10. Phosphoproteome and transcriptome analysis of the neuronal response to a CDK5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gillardon, Frank; Steinlein, Peter; Bürger, Erich; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Gerner, Christopher

    2005-04-01

    In Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) causes hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament proteins, respectively, leading to neuronal cell death. We have demonstrated recently that pharmacological inhibition of CDK5 protects neurons under various stressful conditions (Weishaupt J. H., et al., Molec. Cell. Neurosci. 2003, 24, 489-502). To get an overview on the cellular mechanisms of action we analyzed global changes in protein phosphorylation in cultured cerebellar granule neurons by [(32)P]orthophosphate labeling after administration of a CDK5 inhibitor. Since CDK5 has recently been shown to phosphorylate and inactivate transcription factor MEF2, we included gene expression profiling using cDNA microarrays. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry we identified several phosphoproteins that were modulated by compound administration. Among them syndapin I which is involved in vesicle recycling, and dynein light intermediate chain 2 which represents a regulatory subunit of the dynein protein complex. These findings are consistent with the known physiological function of CDK5 in synaptic signaling and axonal transport. Moreover, we detected phosphoproteins acting in neuronal surival and/or neurite outgrowth, such as cofilin and collapsin response mediator protein. Subsequent testing in cell cultures revealed that the CDK5 inhibitor blocked mitochondrial translocation of pro-apoptotic cofilin in cerebellar granule neurons and enhanced neurite outgrowth in dorsal root ganglia. Numerous genes exhibiting MEF2 consensus binding sequences were modulated by CDK5 inhibitor treatment. Among them some that may contribute to neurite elongation or neuronal survival, but also several genes functioning in synaptic transmission. Taken together, phosphoproteome and transcriptome analysis indicate that the compound promotes both neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth, but also may affect synaptic function in cultured neurons. PMID:15712243

  11. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Components of Host Cell Invasion and Post-transcriptional Regulation During Francisella Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC, and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared with the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin, a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of tristetraprolin, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha that may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that control infection by this pathogen. PMID:23970565

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the non-seed vascular plant model Selaginella moellendorffii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selaginella (Selaginella moellendorffii) is a lycophyte which diverged from other vascular plants approximately 410 million years ago. As the first reported non-seed vascular plant genome, Selaginella genome data allow comparative analysis of genetic changes that may be associated with land plant evolution. Proteomics investigations on this lycophyte model have not been extensively reported. Phosphorylation represents the most common post-translational modifications and it is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism controlling the functional expression of proteins inside living organisms. Results In this study, polyethylene glycol fractionation and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography were employed to isolate phosphopeptides from wild-growing Selaginella. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 1593 unique phosphopeptides spanning 1104 non-redundant phosphosites with confirmed localization on 716 phosphoproteins were identified. Analysis of the Selaginella dataset revealed features that are consistent with other plant phosphoproteomes, such as the relative proportions of phosphorylated Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues, the highest occurrence of phosphosites in the C-terminal regions of proteins, and the localization of phosphorylation events outside protein domains. In addition, a total of 97 highly conserved phosphosites in evolutionary conserved proteins were identified, indicating the conservation of phosphorylation-dependent regulatory mechanisms in phylogenetically distinct plant species. On the other hand, close examination of proteins involved in photosynthesis revealed phosphorylation events which may be unique to Selaginella evolution. Furthermore, phosphorylation motif analyses identified Pro-directed, acidic, and basic signatures which are recognized by typical protein kinases in plants. A group of Selaginella-specific phosphoproteins were found to be enriched in the Pro-directed motif class. Conclusions Our work provides the first large-scale atlas of phosphoproteins in Selaginella which occupies a unique position in the evolution of terrestrial plants. Future research into the functional roles of Selaginella-specific phosphorylation events in photosynthesis and other processes may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to the distinct evolution of lycophytes. PMID:24628833

  13. Atrial septal dissection late after congenital heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Kenneth R; Imamura, Michiaki

    2011-10-01

    Atrial septal dissection is a rare entity usually seen after surgical mitral valve repair, myocardial infarction, or endocarditis. This is a report of an atrial dissection in a young girl found on routine follow-up echocardiography after repair of atrial and ventricular septal defects. No identifiable predisposing risk was found prior to or at the time of surgical repair. Considerable risk of significant morbidity and even mortality attends atrial dissection due to the risk of rupture. PMID:21958812

  14. Iatrogenic left main artery dissection: A catastrophic complication

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Hassan; Rostami, Reza Tajik; Mohammadi, Afsaneh; Amini, Abdol Latifi; Safi, Morteza; Saadat, Habibollah; Vakili, Hosein; Motamedi, Mohammad Reza; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Iatrogenic left main artery (LM) dissection is a catastrophic complication of coronary angiography and angioplasty that requires prompt management using stenting. Although LM dissection can be prevented, it cannot always be avoided and has a reported incidence rate of 0.02%. In the present report, a case of iatrogenic LM dissection that was successfully treated with multiple stents is presented and followed by a brief review of the literature. PMID:23592948

  15. Isolated brachiocephalic artery dissection presenting as acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Mani, Hariharasudan; Ahluwalia, Sharat

    2015-01-01

    Isolated brachiocephalic artery dissection is an extremely rare condition. Its presentation as an acute stroke can pose a significant diagnostic challenge in patients because of its rarity. We present a case of isolated spontaneous brachiocephalic artery dissection presenting as acute cerebrovascular accident. This case also illustrates the treatment dilemma brachiocephalic artery dissection can present, whether to choose antithrombotic/anticoagulation therapy and/or surgery, and also the dilemma in blood pressure management. PMID:26315357

  16. Left Atrial Wall Dissection after Mitral Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Woo; Park, Se Hyeok; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Choe, Won Joo; Park, Jang Su; Kim, Jung Won

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial dissection does occur, though rarely, after mitral valve surgery. A 68-year-old Korean female presented with moderate mitral stenosis, mild mitral regurgitation, moderate tricuspid regurgitation and mild aortic regurgitation. She was scheduled for mitral valve replacement and tricuspid annuloplasty. We experienced a left atrial dissection after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and decided not to repair it. The patient recovered uneventfully. We suggest that a specific type of left atrial dissection can be treated conservatively. PMID:24198922

  17. Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Phospho-Proteomics Data Reveals Compartmentalization of Phosphorylation Motifs[C][W

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Klaas J.; Friso, Giulia; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Protein (de)phosphorylation plays an important role in plants. To provide a robust foundation for subcellular phosphorylation signaling network analysis and kinase-substrate relationships, we performed a meta-analysis of 27 published and unpublished in-house mass spectrometry–based phospho-proteome data sets for Arabidopsis thaliana covering a range of processes, (non)photosynthetic tissue types, and cell cultures. This resulted in an assembly of 60,366 phospho-peptides matching to 8141 nonredundant proteins. Filtering the data for quality and consistency generated a set of medium and a set of high confidence phospho-proteins and their assigned phospho-sites. The relation between single and multiphosphorylated peptides is discussed. The distribution of p-proteins across cellular functions and subcellular compartments was determined and showed overrepresentation of protein kinases. Extensive differences in frequency of pY were found between individual studies due to proteomics and mass spectrometry workflows. Interestingly, pY was underrepresented in peroxisomes but overrepresented in mitochondria. Using motif-finding algorithms motif-x and MMFPh at high stringency, we identified compartmentalization of phosphorylation motifs likely reflecting localized kinase activity. The filtering of the data assembly improved signal/noise ratio for such motifs. Identified motifs were linked to kinases through (bioinformatic) enrichment analysis. This study also provides insight into the challenges/pitfalls of using large-scale phospho-proteomic data sets to nonexperts. PMID:24894044

  18. Proteome and phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-associated proteins from normal maize and mutants affected in starch biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Grimaud, Florent; Rogniaux, Hélène; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.; Planchot, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the exclusively granule-bound starch synthase GBSSI, starch granules also bind significant proportions of other starch biosynthetic enzymes, particularly starch synthases (SS) SSI and SSIIa, and starch branching enzyme (BE) BEIIb. Whether this association is a functional aspect of starch biosynthesis, or results from non-specific entrapment during amylopectin crystallization, is not known. This study utilized genetic, immunological, and proteomic approaches to investigate comprehensively the proteome and phosphoproteome of Zea mays endosperm starch granules. SSIII, BEI, BEIIa, and starch phosphorylase were identified as internal granule-associated proteins in maize endosperm, along with the previously identified proteins GBSS, SSI, SSIIa, and BEIIb. Genetic analyses revealed three instances in which granule association of one protein is affected by the absence of another biosynthetic enzyme. First, eliminating SSIIa caused reduced granule association of SSI and BEIIb, without affecting GBSS abundance. Second, eliminating SSIII caused the appearance of two distinct electrophoretic mobility forms of BEIIb, whereas only a single migration form of BEIIb was observed in wild type or any other mutant granules examined. Third, eliminating BEIIb caused significant increases in the abundance of BEI, BEIIa, SSIII, and starch phosphorylase in the granule, without affecting SSI or SSIIa. Analysis of the granule phosphoproteome with a phosphorylation-specific dye indicated that GBSS, BEIIb, and starch phosphorylase are all phosphorylated as they occur in the granule. These results suggest the possibility that starch metabolic enzymes located in granules are regulated by post-translational modification and/or protein–protein interactions. PMID:18653693

  19. In vivo Phosphoproteome of Human Skeletal Muscle Revealed by Phosphopeptide Enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Højlund, Kurt; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Hwang, Hyonson; Flynn, Charles R.; Madireddy, Lohith; Thangiah, Geetha; Langlais, Paul; Meyer, Christian; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in signal transduction pathways that regulate substrate and energy metabolism, contractile function, and muscle mass in human skeletal muscle. Abnormal phosphorylation of signaling enzymes has been identified in insulin resistant muscle using phosphoepitope-specific antibodies, but its role in other skeletal muscle disorders remains largely unknown. This may be in part due to insufficient knowledge of relevant targets. Here, we therefore present the first large-scale in vivo phosphoproteomic study of human skeletal muscle from 3 lean, healthy volunteers. Trypsin digestion of 3-5 mg human skeletal muscle protein was followed by phosphopeptide enrichment using SCX and TiO2. The resulting phosphopeptides were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Using this unbiased approach, we identified 306 distinct in vivo phosphorylation sites in 127 proteins, including 240 phosphoserines, 53 phosphothreonines and 13 phosphotyrosines in at least 2 out of 3 subjects. In addition, 61 ambiguous phosphorylation sites were identified in at least 2 out of 3 subjects. The majority of phosphoproteins detected are involved in sarcomeric function, excitation-contraction coupling (the Ca2+-cycle), glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. Of particular interest, we identified multiple novel phosphorylation sites on several sarcomeric Z-disc proteins known to be involved in signaling and muscle disorders. These results provide numerous new targets for the investigation of human skeletal muscle phosphoproteins in health and disease and demonstrate feasibility of phosphoproteomics research of human skeletal muscle in vivo. PMID:19764811

  20. Preparation of Polypropylene Spin Tips Filled with Immobilized Titanium(IV) Ion Monolithic Adsorbent for Robust Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangjie; Wan, Hao; Liu, Zhongshan; Wang, Hongwei; Mao, Jiawei; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-05-17

    In this study, we developed a Ti(IV) monolithic spin tip for phosphoproteome analysis of a minute amount of biological sample for the first time. The surface of polypropylene pipet tip was activated by the photoinitiator benzophenone under UV light radiation followed by polymerization of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate and bis-acrylamide in the tip to form a porous monolith with reactive phosphate groups. The as-prepared tips grafted with monolithic adsorbent were then chelated with titanium(IV) ion for phosphopeptide enrichment. It was found that the tips enabled fast and efficient capture of phosphopeptides from microscale complex samples. The monolithic tip was demonstrated to have a detection limit as low as 5 fmol β-casein tryptic digest, along with an exceptionally high specificity to capture phosphopeptides from complex tryptic digest mixed with an unphosphorylated protein and a phosphorylated protein at a molar ratio up to 1000:1. When the tip was applied to enrich phosphopeptides from 5 μg of tryptic digest of complex HeLa cell proteins, 1185 high confidence of phosphorylated sites were successfully identified with the specificity as high as 92.5%. So far, this is the most sensitive phosphoproteomics analysis using a standard liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system for proteome-wide phosphorylation analysis in mammalian cells. PMID:27101427

  1. Serial Dissection of Parasite Gene Families.

    PubMed

    Bzik, David J

    2016-05-01

    Calcium ion signaling regulates central aspects of the biology controlling stage and life cycle transitions of apicomplexan parasites. In the current issue of Infection and Immunity, Long and coworkers (S. Long, Q. Wang, and L. D. Sibley, Infect Immun 84:1262-1273, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01173-15) describe a powerful genetic system enabling reliable serial genetic dissection of a large gene family encoding novel calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) that provides new insights into the roles of CDPKs during Toxoplasma gondii infection. PMID:26953326

  2. [Coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Henningsen, Kristoffer; Abildgaard, Ulrik

    2015-03-16

    A previously healthy 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with chest pain. The day before the patient had been to a karate session and had received multiple punches and kicks to the chest region. An ECG showed Q-waves in V1 and V2 and flattening of the T-waves in V1-V6. Levels of cardiac enzyme markers were elevated. The patient subsequently underwent coronary angiography with supplemental optical coherence tomography that revealed a bifurcate dissection involving the proximal parts of left ramus interventricularis anterior and circumflex coronary artery. Two drug-eluting stents were implanted with good angiographic result. PMID:25786846

  3. Vessel wall MRI for suspected isolated basilar artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Obusez, Emmanuel C; Jones, Stephen E; Hui, Ferdinand

    2016-05-01

    Isolated basilar artery dissection is an uncommon intracranial vasculopathy with a poor prognosis. Digital subtraction angiography is considered the definitive modality for diagnosis. Vessel wall MRI (VW-MRI) is an emerging non-invasive technique for assessing the structural integrity of intracranial vessel walls and lumina. Recently, a small number of studies have described the vessel wall patterns of intracranial artery dissection. However, studies on vessel wall imaging of isolated basilar artery dissection remain limited. We describe a patient with suspected isolated spontaneous basilar artery dissection diagnosed using VW-MRI. PMID:26765755

  4. Acute aortic dissection diagnosed after embalming: macroscopic and microscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frédéric; Dedouit, Fabrice; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Leonetti, Georges; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 58-year-old man died suddenly in Madagascar and poisoning was suspected. The body was embalmed after death and the general state of preservation was good. We found a major aortic dissection with a large false lumen from the aortic root to the common iliac arteries and a hemopericardium with formalinized blood clot. The intimal tear was on the ascending aorta, and an intramural hemorrhage was noted at the right coronary artery, attesting to a retrograde dissection. Microscopic studies confirmed aortic dissection with extensive intramural hemorrhage and also confirmed the retrograde dissection to the right coronary artery with a reduction of 90% of the true lumen. Classically, aortic dissection occurs in individuals with hypertension and individuals with genetic disorders of collagen formation. The diagnosis is often first established at the postmortem examination. Aortic dissection is therefore dealt with largely in necropsy studies. The usual cause of death is rupture into the pericardial sac. One case of bloodless dissection has been reported but the sudden death was explained by acute myocardial ischemia secondary to dissection of the left coronary artery. In our case, we found major hemopericardium and also intramural hemorrhage at the right coronary artery. We were able to make the diagnosis of aortic dissection and exclude the suspicion of homicide 15 days after death and after embalming. PMID:24684562

  5. Doing Dissections Differently: A Structured, Peer-Assisted Learning Approach to Maximizing Learning in Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Emma R.; Davis, Rachel C.; Weller, Renate; Powney, Sonya; Williams, Sarah B.

    2013-01-01

    Areas of difficulty faced by our veterinary medicine students, with respect to their learning in dissection classes, were identified. These challenges were both general adult-learning related and specific to the discipline of anatomy. Our aim was to design, implement, and evaluate a modified reciprocal peer-assisted/team-based learning

  6. Doing Dissections Differently: A Structured, Peer-Assisted Learning Approach to Maximizing Learning in Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Emma R.; Davis, Rachel C.; Weller, Renate; Powney, Sonya; Williams, Sarah B.

    2013-01-01

    Areas of difficulty faced by our veterinary medicine students, with respect to their learning in dissection classes, were identified. These challenges were both general adult-learning related and specific to the discipline of anatomy. Our aim was to design, implement, and evaluate a modified reciprocal peer-assisted/team-based learning…

  7. Background Music in the Dissection Laboratory: Impact on Stress Associated with the Dissection Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.

    2015-01-01

    Notable challenges, such as mental distress, boredom, negative moods, and attitudes, have been associated with learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory (CDL). The ability of background music (BM) to enhance the cognitive abilities of students is well documented. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of BM in the CDL and on…

  8. The Effect of a Prior Dissection Simulation on Middle School Students' Dissection Performance and Understanding of the Anatomy and Morphology of the Frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Joseph Paul; Andre, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Science teachers, school administrators, educators, and the scientific community are faced with ethical controversies over animal dissection in classrooms. Simulation has been proposed as a way of dealing with this issue. One intriguing previous finding was that use of an interactive videodisc dissection facilitated performance on a subsequent actual dissection. This study examined the prior use of simulation of frog dissection in improving students' actual dissection performance and learning of frog anatomy and morphology. There were three experimental conditions: simulation before dissection (SBD); dissection before simulation (DBS); or dissection-only (DO). Results of the study indicated that students receiving SBD performed significantly better than students receiving DBS or DO on both actual dissection and knowledge of the anatomy and morphology. Students' attitudes toward the use of animals for dissection did not change significantly from pretest to posttest and did not interact with treatment. The genders did not differ in achievement, but males were more favorable towards dissection and computers than were females.

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Hsp90 Inhibition Preferentially Targets Kinases and the DNA Damage Response*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kirti; Vabulas, R. Martin; Macek, Boris; Pinkert, Stefan; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents in diseases such as cancer, their global effects on the proteome remain largely unknown. Here we use high resolution, quantitative mass spectrometry to map protein expression changes associated with the application of the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG). In depth data obtained from five replicate SILAC experiments enabled accurate quantification of about 6,000 proteins in HeLa cells. As expected, we observed activation of a heat shock response with induced expression of molecular chaperones, which refold misfolded proteins, and proteases, which degrade irreparably damaged polypeptides. Despite the broad range of known Hsp90 substrates, bioinformatics analysis revealed that particular protein classes were preferentially affected. These prominently included proteins involved in the DNA damage response, as well as protein kinases and especially tyrosine kinases. We followed up on this observation with a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of about 4,000 sites, which revealed that Hsp90 inhibition leads to much more down- than up-regulation of the phosphoproteome (34% down versus 6% up). This study defines the cellular response to Hsp90 inhibition at the proteome level and sheds light on the mechanisms by which it can be used to target cancer cells. PMID:22167270

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Darrell; Shen, Ying H.; Russell, Ludivine; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a highly lethal vascular disease. In many patients with TAD, the aorta progressively dilates and ultimately ruptures. Dissection formation, progression, and rupture cannot be reliably prevented pharmacologically because the molecular mechanisms of aortic wall degeneration are poorly understood. The key histopathologic feature of TAD is medial degeneration, a process characterized by smooth muscle cell depletion and extracellular matrix degradation. These structural changes have a profound impact on the functional properties of the aortic wall and can result from excessive protease-mediated destruction of the extracellular matrix, altered signaling pathways, and altered gene expression. Review of the literature reveals differences in the processes that lead to ascending versus descending and sporadic versus hereditary TAD. These differences add to the complexity of this disease. Although tremendous progress has been made in diagnosing and treating TAD, a better understanding of the molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that cause this disease is necessary to developing more effective preventative and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:23856125

  11. Molecular dissection of developmental behavior of plant height in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J; Zhu, J; He, C; Benmoussa, M; Wu, P

    1998-01-01

    A doubled haploid population of 123 lines from IR64/Azucena was used to dissect the developmental behavior and genotype by environment interaction for plant height by conditional and unconditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping methods in rice. It was shown that the number of QTL detected was different at various measuring stages. Some QTL could be detected at all stages and some only at one or several stages. More QTL could be found on the basis of time-dependent measures of different stages. By conditional QTL mapping of time-dependent measures, it is possible to reveal dynamic gene expression for quantitative traits. Mapping QTL for genetic main effects and GE interaction effects could help us in understanding the nature of QTL x environment interaction for the development of quantitative traits. PMID:9799277

  12. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Scott M.; Eskin, Barnet; Allegra, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED) chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400–13,100]) visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8%) with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910–1,050]) atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years. PMID:26587083

  13. Functional dissection of Odorant binding protein genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Swarup, S; Williams, T I; Anholt, R R H

    2011-08-01

    Most organisms rely on olfaction for survival and reproduction. The olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster is one of the best characterized chemosensory systems and serves as a prototype for understanding insect olfaction. Olfaction in Drosophila is mediated by multigene families of odorant receptors and odorant binding proteins (OBPs). Although molecular response profiles of odorant receptors have been well documented, the contributions of OBPs to olfactory behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we used RNAi-mediated suppression of Obp gene expression and measurements of behavioral responses to 16 ecologically relevant odorants to systematically dissect the functions of 17 OBPs. We quantified the effectiveness of RNAi-mediated suppression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and used a proteomic liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry procedure to show target-specific suppression of OBPs expressed in the antennae. Flies in which expression of a specific OBP is suppressed often show altered behavioral responses to more than one, but not all, odorants, in a sex-dependent manner. Similarly, responses to a specific odorant are frequently affected by suppression of expression of multiple, but not all, OBPs. These results show that OBPs are essential for mediating olfactory behavioral responses and suggest that OBP-dependent odorant recognition is combinatorial. PMID:21605338

  14. Genetic dissection of agronomic traits in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Bento, C S; Gonçalves, L S A; Santos, J O; Sudré, C P; Viana, A P

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mapping is very useful for dissecting complex agronomic traits. Genetic mapping allows for identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL), provide knowledge on a gene position and its adjacent region, and enable prediction of evolutionary mechanisms, in addition to contributing to synteny studies. The aim of this study was to predict genetic values associated with different agronomic traits evaluated in an F2 population of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum. Previously, a reference genetic map for C. baccatum was constructed, which included 183 markers (42 microsatellite, 85 inter-simple sequence repeat, and 56 random amplification of polymorphic DNA) arranged in 16 linkage groups. The map was used to identify QTL associated with 11 agronomic traits, including plant height, crown diameter, number of days to flowering, days to fruiting, number of fruits per plant, average fruit weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, fruit pulp thickness, soluble solids, and fruit dry weight. QTL mapping was performed by standard interval mapping. The number of small QTL effects ranged from 3-11, with a total of 61 QTL detected in 9 linkage groups. This is the first report involving QTL analysis for C. baccatum species. PMID:25867359

  15. Dissection of miRNA pathways using arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Cláudia; Confraria, Ana; Elias, Carlos Alexandre; Crozet, Pierre; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Weigel, Detlef; Baena-González, Elena

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression mostly post-transcriptionally by guiding transcript cleavage and/or translational repression of complementary mRNA targets, thereby regulating developmental processes and stress responses. Despite the remarkable expansion of the field, the mechanisms underlying miRNA activity are not fully understood. In this article, we describe a transient expression system in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, which is highly amenable for the dissection of miRNA pathways. We show that by transiently overexpressing primary miRNAs and target mimics, we can manipulate miRNA levels and consequently impact on their targets. Furthermore, we developed a set of luciferase-based sensors for quantifying miRNA activity that respond specifically to both endogenous and overexpressed miRNAs and target mimics. We demonstrate that these miRNA sensors can be used to test the impact of putative components of the miRNA pathway on miRNA activity, as well as the impact of specific mutations, by either overexpression or the use of protoplasts from the corresponding mutants. We further show that our miRNA sensors can be used for investigating the effect of chemicals on miRNA activity. Our cell-based transient expression system is fast and easy to set up, and generates quantitative results, being a powerful tool for assaying miRNA activity in vivo. PMID:25680775

  16. Dissection of miRNA pathways using Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Cláudia; Confraria, Ana; Elias, Carlos Alexandre; Crozet, Pierre; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Weigel, Detlef; Baena-González, Elena

    2014-10-24

    microRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression mostly post-transcriptionally by guiding transcript cleavage and/or translational repression of complementary mRNA targets, thereby regulating developmental processes and stress responses. Despite the remarkable expansion of the field, the mechanisms underlying miRNA activity are not fully understood. In this paper, we describe a transient expression system in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts that is highly amenable for the dissection of miRNA pathways. We show that by transiently overexpressing primary miRNAs and target mimics, we can manipulate miRNA levels and consequently impact on their targets. Furthermore, we developed a set of luciferase-based sensors for quantifying miRNA activity that respond specifically to both endogenous and overexpressed miRNAs and target mimics. We demonstrate that these miRNA sensors can be used to test the impact of putative components of the miRNA pathway on miRNA activity, as well as the impact of specific mutations, either by overexpression or by the use of protoplasts from the corresponding mutants. We further show that our miRNA sensors can be used for investigating the effect of chemicals on miRNA activity. Our cell-based transient expression system is fast and easy to set up and generates quantitative results, being a powerful tool for assaying miRNA activity in vivo. PMID:25343984

  17. The Effect of a Prior Dissection Simulation on Middle School Students' Dissection Performance and Understanding of the Anatomy and Morphology of the Frog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpan, Joseph Paul; Andre, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study that examined the prior use of simulation on frog dissection in improving students' actual dissection performance and learning of frog anatomy and morphology. Finds that students who performed the simulation before dissection performed significantly better than students who performed dissection before using the simulation or…

  18. Outcomes of a Rotational Dissection System in Gross Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, David W.; Oakes, Joanne; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Chuang, Alice Z.; Cleary, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Texas Houston Medical School, a rotational dissection system was introduced to improve coordination between the Gross Anatomy and the Introduction to Clinical Medicine (ICM) courses. Six students were assigned to each cadaver and divided into two teams. For each laboratory, one team was assigned to dissect and the other to…

  19. Traumatic Axillary Artery Dissection with Radial Artery Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Seung Hwa; Shin, Jae Seung; Park, Sang Woo

    2006-04-15

    This report describes a case of pathologically proven traumatic arterial dissection, presenting as complete occlusion of the axillary artery with radial artery embolism. Occlusion of the axillary artery by traumatic dissection mimicked transection and radial artery embolism mimicked congenital absence of the radial artery on the initial angiogram, but these were correctly diagnosed with the following sonogram.

  20. Alternatives To Animal Dissection in School Science Classes. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.

    Until recently, one of the most expected and accepted experiences among students in biology classrooms of the United States has been the dissection of vertebrate animals, from frogs and mice to cats and fetal pigs. However, resistance to animal dissection has grown during the past decade with concerns ranging from inhumane treatment of animals by…

  1. Dissection Videos Do Not Improve Anatomy Examination Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Waqas; Hyder, Omar; Butt, Jamaal; Aftab, Arsalan

    2011-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental study, we describe the effect of showing dissection videos on first-year medical students' performance in terms of test scores during a gross anatomy course. We also surveyed students' perception regarding the showing of dissection videos. Two hundred eighty-seven first-year medical students at Rawalpindi Medical College…

  2. Intracranial dissecting and saccular aneurysms in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kulla, L; Deymeer, F; Smith, T W; Weiner, M; Mullins, T F

    1982-12-01

    A young man with polycystic kidney disease was seen initially with an brain-stem infarction. Postmortem examination disclosed a dissecting aneurysm of the basilar artery and a saccular aneurysm of the right vertebral artery. Dissecting intracranial aneurysms rarely are associated with saccular aneurysms and, to our knowledge, have not been reported in association with polycystic kidney disease. PMID:7138321

  3. Student Attitudes toward Cadaveric Dissection at a UK Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quince, Thelma A.; Barclay, Stephen I. G.; Spear, Michelle; Parker, Richard A.; Wood, Diana F.

    2011-01-01

    A more humanistic approach toward dissection has emerged. However, student attitudes toward this approach are unknown and the influences on such attitudes are little understood. One hundred and fifty-six first-year medical students participated in a study examining firstly, attitudes toward the process of dissection and the personhood of the…

  4. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

  5. Justifying the Dissection of Animals in Biology Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Anthony G.

    1993-01-01

    Presents the idea that several points should be considered in animal dissection: (1) ethics; (2) the animal's position; (3) the law; and (4) the actual benefits to society. Recommends that students be carefully prepared for animal dissection. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  6. Choosing the correct treatment for acute aortic type B dissection.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Hager, E; Avgerinos, E; Genovese, E; Mapara, K; Makaroun, M

    2015-04-01

    Acute type B aortic dissection is a life threatening disease process, which remains a clinical dilemma despite advances in technology, surgical technique and postoperative management. The variability of presenting symptoms, lack of a consensus on indications for treatment and differing opinions about the optimal timing for repair have added to the management confusion. Medical management has been the standard of care for acute uncomplicated type B dissection. Surgical repair and endovascular intervention are reserved for those who present with, or subsequently develop, dissection-related complications. Complicated dissections occur in 25% of cases and may include organ malperfusion, aortic rupture, periaortic hematoma, and uncontrolled hypertension. In the past decade thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has gained widespread acceptance as the modality of choice for the treatment of complicated type B dissection. This transition is representative of advances in technology, physician experience with aortic endografts and lower morbidity and mortality rates associated with TEVAR. The best medical therapy remains the standard of care for uncomplicated dissection, however this strategy fails to prevent long-term aortic-related morbidity and mortality. Recent data suggest that early TEVAR lowers aortic-related events and improves long-term aortic specific survival by covering the entry tear, promoting false lumen thrombosis and inducing aortic wall remodeling. The paucity of supporting data has created controversy surrounding the optimal treatment strategy for acute type B dissection. Nonetheless, recent healthcare trends show a paradigm shift towards the utilization of early TEVAR in acute type B dissection. PMID:25644833

  7. Traditional versus Computer-Based Dissections in Enhancing Learning in a Tertiary Setting: A Student Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Sue; Peat, Mary; Lewis, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that investigates both the use and usefulness of laboratory dissections and computer-based dissections in a tertiary, first-year human biology course. Explores attitudes toward dissection. (DDR)

  8. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients. PMID:25917634

  9. Lymph node dissection for gastric cancer: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thales Paulo; Martins, Mário Rino

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common neoplasms and an important cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Efforts to reduce its high mortality rates are currently focused on multidisciplinary management. However, surgery remains a cornerstone in the management of patients with resectable disease. There is still some controversy as to the extent of lymph node dissection for potentially curable stomach cancer. Surgeons in eastern countries favor more extensive lymph node dissection, whereas those in the West favor less extensive dissection. Thus, extent of lymph node dissection remains one of the most hotly discussed aspects of gastric surgery, particularly because most stomach cancers are now often comprehensively treated by adding some perioperative chemotherapy or chemo-radiation. We provide a critical review of lymph nodes dissection for gastric cancer with a particular focus on its benefits in a multimodal approach. PMID:25992202

  10. Dissecting aortic aneurysms: accuracy of computed tomographic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, M.K.; San Dretto, M.A.; Lawson, T.L.; Foley, W.D.; Smith, D.F.; Berland, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    During a three-year period, fifty patients were evaluated for the possibility of dissecting aortic aneurysm using high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The diagnosis of dissection was made if two contrast-medium-filled channels were identified within the aortic lumen. Eighteen patients were diagnosed with CT as having dissecting aortic aneurysms. Eight patients were evaluated postoperatively and five of these patients had persistence of the double channel. Twenty-four patients had no evidence on CT of aortic dissection. Follow-up was obtained in all patients. There were no known false-negative diagnoses and one false-positive diagnosis. High-resolution CT offers an accurate, noninvasive means to evaluate patients for suspected dissecting aortic aneurysms.

  11. Dissecting Japan's Dengue Outbreak in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Mikkel B.; Sessions, October; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    Despite Japan's temperate climate, a dengue outbreak occurred in Tokyo for the first time in over 70 years in 2014. We dissected this dengue outbreak based on phylogenetic analysis, travel interconnectivity, and environmental drivers for dengue epidemics. Comparing the available dengue virus 1 (DENV1) E gene sequence from this outbreak with 3,282 unique DENV1 sequences in National Center for Biotechnology Information suggested that the DENV might have been imported from China, Indonesia, Singapore, or Vietnam. With travelers arriving into Japan, Guangzhou (China) may have been the source of DENV introduction, given that Guangzhou also reported a large-scale dengue outbreak in 2014. Coinciding with the 2014 outbreak, Tokyo's climate conditions permitted the amplification of Aedes vectors and the annual peak of vectorial capacity. Given suitable vectors and climate conditions in addition to increasing interconnectivity with endemic areas of Asia, Tokyo's 2014 outbreak did not come as a surprise and may foretell more to come. PMID:26711518

  12. Chemical Genetics in Dissecting Membrane Glycerolipid Functions.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Florian; Carrera, Laura Cuyàs; Nussaume, Laurent; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genetics has emerged as a powerful approach to dissect biological processes, based on the utilization of small molecules disturbing the function of specific target proteins. By analogy with classical genetics, 'reverse chemical genetics' refers to the utilization of drugs acting on a known target, enabling its functional characterization at the levels of the cells, tissues and organisms. Likewise, 'direct chemical genetics' refers to the utilization of a drug of unknown mode of action, but triggering a phenotype of interest. In that case, one has to identify the target(s) possibly blocked (or possibly activated) by the small molecule. This chapter illustrates both approaches, like the analysis of the elongation of fatty acids, the biosynthesis of galactoglycerolipids or the catabolism of phosphoglycerolipids by reverse chemical genetics or the study of the membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered upon phosphate starvation, by direct chemical genetics. PMID:27023235

  13. Dissecting Japan's Dengue Outbreak in 2014.

    PubMed

    Quam, Mikkel B; Sessions, October; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2016-02-01

    Despite Japan's temperate climate, a dengue outbreak occurred in Tokyo for the first time in over 70 years in 2014. We dissected this dengue outbreak based on phylogenetic analysis, travel interconnectivity, and environmental drivers for dengue epidemics. Comparing the available dengue virus 1 (DENV1) E gene sequence from this outbreak with 3,282 unique DENV1 sequences in National Center for Biotechnology Information suggested that the DENV might have been imported from China, Indonesia, Singapore, or Vietnam. With travelers arriving into Japan, Guangzhou (China) may have been the source of DENV introduction, given that Guangzhou also reported a large-scale dengue outbreak in 2014. Coinciding with the 2014 outbreak, Tokyo's climate conditions permitted the amplification of Aedes vectors and the annual peak of vectorial capacity. Given suitable vectors and climate conditions in addition to increasing interconnectivity with endemic areas of Asia, Tokyo's 2014 outbreak did not come as a surprise and may foretell more to come. PMID:26711518

  14. Cervical artery dissection: emerging risk factors.

    PubMed

    Micheli, S; Paciaroni, M; Corea, F; Agnelli, G; Zampolini, M; Caso, V

    2010-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CAD) represents an increasingly recognized cause of stroke and the most common cause of ischemic stroke in young adults. Many factors have been identified in association with CAD such as primary disease of arterial wall (fibrodysplasia) and other non-specific diseases related to CAD like Ehlers Danlos-syndrome IV, Marfan's syndrome, vessel tortuosity. Moreover, an underlying arteriopathy which could be in part genetically determined, has been suspected. The rule of emerging risk factors for CAD such as recent respiratory tract infection, migraine and hyperhomocysteinemia are still a matter of research. Other known risks factors for CAD are major head/neck trauma like chiropractic maneuver, coughing or hyperextension injury associated to car. We examined emerging risks factors for CAD detected in the last years, as CAD pathogenesis is still not completely understood and needs further investigations. PMID:21270941

  15. Proto-professionalism and the dissecting laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Henry B; Hilton, Sean R

    2006-07-01

    This essay argues for medical students' dissection of cadavers because this activity offers medical students opportunities to have certain experiences and reflect on them in ways facilitating their development of mature medical professionalism at the time they enter clinical practice. Issues central to professionalism as we envision it are (1) cognitive abilities identified as reflective judgment and principled ethical reasoning as they are exercised in four practice domains and (2) learning to learn in medical settings. We argue further that a key feature of such setting is practitioners' having to deal with ill-structured problems, and so we identify their features and relate their management to the sophisticated cognitive and learning abilities required of medical professionals. PMID:16583422

  16. A variant of nested dissection for solving n by n grid problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A.; Poole, W. G., Jr.; Voigt, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Nested dissection orderings are known to be very effective for solving the sparse positive definite linear systems which arise from n by n grid problems. In this paper nested dissection is shown to be the final step of incomplete nested dissection, an ordering which corresponds to the premature termination of dissection. Analyses of the arithmetic and storage requirements for incomplete nested dissection are given, and the ordering is shown to be competitive with nested dissection under certain conditions.

  17. Immunostaining of dissected zebrafish embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingchun; Xu, Xiaolei

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish embryo becomes a popular in vivo vertebrate model for studying cardiac development and human heart diseases due to its advantageous embryology and genetics. About 100-200 embryos are readily available every week from a single pair of adult fish. The transparent embryos that develop ex utero make them ideal for assessing cardiac defects. The expression of any gene can be manipulated via morpholino technology or RNA injection. Moreover, forward genetic screens have already generated a list of mutants that affect different perspectives of cardiogenesis. Whole mount immunostaining is an important technique in this animal model to reveal the expression pattern of the targeted protein to a particular tissue. However, high resolution images that can reveal cellular or subcellular structures have been difficult, mainly due to the physical location of the heart and the poor penetration of the antibodies. Here, we present a method to address these bottlenecks by dissecting heart first and then conducting the staining process on the surface of a microscope slide. To prevent the loss of small heart samples and to facilitate solution handling, we restricted the heart samples within a circle on the surface of the microscope slides drawn by an immEdge pen. After the staining, the fluorescence signals can be directly observed by a compound microscope. Our new method significantly improves the penetration for antibodies, since a heart from an embryonic fish only consists of few cell layers. High quality images from intact hearts can be obtained within a much reduced procession time for zebrafish embryos aged from day 2 to day 6. Our method can be potentially extended to stain other organs dissected from either zebrafish or other small animals. PMID:22258109

  18. Diamondiferous Peridotite Tomography: Precursor to Xenolith Dissections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Taylor, D. S.; Anand, M.; Ketcham, R.; Carlson, W.; Sobolev, N. V.; Pokhilenko, N.

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional, high-resolution computed X-ray tomography (HRCXT) of diamondiferous peridotite xenoliths from Siberia has successfully imaged diamonds and their textural relationships with co-existing minerals. This is an extension to the tomography and xenolith dissections performed previously on diamondiferous eclogites (e.g., Taylor et al., 2000, Int'l Geol Rev 42; Anand et al., 2003, 8th Int'l Kimb Conf). Spatial relationships between diamonds and their surroundings provide clues to the processes that control diamond crystallization. These relationships can be determined by rotating and viewing the 3-D model at different perspectives and orientations to look for specific associations/alignments. It is possible to render some of the phases transparent and display only one or two minerals at a time. Then by rotating the model, it is possible to look for spatial relationships between different crystals of the same mineral or different minerals. The maps obtained from the tomography form the basis for the delicate dissections of the xenoliths, revealing the diamonds as they formed in their mantle host rocks. Diamondiferous peridotites appear to be sparse carriers of diamonds compared to eclogites, where one unusual eclogite of 65 g contained 74 macro-diamonds. Although kimberlites always contain considerably more peridotite xenoliths than eclogites, the diamond population may actually be more indicative of eclogitic origin. The diamonds appear to be preferentially located in zones with a prominent sub-planar fabric of secondary mineralization - i.e., zones of increased permeability. Diamond was never observed in direct contact with any fresh, primary minerals. Also, there is insufficient sulfide mineralization to call upon an immiscible-sulfide melt as the diamond-forming medium. The association of the diamonds with secondary minerals strongly suggests that the diamonds formed after the initial host peridotite or eclogite, perhaps in conjunction with introduction of metasomatic fluids.

  19. Influence of a Dissection Video Clip on Anxiety, Affect, and Self-Efficacy in Educational Dissection: A Treatment Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Demirhan, Eda; Wüst-Ackermann, Peter; Desch, Inga H.

    2016-01-01

    In science education, dissections of animals are an integral part of teaching, but they often evoke negative emotions. We aimed at reducing negative emotions (anxiety, negative affect [NA]) and increasing positive affect (PA) and self-efficacy by an experimental intervention using a predissection video to instruct students about fish dissection.…

  20. The Effects of Computer Animated Dissection versus Preserved Animal Dissection on the Student Achievement in a High School Biology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariuki, Patrick; Paulson, Ronda

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of computer-animated dissection techniques versus the effectiveness of traditional dissection techniques as related to student achievement. The sample used was 104 general biology students from a small, rural high school in Northeast Tennessee. Random selection was used to separate the…

  1. Influence of a Dissection Video Clip on Anxiety, Affect, and Self-Efficacy in Educational Dissection: A Treatment Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Demirhan, Eda; Wst-Ackermann, Peter; Desch, Inga H.

    2016-01-01

    In science education, dissections of animals are an integral part of teaching, but they often evoke negative emotions. We aimed at reducing negative emotions (anxiety, negative affect [NA]) and increasing positive affect (PA) and self-efficacy by an experimental intervention using a predissection video to instruct students about fish dissection.

  2. Influence of a Dissection Video Clip on Anxiety, Affect, and Self-Efficacy in Educational Dissection: A Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Randler, Christoph; Demirhan, Eda; Wüst-Ackermann, Peter; Desch, Inga H.

    2016-01-01

    In science education, dissections of animals are an integral part of teaching, but they often evoke negative emotions. We aimed at reducing negative emotions (anxiety, negative affect [NA]) and increasing positive affect (PA) and self-efficacy by an experimental intervention using a predissection video to instruct students about fish dissection. We compared this treatment with another group that watched a life history video about the fish. The participants were 135 students studying to become biology teachers. Seventy received the treatment with the dissection video, and 65 viewed the life history video. We applied a pre/posttest treatment-comparison design and used the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the State–Trait–Anxiety Inventory for State (STAI-S), and a self-efficacy measure three times: before the lesson (pretest), after the film treatment (posttest 1), and after the dissection (posttest 2). The dissection film group scored higher in PA, NA, and state anxiety (STAI-S) after the dissection video treatment and higher in self-efficacy after the dissection. The life history group showed no differences between the pretest and posttest 1. The dissection film has clear benefits—increasing PA and self-efficacy—that come at the cost of higher NA and higher STAI-S.

  3. Dissecting the iTRAQ Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Suruchi; Yadav, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In the era of large-scale quantitative biology, mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics is progressively becoming indispensable for gaining insights into the biological systems at molecular level. Various quantitative study designs rely on chemical tagging approaches to study disease, stress, or drug response and temporal studies aiming at disease/developmental progression in a biological system. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) is one of the most popular chemical labeling techniques which allows four, six, or eight samples to be multiplexed in a single run. As the iTRAQ tag has a balancer group to equalize all states of a labeled peptide to same mass, the differentially labeled iTRAQ peptides are mixed before chromatography and elute as a single combined peak in MS. This enhances the peptide signal and quantitation is performed during MS/MS along with sequencing, where reporter ions of different masses are released to give relative quantitation. Known amount of a spiked-in protein can also help in absolute quantitation of the proteins in a sample. PMID:26519184

  4. Quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative analysis permits the isolation of invariant relations in the study of behavior. The parameters of these relations can serve as higher-order dependent variables in more extensive analyses. These points are illustrated by reference to quantitative descriptions of performance maintained by concurrent schedules, multiple schedules, and signal-detection procedures. Such quantitative descriptions of empirical data may be derived from mathematical theories, which in turn can lead to novel empirical analyses so long as their terms refer to behavioral and environmental events. Thus, quantitative analysis is an integral aspect of the experimental analysis of behavior. PMID:16812400

  5. Proteome and phosphoproteome characterization reveals new response and defense mechanisms of Brachypodium distachyon leaves under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dong-Wen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Min; Yan, Xing; Li, Xiaohui; Appels, Rudi; Sun, Dong-Fa; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant growth and development. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of salt response and defense in plants will help in efforts to improve the salt tolerance of crops. Brachypodium distachyon is a new model plant for wheat, barley, and several potential biofuel grasses. In the current study, proteome and phosphoproteome changes induced by salt stress were the focus. The Bd21 leaves were initially treated with salt in concentrations ranging from 80 to 320 mm and then underwent a recovery process prior to proteome analysis. A total of 80 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 60 unique proteins were identified. The sample treated with a median salt level of 240 mm and the control were selected for phosphopeptide purification using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS for phosphoproteome analysis to identify the phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. A total of 1509 phosphoproteins and 2839 phosphorylation sites were identified. Among them, 468 phosphoproteins containing 496 phosphorylation sites demonstrated significant changes at the phosphorylation level. Nine phosphorylation motifs were extracted from the 496 phosphorylation sites. Of the 60 unique differentially expressed proteins, 14 were also identified as phosphoproteins. Many proteins and phosphoproteins, as well as potential signal pathways associated with salt response and defense, were found, including three 14-3-3s (GF14A, GF14B, and 14-3-3A) for signal transduction and several ABA signal-associated proteins such as ABF2, TRAB1, and SAPK8. Finally, a schematic salt response and defense mechanism in B. distachyon was proposed. PMID:24335353

  6. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of In Vivo Signaling in Liver by the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1)

    PubMed Central

    Demirkan, Gokhan; Yu, Kebing; Boylan, Joan M.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates. Conclusions/Significance In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo. PMID:21738781

  7. Phosphoproteomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth matrix: identification of a major acidic sea urchin tooth phosphoprotein, phosphodontin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sea urchin is a major model organism for developmental biology and biomineralization research. However, identification of proteins involved in larval skeleton formation and mineralization processes in the embryo and adult, and the molecular characterization of such proteins, has just gained momentum with the sequencing of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the introduction of high-throughput proteomics into the field. Results The present report contains the determination of test (shell) and tooth organic matrix phosphoproteomes. Altogether 34 phosphoproteins were identified in the biomineral organic matrices. Most phosphoproteins were specific for one compartment, only two were identified in both matrices. The sea urchin phosphoproteomes contained several obvious orthologs of mammalian proteins, such as a Src family tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C-delta 1, Dickkopf-1 and other signal transduction components, or nucleobindin. In most cases phosphorylation sites were conserved between sea urchin and mammalian proteins. However, the majority of phosphoproteins had no mammalian counterpart. The most interesting of the sea urchin-specific phosphoproteins, from the perspective of biomineralization research, was an abundant highly phosphorylated and very acidic tooth matrix protein composed of 35 very similar short sequence repeats, a predicted N-terminal secretion signal sequence, and an Asp-rich C-terminal motif, contained in [Glean3:18919]. Conclusions The 64 phosphorylation sites determined represent the most comprehensive list of experimentally identified sea urchin protein phosphorylation sites at present and are an important addition to the recently analyzed Strongylocentrotus purpuratus shell and tooth proteomes. The identified phosphoproteins included a major, highly phosphorylated protein, [Glean3:18919], for which we suggest the name phosphodontin. Although not sequence-related to such highly phosphorylated acidic mammalian dental phosphoproteins as phosphoryn or dentin matrix protein-1, phosphodontin may perform similar functions in the sea urchin tooth. More than half of the detected proteins were not previously identified at the protein level, thus confirming the existence of proteins only known as genomic sequences previously. PMID:20181113

  8. Proteome and Phosphoproteome Characterization Reveals New Response and Defense Mechanisms of Brachypodium distachyon Leaves under Salt Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dong-Wen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Min; Yan, Xing; Li, Xiaohui; Appels, Rudi; Sun, Dong-Fa; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant growth and development. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of salt response and defense in plants will help in efforts to improve the salt tolerance of crops. Brachypodium distachyon is a new model plant for wheat, barley, and several potential biofuel grasses. In the current study, proteome and phosphoproteome changes induced by salt stress were the focus. The Bd21 leaves were initially treated with salt in concentrations ranging from 80 to 320 mm and then underwent a recovery process prior to proteome analysis. A total of 80 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 60 unique proteins were identified. The sample treated with a median salt level of 240 mm and the control were selected for phosphopeptide purification using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS for phosphoproteome analysis to identify the phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. A total of 1509 phosphoproteins and 2839 phosphorylation sites were identified. Among them, 468 phosphoproteins containing 496 phosphorylation sites demonstrated significant changes at the phosphorylation level. Nine phosphorylation motifs were extracted from the 496 phosphorylation sites. Of the 60 unique differentially expressed proteins, 14 were also identified as phosphoproteins. Many proteins and phosphoproteins, as well as potential signal pathways associated with salt response and defense, were found, including three 14-3-3s (GF14A, GF14B, and 14-3-3A) for signal transduction and several ABA signal-associated proteins such as ABF2, TRAB1, and SAPK8. Finally, a schematic salt response and defense mechanism in B. distachyon was proposed. PMID:24335353

  9. Endovascular management of chronic post-dissection aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Ritter, Wolfgang; Spinelli, Domenico; Seto, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Open repair is still the gold standard in acute type A dissection. Endovascular repair is advocated for complicated acute type B dissections. Recent evidence also supports the role of endovascular repair in a larger proportion of uncomplicated acute type B dissections. The role of endovascular repair in chronic post-dissection aneurysms, however, is still unclear. Most commonly, post-dissection aneurysms involve the thoracoabdominal aorta, making the use of fenestrated/branched stent-grafts to achieve complete aneurysm exclusion mandatory. These fenestrated/branched stent-grafts have been used with success in atherosclerotic thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs). In chronic post-dissection aneurysms, however, additional technical challenges arise. The usually narrow true lumen makes the use of branches more tedious and overall planning difficult. A second technical challenge relates to the fact that visceral branches can also originate from the false lumen. In such cases, perforation of the stiff chronic dissection flap is required to obtain access to the vessel. During the period January 2010 to November 2013, 17 patients (13 males, mean age 65±7.8 years) with chronic thoracoabdominal aneurismal degeneration following acute dissection were treated in our department with the use of fenestrated/branched stent-grafts. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100%). Perioperative mortality was two (11.8%) patients. One patient died due to multiple organ failure and one due to cardiac failure. No case of paraplegia was observed. During a 12-month median follow-up (range, 4-28 months) no aneurysm-related deaths were observed. Reintervention was required in three cases to repair a type Ib endoleak from a side branch. Endovascular treatment with fenestrated/branched stent-grafts is feasible for chronic post-dissection aneurysms. Standard thoracic stent-grafting is an option in a minority of patients, when the aneurysm is limited to the thoracic segment. Fenestrated and branched devices can successfully be used for aneurysms extending to the thoracoabdominal aorta. PMID:24967171

  10. Acute aortic dissection caused by Clostridium septicum aortitis.

    PubMed

    Eplinius, Franziska; Hädrich, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare cause of aortic dissection. So far, only 28 cases have been described in literature before. Most of these cases occurred in elderly patients and an association to colonic neoplasms and/or atherosclerosis has been witnessed frequently. Here we report the case of a 32-year-old man with fatal aortic dissection due to aortic infection with C. septicum. Beside a case of a 22-year-old man who died of aortic dissection due to C. septicum aortitis this is the second case of C. septicum aortitis in a young individual with no signs of colonic neoplasms or atherosclerosis. PMID:25242573

  11. Thoraco-abdominal Aorta Dissection: Look Again Before You Leap

    PubMed Central

    Zeina, Abdel-Rauf; Trachtengerts, Victoria; Abadi, Sobhi; Jarchowsky, Jacob; Soimu, Uri; Nachtigal, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition that might require immediate assessment and therapy. We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with essential hypertension complaining about low back pain; unenhanced thoracic-lumbar spine computed tomography examination (CT) revealed a hyperdense thin line across the aorta with an appearance of "double aortic lumen". Enhanced CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of type B aortic dissection. Radiologists should be familiar with this finding that could be considered a new radiological sign of aortic dissection on unenhanced CT examination. PMID:22470686

  12. Chronic type B aortic dissection: indications and strategies for treatment.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, F; Tsilimparis, N; Diener, H; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Von Kodolitsch, Y; Wipper, S; Debus, E S; Kölbel, T

    2015-04-01

    Chronic type B aortic dissection is a distinctive condition that needs individual treatment strategies and different considerations than in therapy of acute or subacute type B aortic dissection. The most common indication for treatment of this complex disease is aneurysmal dilatation of the dissected aortic segment. While open repair of the enlarged dissected aorta remains the best option for good-risk patients and patients with connective tissue disorders in high-volume centers with respective expertise, endovascular management of chronic type B aortic dissection with postdissection aneurysms has significantly gained ground in the past years. But the concept of TEVAR with implantation of a tubular stent-graft into the thoracic aorta to seal the proximal entry tear and reroute the blood flow into the true lumen alone, is not associated with satisfactory results. This is mainly due to the sparse remodeling capacity of the aortic tissue compared to earlier stages of the disease as the aortic wall and the dissection membrane are thickened and more rigid. On the other hand, it is restricted by the most limiting factor for endovascular success in chronic type B aortic dissection: persistent false lumen perfusion. This problem also affects patients with residual dissection after surgical repair of a DeBakey type I aortic dissection or dissection after ascending aortic repair for other pathologies. Hence, it is evident that strategies to achieve endovascular false lumen occlusion are of increasing importance and novel techniques have been introduced to solve the problem of persisting false lumen flow. Thus, the evolution of a large variety of techniques to address the false lumen perfusion issue indicates that complicated chronic type B dissection involves a high diversity in clinical presentation and morphology. A large armamentarium of catheter skills as well as critical individualized treatment strategies are required to address the heterogenous morphological disease pattern for each individual patient. The rapid development in endovascular techniques gives new directions for treatment indications and strategies in chronic aortic dissection and enables new insights into this old disease. PMID:25604323

  13. Comparative Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteomics between two mycobacterial species: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nakedi, Kehilwe C; Nel, Andrew J M; Garnett, Shaun; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Soares, Nelson C

    2015-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating mycobacterial growth and development. Understanding the mechanistic link between protein phosphorylation signaling network and mycobacterial growth rate requires a global view of the phosphorylation events taking place at a given time under defined conditions. In the present study we employed a phosphopeptide enrichment and high throughput mass spectrometry-based strategy to investigate and qualitatively compare the phosphoproteome of two mycobacterial model organisms: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Cells were harvested during exponential phase and our analysis detected a total of 185 phospho-sites in M. smegmatis, of which 106 were confidently localized [localization probability (LP) = 0.75; PEP = 0.01]. By contrast, in M. bovis BCG the phosphoproteome comprised 442 phospho-sites, of which 289 were confidently localized. The percentage distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation was 39.47, 57.02, and 3.51% for M. smegmatis and 35, 61.6, and 3.1% for M. bovis BCG. Moreover, our study identified a number of conserved Ser/Thr phosphorylated sites and conserved Tyr phosphorylated sites across different mycobacterial species. Overall a qualitative comparison of the fast and slow growing mycobacteria suggests that the phosphoproteome of M. smegmatis is a simpler version of that of M. bovis BCG. In particular, M. bovis BCG exponential cells exhibited a much more complex and sophisticated protein phosphorylation network regulating important cellular cycle events such as cell wall biosynthesis, elongation, cell division including immediately response to stress. The differences in the two phosphoproteomes are discussed in light of different mycobacterial growth rates. PMID:25904896

  14. Comparative Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteomics between two mycobacterial species: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Nakedi, Kehilwe C.; Nel, Andrew J. M.; Garnett, Shaun; Blackburn, Jonathan M.; Soares, Nelson C.

    2015-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating mycobacterial growth and development. Understanding the mechanistic link between protein phosphorylation signaling network and mycobacterial growth rate requires a global view of the phosphorylation events taking place at a given time under defined conditions. In the present study we employed a phosphopeptide enrichment and high throughput mass spectrometry-based strategy to investigate and qualitatively compare the phosphoproteome of two mycobacterial model organisms: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Cells were harvested during exponential phase and our analysis detected a total of 185 phospho-sites in M. smegmatis, of which 106 were confidently localized [localization probability (LP) = 0.75; PEP = 0.01]. By contrast, in M. bovis BCG the phosphoproteome comprised 442 phospho-sites, of which 289 were confidently localized. The percentage distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation was 39.47, 57.02, and 3.51% for M. smegmatis and 35, 61.6, and 3.1% for M. bovis BCG. Moreover, our study identified a number of conserved Ser/Thr phosphorylated sites and conserved Tyr phosphorylated sites across different mycobacterial species. Overall a qualitative comparison of the fast and slow growing mycobacteria suggests that the phosphoproteome of M. smegmatis is a simpler version of that of M. bovis BCG. In particular, M. bovis BCG exponential cells exhibited a much more complex and sophisticated protein phosphorylation network regulating important cellular cycle events such as cell wall biosynthesis, elongation, cell division including immediately response to stress. The differences in the two phosphoproteomes are discussed in light of different mycobacterial growth rates. PMID:25904896

  15. A comprehensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of yeast deletion mutants of 14-3-3 orthologs and associated effects of rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    We applied a multiplexed, mass spectrometry-based strategy to interrogate the proteome and phosphoproteome of three yeast strains under two growth conditions. The yeast proteins Bmh1 and Bmh2, analogs to the 14-3-3 protein family, have a wide-array of cellular functions including the regulation of phosphorylation events. Similarly, rapamycin is a drug that can regulate phosphorylation events. By performing a series of TMT10-plex experiments, we investigated the alterations in the proteome and phosphoproteome of wildtype and two deletion strains (bmh1Δ and bmh2Δ) of S. cerevisiae treated with rapamycin and DMSO as a control. Our 3×3+1 strategy allowed for triplicate analysis of each of the three strains, plus an additional sample consisting of an equal mix of all samples. We quantified over 4000 proteins and 20,000 phosphorylation events. Of these, we quantified over 3700 proteins across all 20 samples and over 14,300 phosphorylation events within each drug treatment. In total, data collected from four TMT10-plex experiments required approximately one week of data collection on the mass spectrometer. This study underscores the complex cellular roles of Bmh1 and Bmh2 coupled with response to rapamycin treatment and emphasizes the utility of multiplexed proteomic techniques to elucidate comprehensive proteomes and phosphoproteomes. PMID:25315811

  16. Dissecting innate immunity by germline mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Sophie; Hoebe, Kasper

    2008-04-01

    The innate arm of our immune system is the first line of defence against infections. In addition, it is believed to drive adaptive immune responses, which help fight pathogens and provide long-term memory. As such, the innate immune system is instrumental for protection against pathogens that would otherwise destroy their host. Although our understanding of the innate immune components involved in pathogen sensing and fighting is improving, it is still limited. This is particularly exemplified by increased documentation of innate immune deficiencies in humans that often result in high and recurrent susceptibility to infections or even death, without the genetic cause being evident. To provide further insight into the mechanisms by which pathogen sensing and eradication occur, several strategies can be used. The current review focuses on the forward genetic approaches that have been used to dissect innate immunity in the fruit fly and the mouse. For both animal models, forward genetics has been instrumental in the deciphering of innate immunity and has greatly improved our understanding of how we respond to invading pathogens. PMID:18205789

  17. Dissecting innate immunity by germline mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rutschmann, Sophie; Hoebe, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    The innate arm of our immune system is the first line of defence against infections. In addition, it is believed to drive adaptive immune responses, which help fight pathogens and provide long-term memory. As such, the innate immune system is instrumental for protection against pathogens that would otherwise destroy their host. Although our understanding of the innate immune components involved in pathogen sensing and fighting is improving, it is still limited. This is particularly exemplified by increased documentation of innate immune deficiencies in humans that often result in high and recurrent susceptibility to infections or even death, without the genetic cause being evident. To provide further insight into the mechanisms by which pathogen sensing and eradication occur, several strategies can be used. The current review focuses on the forward genetic approaches that have been used to dissect innate immunity in the fruit fly and the mouse. For both animal models, forward genetics has been instrumental in the deciphering of innate immunity and has greatly improved our understanding of how we respond to invading pathogens. PMID:18205789

  18. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  19. [Esophagectomy after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)].

    PubMed

    Nako, Yoshito; Shiozaki, Atushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ikoma, Hisashi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2014-11-01

    Herein, we report 9 patients who underwent esophagectomy after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) between April 2003 and December 2013. All patients were men, with a mean age of 65 years. En bloc ESD was performed, and no complications arose in any patient. The mean surgical time of esophagectomy was 323 minutes, and mean blood loss was 295 mL. Postoperative complications were present in 5 patients(anastomotic leakage in 3, pulmonary complications in 2, and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 1). In a patient diagnosed with pT1b-SM1 disease after ESD, a residual tumor(pT1a-MM, N0) was detected after esophagectomy. In another patient diagnosed with pT1b-SM2 disease, lymph node metastasis was detected after esophagectomy. In all patients, curative resection was performed, and no recurrences have been observed to date. This highlights the importance of additional esophagectomy after ESD for patients with pT1b disease. Esophagectomy after ESD can be considered a valid treatment because it provides high curative rates with acceptable safety. PMID:25731401

  20. Mesenteric ischemia in acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Mesenteric ischemia complicated by acute aortic dissection (AAD) is uncommon, but serious, as there is no established treatment strategy and it can progress rapidly to multi-organ failure. Diagnosing mesenteric ischemia before necrotic change is difficult, not only for primary care physicians, but even for gastrointestinal or cardiovascular surgeons as it can occur at any time during surgery. Thus, measures need to be in place at the bedside to enable us to obtain information on visceral perfusion. It is often difficult to decide which of laparotomy or aortic repair should be performed first, especially when there is associated shock or malperfusion of other vital organs. The standard surgical procedures for mesenteric ischemia are prompt revascularization of the mesenteric artery and, if needed, resection of necrotic intestine. However, the development of endovascular treatment and the introduction of hybrid ORs have improved the treatment strategies for mesenteric ischemia. This article reviews the issues of "diagnosis" in relation to the mechanism of mesenteric ischemia, and discusses the current "treatment strategies". PMID:26024781

  1. [Thoracic aortic dissection revealed by systemic cholesterol embolism].

    PubMed

    Braem, L; Paule, P; Héno, P; Morand, J J; Mafart, B; La Folie, T; Varlet, P; Mioulet, D; Fourcade, L

    2006-10-01

    Systemic cholesterol embolism is a rare complication of atherosclerosis, and has various presentations. Arterial catheterisms are a common cause. However, the association with an aortic dissection has been exceptionally reported. We report the observation of a 70 year-old man, with coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Six months before hospitalization, a coronary angioplasty was performed due to recurrent angina. The association of purpuric lesions on the feet, with acute renal failure confirmed cholesterol embolism syndrome. Transoesophageal echocardiography showed a dissection of the descending thoracic aorta associated with complex atheroma. The evolution was marked by the pulpar necrosis of a toe and by a worsening of the renal failure, requiring definitive hemodialysis. Further echographic control highlighted the rupture of the intimal veil of the dissection. Cholesterol embolism syndrome may reveal an aortic dissection in patients without thoracic symptoms. In such cases, transoesophageal echocardiography is a useful and non-invasive examination. PMID:17078270

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection presenting as acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mahenthiran, J.; Revankar, R.; Koka, V.; Hoo, J.; Shenoy, M.

    2000-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare entity being increasingly diagnosed as a cause of acute myocardial infarction, especially in cases of low cardiac risk female patients. This is one such case report of a black female patient, who suffered an acute anterior wall myocardial infarction due to an idiopathic spontaneous coronary artery dissection of the left anterior descending artery. She was treated with a thrombolytic agent in the acute phase, uneventfully. An urgent coronary angiogram demonstrated an intimal tear with a dissection of the left anterior descending artery. She survived the acute event and her subsequent hospital course was uncomplicated. Hence she was treated medically for her ischemic event and left ventricular systolic dysfunction with a favorable outcome. This case is yet another report of a survivor treated with a thrombolytic agent for the acute myocardial infarction due to spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10800297

  3. Eosinophilic Coronary Periarteritis with Arterial Dissection: The Mast Cell Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rakesh; Brooks, Erin G; Corliss, Robert F

    2015-07-01

    A subset of coronary arterial dissections is associated with eosinophilic coronary periarteritis (ECPA); however, the pathogenesis of the process remains unclear. Mast cells normally reside in coronary arterial adventitia and are known mediators of eosinophilic inflammatory conditions such as type I hypersensitivity reactions. We report two cases in which coronary arterial dissection with ECPA was detected at autopsy. Tryptase, CD68, CD4, CD8, and CD1a immunohistochemical staining was performed to better characterize inflammation. While eosinophils represented a prominent periadventitial inflammatory cell, there were slightly more lymphocytes: CD4/CD8 ratios were within expected reference ranges. There were moderate numbers of macrophages, and few neutrophils or dendritic cells. Numbers of mast cells in dissected versus nondissected sections were compared: adventitial mast cell densities were threefold higher in dissected portions and showed a trend toward increased degranulation. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a role in orchestrating inflammation in cases of ECPA. PMID:25771824

  4. [Aortic dissection and pregnancy. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Helms, E; Uguen, T; Amaranto, P; Carton, M J; Ducreux, J C; Tempelhoff, C

    1995-03-01

    Aortic dissection is a serious disease which rarely affects young women. In this context, it occurs in nearly one out of two cases during pregnancy, usually during the third term. The authors report acute dissection of the ascending aorta (de Bakey type 2) during pregnancy for which rapid cardiothoracic surgical management as a semi-emergency resulted in a favourable outcome for mother and child. PMID:7487294

  5. Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection Presented with Flank Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Shruti P.; Patel, Kajal; Pal, Bipin C.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare but important cause of flank pain. We report a case of isolated spontaneous renal artery dissection in 56-year-old man complicated by renal infarction presented with flank pain. Doppler study pointed towards vascular pathology. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was used to make final diagnosis which demonstrated intimal flap in main renal artery with renal infarction. PMID:26090259

  6. On Quantitizing

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Knafl, George

    2009-01-01

    Quantitizing, commonly understood to refer to the numerical translation, transformation, or conversion of qualitative data, has become a staple of mixed methods research. Typically glossed are the foundational assumptions, judgments, and compromises involved in converting disparate data sets into each other and whether such conversions advance inquiry. Among these assumptions are that qualitative and quantitative data constitute two kinds of data, that quantitizing constitutes a unidirectional process essentially different from qualitizing, and that counting is an unambiguous process. Among the judgments are deciding what and how to count. Among the compromises are balancing numerical precision with narrative complexity. The standpoints of “conditional complementarity,” “critical remediation,” and “analytic alternation” clarify the added value of converting qualitative data into quantitative form. PMID:19865603

  7. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M; Majersik, Jennifer J; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F; Pereira, Vitor M; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S; Worrall, Bradford B; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with mass effect, mostly on the brainstem. Although intracranial artery dissection is less common than cervical artery dissection in adults of European ethnic origin, intracranial artery dissection is reportedly more common in children and in Asian populations. Risk factors and mechanisms are poorly understood, and diagnosis is challenging because characteristic imaging features can be difficult to detect in view of the small size of intracranial arteries. Therefore, multimodal follow-up imaging is often needed to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment of intracranial artery dissections is empirical in the absence of data from randomised controlled trials. Most patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage undergo surgical or endovascular treatment to prevent rebleeding, whereas patients with intracranial artery dissection and cerebral ischaemia are treated with antithrombotics. Prognosis seems worse in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage than in those without. PMID:25987283

  8. Implantation of esophageal cancer onto post-dissection ulcer after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Asai, Satoshi; Takeshita, Koutarou; Kano, Yuki; Nakao, Eisuke; Ichinona, Takumi; Fujimoto, Naoki; Akamine, Eisuke; Mori, Takuji; Ogawa, Atsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    A case in which implantation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma onto a post-dissection gastric ulcer was strongly suspected is presented. A 72-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Esophageal cancer (EC) (Mt, 20 mm, 0-Is) and gastric cancer (GC) (antrum, 15 mm, 0-IIc) were identified. Biopsy specimens revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and differentiated adenocarcinoma, respectively. The GC was resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) [14 mm × 9 mm, type 0-IIc, tub1, pT1a(M), ly0, v0, HM(-), VM(-)]. Two months after ESD, radiation therapy was started for the EC, and an almost complete response was obtained. Nine months after the ESD, a follow-up EGD showed a submucosal tumor-like lesion with ulceration, located immediately under the post-ESD scar, and biopsy specimens showed moderately differentiated SCC. There were no similar lesions suggesting hematogenous or lymphatic metastasis in the stomach. PMID:26973424

  9. Implantation of esophageal cancer onto post-dissection ulcer after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Satoshi; Takeshita, Koutarou; Kano, Yuki; Nakao, Eisuke; Ichinona, Takumi; Fujimoto, Naoki; Akamine, Eisuke; Mori, Takuji; Ogawa, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A case in which implantation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma onto a post-dissection gastric ulcer was strongly suspected is presented. A 72-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Esophageal cancer (EC) (Mt, 20 mm, 0-Is) and gastric cancer (GC) (antrum, 15 mm, 0-IIc) were identified. Biopsy specimens revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and differentiated adenocarcinoma, respectively. The GC was resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) [14 mm × 9 mm, type 0-IIc, tub1, pT1a(M), ly0, v0, HM(-), VM(-)]. Two months after ESD, radiation therapy was started for the EC, and an almost complete response was obtained. Nine months after the ESD, a follow-up EGD showed a submucosal tumor-like lesion with ulceration, located immediately under the post-ESD scar, and biopsy specimens showed moderately differentiated SCC. There were no similar lesions suggesting hematogenous or lymphatic metastasis in the stomach. PMID:26973424

  10. Open retrograde endovascular stenting for left common carotid artery dissection secondary to surgical repair of acute aortic dissection: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yabing; Chen, Yanfei; Jiao, Liqun

    2015-07-01

    A 30-year-old male presented with an acute aortic artery dissection (Stanford type A) and underwent total arch replacement using a stented elephant trunk technique. One month later, the patient developed dissections in the innominate and left common carotid artery (CCA). The innominate artery dissection caused occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) and a major stroke. Dissection of the left CCA progressed and extended to the bifurcation site. Antegrade access for a left carotid intervention was deemed as difficult because of the previously implanted stent and the additional risks of embolic events and dissection enlargement. Hybrid procedures combining left carotid bifurcation exposure and retrograde endovascular stenting were successfully completed. This report is a rare case of retrograde endovascular reconstruction for the left CCA dissection following surgical repair of an aortic artery dissection. Here, we also review previous cases of iatrogenic carotid dissections following surgical intervention. PMID:25765635

  11. On the necessity of dissecting sequence similarity scores into segment-specific contributions for inferring protein homology, function prediction and annotation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein sequence similarities to any types of non-globular segments (coiled coils, low complexity regions, transmembrane regions, long loops, etc. where either positional sequence conservation is the result of a very simple, physically induced pattern or rather integral sequence properties are critical) are pertinent sources for mistaken homologies. Regretfully, these considerations regularly escape attention in large-scale annotation studies since, often, there is no substitute to manual handling of these cases. Quantitative criteria are required to suppress events of function annotation transfer as a result of false homology assignments. Results The sequence homology concept is based on the similarity comparison between the structural elements, the basic building blocks for conferring the overall fold of a protein. We propose to dissect the total similarity score into fold-critical and other, remaining contributions and suggest that, for a valid homology statement, the fold-relevant score contribution should at least be significant on its own. As part of the article, we provide the DissectHMMER software program for dissecting HMMER2/3 scores into segment-specific contributions. We show that DissectHMMER reproduces HMMER2/3 scores with sufficient accuracy and that it is useful in automated decisions about homology for instructive sequence examples. To generalize the dissection concept for cases without 3D structural information, we find that a dissection based on alignment quality is an appropriate surrogate. The approach was applied to a large-scale study of SMART and PFAM domains in the space of seed sequences and in the space of UniProt/SwissProt. Conclusions Sequence similarity core dissection with regard to fold-critical and other contributions systematically suppresses false hits and, additionally, recovers previously obscured homology relationships such as the one between aquaporins and formate/nitrite transporters that, so far, was only supported by structure comparison. PMID:24890864

  12. Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

  13. A comparison of retention of anatomical knowledge in an introductory college biology course: Traditional dissection vs. virtual dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeger, Kelli Rae

    Dissection has always played a crucial role in biology and anatomy courses at all levels of education. However, in recent years, ethical concerns, as well as improved technology, have brought to the forefront the issue of whether virtual dissection is as effective or whether it is more effective than traditional dissection. Most prior research indicated the two methods produced equal results. However, none of those studies examined retention of information past the initial test of knowledge. Two groups of college students currently enrolled in an introductory level college biology course were given one hour to complete a frog dissection. One group performed a traditional frog dissection, making cuts in an actual preserved frog specimen with scalpels and scissors. The other group performed a virtual frog dissection, using "The Digital Frog 2" software. Immediately after the dissections were completed, each group was given an examination consisting of questions on actual specimens, pictures generated from the computer software, and illustrations that neither group had seen. Two weeks later, unannounced, the groups took the same exam in order to test retention. The traditional dissection group scored significantly higher on two of the three sections, as well as the total score on the initial exam. However, with the exception of specimen questions (on which the traditional group retained significantly more information), there was no significant difference in the retention from exam 1 to exam 2 between the two groups. These results, along with the majority of prior studies, show that the two methods produce, for the most part, the same end results. Therefore, the decision of which method to employ should be based on the goals and preferences of the instructor(s) and the department. If that department's goals include: Being at the forefront of new technology, increasing time management, increasing student: teacher ratio for economic reasons, and/or ethical issues, then the choice should be the use of computer software. If the goals include: Students gaining a 3-dimensional feel for the location and relationship of parts to one another, students being able to see various naturally occurring anomalies, and increased experience with manipulation of dissection tools, then the choice should be dissection of actual specimens. It is important to note, however, that regardless of which method is chosen, the effectiveness of that method is very much dependent on the skill and enthusiasm of the instructor.

  14. Multiplex staining of 2-DE gels for an initial phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds and early grown seedlings from a non-orthodox specie: Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Rodríguez, M. Cristina; Abril, Nieves; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds (0 and 24 h after seed imbibition) and early grown seedlings (216 h after seed imbibition) from a non-orthodox sp. Quercus ilex, a multiplex (SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q DPS) staining of high-resolution 2-DE gels was used. By using this protocol it was possible to detect changes in protein-abundance and/or phosphorylation status. This simple approach could be a good complementary alternative to the enrichment protocols used in the search for phosphoprotein candidates. While 482 spots were visualized with SYPRO-Ruby, 222 were with Pro-Q DPS. Statistically significant differences in spot intensity were observed among samples, these corresponding to 85 SYPRO-Ruby-, 20 Pro-Q-DPS-, and 35 SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q-DPS-stained spots. Fifty-five phosphoprotein candidates showing qualitative or quantitative differences between samples were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF MS analysis, with 20 of them being identified. Identified proteins belonged to five different functional categories, namely: carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, defense, protein folding, and oxidation-reduction processes. With the exception of a putative cyclase, the other 19 proteins had at least one orthologous phosphoprotein in Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, N. tabacum, and Glycine max. Out of the 20 identified, seven showed differences in intensity in Pro-Q-DPS but not in SYPRO-Ruby-stained gels, including enzymes of the glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. This bears out that theory the regulation of these enzymes occurs at the post-translational level by phosphorylation with no changes at the transcriptional or translational level. This is different from the mechanism reported in orthodox seeds, in which concomitant changes in abundance and phosphorylation status have been observed for these enzymes. PMID:26322061

  15. [Could apoptosis be contributed to the occurrence of aortic dissection?].

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, B; Hamano, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawamura, T; Gohra, H; Katoh, T; Fujimura, Y; Zempo, N; Esato, K

    2000-03-01

    This clinical study was conducted to determine whether apoptosis is contributed to the occurrence of aortic dissection. The subjects comprised 11 patients who underwent Stanford type A aortic dissection and 4 autopsy cases, being the control group. The occurrence of apoptosis was determined by the TUNEL assay using an aortic wall specimen, and the distribution of macrophages and h-MMP-9 was examined by immunohistological staining. Apoptotic cells were observed in the aortic specimens for all of the 11 patients who underwent Standford type A aortic dissection, but not in any of the 4 autopsy cases. Moreover, apoptotic cells were present in large numbers on the surface of the false lumen strongly in 8 patients who underwent surgery within 1 month after aortic dissection, but not in 3 who underwent treatment after than 1 month. Those phenomena were also observed in the immunohistological staining of CD 68 and h-MMP-9. These findings indicate that apoptosis could be contributed to the occurrence of aortic dissection. PMID:10714110

  16. A Simple Emergency Prediction Tool for Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wen; Zhu, Qing-yi; Zhou, Xiang-hong; Chai, Xiang-ping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background A simple emergency risk prediction tool should be developed for clinicians to quickly identify the prognosis of patients with acute aortic dissection. Methods We enrolled 280 patients with acute aortic dissection admitted to emergency department between May 2010 and February 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital death. Results The in-hospital mortality of our patients with acute aortic dissection was 32.5%, in-hospital deaths with surgery less than the survived (34.1% VS 54.5%). Multivariate analysis identified that age (≥65 years old), Type A, blood pressure (mean systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mmHg), neutrophil percentage (≥ 80%) and serum D-dimer (≥ 5.0 mg/L) were significant predictors of death. With the simple emergency risk prediction tool, scores of all in-hospital deaths were ≥ 3, whereas almost all of the survivors (97.9%) had scores < 15. A score of 10 offered the best threshold value, with the highest sensitivity (81.3%) and specificity (86.8%). Conclusions The in-hospital mortality rate of patients with acute aortic dissection is high and can be predicted. Early surgery would be beneficial for in-hospital survive. This tool should be available for clinicians in the emergency department to quickly identify the prognosis of patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:26060615

  17. Quantitative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBridge, Lee A.

    An appeal for more research to determine how to educate children as effectively as possible is made. Mathematics teachers can readily examine the educational problems of today in their classrooms since learning progress in mathematics can easily be measured and evaluated. Since mathematics teachers have learned to think in quantitative terms and…

  18. On Quantitizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Knafl, George

    2009-01-01

    "Quantitizing", commonly understood to refer to the numerical translation, transformation, or conversion of qualitative data, has become a staple of mixed methods research. Typically glossed are the foundational assumptions, judgments, and compromises involved in converting disparate data sets into each other and whether such conversions advance…

  19. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  20. Dissecting the Impact of Matrix Anchorage and Elasticity in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, Tilo; Glorius, Stefan; Bischoff, Thomas; Uhlmann, Ina; Kaufmann, Martin; Brenner, Sebastian; Werner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrices determine cellular fate decisions through the regulation of intracellular force and stress. Previous studies suggest that matrix stiffness and ligand anchorage cause distinct signaling effects. We show herein how defined noncovalent anchorage of adhesion ligands to elastic substrates allows for dissection of intracellular adhesion signaling pathways related to matrix stiffness and receptor forces. Quantitative analysis of the mechanical balance in cell adhesion using traction force microscopy revealed distinct scalings of the strain energy imparted by the cells on the substrates dependent either on matrix stiffness or on receptor force. Those scalings suggested the applicability of a linear elastic theoretical framework for the description of cell adhesion in a certain parameter range, which is cell-type-dependent. Besides the deconvolution of biophysical adhesion signaling, site-specific phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, dependent either on matrix stiffness or on receptor force, also demonstrated the dissection of biochemical signaling events in our approach. Moreover, the net contractile moment of the adherent cells and their strain energy exerted on the elastic substrate was found to be a robust measure of cell adhesion with a unifying power-law scaling exponent of 1.5 independent of matrix stiffness. PMID:19843448

  1. 3D segmentation of the true and false lumens on CT aortic dissection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetnaci, Nawel; Łubniewski, Paweł; Miguel, Bruno; Lohou, Christophe

    2013-03-01

    Our works are related to aortic dissections which are a medical emergency and can quickly lead to death. In this paper, we want to retrieve in CT images the false and the true lumens which are aortic dissection features. Our aim is to provide a 3D view of the lumens that we can difficultly obtain either by volume rendering or by another visualization tool which only directly gives the outer contour of the aorta; or by other segmentation methods because they mainly directly segment either only the outer contour of the aorta or other connected arteries and organs both. In our work, we need to segment the two lumens separately; this segmentation will allow us to: distinguish them automatically, facilitate the landing of the aortic prosthesis, propose a virtual 3d navigation and do quantitative analysis. We chose to segment these data by using a deformable model based on the fast marching method. In the classical fast marching approach, a speed function is used to control the front propagation of a deforming curve. The speed function is only based on the image gradient. In our CT images, due to the low resolution, with the fast marching the front propagates from a lumen to the other; therefore, the gradient data is insufficient to have accurate segmentation results. In the paper, we have adapted the fast marching method more particularly by modifying the speed function and we succeed in segmenting the two lumens separately.

  2. Phosphoproteomic analysis of basal and therapy-induced adaptive signaling networks in BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fedorenko, Inna V.; Fang, Bin; Munko, A. Cecelia; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Basal and kinase inhibitor-driven adaptive signaling has been examined in a panel of melanoma cell lines using phosphoproteomics in conjunction with pathway analysis. A considerable divergence in the spectrum of tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides was noted at the cell line level. The unification of genotype-specific cell line data revealed the enrichment for the tyrosine-phosphorylated cytoskeletal proteins to be associated with the presence of a BRAF mutation and oncogenic NRAS to be associated with increased receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. A number of proteins including cell cycle regulators (CDK1, CDK2 and CDK3), MAPK pathway components (ERK1 and ERK2), interferon regulators (TYK2), GTPase regulators (RIN1) and controllers of protein tyrosine phosphorylation (DYR1A and PTPRA) were common to all genotypes. Treatment of a BRAF-mutant/PTEN-null melanoma cell line with vemurafenib led to decreased phosphorylation of ERK, phospholipase C1 and β-catenin with increases in RTK phosphorylation, STAT3 and GSK3α noted. In NRAS-mutant melanoma, MEK inhibition led to increased phosphorylation of EGFR signaling pathway components, Src family kinases and PKCδ with decreased phosphorylation seen in STAT3 and ERK1/2. Together these data present the first systems level view of adaptive and basal phosphotyrosine signaling in BRAF- and NRAS-mutant melanoma. PMID:25339196

  3. Differential Phosphoproteome Regulation of Nucleus Accumbens in Environmentally Enriched and Isolated Rats in Response to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiuzhen; Li, Dingge; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that stress contributes to the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder which is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder and influences over 10% of the world's population. Our previous studies revealed that rats reared in an enriched environment display less depression-related behavior compared to rats raised in an isolated environment, which implies that environmental enrichment produces an antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Protein phosphorylation rapidly changes signaling pathway function and alters the function of proteins associated with the stress-induced depressive disorder. Thus, in this study, a phosphoproteomic approach was used to uncover differential phosphoprotein regulation in rat nucleus accumbens between isolated (IC) and enriched environmental conditions (EC) under basal conditions, and in response to acute stress. We found 23 phosphoproteins were regulated in EC vs. IC rats under basal conditions; 10 phosphoproteins regulated by stress in IC rats; and 15 regulated by stress in EC rats. Among all significantly regulated phosphoproteins, 11 of them were represented in at least two conditions. The regulated phosphoproteins represent signaling pathway proteins (including ERK2), enzymes, transcriptional regulators, protein translation regulators, transporters, chaperones and cytoskeletal proteins. These findings provide a global view for further understanding the contribution of protein phosphorylation in depression pathogenesis and antidepressant action. PMID:24278208

  4. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic determination of ABA's effects on grain-filling of Oryza sativa L. inferior spikelets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhixing; Chen, Jun; Lin, Shisheng; Li, Zhong; Cheng, Ronghuai; Fang, Changxun; Chen, Hongfei; Lin, Wenxiong

    2012-04-01

    Cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.), especially the large-spikelet-type, often fail to achieve the high yield potential due to poor grain-filling of their inferior (late-flowering) spikelets. The superior (early-flowering) spikelets normally contain more abscisic acid (ABA) than the inferior spikelets. It was speculated that ABA might play a pivotal role in the grain-filling of inferior spikelets. To understand the molecular regulation involved in this process, we employed the 2-D gel-based comparative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses to search for differentially expressed proteins in the inferior spikelets under exogenous ABA treatment. A total of 111 significantly differential proteins and 31 phosphoproteins were found in the inferior spikelets after treatment. Among them, 100 proteins and 23 phosphoproteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In addition, the gene expression patterns of the inferior spikelets were confirmed with RT-PCR. These differentially expressed proteins are active in defense response, carbohydrate, protein, amino acid, energy and secondary metabolisms, as well as cell development and photosynthesis. The results suggest that the grain-filling of rice inferior spikelets is regulated by ABA through some proteins and phosphoproteins participating in carbon, nitrogen and energy metabolisms. PMID:22325889

  5. Comparative phosphoproteome profiling reveals a function of the STN8 kinase in fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow (CEF)

    PubMed Central

    Reiland, Sonja; Finazzi, Giovanni; Endler, Anne; Willig, Adrian; Baerenfaller, Katja; Grossmann, Jonas; Gerrits, Bertran; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rochaix, Jean-David; Baginsky, Sacha

    2011-01-01

    Important aspects of photosynthetic electron transport efficiency in chloroplasts are controlled by protein phosphorylation. Two thylakoid-associated kinases, STN7 and STN8, have distinct roles in short- and long-term photosynthetic acclimation to changes in light quality and quantity. Although some substrates of STN7 and STN8 are known, the complexity of this regulatory kinase system implies that currently unknown substrates connect photosynthetic performance with the regulation of metabolic and regulatory functions. We performed an unbiased phosphoproteome-wide screen with Arabidopsis WT and stn8 mutant plants to identify unique STN8 targets. The phosphorylation status of STN7 was not affected in stn8, indicating that kinases other than STN8 phosphorylate STN7 under standard growth conditions. Among several putative STN8 substrates, PGRL1-A is of particular importance because of its possible role in the modulation of cyclic electron transfer. The STN8 phosphorylation site on PGRL1-A is absent in both monocotyledonous plants and algae. In dicots, spectroscopic measurements with Arabidopsis WT, stn7, stn8, and stn7/stn8 double-mutant plants indicate a STN8-mediated slowing down of the transition from cyclic to linear electron flow at the onset of illumination. This finding suggests a possible link between protein phosphorylation by STN8 and fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow during this critical step of photosynthesis, when the carbon assimilation is not commensurate to the electron flow capacity of the chloroplast. PMID:21768351

  6. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Resveratrol-Dependent Inhibition of Akt/mTORC1/S6K1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenol, regulates many cellular processes, including cell proliferation, aging and autophagy. However, the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol action in cells are not completely understood. Intriguingly, resveratrol treatment of cells growing in nutrient-rich conditions induces autophagy, while acute resveratrol treatment of cells in a serum-deprived state inhibits autophagy. In this study, we performed a phosphoproteomic analysis after applying resveratrol to serum-starved cells with the goal of identifying the acute signaling events initiated by resveratrol in a serum-deprived state. We determined that resveratrol in serum-starved conditions reduces the phosphorylation of several proteins belonging to the mTORC1 signaling pathway, most significantly, PRAS40 at T246 and S183. Under these same conditions, we also found that resveratrol altered the phosphorylation of several proteins involved in various biological processes, most notably transcriptional modulators, represented by p53, FOXA1, and AATF. Together these data provide a more comprehensive view of both the spectrum of phosphoproteins upon which resveratrol acts as well as the potential mechanisms by which it inhibits autophagy in serum-deprived cells. PMID:25311616

  7. Phosphoproteome profiles of the phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea during exponential growth in axenic cultures.

    PubMed

    Davanture, Marlène; Dumur, Jérôme; Bataillé-Simoneau, Nelly; Campion, Claire; Valot, Benoît; Zivy, Michel; Simoneau, Philippe; Fillinger, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the gel-free phosphoproteomic analysis of the phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea grown in vitro under nonlimiting conditions. Using a combination of strong cation exchange and IMAC prior to LC-MS, we identified over 1350 phosphopeptides per fungus representing over 800 phosphoproteins. The preferred phosphorylation sites were found on serine (>80%) and threonine (>15%), whereas phosphorylated tyrosine residues were found at less than 1% in A. brassicicola and at a slightly higher ratio in B. cinerea (1.5%). Biological processes represented principally among the phoshoproteins were those involved in response and transduction of stimuli as well as in regulation of cellular and metabolic processes. Most known elements of signal transduction were found in the datasets of both fungi. This study also revealed unexpected phosphorylation sites in histidine kinases, a category overrepresented in filamentous ascomycetes compared to yeast. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange database with identifier PXD000817 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000817). PMID:24825570

  8. A novel double-component MOAC honeycomb composite with pollen grains as a template for phosphoproteomics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxi; Li, Jie; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-07-01

    The enrichment and separation of phosphopeptides from mixed biological samples is a technologically very significance, but highly challenging work. Current designed materials are mainly based on the broad and effective adsorptive character of metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). Though significant progress has been made in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with MOAC material, there are chances for further development. In this study, a novel pollen-based MOAC honeycomb material was firstly explored in which the suitable hydrophilic channels preferentially enrich much more endogenous phosphopeptides than nonphosphopeptides or proteins while doping binary metal oxides at the atomic level and the ultra-high specific surface area have further allowed it to possess more effective active sites. Based on these unique features, the pollen-based material exhibited high selectivity for β-casein (mass ratio of β-casein/BSA, 1:1500), ultra-low detection limit (0.1fmol), desirable reusability. Moreover, the bionics MOAC composites were investigated in the enrichment of phosphopeptides from nonfat milk, human serum (male and female at the same age) and mice liver, results of which indicate the great potential of the composite for the phosphoproteome analysis of complex biological samples through the cheap and environmentally friendly process. PMID:27154659

  9. Fast and easy phosphopeptide fractionation by combinatorial ERLIC-SCX solid-phase extraction for in-depth phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian; Rackiewicz, Michal; Dengjel, Joern

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis is a powerful method for gaining a global, unbiased understanding of cellular signaling. Its accuracy and comprehensiveness stands or falls with the quality and choice of the applied phosphopeptide prefractionation strategy. This protocol covers a powerful but simple and rapid strategy for phosphopeptide prefractionation. The combinatorial use of two distinct chromatographic techniques that address the inverse physicochemical properties of peptides allows for superior fractionation efficiency of multiple phosphorylated peptides. In the first step, multiphosphorylated peptides are separated according to the number of negatively charged phosphosites by electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC). A subsequent strong cation exchange (SCX) step separates mostly singly phosphorylated peptides in the ERLIC flow-through according to their positive charge. The presented strategy is inexpensive and adaptable to large and small amounts of starting material, and it allows highly multiplexed sample preparation. Because of its implementation as solid-phase extraction, the entire workflow takes only 2 h to complete. PMID:26633130

  10. Combined Integrin Phosphoproteomic Analyses and siRNA-based Functional Screening Identified Key Regulators for Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Lu, Bingwen; Yang, Qingkai; Fearns, Colleen; Yates, John R.; Lee, Jiing-Dwan

    2009-01-01

    Integrins interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) and deliver intracellular signaling for cell proliferation, survival and motility. During tumor metastasis, integrin-mediated cell adhesion to and migration on the ECM proteins are required for cancer cell survival and adaptation to the new microenvironment. Using SILAC-MS, we profiled the phosphoproteomic changes induced by the interactions of cell integrins with type I collagen, the most common ECM substratum. Integrin-ECM interactions modulate phosphorylation of 517 serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues in 513 peptides, corresponding to 357 proteins. Among these proteins, 33 key signaling mediators with kinase or phosphatase activity were subjected to siRNA-based functional screening. Three integrin-regulated kinases, DBF4, PAK2 and GRK6, were identified for their critical role in cell adhesion and migration possibly through their regulation of actin cytoskeleton arrangement. Altogether, we not only depict an integrin-modulated phosphorylation network during cell-ECM protein interactions but also reveal novel regulators for cell adhesion and migration. PMID:19351860

  11. MALDI-TOF and nESI Orbitrap MS/MS identify orthogonal parts of the phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Roesli, Christoph; Lemeer, Simone; Kuster, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is a reversible posttranslational protein modification which plays a pivotal role in intracellular signaling. Despite extensive efforts, phosphorylation site mapping of proteomes is still incomplete motivating the exploration of alternative methods that complement existing workflows. In this study, we compared tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and nano-electrospray ionization (nESI) Orbitrap instruments with respect to their ability to identify phosphopeptides from complex proteome digests. Phosphopeptides were enriched from tryptic digests of cell lines using Fe-IMAC column chromatography and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. We found that the two analytical workflows exhibited considerable orthogonality. For instance, MALDI-TOF MS/MS favored the identification of phosphopeptides encompassing clear motif signatures for acidic residue directed kinases. The extent of orthogonality of the two LC-MS/MS systems was comparable to that of using alternative proteases such as Asp-N, Arg-C, chymotrypsin, Glu-C and Lys-C on just one LC-MS/MS instrument. Notably, MALDI-TOF MS/MS identified an unexpectedly high number and percentage of phosphotyrosine sites (∼20% of all sites), possibly as a direct consequence of more efficient ionization. The data clearly show that LC-MALDI MS/MS can be a useful complement to LC-nESI MS/MS for phosphoproteome mapping and particularly so for acidic and phosphotyrosine containing peptides. PMID:26990019

  12. Integrated analysis of global proteome, phosphoproteome, and glycoproteome enables complementary interpretation of disease-related protein networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Moon; Park, Ji-Hwan; Mun, Dong-Gi; Bae, Jingi; Jung, Jae Hun; Back, Seunghoon; Lee, Hangyeore; Kim, Hokeun; Jung, Hee-Jung; Kim, Hark Kyun; Lee, Hookeun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Multi-dimensional proteomic analyses provide different layers of protein information, including protein abundance and post-translational modifications. Here, we report an integrated analysis of protein expression, phosphorylation, and N-glycosylation by serial enrichments of phosphorylation and N-glycosylation (SEPG) from the same tissue samples. On average, the SEPG identified 142,106 unmodified peptides of 8,625 protein groups, 18,846 phosphopeptides (15,647 phosphosites), and 4,019 N-glycopeptides (2,634 N-glycosites) in tumor and adjacent normal tissues from three gastric cancer patients. The combined analysis of these data showed that the integrated analysis additively improved the coverages of gastric cancer-related protein networks; phosphoproteome and N-glycoproteome captured predominantly low abundant signal proteins, and membranous or secreted proteins, respectively, while global proteome provided abundances for general population of the proteome. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the SEPG can serve as an effective approach for multi-dimensional proteome analyses, and the holistic profiles of protein expression and PTMs enabled improved interpretation of disease-related networks by providing complementary information. PMID:26657352

  13. The Tec Kinase-Regulated Phosphoproteome Reveals a Mechanism for the Regulation of Inhibitory Signals in Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tampella, Giacomo; Kerns, Hannah M; Niu, Deqiang; Singh, Swati; Khim, Socheath; Bosch, Katherine A; Garrett, Meghan E; Moguche, Albanus; Evans, Erica; Browning, Beth; Jahan, Tahmina A; Nacht, Mariana; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Plebani, Alessandro; Hamerman, Jessica A; Rawlings, David J; James, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown conflicting roles for Tec family kinases in regulation of TLR-dependent signaling in myeloid cells. In the present study, we performed a detailed investigation of the role of the Tec kinases Btk and Tec kinases in regulating TLR signaling in several types of primary murine macrophages. We demonstrate that primary resident peritoneal macrophages deficient for Btk and Tec secrete less proinflammatory cytokines in response to TLR stimulation than do wild-type cells. In contrast, we found that bone marrow-derived and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages deficient for Btk and Tec secrete more proinflammatory cytokines than do wild-type cells. We then compared the phosphoproteome regulated by Tec kinases and LPS in primary peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages. From this analysis we determined that Tec kinases regulate different signaling programs in these cell types. In additional studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages, we found that Tec and Btk promote phosphorylation events necessary for immunoreceptor-mediated inhibition of TLR signaling. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model where Tec kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx) are required for TLR-dependent signaling in many types of myeloid cells. However, our data also support a cell type-specific TLR inhibitory role for Btk and Tec that is mediated by immunoreceptor activation and signaling via PI3K. PMID:26026062

  14. Integrated analysis of global proteome, phosphoproteome, and glycoproteome enables complementary interpretation of disease-related protein networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Moon; Park, Ji-Hwan; Mun, Dong-Gi; Bae, Jingi; Jung, Jae Hun; Back, Seunghoon; Lee, Hangyeore; Kim, Hokeun; Jung, Hee-Jung; Kim, Hark Kyun; Lee, Hookeun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Multi-dimensional proteomic analyses provide different layers of protein information, including protein abundance and post-translational modifications. Here, we report an integrated analysis of protein expression, phosphorylation, and N-glycosylation by serial enrichments of phosphorylation and N-glycosylation (SEPG) from the same tissue samples. On average, the SEPG identified 142,106 unmodified peptides of 8,625 protein groups, 18,846 phosphopeptides (15,647 phosphosites), and 4,019 N-glycopeptides (2,634 N-glycosites) in tumor and adjacent normal tissues from three gastric cancer patients. The combined analysis of these data showed that the integrated analysis additively improved the coverages of gastric cancer-related protein networks; phosphoproteome and N-glycoproteome captured predominantly low abundant signal proteins, and membranous or secreted proteins, respectively, while global proteome provided abundances for general population of the proteome. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the SEPG can serve as an effective approach for multi-dimensional proteome analyses, and the holistic profiles of protein expression and PTMs enabled improved interpretation of disease-related networks by providing complementary information. PMID:26657352

  15. Organic-inorganic hybrid silica monolith based immobilized titanium ion affinity chromatography column for analysis of mitochondrial phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chunyan; Ma, Junfeng; Tao, Dingyin; Shan, Yichu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2010-08-01

    A novel kind of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) column based on organic-inorganic hybrid silica monolith has been developed. The monolithic support was prepared in a 250 microm i.d. capillary by the sol-gel method with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as precursors. Subsequently, amine groups were functionalized by glutaraldehyde, and then activated with (aminomethyl) phosphonic acid, followed by Ti(4+) chelation. By such a hybrid silica monolithic Ti(4+)-IMAC column, 15 phosphopeptides were effectively isolated from the digest mixture of alpha-casein and BSA with the molar ratio as low as 1:200, illustrating its superior selectivity. With a synthetic phosphorylated peptide, YKVPQLEIVPNSpAEER, as the sample, the loading capacity and recovery of the Ti(4+)-IMAC monolithic column were measured to be 1.4 micromol/mL and 69%, respectively. Such an IMAC monolithic column was further applied to enrich phosphopeptides from rat liver mitochondria. In total, 224 unique phosphopeptides, corresponding to 148 phosphoprotein groups, were identified by duplicate nanoRPLC-LTQ MS/MS/MS runs with a false-positive rate of less than 1% at the peptide level. These results demonstrate that the hybrid silica monolith based Ti(4+)-IMAC column might provide a promising tool for large-scale phosphopeptide enrichment, facilitating the in-depth understanding of the biological functions of phosphoproteomes. PMID:20568813

  16. Large-Scale Phosphoproteome of Human Whole Saliva Using Disulphide-Thiol-Interchange Covalent Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Erdjan; Siqueira, Walter L.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.

    2010-01-01

    Thus far only a handful of phosphoproteins with important biological functions have been identified and characterized in oral fluids and these include some of the abundant protein constituents of saliva. Whole saliva (WS) samples were trypsin digested followed by chemical derivatization using dithiothreitol (DTT) of the phospho-serine/threonine containing peptides. The DTT-phosphopeptides were enriched by covalent disulphide-thiol-interchange chromatography and analysis by nano-flow LC-ESI-MS/MS. The specificity of DTT chemical derivatization was evaluated separately under different base-catalyzed conditions with NaOH and Ba(OH)2, blocking cysteine residues by iodoacetamide and enzymatic O-deglycosylation prior to DTT reaction. Further analysis of WS samples which were subjected to either of these conditions provided supporting evidence for phosphoprotein identifications. The combined chemical strategies and mass spectrometric analyses identified 65 phosphoproteins in WS of which 28 were based on two or more peptide identification criteria with high confidence, and 37 were based on a single phosphopeptide identification. Most of the identified proteins, ~80%, were hitherto unknown phosphoprotein components. This study represents the first large-scale documentation of phosphoproteins of WS. The origins and identity of WS phosphoproteome suggest significant implications for both basic science and the development of novel biomarkers/diagnostic tools for both systemic and oral disease states. PMID:20659418

  17. Global Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Human Skeletal Muscle Reveals a Network of Exercise-Regulated Kinases and AMPK Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Kleinert, Maximilian; Humphrey, Sean J; Yang, Pengyi; Holliday, Mira; Trefely, Sophie; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Burchfield, James G; Jensen, Thomas E; Jothi, Raja; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Richter, Erik A; James, David E

    2015-11-01

    Exercise is essential in regulating energy metabolism and whole-body insulin sensitivity. To explore the exercise signaling network, we undertook a global analysis of protein phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle biopsies from untrained healthy males before and after a single high-intensity exercise bout, revealing 1,004 unique exercise-regulated phosphosites on 562 proteins. These included substrates of known exercise-regulated kinases (AMPK, PKA, CaMK, MAPK, mTOR), yet the majority of kinases and substrate phosphosites have not previously been implicated in exercise signaling. Given the importance of AMPK in exercise-regulated metabolism, we performed a targeted in vitro AMPK screen and employed machine learning to predict exercise-regulated AMPK substrates. We validated eight predicted AMPK substrates, including AKAP1, using targeted phosphoproteomics. Functional characterization revealed an undescribed role for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of AKAP1 in mitochondrial respiration. These data expose the unexplored complexity of acute exercise signaling and provide insights into the role of AMPK in mitochondrial biochemistry. PMID:26437602

  18. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 Signaling Reveals ZO-1 as a Critical Regulator of Endothelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chidiac, Rony; Zhang, Ying; Tessier, Sylvain; Faubert, Denis; Delisle, Chantal; Gratton, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    VEGF and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) are essential factors to promote angiogenesis through regulation of a plethora of signaling events in endothelial cells (ECs). Although pathways activated by VEGF and Ang-1 are being established, the unique signaling nodes conferring specific responses to each factor remain poorly defined. Thus, we conducted a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling pathways activated by VEGF and Ang-1 in ECs using mass spectrometry. Analysis of VEGF and Ang-1 networks of regulated phosphoproteins revealed that the junctional proteins ZO-1, ZO-2, JUP and p120-catenin are part of a cluster of proteins phosphorylated following VEGF stimulation that are linked to MAPK1 activation. Down-regulation of these junctional proteins led to MAPK1 activation and accordingly, increased proliferation of ECs stimulated specifically by VEGF, but not by Ang-1. We identified ZO-1 as the central regulator of this effect and showed that modulation of cellular ZO-1 levels is necessary for EC proliferation during vascular development of the mouse postnatal retina. In conclusion, we uncovered ZO-1 as part of a signaling node activated by VEGF, but not Ang-1, that specifically modulates EC proliferation during angiogenesis. PMID:26846344

  19. Phosphoproteomics of the Dopamine Pathway Enables Discovery of Rap1 Activation as a Reward Signal In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Nakauchi, Sakura; Nishioka, Tomoki; Takano, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xinjian; Tsuboi, Daisuke; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Kobayashi, Kenta; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miura, Masami; Nishi, Akinori; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) type 1 receptor (D1R) signaling in the striatum presumably regulates neuronal excitability and reward-related behaviors through PKA. However, whether and how D1Rs and PKA regulate neuronal excitability and behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we developed a phosphoproteomic analysis method to identify known and novel PKA substrates downstream of the D1R and obtained more than 100 candidate substrates, including Rap1 GEF (Rasgrp2). We found that PKA phosphorylation of Rasgrp2 activated its guanine nucleotide-exchange activity on Rap1. Cocaine exposure activated Rap1 in the nucleus accumbens in mice. The expression of constitutively active PKA or Rap1 in accumbal D1R-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1R-MSNs) enhanced neuronal firing rates and behavioral responses to cocaine exposure through MAPK. Knockout of Rap1 in the accumbal D1R-MSNs was sufficient to decrease these phenotypes. These findings demonstrate a novel DA-PKA-Rap1-MAPK intracellular signaling mechanism in D1R-MSNs that increases neuronal excitability to enhance reward-related behaviors. PMID:26804993

  20. Methodological aspects of the genetic dissection of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Carlborg, O; DeKoning, D; Manly, Kenneth; Chesler, Elissa J; Williams, Robert; Haley, C

    2004-01-01

    Motivation: Dissection of the genetics underlying gene expression utilizes techniques from microarray analyses as well as quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Available QTL mapping methods are not tailored for the highly automated analyses required to deal with the thousands of gene transcripts encountered in the mapping of QTL affecting gene expression (sometimes referred to as eQTL). This report focuses on the adaptation of QTL mapping methodology to perform automated mapping of QTL affecting gene expression. Results: The analyses of expression data on>12 000 gene transcripts in BXD recombinant inbred mice found, on average, 629 QTL exceeding the genome-wide 5% threshold. Using additional information on trait repeatabilities and QTL location, 168 of these were classified as high confidence QTL. Current sample sizes of genetical genomics studies make it possible to detect a reasonable number of QTL using simple genetic models, but considerably larger studies are needed to evaluate more complex genetic models. After extensive analyses of real data and additional simulated data (altogether >300 000 genome scans) we make the following recommendations for detection of QTL for gene expression: (1) For populations with an unbalanced number of replicates on each genotype, weighted least squares should be preferred above ordinary least squares. Weights can be based on the repeatability of the trait and the number of replicates. (2) A genome scan based on multiple marker information but analysing only at marker locations is a good approximation to a full interval mapping procedure. (3) Significance testing should be based on empirical genome-wide significance thresholds that are derived for each trait separately. (4) The significant QTL can be separated into high and low confidence QTL using a false discovery rate that incorporates prior information such as transcript repeatabilities and co-localization of gene- ranscripts and QTL. (5) Including observations on the founder lines in the QTL analysis