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1

Telephone Survey Designs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concepts, definitions, and notation that have evolved with the development of telephone survey design methodology are discussed and presented as a unified structure. This structure is then applied to some of the more well-known telephone survey designs and alternative designs are developed. The relative merits of the different survey designs

Casady, Robert J.

2

Quantitative evolutionary design  

PubMed Central

The field of quantitative evolutionary design uses evolutionary reasoning (in terms of natural selection and ultimate causation) to understand the magnitudes of biological reserve capacities, i.e. excesses of capacities over natural loads. Ratios of capacities to loads, defined as safety factors, fall in the range 1.2-10 for most engineered and biological components, even though engineered safety factors are specified intentionally by humans while biological safety factors arise through natural selection. Familiar examples of engineered safety factors include those of buildings, bridges and elevators (lifts), while biological examples include factors of bones and other structural elements, of enzymes and transporters, and of organ metabolic performances. Safety factors serve to minimize the overlap zone (resulting in performance failure) between the low tail of capacity distributions and the high tail of load distributions. Safety factors increase with coefficients of variation of load and capacity, with capacity deterioration with time, and with cost of failure, and decrease with costs of initial construction, maintenance, operation, and opportunity. Adaptive regulation of many biological systems involves capacity increases with increasing load; several quantitative examples suggest sublinear increases, such that safety factors decrease towards 1.0. Unsolved questions include safety factors of series systems, parallel or branched pathways, elements with multiple functions, enzyme reaction chains, and equilibrium enzymes. The modest sizes of safety factors imply the existence of costs that penalize excess capacities. Those costs are likely to involve wasted energy or space for large or expensive components, but opportunity costs of wasted space at the molecular level for minor components. PMID:12122135

Diamond, Jared

2002-01-01

3

Quantitative resilience analysis through control design.  

SciTech Connect

Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. Few quantitative resilience methods exist, and those existing approaches tend to be rather simplistic and, hence, not capable of sufficiently assessing all aspects of critical infrastructure resilience. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the development of quantitative resilience through application of control design methods. Specifically, we conducted a survey of infrastructure models to assess what types of control design might be applicable for critical infrastructure resilience assessment. As a result of this survey, we developed a decision process that directs the resilience analyst to the control method that is most likely applicable to the system under consideration. Furthermore, we developed optimal control strategies for two sets of representative infrastructure systems to demonstrate how control methods could be used to assess the resilience of the systems to catastrophic disruptions. We present recommendations for future work to continue the development of quantitative resilience analysis methods.

Sunderland, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Camphouse, Russell Chris (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM)

2009-09-01

4

Evaluating quantitative research designs: Part 1.  

PubMed

This article has provided an overview of the three major types of quantitative designs commonly used in nursing research, as well as some criteria for evaluating the designs of published research. The next column will include additional criteria for critiquing quantitative research designs. PMID:7859458

Haughey, B P

1994-10-01

5

Web Survey Design and Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many claims are being made about the advantages of conducting surveys on the Web. However, there has been little research on the effects of format or design on the levels of unit and item response or on data quality. In a study conducted at the University of Michigan, a number of experiments were added to a survey of the student

Mick P. Couper; Michael W. Traugott; Mark J. Lamias

2001-01-01

6

Report on Solar Water Heating Quantitative Survey  

SciTech Connect

This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar water-heating systems from the perspective of home builders, architects, and home buyers.

Focus Marketing Services

1999-05-06

7

Quantitative methods for knowledge-base design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of quantitative methods for knowledge base design are presented. The result of the research consists of methods that draw from three different areas of mathematics: a statistical process for integration, a set of matrix manipulations for verification and heuristic clustering algorithms for knowledge base partitioning. A key feature that cuts across all of the design activities is the

Botten

1989-01-01

8

WATERSHED BASED SURVEY DESIGNS  

EPA Science Inventory

The development of watershed-based design and assessment tools will help to serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional condition to meet Section 305(b), identification of impaired water bodies or wate...

9

TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY DESIGN AND CONDUCT OF THE SURVEY  

E-print Network

TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY 2001 DESIGN AND CONDUCT OF THE SURVEY #12;TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY 2001 A Telephone Interview Survey on Household Travel Behaviour in Greater Toronto OF THE SURVEY Prepared for the Transportation Information Steering Committee by the Data Management Group

Toronto, University of

10

TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY DESIGN AND CONDUCT OF THE SURVEY  

E-print Network

TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY 1996 DESIGN AND CONDUCT OF THE SURVEY FIRST REPORT OF THE 1996 SERIES #12;TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY 1996 A Telephone Interview Survey on Household Travel Behaviour AND CONDUCT OF THE SURVEY Prepared for the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection Steering

Toronto, University of

11

Examining Stress in Graduate Assistants: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to employ qualitative and quantitative survey methods in a concurrent mixed model design to assess stressors and strains in graduate assistants. The stressors most frequently reported qualitatively were work overload, interpersonal conflict, and organizational constraints; the most frequently reported psychological…

Mazzola, Joseph J.; Walker, Erin J.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Spector, Paul E.

2011-01-01

12

Qualities of a Psychiatric Mentor: A Quantitative Singaporean Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Psychiatric mentors are an important part of the new, seamless training program in Singapore. There is a need to assess the qualities of a good psychiatric mentor vis-a-vis those of a good psychiatrist. Method: An anonymous survey was sent out to all psychiatry trainees and psychiatrists in Singapore to assess quantitatively the…

Tor, Phern-Chern; Goh, Lee-Gan; Ang, Yong-Guan; Lim, Leslie; Winslow, Rasaiah-Munidasa; Ng, Beng-Yeong; Wong, Sze-Tai; Ng, Tse-Pin; Kia, Ee-Heok

2011-01-01

13

Watershed-based survey designs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Watershed-based sampling design and assessment tools help serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional conditions to meet Section 305(b), identification of impaired water bodies or watersheds to meet Section 303(d), and development of empirical relationships between causes or sources of impairment and biological responses. Creation of GIS databases for hydrography, hydrologically corrected digital elevation models, and hydrologic derivatives such as watershed boundaries and upstream-downstream topology of subcatchments would provide a consistent seamless nationwide framework for these designs. The elements of a watershed-based sample framework can be represented either as a continuous infinite set defined by points along a linear stream network, or as a discrete set of watershed polygons. Watershed-based designs can be developed with existing probabilistic survey methods, including the use of unequal probability weighting, stratification, and two-stage frames for sampling. Case studies for monitoring of Atlantic Coastal Plain streams, West Virginia wadeable streams, and coastal Oregon streams illustrate three different approaches for selecting sites for watershed-based survey designs. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005.

Detenbeck, N.E.; Cincotta, D.; Denver, J.M.; Greenlee, S.K.; Olsen, A.R.; Pitchford, A.M.

2005-01-01

14

A Quantitative Survey of Local Adaptation and Fitness TradeOffs. Author(s): Joe Hereford  

E-print Network

A Quantitative Survey of Local Adaptation and Fitness TradeOffs. Author(s): Joe Hereford Source naturalist may 2009 A Quantitative Survey of Local Adaptation and Fitness Trade-Offs Joe Hereford* National

Nuismer, Scott L.

15

Web Survey Design: Paging versus Scrolling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key choice in the design of Web surveys is whether to place the survey questions in a multitude of short pages or in long scrollable pages. There are advantages and disadvantages of each approach, but little empirical evidence to guide the choice. In 2003 we conducted a survey of over 21,000 undergraduate students. Ten per- cent of the 10,000

ANDY PEYTCHEV; MICK P. COUPER; SEAN ESTEBAN MCCABE; SCOTT D. CRAWFORD

2006-01-01

16

Quantitative evolutionary design of nutrient processing: Glucose  

PubMed Central

Quantitative evolutionary design involves the numerical relationships, evolved through natural selection, of biological capacities to each other and to natural loads. Here we study the relation of nutrient-processing capacities of the intestine and of organs beyond it (such as liver and kidneys) to each other and to natural loads of nutrients normally consumed. To control experimentally the rate of nutrient delivery to organs beyond the intestine, we administered nutrients directly into the veins of rats by the method of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Control rats consuming the TPN solution by mouth ingested glucose at 42 mmol/day and processed it completely, as gauged by negligible appearance of glucose in urine and feces. Experimental rats receiving TPN were able to process infused glucose completely at rates up to 92 mmol/day. At higher infusion rates, they were unable to process further glucose, as gauged by rises in serum and urinary glucose levels and serum osmolality. At the highest infusion rates, they exhibited diuresis, dehydration, and both decreased weight gain and survival. These symptoms closely resemble the human diabetic condition known as nonketotic hypertonicity. Thus, a rat's body has a safety factor of 2.2 (=92/42) for glucose processing: it can process glucose at a rate 2.2 times its voluntary intake. This safety factor represents apparent excess capacity that may have evolved to process other nutrients converted into glucose, to minimize the risk of loads swamping capacities, to handle suddenly increased nutrient requirements, or to effect rapid mobilization of glucose. PMID:12077313

Steyermark, Anthony C.; Lam, Mandy M.; Diamond, Jared

2002-01-01

17

The XMM-LSS survey. Survey design and first results  

E-print Network

We have designed a medium deep large area X-ray survey with XMM - the XMM Large Scale Structure survey, XMM-LSS - with the scope of extending the cosmological tests attempted using ROSAT cluster samples to two redshift bins between 0survey design: the evolutionary study of the cluster-cluster correlation function and of the cluster number density. The results are promising and, so far, in accordance with our predictions as to the survey sensitivity and cluster number density. The feasibility of the programme is demonstrated and further X-ray coverage is awaited in order to proceed with a truly significant statistical analysis. (Abridged)

M. Pierre; I. Valtchanov; B. Altieri; S. Andreon; M. Bolzonella; M. Bremer; L. Disseau; S. Dos Santos; P. Ghandi; C. Jean; F. Pacaud; A. M. Read; A. Refregier; J. Willis; C. Adami; D. Alloin; M. Birkinshaw; L. Chiappetti; A. Cohen; A. Detal; P. -A. Duc; E. Gosset; J. Hjorth; L. R. Jones; O. Le Fevre; C. Lonsdale; D. Maccagni; A. Mazure; B. McBreen; H. McCracken; Y. Mellier; T. J. Ponman; H. Quintana; H. Rottgering; A. Smette; J. Surdej; J. -L. Starck; L. Vigroux; S. D. M. White

2004-11-01

18

76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New...Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration,...

2011-05-11

19

A Survey of Network Design Problems  

E-print Network

Network design problems arise in many different application areas such as air freight, highway traffic, and communication systems. The intention of this survey is to present a coherent unified view of a number of papers ...

Wong, Richard T.

20

Design-based and model-based inference in surveys of freshwater mollusks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Well-known concepts in statistical inference and sampling theory are used to develop recommendations for planning and analyzing the results of quantitative surveys of freshwater mollusks. Two methods of inference commonly used in survey sampling (design-based and model-based) are described and illustrated using examples relevant in surveys of freshwater mollusks. The particular objectives of a survey and the type of information observed in each unit of sampling can be used to help select the sampling design and the method of inference. For example, the mean density of a sparsely distributed population of mollusks can be estimated with higher precision by using model-based inference or by using design-based inference with adaptive cluster sampling than by using design-based inference with conventional sampling. More experience with quantitative surveys of natural assemblages of freshwater mollusks is needed to determine the actual benefits of different sampling designs and inferential procedures.

Dorazio, R.M.

1999-01-01

21

WATERSHED-BASED SURVEY DESIGNS  

EPA Science Inventory

Water-based sampling design and assessment tools help serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional conditions to meet Section 305(b), identification if impaired water bodies or watersheds to meet Sectio...

22

Design for manufacturability: quantitative measures for design evaluation  

E-print Network

In a design for manufacturing (DFM) approach, the designer has to consider the interactions between the various parameters in the design and the ease with which it can be manufactured, very early in the design process. This research is aimed...

Polisetty, Francis Showry Kumar

1997-01-01

23

Spatially balanced survey designs for natural resources  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecological resource monitoring programs typically require the use of a probability survey design to select locations or entities to be physically sampled in the field. The ecological resource of interest, the target population, occurs over a spatial domain and the sample selecte...

24

A quantitative and objective evaluation approach for optimal selection of design concept in conceptual design stage  

E-print Network

(Head of Department) December 2002 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT A Quantitative and Objective Evaluation Approach for Optimal Selection of Design Concept in Conceptual Design Stage. (December 2002) Sanjay Tiwari, B. E. , Shri G. S...A QUANTITATIVE AND OBJECTIVE EVALUATION APPROACH FOR OPTIMAL SELECTION OF DESIGN CONCEPT IN CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STAGE A Thesis by SANJAY TIWARI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Tiwari, Sanjay

2002-01-01

25

Survey over image thresholding techniques and quantitative performance evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conduct an exhaustive survey of image thresholding methods, categorize them, express their formulas under a uniform notation, and finally carry their performance comparison. The thresholding methods are categorized according to the information they are exploiting, such as histogram shape, measurement space clustering, entropy, object attributes, spatial correlation, and local gray-level surface. 40 selected thresholding methods from various categories are

Mehmet Sezgin; Bülent Sankur

2004-01-01

26

The Dark Energy Survey CCD imager design  

SciTech Connect

The Dark Energy Survey is planning to use a 3 sq. deg. camera that houses a {approx} 0.5m diameter focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs. The camera vessel including the optical window cell, focal plate, focal plate mounts, cooling system and thermal controls is described. As part of the development of the mechanical and cooling design, a full scale prototype camera vessel has been constructed and is now being used for multi-CCD readout tests. Results from this prototype camera are described.

Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Guarino, V.; Kuk, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schultz, K.; Schmitt, R.L.; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Argonne

2008-06-01

27

Design of future surveys: chapter 13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This brief chapter addresses two related issues: how effort should be allocated to different parts of the sampling plan and, given optimal allocation, how large a sample will be required to achieve the PRISM accuracy target. Simulations based on data collected to date showed that 2 plots per cluster on rapid surveys, 2 intensive camps per field crew-year, 2-4 intensive plots per intensive camp, and 2-3 rapid surveys per intensive plot is the most efficient allocation of resources. Using this design, we investigated how crew-years should be allocated to each region in order to meet the PRISM accuracy target most efficiently. The analysis indicated that 40-50 crew-years would achieve the accuracy target for 18-24 of the 26 species breeding widely in the Arctic. This analysis was based on assuming that two rounds of surveys were conducted and that a 50% decline occurred between them. We discuss the complexity of making these estimates and why they should be viewed as first approximations.

Bart, Jonathan; Smith, Paul A.

2012-01-01

28

Online Survey Design and Development: A Janus-Faced Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we propose a "Janus-faced" approach to survey design--an approach that encourages researchers to consider how they can design and implement surveys more effectively using the latest web and database tools. Specifically, this approach encourages researchers to look two ways at once; attending to both the survey interface…

Lauer, Claire; McLeod, Michael; Blythe, Stuart

2013-01-01

29

The Design of Grids in Web Surveys  

PubMed Central

Grid or matrix questions are associated with a number of problems in Web surveys. In this paper, we present results from two experiments testing the design of grid questions to reduce breakoffs, missing data, and satisficing. The first examines dynamic elements to help guide respondent through the grid, and on splitting a larger grid into component pieces. The second manipulates the visual complexity of the grid and on simplifying the grid. We find that using dynamic feedback to guide respondents through a multi-question grid helps reduce missing data. Splitting the grids into component questions further reduces missing data and motivated underreporting. The visual complexity of the grid appeared to have little effect on performance. PMID:25258472

Couper, Mick P.; Tourangeau, Roger; Conrad, Frederick G.; Zhang, Chan

2014-01-01

30

Quantitative survey on the shape of the back of men's head as viewed from the side.  

PubMed

This article classifies quantitatively into 4 shapes men's back part of the head viewed from the side that are demonstrated in some of the figures in this article. Because of self-evident reasons, the shapes were blurred. The survey is based on the analysis of 2220 shapes obtained by photographing mainly bald men and by finding pictures in the Internet. To the best of the author's knowledge, this quantitative approach has never been implemented before. The results obtained are as follows: the percentage of 376 "flat heads" is 17%; the percentage of 755 "little round heads," 34%; the percentage of 1017 "round heads," 45.8%; and the percentage of 72 "very round heads," 3.2%. This quantitative survey is an additional step in analyzing quantitatively the shape of the parts of the face wherein, in articles that were previously published or that will be published in this magazine, shapes of the nose, ear conch, and human eye were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, the shapes of the leg toes were also analyzed. Finally, it should be noted that, because of obvious reasons, the survey is based on men's head, most of which are with baldness. PMID:23714907

Tamir, Abraham

2013-05-01

31

Design and Validation of the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS) is a 12-question survey of students' conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. It is intended to be used to measure the relative effectiveness of different instructional methods in modern physics courses. In this paper, we describe the design and validation of the survey, a process that included…

McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

2010-01-01

32

Designing Strategic Survey Protocols for Bats Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary I present results from a project that evaluated design components and field-tested survey protocols necessary to initiate a strategic survey program for 8 Sensitive Species of bats throughout the NWFP area. Survey protocols were evaluated in 8 study areas distributed across the NWFP from northern California to the Olympic peninsula. Sample units within study areas were located consistent with

Theodore J. Weller

33

5 SURVEY PLANNING AND DESIGN 5.1 Introduction  

E-print Network

5 SURVEY PLANNING AND DESIGN 5.1 Introduction This chapter is intended to assist the user in planning a strategy for conducting a final status survey, with the ultimate objective being to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs). The survey types that make up

34

Design Effects and the Analysis of Survey Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), like most large national surveys, employs a complex stratified multistage unequal probability sample. The design provides a rigorous justification for extending survey results to the entire U.S. target population. Developments in the analysis of data from complex surveys which provide a…

Folsom, Ralph E.; Williams, Rick L.

35

Statistical aspects of quantitative real-time PCR experiment design.  

PubMed

Experiments using quantitative real-time PCR to test hypotheses are limited by technical and biological variability; we seek to minimise sources of confounding variability through optimum use of biological and technical replicates. The quality of an experiment design is commonly assessed by calculating its prospective power. Such calculations rely on knowledge of the expected variances of the measurements of each group of samples and the magnitude of the treatment effect; the estimation of which is often uninformed and unreliable. Here we introduce a method that exploits a small pilot study to estimate the biological and technical variances in order to improve the design of a subsequent large experiment. We measure the variance contributions at several 'levels' of the experiment design and provide a means of using this information to predict both the total variance and the prospective power of the assay. A validation of the method is provided through a variance analysis of representative genes in several bovine tissue-types. We also discuss the effect of normalisation to a reference gene in terms of the measured variance components of the gene of interest. Finally, we describe a software implementation of these methods, powerNest, that gives the user the opportunity to input data from a pilot study and interactively modify the design of the assay. The software automatically calculates expected variances, statistical power, and optimal design of the larger experiment. powerNest enables the researcher to minimise the total confounding variance and maximise prospective power for a specified maximum cost for the large study. PMID:20109551

Kitchen, Robert R; Kubista, Mikael; Tichopad, Ales

2010-04-01

36

Designing community surveys to provide a basis for noise policy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After examining reports from a large number of social surveys, two areas were identified where methodological improvements in the surveys would be especially useful for public policy. The two study areas are: the definition of noise indexes and the assessment of noise impact. Improvements in the designs of surveys are recommended which would increase the validity and reliability of the noise indexes. Changes in interview questions and sample designs are proposed which would enable surveys to provide measures of noise impact which are directly relevant for public policy.

Fields, J. M.

1980-01-01

37

A Comprehensive Survey of Brain Interface Technology Designs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we present the first comprehensive survey of Brain Interface (BI) technology designs published prior to January\\u000a 2006. Detailed results from this survey, which was based on the Brain Interface Design Framework proposed by Mason and Birch,\\u000a are presented and discussed to address the following research questions: (1) which BI technologies are directly comparable,\\u000a (2) what technology designs

S. G. Mason; A. Bashashati; M. Fatourechi; K. F. Navarro; G. E. Birch

2007-01-01

38

A comprehensive survey of brain interface technology designs.  

PubMed

In this work we present the first comprehensive survey of Brain Interface (BI) technology designs published prior to January 2006. Detailed results from this survey, which was based on the Brain Interface Design Framework proposed by Mason and Birch, are presented and discussed to address the following research questions: (1) which BI technologies are directly comparable, (2) what technology designs exist, (3) which application areas (users, activities and environments) have been targeted in these designs, (4) which design approaches have received little or no research and are possible opportunities for new technology, and (5) how well are designs reported. The results of this work demonstrate that meta-analysis of high-level BI design attributes is possible and informative. The survey also produced a valuable, historical cross-reference where BI technology designers can identify what types of technology have been proposed and by whom. PMID:17115262

Mason, S G; Bashashati, A; Fatourechi, M; Navarro, K F; Birch, G E

2007-02-01

39

Quantitative performance-based evaluation of a procedure for flexible design concept generation  

E-print Network

This thesis presents an experimental methodology for objective and quantitative design procedure evaluation based on anticipated lifecycle performance of design concepts, and a procedure for flexible design concept generation. ...

Cardin, Michel-Alexandre, 1979-

2011-01-01

40

Variance estimation for systematic designs in spatial surveys.  

PubMed

In spatial surveys for estimating the density of objects in a survey region, systematic designs will generally yield lower variance than random designs. However, estimating the systematic variance is well known to be a difficult problem. Existing methods tend to overestimate the variance, so although the variance is genuinely reduced, it is over-reported, and the gain from the more efficient design is lost. The current approaches to estimating a systematic variance for spatial surveys are to approximate the systematic design by a random design, or approximate it by a stratified design. Previous work has shown that approximation by a random design can perform very poorly, while approximation by a stratified design is an improvement but can still be severely biased in some situations. We develop a new estimator based on modeling the encounter process over space. The new "striplet" estimator has negligible bias and excellent precision in a wide range of simulation scenarios, including strip-sampling, distance-sampling, and quadrat-sampling surveys, and including populations that are highly trended or have strong aggregation of objects. We apply the new estimator to survey data for the spotted hyena?(Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, and find that the reported coefficient of variation for estimated density is 20% using approximation by a random design, 17% using approximation by a stratified design, and 11% using the new striplet estimator. This large reduction in reported variance is verified by simulation. PMID:21534940

Fewster, R M

2011-12-01

41

Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates  

E-print Network

Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland & Andrew J. Plumptre for estimating abundance of primate populations. The method relies on a small number of key assumptions, and if these are not met, substantial bias may occur. For a variety of reasons, primate surveys often do not follow what

Thomas, Len

42

Heterogeneous Access: Survey and Design Considerations  

E-print Network

that have multiple network interfaces such as Wi-Fi, LTE, Bluetooth, and possibly wired LAN. Such diverse enhancements. The existing networking stack, however, offers almost no support for intelligently exploiting such network, device, and location diversity. In this work, we survey recently proposed protocols and ar

Salzman, Daniel

43

Quantitative Training in the Life Sciences: Designing an Undergraduate Curriculum in  

E-print Network

Quantitative Training in the Life Sciences: Designing an Undergraduate Curriculum in Computational in the life sciences ­ the CPA approach 2. Background from past and ongoing projects for quantitative training for undergraduate biology d. Content of an entry­level math course e. Quantitative enhancement of life science

Gross, Louis J.

44

Employee Interest Survey This employee interest survey is designed to assess employee interests in worksite wellness  

E-print Network

plan a wellness program that meets the needs of employees at your worksite. All information. Allow open time for employees to attend wellness activities NEXT PAGE #12;SECTION E: If you use tobaccoEmployee Interest Survey This employee interest survey is designed to assess employee interests

45

Designing surveys for tests of gravity.  

PubMed

Modified gravity theories may provide an alternative to dark energy to explain cosmic acceleration. We argue that the observational programme developed to test dark energy needs to be augmented to capture new tests of gravity on astrophysical scales. Several distinct signatures of gravity theories exist outside the 'linear' regime, especially owing to the screening mechanism that operates inside halos such as the Milky Way to ensure that gravity tests in the solar system are satisfied. This opens up several decades in length scale and classes of galaxies at low redshift that can be exploited by surveys. While theoretical work on models of gravity is in the early stages, we can already identify new regimes that cosmological surveys could target to test gravity. These include: (i) a small-scale component that focuses on the interior and vicinity of galaxy and cluster halos, (ii) spectroscopy of low-redshift galaxies, especially galaxies smaller than the Milky Way, in environments that range from voids to clusters, and (iii) a programme of combining lensing and dynamical information, from imaging and spectroscopic surveys, respectively, on the same (or statistically identical) sample of galaxies. PMID:22084295

Jain, Bhuvnesh

2011-12-28

46

Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

Not Available

1994-08-01

47

Surveying clinicians by web: current issues in design and administration.  

PubMed

The versatility, speed, and reduced costs with which web surveys can be conducted with clinicians are often offset by low response rates. Drawing on best practices and general recommendations in the literature, we provide an evidence-based overview of methods for conducting online surveys with providers. We highlight important advantages and disadvantages of conducting provider surveys online and include a review of differences in response rates between web and mail surveys of clinicians. When administered online, design-based features affect rates of survey participation and data quality. We examine features likely to have an impact including sample frames, incentives, contacts (type, timing, and content), mixed-mode approaches, and questionnaire length. We make several recommendations regarding optimal web-based designs, but more empirical research is needed, particularly with regard to identifying which combinations of incentive and contact approaches yield the highest response rates and are the most cost-effective. PMID:23975760

Dykema, Jennifer; Jones, Nathan R; Piché, Tara; Stevenson, John

2013-09-01

48

Database design and implementation for quantitative image analysis research.  

PubMed

Quantitative image analysis (QIA) goes beyond subjective visual assessment to provide computer measurements of the image content, typically following image segmentation to identify anatomical regions of interest (ROIs). Commercially available picture archiving and communication systems focus on storage of image data. They are not well suited to efficient storage and mining of new types of quantitative data. In this paper, we present a system that integrates image segmentation, quantitation, and characterization with database and data mining facilities. The paper includes generic process and data models for QIA in medicine and describes their practical use. The data model is based upon the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data hierarchy, which is augmented with tables to store segmentation results (ROIs) and quantitative data from multiple experiments. Data mining for statistical analysis of the quantitative data is described along with example queries. The database is implemented in PostgreSQL on a UNIX server. Database requirements and capabilities are illustrated through two quantitative imaging experiments related to lung cancer screening and assessment of emphysema lung disease. The system can manage the large amounts of quantitative data necessary for research, development, and deployment of computer-aided diagnosis tools. PMID:15787012

Brown, Matthew S; Shah, Sumit K; Pais, Richard C; Lee, Yeng-Zhong; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Goldin, Jonathan G; Cardenas, Alfonso F; Aberle, Denise R

2005-03-01

49

The Dark Energy Survey instrument design  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new project, the Dark Energy Survey (DES), aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx}5%, with four complementary techniques. The survey will use a new 3 sq. deg. mosaic camera (DECam) mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam includes a large mosaic camera, a five element optical corrector, four filters (g,r,i,z), and the associated infrastructure for operation in the prime focus cage. The focal plane consists of 62 2K x 4K CCD modules (0.27''/pixel) arranged in a hexagon inscribed within the 2.2 deg. diameter field of view. We plan to use the 250 micron thick fully-depleted CCDs that have been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At Fermilab, we will establish a packaging factory to produce four-side buttable modules for the LBNL devices, as well as to test and grade the CCDs. R&D is underway and delivery of DECam to CTIO is scheduled for 2009.

Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab

2006-05-01

50

A Survey and Taxonomy of GALS Design Styles  

E-print Network

A Survey and Taxonomy of GALS Design Styles Paul Teehan, Mark Greenstreet, and Guy Lemieux find the concepts and taxonomy presented here very useful. --Sandeep Shukla, Virginia Tech Figure 1. In this article, we describe some design examples and introduce our taxonomy of these techniques. Taxonomy

Lemieux, Guy

51

Optical Design Alternatives:. a Survey Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computers have enhanced human life to a great extent. Our daily lives demand solutions to increasingly sophisticated and complex problems, which requires more speed and better performance of computers. Although the development of the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology with smaller device dimensions and greater complexity and speed but it does not permits the demand of faster and enhanced computers. Because of the advantages of optical transmission over electronic ones most of researches focused on optical circuit design. In the recent few years, many studies were published in this field. In this paper we will review different methods of optical digital design.

Ismail, Ayman Abdel Khader; Ismail, Imane Aly Saroit; Ahmed, S. H.

2010-04-01

52

European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey II: rationale and design.  

PubMed

The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe. PMID:25414481

Dickstein, Kenneth; Normand, Camilla; Anker, Stefan D; Auricchio, Angelo; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström; Bogale, Nigussie; Cleland, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gasparini, Maurizio; Gitt, Anselm; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellbrink, Christoph; Ruschitzka, Frank; Linde, Cecilia

2015-01-01

53

Lack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: a survey of the problem and potential solutions  

PubMed Central

Proficiency in mathematics and statistics is essential to modern ecological science, yet few studies have assessed the level of quantitative training received by ecologists. To do so, we conducted an online survey. The 937 respondents were mostly early-career scientists who studied biology as undergraduates. We found a clear self-perceived lack of quantitative training: 75% were not satisfied with their understanding of mathematical models; 75% felt that the level of mathematics was “too low” in their ecology classes; 90% wanted more mathematics classes for ecologists; and 95% more statistics classes. Respondents thought that 30% of classes in ecology-related degrees should be focused on quantitative disciplines, which is likely higher than for most existing programs. The main suggestion to improve quantitative training was to relate theoretical and statistical modeling to applied ecological problems. Improving quantitative training will require dedicated, quantitative classes for ecology-related degrees that contain good mathematical and statistical practice. PMID:24688862

Ezard, Thomas H.G.; Jørgensen, Peter S.; Zimmerman, Naupaka; Chamberlain, Scott; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Curran, Timothy J.; Poisot, Timothée

2014-01-01

54

Designer substrate library for quantitative, predictive modeling of reaction performance  

PubMed Central

Assessment of reaction substrate scope is often a qualitative endeavor that provides general indications of substrate sensitivity to a measured reaction outcome. Unfortunately, this field standard typically falls short of enabling the quantitative prediction of new substrates’ performance. The disconnection between a reaction’s development and the quantitative prediction of new substrates’ behavior limits the applicative usefulness of many methodologies. Herein, we present a method by which substrate libraries can be systematically developed to enable quantitative modeling of reaction systems and the prediction of new reaction outcomes. Presented in the context of rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, these models quantify the molecular features that influence enantioselection and, in so doing, lend mechanistic insight to the modes of asymmetric induction. PMID:25267648

Bess, Elizabeth N.; Bischoff, Amanda J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

2014-01-01

55

Designer substrate library for quantitative, predictive modeling of reaction performance.  

PubMed

Assessment of reaction substrate scope is often a qualitative endeavor that provides general indications of substrate sensitivity to a measured reaction outcome. Unfortunately, this field standard typically falls short of enabling the quantitative prediction of new substrates' performance. The disconnection between a reaction's development and the quantitative prediction of new substrates' behavior limits the applicative usefulness of many methodologies. Herein, we present a method by which substrate libraries can be systematically developed to enable quantitative modeling of reaction systems and the prediction of new reaction outcomes. Presented in the context of rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, these models quantify the molecular features that influence enantioselection and, in so doing, lend mechanistic insight to the modes of asymmetric induction. PMID:25267648

Bess, Elizabeth N; Bischoff, Amanda J; Sigman, Matthew S

2014-10-14

56

Epidemiologic studies utilizing surveys: accounting for the sampling design.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Since large-scale health surveys usually have complicated sampling schemes, there is often a question as to whether the sampling design must be considered in the analysis of the data. A recent disagreement concerning the analysis of a body iron stores-cancer association found in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and its follow-up is used to highlight the issues. METHODS. We explain and illustrate the importance of two aspects of the sampling design: clustering and weighting of observations. The body iron stores-cancer data are reanalyzed by utilizing or ignoring various aspects of the sampling design. Simple formulas are given to describe how using the sampling design of a survey in the analysis will affect the conclusions of that analysis. RESULTS. The different analyses of the body iron stores-cancer data lead to very different conclusions. Application of the simple formulas suggests that utilization of the sample clustering in the analysis is appropriate, but that a standard utilization of the sample weights leads to an uninformative analysis. The recommended analysis incorporates the sampling weights in a nonstandard way and the sample clustering in the standard way. CONCLUSIONS. Which particular aspects of the sampling design to use in the analysis of complex survey data and how to use them depend on certain features of the design. We give some guidelines for when to use the sample clustering and sample weights in the analysis. PMID:1951829

Korn, E L; Graubard, B I

1991-01-01

57

A Successful Broadband Survey for Giant Ly? Nebulae. I. Survey Design and Candidate Selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Giant Ly? nebulae (or Ly? "blobs") are likely sites of ongoing massive galaxy formation, but the rarity of these powerful sources has made it difficult to form a coherent picture of their properties, ionization mechanisms, and space density. Systematic narrowband Ly? nebula surveys are ongoing, but the small redshift range covered and the observational expense limit the comoving volume that can be probed by even the largest of these surveys and pose a significant problem when searching for such rare sources. We have developed a systematic search technique designed to find large Ly? nebulae at 2 <~ z <~ 3 within deep broadband imaging and have carried out a survey of the 9.4 deg2 NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Boötes field. With a total survey comoving volume of ?108 h -3 70 Mpc3, this is the largest volume survey for Ly? nebulae ever undertaken. In this first paper in the series, we present the details of the survey design and a systematically selected sample of 79 candidates, which includes one previously discovered Ly? nebula.

Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

2012-04-01

58

Multidisciplinary aerospace design optimization: Survey of recent developments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The increasing complexity of engineering systems has sparked increasing interest in multidisciplinary optimization (MDO). This paper presents a survey of recent publications in the field of aerospace where interest in MDO has been particularly intense. The two main challenges of MDO are computational expense and organizational complexity. Accordingly the survey is focussed on various ways different researchers use to deal with these challenges. The survey is organized by a breakdown of MDO into its conceptual components. Accordingly, the survey includes sections on Mathematical Modeling, Design-oriented Analysis, Approximation Concepts, Optimization Procedures, System Sensitivity, and Human Interface. With the authors' main expertise being in the structures area, the bulk of the references focus on the interaction of the structures discipline with other disciplines. In particular, two sections at the end focus on two such interactions that have recently been pursued with a particular vigor: Simultaneous Optimization of Structures and Aerodynamics, and Simultaneous Optimization of Structures Combined With Active Control.

Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Haftka, Raphael T.

1995-01-01

59

The Design of a Quantitative Western Blot Experiment  

PubMed Central

Western blotting is a technique that has been in practice for more than three decades that began as a means of detecting a protein target in a complex sample. Although there have been significant advances in both the imaging and reagent technologies to improve sensitivity, dynamic range of detection, and the applicability of multiplexed target detection, the basic technique has remained essentially unchanged. In the past, western blotting was used simply to detect a specific target protein in a complex mixture, but now journal editors and reviewers are requesting the quantitative interpretation of western blot data in terms of fold changes in protein expression between samples. The calculations are based on the differential densitometry of the associated chemiluminescent and/or fluorescent signals from the blots and this now requires a fundamental shift in the experimental methodology, acquisition, and interpretation of the data. We have recently published an updated approach to produce quantitative densitometric data from western blots (Taylor et al., 2013) and here we summarize the complete western blot workflow with a focus on sample preparation and data analysis for quantitative western blotting. PMID:24738055

Taylor, Sean C.; Posch, Anton

2014-01-01

60

The design of a quantitative western blot experiment.  

PubMed

Western blotting is a technique that has been in practice for more than three decades that began as a means of detecting a protein target in a complex sample. Although there have been significant advances in both the imaging and reagent technologies to improve sensitivity, dynamic range of detection, and the applicability of multiplexed target detection, the basic technique has remained essentially unchanged. In the past, western blotting was used simply to detect a specific target protein in a complex mixture, but now journal editors and reviewers are requesting the quantitative interpretation of western blot data in terms of fold changes in protein expression between samples. The calculations are based on the differential densitometry of the associated chemiluminescent and/or fluorescent signals from the blots and this now requires a fundamental shift in the experimental methodology, acquisition, and interpretation of the data. We have recently published an updated approach to produce quantitative densitometric data from western blots (Taylor et al., 2013) and here we summarize the complete western blot workflow with a focus on sample preparation and data analysis for quantitative western blotting. PMID:24738055

Taylor, Sean C; Posch, Anton

2014-01-01

61

Particle design using supercritical fluids: Literature and patent survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

As particle design is presently a major development of supercritical fluids applications, mainly in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmetic and specialty chemistry industries, number of publications are issued and numerous patents filed every year. This document presents a survey (that cannot pretend to be exhaustive!) of published knowledge classified according to the different concepts currently used to manufacture particles, microspheres or

Jennifer Jung; Michel Perrut

2001-01-01

62

Mathematical Models for Aircraft Trajectory Design : A Survey  

E-print Network

Mathematical Models for Aircraft Trajectory Design : A Survey D. Delahaye and S. Puechmorel and P. Tsiotras and E. Feron Abstract Air traffic management ensures the safety of flight by optimizing flows and maintaining separation between aircraft. After giving some definitions, some typical feature of aircraft

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Survey design and extent estimates for the National Lakes Assessment  

EPA Science Inventory

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a National Lake Assessment (NLA) in the conterminous USA in 2007 as part of a national assessment of aquatic resources using probability based survey designs. The USEPA Office of Water led the assessment, in cooperation with...

64

Performance of new space suit designs is typically tested quantitatively in laboratory tests, at both the  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Performance of new space suit designs is typically tested quantitatively in laboratory in earlier generation suits. This paper details the equipment design and test methodology for extended space suit in realistic simulations of its operating environment. INTRODUCTION Space suit design is a field

Akin, David

65

A survey of bio-inspired compliant legged robot designs.  

PubMed

The roles of biological springs in vertebrate animals and their implementations in compliant legged robots offer significant advantages over the rigid legged ones in certain types of scenarios. A large number of robotics institutes have been attempting to work in conjunction with biologists and incorporated these principles into the design of biologically inspired robots. The motivation of this review is to investigate the most published compliant legged robots and categorize them according to the types of compliant elements adopted in their mechanical structures. Based on the typical robots investigated, the trade-off between each category is summarized. In addition, the most significant performances of these robots are compared quantitatively, and multiple available solutions for the future compliant legged robot design are suggested. Finally, the design challenges for compliant legged robots are analysed. This review will provide useful guidance for robotic designers in creating new designs by inheriting the virtues of those successful robots according to the specific tasks. PMID:23151609

Zhou, Xiaodong; Bi, Shusheng

2012-12-01

66

Metamodels for Computer-Based Engineering Design: Survey and Recommendations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of statistical techniques to build approximations of expensive computer analysis codes pervades much of todays engineering design. These statistical approximations, or metamodels, are used to replace the actual expensive computer analyses, facilitating multidisciplinary, multiobjective optimization and concept exploration. In this paper we review several of these techniques including design of experiments, response surface methodology, Taguchi methods, neural networks, inductive learning, and kriging. We survey their existing application in engineering design and then address the dangers of applying traditional statistical techniques to approximate deterministic computer analysis codes. We conclude with recommendations for the appropriate use of statistical approximation techniques in given situations and how common pitfalls can be avoided.

Simpson, Timothy W.; Peplinski, Jesse; Koch, Patrick N.; Allen, Janet K.

1997-01-01

67

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design  

SciTech Connect

In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

2011-10-14

68

One-year monthly quantitative survey of noroviruses, enteroviruses, and adenoviruses in wastewater collected from six plants in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sewerage systems are important nodes to monitor human enteric pathogens transmitted via water. A quantitative virus survey was performed once a month for a year to understand the seasonal profiles of noroviruses genotype 1 and genotype 2, enteroviruses, and adenoviruses in sewerage systems. A total of 72 samples of influent, secondary-treated wastewater before chlorination and effluent were collected from six

Hiroyuki Katayama; Eiji Haramoto; Kumiko Oguma; Hiromasa Yamashita; Atsushi Tajima; Hideichiro Nakajima; Shinichiro Ohgaki

2008-01-01

69

Assessing usual dietary intake in complex sample design surveys: the National Dietary Survey.  

PubMed

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) method allows the distributions of usual intake of nutrients and foods to be estimated. This method can be used in complex surveys. However, the user must perform additional calculations, such as balanced repeated replication (BRR), in order to obtain standard errors and confidence intervals for the percentiles and mean from the distribution of usual intake. The objective is to highlight adaptations of the NCI method using data from the National Dietary Survey. The application of the NCI method was exemplified analyzing the total energy (kcal) and fruit (g) intake, comparing estimations of mean and standard deviation that were based on the complex design of the Brazilian survey with those assuming simple random sample. Although means point estimates were similar, estimates of standard error using the complex design increased by up to 60% compared to simple random sample. Thus, for valid estimates of food and energy intake for the population, all of the sampling characteristics of the surveys should be taken into account because when these characteristics are neglected, statistical analysis may produce underestimated standard errors that would compromise the results and the conclusions of the survey. PMID:23703261

Barbosa, Flávia dos Santos; Sichieri, Rosely; Junger, Washington Leite

2013-02-01

70

Exploring the utility of quantitative network design in evaluating Arctic sea-ice thickness sampling strategies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a quantitative network design (QND) study of the Arctic sea ice-ocean system using a software tool that can evaluate hypothetical observational networks in a variational data assimilation system. For a demonstration, we evaluate two idealised flight transects derived from NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne ice surveys in terms of their potential to improve ten-day to five-month sea-ice forecasts. As target regions for the forecasts we select the Chukchi Sea, an area particularly relevant for maritime traffic and offshore resource exploration, as well as two areas related to the Barnett Ice Severity Index (BSI), a standard measure of shipping conditions along the Alaskan coast that is routinely issued by ice services. Our analysis quantifies the benefits of sampling upstream of the target area and of reducing the sampling uncertainty. We demonstrate how observations of sea-ice and snow thickness can constrain ice and snow variables in a target region and quantify the complementarity of combining two flight transects. We further quantify the benefit of improved atmospheric forecasts and a well-calibrated model.

Kaminski, T.; Kauker, F.; Eicken, H.; Karcher, M.

2015-03-01

71

The ZInEP Epidemiology Survey: background, design and methods.  

PubMed

This article introduces the design, sampling, field procedures and instruments used in the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey. This survey is one of six ZInEP projects (Zürcher Impulsprogramm zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung der Psychiatrie, i.e. the "Zurich Program for Sustainable Development of Mental Health Services"). It parallels the longitudinal Zurich Study with a sample comparable in age and gender, and with similar methodology, including identical instruments. Thus, it is aimed at assessing the change of prevalence rates of common mental disorders and the use of professional help and psychiatric sevices. Moreover, the current survey widens the spectrum of topics by including sociopsychiatric questionnaires on stigma, stress related biological measures such as load and cortisol levels, electroencephalographic (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) examinations with various paradigms, and sociophysiological tests. The structure of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey entails four subprojects: a short telephone screening using the SCL-27 (n of nearly 10,000), a comprehensive face-to-face interview based on the SPIKE (Structured Psychopathological Interview and Rating of the Social Consequences for Epidemiology: the main instrument of the Zurich Study) with a stratified sample (n?=?1500), tests in the Center for Neurophysiology and Sociophysiology (n?=?227), and a prospective study with up to three follow-up interviews and further measures (n?=?157). In sum, the four subprojects of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey deliver a large interdisciplinary database. PMID:24942564

Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Warnke, Inge; Hengartner, Michael P; Landolt, Karin; Hagenmuller, Florence; Meier, Magali; Tse, Lee-Ting; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Passardi, Marco; Knöpfli, Daniel; Schönfelder, Herdis; Eisele, Jochen; Rüsch, Nicolas; Haker, Helene; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf

2014-12-01

72

On the Design of IEEE Compliant FloatingPoint Units and Their Quantitative Analysis  

E-print Network

On the Design of IEEE Compliant Floating­Point Units and Their Quantitative Analysis Dissertation addresses the question of which are the important issues in the design of a high­speed floating­point unit (FPU) that is fully compliant with the IEEE floating­point standard 754­1985 [19]. There are a few

Seidel, Peter-Michael

73

Design and performance of a thin-film calorimeter for quantitative characterization of photopolymerizable systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thin-film calorimeter (TFC) was designed for the quantitative characterization of photopolymerizable systems. A detailed description of its construction indicates the ease with which a TFC can be assembled and the flexibility inherent in its design. The mechanics of operation were optimized to yield a significantly faster instrument response time than other calorimetric methods such as photodifferential scanning calorimetry (photo-DSC).

Todd M. Roper; C. Allan Guymon; Charles E. Hoyle

2005-01-01

74

Methods for Evidence-Based Practice: Quantitative Synthesis of Single-Subject Designs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good quantitative evidence does not require large, aggregate group designs. The authors describe ground-breaking work in managing the conceptual and practical demands in developing meta-analytic strategies for single subject designs in an effort to add to evidence-based practice. (Contains 2 figures.)

Shadish, William R.; Rindskopf, David M.

2007-01-01

75

The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey: I - Survey Objectives and Design  

E-print Network

We describe the HST ACS Coma cluster Treasury survey, a deep two-passband imaging survey of one of the nearest rich clusters of galaxies, the Coma cluster (Abell 1656). The survey was designed to cover an area of 740 square arcmin in regions of different density of both galaxies and intergalactic medium within the cluster. The ACS failure of January 27th 2007 leaves the survey 28% complete, with 21 ACS pointings (230 square arcmin) complete, and partial data for a further 4 pointings (44 square arcmin). Predicted survey depth for 10 sigma detections for optimal photometry of point sources is g' = 27.6 in the F475W filter, and IC=26.8 mag in F814 (AB magnitudes). Initial simulations with artificially injected point sources show 90% recovered at magnitude limits of g' = 27.55 and IC = 26.65. For extended sources, the predicted 10 sigma limits for a 1 square arcsecond region are g' = 25.8 mag/sq. arcsec and IC = 25.0 mag/sq. arcsec. We highlight several motivating science goals of the survey, including study of the faint end of the cluster galaxy luminosity function, structural parameters of dwarf galaxies, stellar populations and their effect on colors and color gradients, evolution of morphological components in a dense environment, the nature of ultra compact dwarf galaxies, and globular cluster populations of cluster galaxies of a range of luminosities and types. This survey will also provide a local rich cluster benchmark for various well known global scaling relations and explore new relations pertaining to the nuclear properties of galaxies.

David Carter; Paul Goudfrooij; Bahram Mobasher; Henry C. Ferguson; Thomas H. Puzia; Alfonso L. Aguerri; Marc Balcells; Dan Batcheldor; Terry J. Bridges; Jonathan I. Davies; Peter Erwin; Alister W. Graham; Rafael Guzmán; Derek Hammer; Ann Hornschemeier; Carlos Hoyos; Michael J. Hudson; Avon Huxor; Shardha Jogee; Yutaka Komiyama; Jennifer Lotz; John R. Lucey; Ronald O. Marzke; David Merritt; Bryan W. Miller; Neal A. Miller; Mustapha Mouhcine; Sadanori Okamura; Reynier F. Peletier; Steven Phillipps; Bianca M. Poggianti; Ray M. Sharples; Russell J. Smith; Neil Trentham; R. Brent Tully; Edwin Valentijn; Gijs Verdoes Kleijn

2008-01-24

76

Optimal Survey design using the point spread function measure of resolution Partha S. Routh  

E-print Network

Optimal Survey design using the point spread function measure of resolution Partha S. Routh , Greg in a region of interest. We pose survey design as an inverse problem by maxi- mizing a resolution measure survey. The interpre- tation of ground survey data is then validated by borehole measurements

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

77

The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey. I. Science Goals, Survey Design, and Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recently initiated Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey aims to map ~7000 deg2 of the high Galactic latitude sky visible from Arecibo, providing a H I line spectral database covering the redshift range between -1600 and 18,000 km s-1 with ~5 km s-1 resolution. Exploiting Arecibo's large collecting area and small beam size, ALFALFA is specifically designed to probe

Riccardo Giovanelli; Martha P. Haynes; Brian R. Kent; Philip Perillat; Amelie Saintonge; Noah Brosch; Barbara Catinella; G. Lyle Hoffman; Sabrina Stierwalt; Kristine Spekkens; Mikael S. Lerner; Karen L. Masters; Emmanuel Momjian; Jessica L. Rosenberg; Christopher M. Springob; Alessandro Boselli; Vassilis Charmandaris; Jeremy K. Darling; Jonathan Davies; Diego Garcia Lambas; Giuseppe Gavazzi; Carlo Giovanardi; Eduardo Hardy; Leslie K. Hunt; Angela Iovino; Igor D. Karachentsev; Valentina E. Karachentseva; Rebecca A. Koopmann; Christian Marinoni; Robert Minchin; Erik Muller; Mary Putman; Carmen Pantoja; John J. Salzer; Marco Scodeggio; Evan Skillman; Jose M. Solanes; Carlos Valotto; Wim van Driel; Liese van Zee

2005-01-01

78

Improved field experimental designs and quantitative evaluation of aquatic ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The paired-station concept and a log transformed analysis of variance were used as methods to evaluate zooplankton density data collected during five years at an electrical generation station on Lake Michigan. To discuss the example and the field design necessary for a valid statistical analysis, considerable background is provided on the questions of selecting (1) sampling station pairs, (2) experimentwise error rates for multi-species analyses, (3) levels of Type I and II error rates, (4) procedures for conducting the field monitoring program, and (5) a discussion of the consequences of violating statistical assumptions. Details for estimating sample sizes necessary to detect changes of a specified magnitude are included. Both statistical and biological problems with monitoring programs (as now conducted) are addressed; serial correlation of successive observations in the time series obtained was identified as one principal statistical difficulty. The procedure reduces this problem to a level where statistical methods can be used confidently. 27 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.

1984-05-01

79

Quantitative Transcriptomics using Designed Primer-based Amplification  

PubMed Central

We developed a novel Designed Primer-based RNA-sequencing strategy (DP-seq) that uses a defined set of heptamer primers to amplify the majority of expressed transcripts from limiting amounts of mRNA, while preserving their relative abundance. Our strategy reproducibly yielded high levels of amplification from as low as 50 picograms of mRNA while offering a dynamic range of over five orders of magnitude in RNA concentrations. We also demonstrated the potential of DP-seq to selectively suppress the amplification of the highly expressing ribosomal transcripts by more than 70% in our sequencing library. Using lineage segregation in embryonic stem cell cultures as a model of early mammalian embryogenesis, DP-seq revealed novel sets of low abundant transcripts, some corresponding to the identity of cellular progeny before they arise, reflecting the specification of cell fate prior to actual germ layer segregation. PMID:23624976

Bhargava, Vipul; Ko, Pang; Willems, Erik; Mercola, Mark; Subramaniam, Shankar

2013-01-01

80

SEDS: THE SPITZER EXTENDED DEEP SURVEY. SURVEY DESIGN, PHOTOMETRY, AND DEEP IRAC SOURCE COUNTS  

SciTech Connect

The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg{sup 2} to a depth of 26 AB mag (3{sigma}) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 {+-} 1.0 and 4.4 {+-} 0.8 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arendt, R. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Barmby, P. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Barro, G.; Faber, S.; Guhathakurta, P. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bouwens, R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Cattaneo, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218 Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Dave, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Finlator, K. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, CK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Grogin, N. A., E-mail: mashby@cfa.harvard.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

2013-05-20

81

SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg(exp 2) to a depth of 26 AB mag (3sigma) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 +/- 1.0 and 4.4 +/- 0.8 nW / square m/sr at 3.6 and 4.5 micron to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, A.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Dave, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A; Koekmoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Moseley, H.

2013-01-01

82

SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg2 to a depth of 26 AB mag (3?) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 ?m. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 ± 1.0 and 4.4 ± 0.8 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3.6 and 4.5 ?m to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, R.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G.; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Davé, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Labbé, I.; Li, Y.; Lin, L.; Moseley, H.; Nandra, K.; Newman, J.; Noeske, K.; Ouchi, M.; Peth, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Robertson, B.; Sarajedini, V.; Simard, L.; Smith, H. A.; Wang, Z.; Wechsler, R.; Weiner, B.; Wilson, G.; Wuyts, S.; Yamada, T.; Yan, H.

2013-05-01

83

Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes  

E-print Network

and was suitable for laboratory determinations only. Most of the spectrometers used at this time were wavelength dispersive spectrometers, in which wavelengths of the elements were separated by Bragg diffraction from an analyzing crystal. An x-ray tube...EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORE~ SURVEY METER FOR TIIE QUANTITATIVE DEPERMINATI(gq OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by MARY CATHERINE FEHRENBACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University in partial...

Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

1984-01-01

84

Survey of parallel slat collimator designs for hybrid PET imaging.  

PubMed

Hybrid PET gamma cameras with coincidence detection electronics are commonly equipped with parallel slat collimators in order to reduce detection of singles and scattered photons, and create a pseudo-2D imaging geometry. The objective of this work was to survey a broad range of parallel slat collimator designs using a series of Monte Carlo simulated PET acquisitions. Collimator properties including septal height, septal thickness and pitch were independently examined over a wide range of values. Simulations were performed for hybrid PET imaging of a long cylindrical phantom uniformly filled with water and radioactivity. The performance for each collimator design was evaluated in terms of the trues-to-singles ratio, scatter fraction, and noise equivalent count rate for a wide range of camera trigger rates. Results indicate that increasing septal height offers the biggest performance gain. Septal thickness should be at least 0.5 mm, and should be optimized in conjunction with pitch to obtain the best performance. This survey provides the groundwork necessary for optimizing slat collimators, and provides a starting point for investigating new slat collimator designs. PMID:12699197

Rust, T C; Kadrmas, D J

2003-03-21

85

76 FR 9637 - Proposed Information Collection (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New...Proposed Information Collection (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative...Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department...

2011-02-18

86

The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: I. Science Goals, Survey Design and Strategy  

E-print Network

The recently initiated Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey aims to map 7000 square degrees of the high galactic latitude sky visible from Arecibo, providing a HI line spectral database covering the redshift range between -1600 km/s and 18,000 km/s with 5 km/s resolution. Exploiting Arecibo's large collecting area and small beam size, ALFALFA is specifically designed to probe the faint end of the HI mass function in the local universe and will provide a census of HI in the surveyed sky area to faint flux limits, making it especially useful in synergy with wide area surveys conducted at other wavelengths. ALFALFA will also provide the basis for studies of the dynamics of galaxies within the Local and nearby superclusters, will allow measurement of the HI diameter function, and enable a first wide-area blind search for local HI tidal features, HI absorbers at z survey will require some five years, public access to the ALFALFA data and data products will be provided in a timely manner, thus allowing its application for studies beyond those targeted by the ALFALFA collaboration. ALFALFA adopts a two-pass, minimum intrusion, drift scan observing technique which samples the same region of sky at two separate epochs to aid in the discrimination of cosmic signals from noise and terrestrial interference. Survey simulations, which take into account large scale structure in the mass distribution and incorporate experience with the ALFA system gained from tests conducted during its commissioning phase, suggest that ALFALFA will detect on the order of 20,000 extragalactic HI line sources out to z=0.06, including several hundred with HI masses of less than 10^{7.5} msun.

Riccardo Giovanelli; Martha P. Haynes; Brian R. Kent

2005-08-12

87

Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) applied to the design of a rotorcraft flight control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantitative Feedback Theory describes a frequency-domain technique for the design of multi-input, multi-output control systems which meet time or frequency domain performance criteria when specified uncertainty exists in the linear description of the vehicle dynamics. Quantitative Feedback Theory is applied to the design of the longitudinal flight control system for a linear uncertain model of the AH-64 rotorcraft. In this model, the uncertainty is assigned, and is assumed to be attributable to actual uncertainty in the dynamic model and to the changes in the vehicle aerodynamic characteristics which occur near hover. The model includes an approximation to the rotor and actuator dynamics. The design example indicates the manner in which handling qualities criteria may be incorporated into the design of realistic rotorcraft control systems in which significant uncertainty exists in the vehicle model.

Hess, R. A.; Gorder, P. J.

1992-01-01

88

Combining qualitative and quantitative research within mixed method research designs: A methodological review  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesIt has been argued that mixed methods research can be useful in nursing and health science because of the complexity of the phenomena studied. However, the integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches continues to be one of much debate and there is a need for a rigorous framework for designing and interpreting mixed methods research. This paper explores the analytical

Ulrika Östlund; Lisa Kidd; Yvonne Wengström; Neneh Rowa-Dewar

2011-01-01

89

DESIGN OF SRM BASED MASS SPECTROMETRY METHODS FOR QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF PORCINE ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS  

E-print Network

DESIGN OF SRM BASED MASS SPECTROMETRY METHODS FOR QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF PORCINE ACUTE PHASE for the quantification of four porcine APPs: Hp, ITIH4, Apo A-I and fetuin A. The measurement of these four APPs (intense transitions); B) Bad proteotypic peptide (non-intense transitions) 2) Quantification of porcine

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

90

A Quantitative Evaluation of C-Based Synthesis on Heterogeneous Embedded Systems Design  

E-print Network

A Quantitative Evaluation of C-Based Synthesis on Heterogeneous Embedded Systems Design Omar proposed to tackle the complexity of heterogeneous embedded systems. The heterogeneity comes of heterogeneous embedded systems and point out the impact of behavioral synthesis on partitioning. I

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

91

Responsive Survey Design, Demographic Data Collection, and Models of Demographic Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address declining response rates and rising data-collection costs, survey methodologists have devised new techniques for\\u000a using process data (“paradata”) to address nonresponse by altering the survey design dynamically during data collection. We\\u000a investigate the substantive consequences of responsive survey design—tools that use paradata to improve the representative\\u000a qualities of surveys and control costs. By improving representation of reluctant respondents,

William G. Axinn; Cynthia F. Link; Robert M. Groves

2011-01-01

92

Ten Years of LibQual: A Study of Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Results at the University of Mississippi 2001-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyzes quantitative adequacy gap scores and coded qualitative comments from LibQual surveys at the University of Mississippi from 2001 to 2010, looking for relationships between library policy changes and LibQual results and any other trends that emerged. Analysis found no relationship between changes in policy and survey results…

Greenwood, Judy T.; Watson, Alex P.; Dennis, Melissa

2011-01-01

93

Curriculum Design of Computer Graphics Programs: A Survey of Art/Design Programs at the University Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This master's thesis reports the results of a survey submitted to over 30 colleges and universities that currently offer computer graphics courses or are in the planning stage of curriculum design. Intended to provide a profile of the computer graphics programs and insight into the process of curriculum design, the survey gathered data on program…

McKee, Richard Lee

94

Retrospective pilot feedback survey of 200 users of the AIDA Version 4 Educational Diabetes Program. 1--Quantitative Survey Data.  

PubMed

This column reports a detailed, questionnaire-based, post-release feedback survey of 200 users of the AIDA version 4 educational diabetes simulator. AIDA is a freeware computer program that permits the interactive simulation of plasma insulin and blood glucose profiles for educational, demonstration, self-learning, and research purposes. Since its Internet launch in 1996 over 700,000 visits have been logged to the AIDA Websites-including www.2aida.org-and over 200,000 program copies have been downloaded free-of-charge. The main goals of the current study were: (1) to establish what people have thought about the AIDA program, (2) to assess the utility of the software, and (3) to ascertain how much people have actually used it. An analysis was therefore undertaken of the first 200 feedback forms that were returned by AIDA users. The questionnaire-based survey methodology was found to be robust and reliable. Feedback forms were received from participants in 21 countries. One hundred six of 209 responses (50.7%) were received from people with diabetes, and 36 of 209 (17.2%) from relatives of patients, with lesser numbers from doctors, students, diabetes educators, nurses, pharmacists, and other end users. Please note some respondents fulfilled more than one end-user category, hence the denominator <200; for example, someone with diabetes who was also a doctor. This study has established the feasibility of using a simple feedback form to survey a substantial number of diabetes software users. In addition, it has yielded interesting data in terms of who are the main users of the AIDA program, and has also provided technical (computer) information that has aided the release of a freeware upgrade to the software. In general, users reported finding the program to be of educational value. The majority also felt it would be of interest to diabetes educators and people with diabetes. Most were clear about its limitations as a simulator-based learning tool. The implications of these findings will be discussed. PMID:16800766

Lehmann, Eldon D; Chatu, Sukhdev S; Hashmy, S Sabina H

2006-06-01

95

New facility design and work method for the quantitative fit testing laboratory. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) tests the quantitative fit of masks which are worn by military personnel during nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare. Subjects are placed in a Dynatech-Frontier Fit Testing Chamber, salt air is fed into the chamber, and samples of air are drawn from the mask and the chamber. The ratio of salt air outside the mask to salt air inside the mask is called the quantitative fit factor. A motion-time study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the layout and work method presently used in the laboratory. A link analysis was done to determine equipment priorities, and the link data and design guidelines were used to develop three proposed laboratory designs. The proposals were evaluated by projecting the time and motion efficiency, and the energy expended working in each design. Also evaluated were the lengths of the equipment links for each proposal, and each proposal's adherence to design guidelines. A mock-up was built of the best design proposal, and a second motion-time study was run. Results showed that with the new laboratory and work procedures, the USAFSAM analyst could test 116 more subjects per year than are currently tested. Finally, the results of a questionnaire given to the analyst indicated that user acceptance of the work area improved with the new design.

Ward, G.F.

1989-05-01

96

Pragmatic soil survey design using flexible Latin hypercube sampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review and give a practical example of Latin hypercube sampling in soil science using an approach we call flexible Latin hypercube sampling. Recent studies of soil properties in large and remote regions have highlighted problems with the conventional Latin hypercube sampling approach. It is often impractical to travel far from tracks and roads to collect samples, and survey planning should recognise this fact. Another problem is how to handle target sites that, for whatever reason, are impractical to sample - should one just move on to the next target or choose something in the locality that is accessible? Working within a Latin hypercube that spans the covariate space, selecting an alternative site is hard to do optimally. We propose flexible Latin hypercube sampling as a means of avoiding these problems. Flexible Latin hypercube sampling involves simulated annealing for optimally selecting accessible sites from a region. The sampling protocol also produces an ordered list of alternative sites close to the primary target site, should the primary target site prove inaccessible. We highlight the use of this design through a broad-scale sampling exercise in the Burdekin catchment of north Queensland, Australia. We highlight the robustness of our design through a simulation study where up to 50% of target sites may be inaccessible.

Clifford, David; Payne, James E.; Pringle, M. J.; Searle, Ross; Butler, Nathan

2014-06-01

97

The Goldilocks dilemma in survey design and its solution.  

PubMed

A dilemma appears in the design of any survey with followups intended to detect the occurrence of an event. Suppose that, at followup, the event of interest can only be determined to have occurred since the previous interview (such is often the case, for example, with onset of dependent behavior in the aged). Then a followup which takes place too soon runs the risk of observing no or very few events, while a followup which is conducted after too long a wait might observe events in nearly every subject, and so be equally uninformative. Thus we would have what one investigator compares to Goldilocks dilemma: is the interval before followup too short, too long, or just right? The problem is multiplied when more than one followup is intended. As a partial solution, a technique is described here which provides guidance on the spacing of followup waves in a multiwave study, preventing possibly serious inefficiencies in study design. Data from the Massachusetts Health Care Panel Study (MHCPS) on functional dependence in the elderly are used for a demonstration. PMID:8455056

Chappell, R; Branch, L G

1993-03-01

98

THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. I. SURVEY OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN1  

E-print Network

THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. I. SURVEY OBJECTIVES Neil Trentham,28 R. Brent Tully,29 Edwin Valentijn,26 and Gijs Verdoes Kleijn26 Received 2007 September content -- galaxies: structure 1 Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope ob- tained

Puzia, Thomas H.

99

Using Survey Methods for Design and Evaluation in Child Computer Interaction  

E-print Network

Using Survey Methods for Design and Evaluation in Child Computer Interaction Janet Read Child@aol.com ABSTRACT This paper begins with a review of some of the current literature on the use of survey methods with children. It then presents four known concerns with using survey methods and reflects on how these may

100

A quantitative scuba-diving survey of the sublittoral macrobenthos at subantarctic Marion Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

A SCUBA-diving survey of the macrobenthos of hard substrata in the sublittoral zone at subantarctic Marion Island was conducted during March and April 1988. Dense beds (12 kg m-2) of the kelp Macrocystis laevis occur in depths > 5 m. Durvillaea antarctica is found along the infralittoral fringe and Desmarestia rossi and Durvillaea sp. occur in a narrow zone from

Lynnath E. Beckley; George M. Branch

1992-01-01

101

A robust rotorcraft flight control system design methodology utilizing quantitative feedback theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotorcraft flight control systems present design challenges which often exceed those associated with fixed-wing aircraft. First, large variations in the response characteristics of the rotorcraft result from the wide range of airspeeds of typical operation (hover to over 100 kts). Second, the assumption of vehicle rigidity often employed in the design of fixed-wing flight control systems is rarely justified in rotorcraft where rotor degrees of freedom can have a significant impact on the system performance and stability. This research was intended to develop a methodology for the design of robust rotorcraft flight control systems. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) was chosen as the basis for the investigation. Quantitative Feedback Theory is a technique which accounts for variability in the dynamic response of the controlled element in the design robust control systems. It was developed to address a Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) design problem, and utilizes two degrees of freedom to satisfy the design criteria. Two techniques were examined for extending the QFT MISO technique to the design of a Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) flight control system (FCS) for a UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter. In the first, a set of MISO systems, mathematically equivalent to the MIMO system, was determined. QFT was applied to each member of the set simultaneously. In the second, the same set of equivalent MISO systems were analyzed sequentially, with closed loop response information from each loop utilized in subsequent MISO designs. The results of each technique were compared, and the advantages of the second, termed Sequential Loop Closure, were clearly evident.

Gorder, Peter James

1993-01-01

102

National Aquatic Resource Surveys: Integration of Geospatial Data in Their Survey Design and Analysis  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) are a series of four statistical surveys conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency working in collaboration with states, tribal nations and other federal agencies. The surveys are conducted for lakes and reservoirs, streams...

103

Textile Materials for the Design of Wearable Antennas: A Survey  

PubMed Central

In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

2012-01-01

104

Textile materials for the design of wearable antennas: a survey.  

PubMed

In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

2012-01-01

105

Trajectory Design for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission, scheduled to be launched in 2017. TESS will travel in a highly eccentric orbit around Earth, with initial perigee radius near 17 Earth radii (Re) and apogee radius near 59 Re. The orbit period is near 2:1 resonance with the Moon, with apogee nearly 90 degrees out-of-phase with the Moon, in a configuration that has been shown to be operationally stable. TESS will execute phasing loops followed by a lunar flyby, with a final maneuver to achieve 2:1 resonance with the Moon. The goals of a resonant orbit with long-term stability, short eclipses and limited oscillations of perigee present significant challenges to the trajectory design. To rapidly assess launch opportunities, we adapted the Schematics Window Methodology (SWM76) launch window analysis tool to assess the TESS mission constraints. To understand the long-term dynamics of such a resonant orbit in the Earth-Moon system we employed Dynamical Systems Theory in the Circular Restricted 3-Body Problem (CR3BP). For precise trajectory analysis we use a high-fidelity model and multiple shooting in the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to optimize the maneuver delta-V and meet mission constraints. Finally we describe how the techniques we have developed can be applied to missions with similar requirements. Keywords: resonant orbit, stability, lunar flyby, phasing loops, trajectory optimization

Dichmann, Donald J.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Williams, Trevor W.; Mendelsohn, Chad R.

2014-01-01

106

A Survey of Design Rationale Systems: Approaches, Representation, Capture and Retrieval  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a survey on recent research in the area of design rationale. The study of design rationale spans a number of diverse disciplines, touching on concepts from research communities in mechanical design, software engineering, artificial intelligence, civil engineering, com- puter-supported cooperative work, and human-factors and human-computer interaction research. We focus this survey on prototype design rationale systems for

William C. Regli; Xiaochun Hu; Michael Atwood; Wei Sun

2000-01-01

107

CTSI Quantitative Methods Pilot Program The Design, Biostatistics and Epidemiology (DBE) Core, the Pilot Core, and the Novel  

E-print Network

1 CTSI Quantitative Methods Pilot Program The Design, Biostatistics and Epidemiology (DBE) Core, a quantitative methods researcher is an investigator with a background in statistics, biostatistics, epidemiology the career development of junior investigators in the fields of statistics, biostatistics, and epidemiology

Sibille, Etienne

108

Rotorcraft control system design for uncertain vehicle dynamics using quantitative feedback theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantitative Feedback Theory describes a frequency-domain technique for the design of multi-input, multi-output control systems which must meet time or frequency domain performance criteria when specified uncertainty exists in the linear description of the vehicle dynamics. This theory is applied to the design of the longitudinal flight control system for a linear model of the BO-105C rotorcraft. Uncertainty in the vehicle model is due to the variation in the vehicle dynamics over a range of airspeeds from 0-100 kts. For purposes of exposition, the vehicle description contains no rotor or actuator dynamics. The design example indicates the manner in which significant uncertainty exists in the vehicle model. The advantage of using a sequential loop closure technique to reduce the cost of feedback is demonstrated by example.

Hess, R. A.

1994-01-01

109

Rotorcraft flight control design using quantitative feedback theory and dynamic crossfeeds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-input, multi-output controls design with robust crossfeeds is presented for a rotorcraft in near-hovering flight using quantitative feedback theory (QFT). Decoupling criteria are developed for dynamic crossfeed design and implementation. Frequency dependent performance metrics focusing on piloted flight are developed and tested on 23 flight configurations. The metrics show that the resulting design is superior to alternative control system designs using conventional fixed-gain crossfeeds and to feedback-only designs which rely on high gains to suppress undesired off-axis responses. The use of dynamic, robust crossfeeds prior to the QFT design reduces the magnitude of required feedback gain and results in performance that meets current handling qualities specifications relative to the decoupling of off-axis responses. The combined effect of the QFT feedback design following the implementation of low-order, dynamic crossfeed compensator successfully decouples ten of twelve off-axis channels. For the other two channels it was not possible to find a single, low-order crossfeed that was effective.

Cheng, Rendy P.

1995-01-01

110

The Health Effects of Climate Change: A Survey of Recent Quantitative Research  

PubMed Central

In recent years there has been a large scientific and public debate on climate change and its direct as well as indirect effects on human health. In particular, a large amount of research on the effects of climate changes on human health has addressed two fundamental questions. First, can historical data be of some help in revealing how short-run or long-run climate variations affect the occurrence of infectious diseases? Second, is it possible to build more accurate quantitative models which are capable of predicting the future effects of different climate conditions on the transmissibility of particularly dangerous infectious diseases? The primary goal of this paper is to review the most relevant contributions which have directly tackled those questions, both with respect to the effects of climate changes on the diffusion of non-infectious and infectious diseases, with malaria as a case study. Specific attention will be drawn on the methodological aspects of each study, which will be classified according to the type of quantitative model considered, namely time series models, panel data and spatial models, and non-statistical approaches. Since many different disciplines and approaches are involved, a broader view is necessary in order to provide a better understanding of the interactions between climate and health. In this respect, our paper also presents a critical summary of the recent literature related to more general aspects of the impacts of climate changes on human health, such as: the economics of climate change; how to manage the health effects of climate change; the establishment of Early Warning Systems for infectious diseases. PMID:22754455

Grasso, Margherita; Manera, Matteo; Chiabai, Aline; Markandya, Anil

2012-01-01

111

A split questionnaire survey design applied to German media and consumer surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of real data sets it is shown that splitting a questionnaire survey according to technical rather than qualitative criteria can reduce costs and respondent burden remarkably. Household interview surveys about media and consuming behavior are analyzed and splitted into components. Following the matrix sampling approach, respondents are asked only the varying subsets of the components inducing missing

Susanne Rässler; Florian Koller; Christine Mäenpää

2002-01-01

112

Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems: A survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

Miura, H.

1984-01-01

113

Design and performance of a thin-film calorimeter for quantitative characterization of photopolymerizable systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A thin-film calorimeter (TFC) was designed for the quantitative characterization of photopolymerizable systems. A detailed description of its construction indicates the ease with which a TFC can be assembled and the flexibility inherent in its design. The mechanics of operation were optimized to yield a significantly faster instrument response time than other calorimetric methods such as photodifferential scanning calorimetry (photo-DSC). The TFC has enhanced sensitivity, more than an order of magnitude greater linear response range to changes in light intensity than that of the photo-DSC, resulting in the ability to measure both smaller and larger signals more accurately. The photopolymerization exotherm curves are reproducible and can be collected over a broad range of film thicknesses.

Roper, Todd M.; Guymon, C. Allan; Hoyle, Charles E.

2005-05-01

114

New design of null screens to simplify the correspondence during the quantitative evaluation of optical surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have been working in a method for testing fast aspheric convex surfaces with flat null screens in an array of LCD's, based on the null screen principles accordingly; i.e. we have demonstrated qualitatively that using three LCD's forming a triangular prism, we can evaluate aspheric fast surfaces instead of using the traditional test with a cylindrical null screen. This setup of LCD's has the advantage of display a series of 3 null screens for sampling an optical surface simultaneously, where in the ideal case, the position of the drop-shaped spots should be forming a regular square array of points in the image plane. However, due to typical problems of illumination and directionality with the transmitted light through the LCD's, some spots on the image are missing which complicates the correspondence between centroids and coordinates of the null screens; this is important for the numerical integration procedure used for the quantitative evaluation . In this paper we propose the design of null screens with reference marks, which provide unambiguous correspondence. Specific designs include some strategic color and position coding to ease the image spots identification. We show the method as used during the quantitative evaluation of a spherical steel ball.

Rodríguez Rodríguez, M. I.; Jaramillo-Núñez, A.; Díaz-Uribe, R.

2013-09-01

115

THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. V. FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR STARBURST RECYCLING FROM QUANTITATIVE GALAXY MORPHOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

Using J- and K{sub s}-band imaging obtained as part of the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS), we measure Sérsic indices for 2160 field and cluster galaxies at 0.31 < z < 0.54. Using both mass- and magnitude-limited samples, we compare the distributions for spectroscopically determined passive, continuously star-forming, starburst, and post-starburst systems and show that previously established spatial and statistical connections between these types extend to their gross morphologies. Outside of cluster cores, we find close structural ties between starburst and continuously star-forming, as well as post-starburst and passive types, but not between starbursts and post-starbursts. These results independently support two conclusions presented in Paper II of this series: (1) most starbursts are the product of a non-disruptive triggering mechanism that is insensitive to global environment, such as minor mergers; (2) starbursts and post-starbursts generally represent transient phases in the lives of 'normal' star-forming and quiescent galaxies, respectively, originating from and returning to these systems in closed 'recycling' loops. In this picture, spectroscopically identified post-starbursts constitute a minority of all recently terminated starbursts, largely ruling out the typical starburst as a quenching event in all but the densest environments.

Abramson, Louis E.; Gladders, Michael D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Monson, Andrew; Persson, Eric [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta, E-mail: labramson@uchicago.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

2013-11-10

116

A survey of what customers want in a cell phone design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cell phone is an information appliance that has been widely used. It provides instant access to information and makes people more ‘connected’. The objective of our study is to investigate the relationship among the design features of the cell phone and identify the most important design features and design factors. In our survey study, we asked 1,006 college students

Chen Ling; Wonil Hwang; Gavriel Salvendy

2007-01-01

117

Survey design for lakes and reservoirs in the United States to assess contaminants in fish tissue  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Lake Fish Tissue Study (NLFTS) was the first survey of fish contamination in lakes and reservoirs in the 48 conterminous states based on probability survey design. This study included the largest set (268) of persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals ev...

118

The Design of a Novel Survey for Small Objects in the Solar System  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated several concepts for a new survey for small objects in the Solar System. We designed a highly novel survey for comets in the outer region of the Solar System, which exploits the occultations of relatively bright stars to infer the presence of otherwise extremely faint objects. The populations and distributions of these objects are not known; the uncertainties

C. Alcock; W. P. Chen; I. de Pater; T. Lee; J. Lissauer; J. Rice; C. Liang; K. Cook; S. Marshall; C. Akerlof

2000-01-01

119

Design for manufacturing meets advanced process control: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanometer IC designs are increasingly challenged to achieve manufacturing closure, i.e., being fabricated with high product yield due to feature miniaturizations and process variations. Realizing the critical importance of addressing manufacturability\\/yield during design (which is loosely termed as DFM, design for manufacturing), there has been a surge of research activities recently from both academia and industry under the “DFM” umbrella.

David Z. Pan; Peng Yu; Minsik Cho; Anand Ramalingam; Kiwoon Kim; Anand Rajaram; Sean X. Shi

2008-01-01

120

Targeting Urban Watershed Stressor Gradients: Stream Survey Design, Ecological Responses, and Implications of Land Cover Resolution  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted a stream survey in the Narragansett Bay Watershed designed to target a gradient of development intensity, and to examine how associated changes in nutrients, carbon, and stressors affect periphyton and macroinvertebrates. Concentrations of nutrients, cations, and ani...

121

Design, Fielding, and Analysis of School-Based Surveys on Health Behaviors in  

E-print Network

results, parents know most about the after school clubs, cafeteria food programs-term behaviors can be affected. Parental involvement is highly influential in affecting Design, Fielding, and Analysis of School-Based Surveys on Health

Lewis, Robert Michael

122

SURVEY GUIDE SURVEY FUNDAMENTALS  

E-print Network

SURVEY GUIDE 1 SURVEY FUNDAMENTALS A GUIDE TO DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING SURVEYS #12;S U R V E Y GU I D E OFFICE OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT SURVEY FUNDAMENTALS This guide describes in non-technical terms the underlying principles of good survey design and implementation. Clear, simple explanations lead the reader

Shapiro, Vadim

123

Quantitative imaging of the human upper airway: instrument design and clinical studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Imaging of the human upper airway is widely used in medicine, in both clinical practice and research. Common imaging modalities include video endoscopy, X-ray CT, and MRI. However, no current modality is both quantitative and safe to use for extended periods of time. Such a capability would be particularly valuable for sleep research, which is inherently reliant on long observation sessions. We have developed an instrument capable of quantitative imaging of the human upper airway, based on endoscopic optical coherence tomography. There are no dose limits for optical techniques, and the minimally invasive imaging probe is safe for use in overnight studies. We report on the design of the instrument and its use in preliminary clinical studies, and we present results from a range of initial experiments. The experiments show that the instrument is capable of imaging during sleep, and that it can record dynamic changes in airway size and shape. This information is useful for research into sleep disorders, and potentially for clinical diagnosis and therapies.

Leigh, M. S.; Armstrong, J. J.; Paduch, A.; Sampson, D. D.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.

2006-08-01

124

Effect of survey design and catch rate estimation on total catch estimates in Chinook salmon fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Roving–roving and roving–access creel surveys are the primary techniques used to obtain information on harvest of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho sport fisheries. Once interviews are conducted using roving–roving or roving–access survey designs, mean catch rate can be estimated with the ratio-of-means (ROM) estimator, the mean-of-ratios (MOR) estimator, or the MOR estimator with exclusion of short-duration (?0.5 h) trips. Our objective was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates obtained from use of the two survey designs and three catch rate estimators for Idaho Chinook salmon fisheries. Information on angling populations was obtained by direct visual observation of portions of Chinook salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over an 18-d period. Based on data from the angling populations, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the properties of the catch rate estimators and survey designs. Among the three estimators, the ROM estimator provided the most accurate and precise estimates of mean catch rate and total catch for both roving–roving and roving–access surveys. On average, the root mean square error of simulated total catch estimates was 1.42 times greater and relative bias was 160.13 times greater for roving–roving surveys than for roving–access surveys. Length-of-stay bias and nonstationary catch rates in roving–roving surveys both appeared to affect catch rate and total catch estimates. Our results suggest that use of the ROM estimator in combination with an estimate of angler effort provided the least biased and most precise estimates of total catch for both survey designs. However, roving–access surveys were more accurate than roving–roving surveys for Chinook salmon fisheries in Idaho.

McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

2012-01-01

125

Controls design with crossfeeds for hovering rotorcraft using quantitative feedback theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-input, multi-output controls design with dynamic crossfeed pre-compensation is presented for rotorcraft in near-hovering flight using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT). The resulting closed-loop control system bandwidth allows the rotorcraft to be considered for use as an inflight simulator. The use of dynamic, robust crossfeeds prior to the QFT design reduces the magnitude of required feedback gain and results in performance that meets most handling qualities specifications relative to the decoupling of off-axis responses. Handling qualities are Level 1 for both low-gain tasks and high-gain tasks in the roll, pitch, and yaw axes except for the 10 deg/sec moderate-amplitude yaw command where the rotorcraft exhibits Level 2 handling qualities in the yaw axis caused by phase lag. The combined effect of the QFT feedback design following the implementation of low-order, dynamic crossfeed compensators successfully decouples ten of twelve off-axis channels. For the other two channels it was not possible to find a single, low-order crossfeed that was effective. This is an area to be investigated in future research.

Tischler, Mark B.; Biezad, Daniel J.; Cheng, Rendy

1996-01-01

126

A survey of snake-inspired robot designs.  

PubMed

Body undulation used by snakes and the physical architecture of a snake body may offer significant benefits over typical legged or wheeled locomotion designs in certain types of scenarios. A large number of research groups have developed snake-inspired robots to exploit these benefits. The purpose of this review is to report different types of snake-inspired robot designs and categorize them based on their main characteristics. For each category, we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. This review will assist in familiarizing a newcomer to the field with the existing designs and their distinguishing features. We hope that by studying existing robots, future designers will be able to create new designs by adopting features from successful robots. The review also summarizes the design challenges associated with the further advancement of the field and deploying snake-inspired robots in practice. PMID:19158415

Hopkins, James K; Spranklin, Brent W; Gupta, Satyandra K

2009-06-01

127

Surveying current research in object-oriented design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state of object-oriented is evolving rapidly. This survey describes what are currently thought to be the key ideas. Although it is necessarily incomplete, it contains both academic and industrial efforts and describes work in both the United States and Europe. It ignores well-known ideas, like that of Coad and Meyer [34], in favor of less widely known projects.Research in

Rebecca J. Wirfs-Brock; Ralph E. Johnson

1990-01-01

128

A Developmental Education Survey: Results of a National Survey of Program Design and Mathematics Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the results of a two-part survey on developmental education in four-year colleges and universities. Describes the requirements, staffing, and enrollment in the programs, and assesses the extent to which a subsample of developmental mathematics instructors follow the standards established by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.…

Kull, Keith R.

1999-01-01

129

Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum)  

PubMed Central

Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

Charney, Noah D.; Kubel, Jacob E.; Eiseman, Charles S.

2015-01-01

130

Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).  

PubMed

Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

Charney, Noah D; Kubel, Jacob E; Eiseman, Charles S

2015-01-01

131

Cross-layer design: a survey and the road ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of late, there has been an avalanche of cross-layer design proposals for wireless networks. A number of researchers have looked at specific aspects of network performance and, approaching cross-layer design via their interpretation of what it implies, have presented several cross-layer design proposals. These proposals involve different layers of the protocol stack, and address both cellular and ad hoc networks.

Vineet Srivastava; Mehul Motani

2005-01-01

132

A Survey on Requirements and Design Methods for Secure Software  

E-print Network

................................................................6 3.2.1 SSD Activities for Requirements Engineering .........................................................................................7 3.2.2 SSD Activities for Design.........................................................................................................................7 3.2.3 SSD Activities for Implementation

Graham, Nick

133

A Survey on Requirements and Design Methods for Secure Software  

E-print Network

................................................................ 6 3.2.1 SSD Activities for Requirements Engineering .........................................................................................7 3.2.2 SSD Activities for Design.........................................................................................................................7 3.2.3 SSD Activities for Implementation

Graham, Nick

134

Review of Quantitative Surveys of the Length and Stability of MTBE, TBA, and Benzene Plumes in Groundwater at UST Sites.  

PubMed

Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10?µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185?feet for benzene and 110 to 178?feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400?feet vs. 345?feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530?feet vs. 425?feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends. PMID:25040137

Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

2015-03-01

135

The influence of the design matrix on treatment effect estimates in the quantitative analyses of single-subject experimental design research.  

PubMed

The quantitative methods for analyzing single-subject experimental data have expanded during the last decade, including the use of regression models to statistically analyze the data, but still a lot of questions remain. One question is how to specify predictors in a regression model to account for the specifics of the design and estimate the effect size of interest. These quantitative effect sizes are used in retrospective analyses and allow synthesis of single-subject experimental study results which is informative for evidence-based decision making, research and theory building, and policy discussions. We discuss different design matrices that can be used for the most common single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs), namely, the multiple-baseline designs, reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs, and provide empirical illustrations. The purpose of this article is to guide single-subject experimental data analysts interested in analyzing and meta-analyzing SSED data. PMID:24902590

Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M; Beretvas, S Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

2014-09-01

136

Metamodels for Computer-based Engineering Design: Survey and recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. The use of statistical techniques,to build ap- proximations,of expensive computer,analysis codes pervades much,of today’s engineering,design. These statistical approxi- mations, or metamodels, are used to replace the actual expensive computer analyses, facilitating multidisciplinary, multiobjective optimization and,concept,exploration. In this paper, we review several of these techniques, including design of experiments, response surface methodology, Taguchi methods, neural networks, inductive learning and kriging.

Timothy W. Simpson; J. D. Poplinski; P. N. Koch; J. K. Allen

2001-01-01

137

Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting twinning rate in Israeli Holsteins by the daughter design.  

PubMed

Twinning rate was analyzed in the Israeli Holstein dairy cattle population by the multiple-trait animal model, and a daughter design genome scan for quantitative trait loci was performed. Each parity was considered a separate trait. Heritabilities of twinning rate were very low, but increased by parity from 0.01 in first parity to 0.03 in fifth parity. All genetic correlations among parities were >0.77, but all environmental correlations were <0.07. Genetic correlations between twinning rate and female fertility (measured as the inverse of the number of inseminations to conception) in the first 3 parities were negative for all 9 parity-by-trait combinations. All environmental correlations were very small, but generally negative. The overall genetic trend since 1985 was positive at 0.02% twinning/yr, whereas the phenotypic trends were positive for parities 3 and 4 and negative for the other parities, but all trends were quite small. A total of 5,221 cows, daughters of 11 sires, were genotyped for 73 markers spanning all 29 autosomes. There were 9 markers with significant effects on twinning rate at P < 0.05, for a false discovery rate of 0.4; thus, about 5 of these probably represent true effects. Significant effects were found on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, 8, 14, 15, and 23. Of these, 3 effects were significant at P < 0.01, for a false discovery rate of 0.24. All 11 families were analyzed by interval mapping of chromosome 7. Only 2 families showed nominally significant effects, but chromosome-wise significance at P < 0.05 was not obtained for either family. Suggestive evidence of quantitative trait loci near the beginning of the chromosome and near position 50 cM were found in both families. Sire 3070 also had a significant effect for female fertility near the beginning of the chromosome. There was also evidence for a third quantitative trait loci at the end of the chromosome for sire 2357. PMID:18487670

Weller, J I; Golik, M; Seroussi, E; Ron, M; Ezra, E

2008-06-01

138

Modified Universal Design Survey: Enhancing Operability of Launch Vehicle Ground Crew Worksites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Operability is a driving requirement for next generation space launch vehicles. Launch site ground operations include numerous operator tasks to prepare the vehicle for launch or to perform preflight maintenance. Ensuring that components requiring operator interaction at the launch site are designed for optimal human use is a high priority for operability. To promote operability, a Design Quality Evaluation Survey based on Universal Design framework was developed to support Human Factors Engineering (HFE) evaluation for NASA s launch vehicles. Universal Design per se is not a priority for launch vehicle processing however; applying principles of Universal Design will increase the probability of an error free and efficient design which promotes operability. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey incorporates and tailors the seven Universal Design Principles and adds new measures for Safety and Efficiency. Adapting an approach proven to measure Universal Design Performance in Product, each principle is associated with multiple performance measures which are rated with the degree to which the statement is true. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey was employed for several launch vehicle ground processing worksite analyses. The tool was found to be most useful for comparative judgments as opposed to an assessment of a single design option. It provided a useful piece of additional data when assessing possible operator interfaces or worksites for operability.

Blume, Jennifer L.

2010-01-01

139

Hit by a Perfect Storm? Art & Design in the National Student Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has long been the suspicion amongst staff in Art & Design that the ratings given to their subject disciplines in the UK's National Student Survey are adversely affected by a combination of circumstances--a "perfect storm". The "perfect storm" proposition is tested by comparing ratings for Art & Design with…

Yorke, Mantz; Orr, Susan; Blair, Bernadette

2014-01-01

140

A Survey of Multimedia Developers Concerning the Use of Automated Instructional Design Software.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This survey questioned instructional designers about the increasing use of automated instructional design software to develop computer-based training (CBT). While these automated tools compact the complicated production process, educators complain that the resulting software often presents lock-stepped, linear instruction that neglects the…

Moshinskie, James F.

1998-01-01

141

Distance software: design and analysis of distance sampling surveys for estimating population size  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Distance sampling is a widely used technique for estimating the size or density of biological populations. Many distance sampling designs and most analyses use the software Distance. 2. We briefly review distance sampling and its assumptions, outline the history, structure and capabilities of Distance, and provide hints on its use. 3. Good survey design is a crucial prerequisite

Len Thomas; Stephen T. Buckland; Eric A. Rexstad; Jeff L. Laake; Samantha Strindberg; Sharon L. Hedley; Jon R. B. Bishop; Tiago A. Marques; Kenneth P. Burnham

2009-01-01

142

A Survey of Human-Computer Interaction Design in Science Fiction Movies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Science Fiction movies have always been a medium for spec- ulation about the future of technology. The most visible part of technology often is its interaction design, which therefore appears prominently in these movies. This paper presents a survey of human-computer interaction designs in SciFi movies during the past decades and it relates the techniques shown there to existing technologies

Michael Schmitz; Christoph Endres

2008-01-01

143

Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland Andrew J. Plumptre Len Thomas Eric A. Rexstad  

E-print Network

1 1 2 3 4 5 Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland · Andrew transect surveys for primates Corresponding author: S.T. Buckland, CREEM, The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland

Thomas, Len

144

Quantitative fault tolerant control design for a hydraulic actuator with a leaking piston seal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydraulic actuators are complex fluid power devices whose performance can be degraded in the presence of system faults. In this thesis a linear, fixed-gain, fault tolerant controller is designed that can maintain the positioning performance of an electrohydraulic actuator operating under load with a leaking piston seal and in the presence of parametric uncertainties. Developing a control system tolerant to this class of internal leakage fault is important since a leaking piston seal can be difficult to detect, unless the actuator is disassembled. The designed fault tolerant control law is of low-order, uses only the actuator position as feedback, and can: (i) accommodate nonlinearities in the hydraulic functions, (ii) maintain robustness against typical uncertainties in the hydraulic system parameters, and (iii) keep the positioning performance of the actuator within prescribed tolerances despite an internal leakage fault that can bypass up to 40% of the rated servovalve flow across the actuator piston. Experimental tests verify the functionality of the fault tolerant control under normal and faulty operating conditions. The fault tolerant controller is synthesized based on linear time-invariant equivalent (LTIE) models of the hydraulic actuator using the quantitative feedback theory (QFT) design technique. A numerical approach for identifying LTIE frequency response functions of hydraulic actuators from acceptable input-output responses is developed so that linearizing the hydraulic functions can be avoided. The proposed approach can properly identify the features of the hydraulic actuator frequency response that are important for control system design and requires no prior knowledge about the asymptotic behavior or structure of the LTIE transfer functions. A distributed hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation architecture is constructed that enables the performance of the proposed fault tolerant control law to be further substantiated, under realistic operating conditions. Using the HIL framework, the fault tolerant hydraulic actuator is operated as a flight control actuator against the real-time numerical simulation of a high-performance jet aircraft. A robust electrohydraulic loading system is also designed using QFT so that the in-flight aerodynamic load can be experimentally replicated. The results of the HIL experiments show that using the fault tolerant controller to compensate the internal leakage fault at the actuator level can benefit the flight performance of the airplane.

Karpenko, Mark

145

Net Survey: "Top Ten Mistakes" in Academic Web Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Highlights the top ten mistakes in academic Web design: (1) bloated graphics; (2) scaling images; (3) dense text; (4) lack of contrast; (5) font size; (6) looping animations; (7) courseware authoring software; (8) scrolling/long pages; (9) excessive download; and (10) the nothing site. Includes resources. (CMK)

Petrik, Paula

2000-01-01

146

A survey of design methods for failure detection in dynamic systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A number of methods for the detection of abrupt changes (such as failures) in stochastic dynamical systems were surveyed. The class of linear systems were emphasized, but the basic concepts, if not the detailed analyses, carry over to other classes of systems. The methods surveyed range from the design of specific failure-sensitive filters, to the use of statistical tests on filter innovations, to the development of jump process formulations. Tradeoffs in complexity versus performance are discussed.

Willsky, A. S.

1975-01-01

147

Is design of experiments really used? A survey of Basque industries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new survey is presented concerning the knowledge and use of the design of experiments technique (DoE) within industry in the Basque Country, a region recognised throughout Europe for its quality management. The survey was carried out within manufacturing companies, yielding a response rate of 18%. Results show that 94% of companies undertake experimentation; most of them use one-factor-at-a-time strategies,

Martin Tanco; Elisabeth Viles; Laura Ilzarbe; María Jesus Alvarez

2008-01-01

148

HRMS sky survey wideband feed system design for DSS 24 beam waveguide antenna  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The High-Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) Sky Survey project will be implemented on the DSS 24 beam waveguide (BWG) antenna over the frequency range of 2.86 to 10 GHz. Two wideband, ring-loaded, corrugated feed horns were designed to cover this range. The horns match the frequency-dependent gain requirements for the DSS 24 BWG system. The performance of the feed horns and the calculated system performance of DSS 24 are presented.

Stanton, P. H.; Lee, P. R.; Reilly, H. F.

1993-01-01

149

Study Quality in SLA: An Assessment of Designs, Analyses, and Reporting Practices in Quantitative L2 Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assesses research and reporting practices in quantitative second language (L2) research. A sample of 606 primary studies, published from 1990 to 2010 in "Language Learning and Studies in Second Language Acquisition," was collected and coded for designs, statistical analyses, reporting practices, and outcomes (i.e., effect…

Plonsky, Luke

2013-01-01

150

A quantitative analysis of clinical trial designs in spinal cord injury based on ICCP guidelines.  

PubMed

Clinical studies of spinal cord injury (SCI) have evolved into multidisciplinary programs that investigate multiple types of neurological deficits and sequelae. In 2007, the International Campaign for Cures of SCI Paralysis (ICCP) proposed best practices for interventional trial designs, end-points, and inclusion criteria. Here we quantitatively assessed the extent to which SCI trials follow ICCP guidelines and reflect the overall patient population. We obtained data for all 288 SCI trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. We calculated summary statistics and observed trends pre-2007 versus 2007 onward. To compare the trial population to the overall SCI population, we obtained statistics from the National SCI Statistical Center. We generated tag clouds to describe heterogeneous trial outcomes. Most interventional studies were randomized (147, 73.1%), and utilized active (55, 36.7%) or placebo controls (49, 32.7%), both increasing trends (p=0.09). Most trials were open label (116, 53.5%), rather than double- (62, 28.6%) or single-blinded (39, 18.0%), but blinding has increased (p=0.01). Tag clouds of outcomes suggest an emphasis on assessment using scores and scales. Inclusion criteria related to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) status and neurological level allowed inclusion of most SCI patients. Age inclusion criteria were most commonly 18-65 or older. Consistent with ICCP recommendations, most trials were randomized and controlled, and blinding has increased. Age inclusion criteria skew older than the overall population. ASIA status criteria reflect the population, but neurological lesion criteria could be broadened. Investigators should make trial designs and results available in a complete manner to enable comparisons of populations and outcomes. PMID:22369673

Sorani, Marco D; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

2012-06-10

151

The Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA): Design, Technical Overview and Performance  

E-print Network

The Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is the 4-metre wide-field survey telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory, equipped with the world's largest near-infrared imaging camera (VISTA IR Camera, VIRCAM), with 1.65 degree diameter field of view, and 67 Mpixels giving 0.6 square degrees active pixel area, operating at wavelengths 0.8 - 2.3 microns. We provide a short history of the project, and an overview of the technical details of the full system including the optical design, mirrors, telescope structure, IR camera, active optics, enclosure and software. The system includes several innovative design features such as the f/1 primary mirror, the cold-baffle camera design and the sophisticated wavefront sensing system delivering closed-loop 5-axis alignment of the secondary mirror. We conclude with a summary of the delivered performance, and a short overview of the six ESO public surveys in progress on VISTA.

Sutherland, Will; Dalton, Gavin; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Beard, Steven; Bennett, Richard; Bezawada, Naidu; Born, Andrew; Caldwell, Martin; Clark, Paul; Craig, Simon; Henry, David; Jeffers, Paul; Little, Bryan; McPherson, Alistair; Murray, John; Stewart, Malcolm; Stobie, Brian; Terrett, David; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin; Woodhouse, Guy

2014-01-01

152

The Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA): Design, technical overview, and performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is the 4-m wide-field survey telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory, equipped with the world's largest near-infrared imaging camera (VISTA IR Camera, VIRCAM), with 1.65 degree diameter field of view, and 67 Mpixels giving 0.6 deg2 active pixel area, operating at wavelengths 0.8-2.3 ?m. We provide a short history of the project, and an overview of the technical details of the full system including the optical design, mirrors, telescope structure, IR camera, active optics, enclosure and software. The system includes several innovative design features such as the f/1 primary mirror, thedichroic cold-baffle camera design and the sophisticated wavefront sensing system delivering closed-loop 5-axis alignment of the secondary mirror. We conclude with a summary of the delivered performance, and a short overview of the six ESO public surveys in progress on VISTA.

Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim; Dalton, Gavin; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Beard, Steven; Bennett, Richard; Bezawada, Naidu; Born, Andrew; Caldwell, Martin; Clark, Paul; Craig, Simon; Henry, David; Jeffers, Paul; Little, Bryan; McPherson, Alistair; Murray, John; Stewart, Malcolm; Stobie, Brian; Terrett, David; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin; Woodhouse, Guy

2015-03-01

153

Spatial coverage and inference: Trade-offs between survey design and model assumptions in the North American Breeding Bird Survey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Route selection in the North American Breeding Bird Survey is based on a quasi-stratified random sampling design motivated (in part) by the desire to achieve unbiased estimates of trends and other summaries of avian population status. In practice, some departure from design intentions is realized because active routes become concentrated around urban areas, and this yields unbalanced sampling with respect to habitat and land use patterns, and temporal changes in land use. The need to consider potential biases induced by factors not controlled for (or uncontrollable) by design has motivated the development of a model-based framework for conducting inference about population status and trend assessments from BBS data. The present modeling framework is sufficiently generic to allow consideration of designs that deviate from random sampling. Thus, for example, redundant information that results from clustering routes around urban areas, or targeted sampling to assess specific hypotheses (e.g., about the effect of land-use patterns on population status), can be viewed not as deficiencies in the design, but as features that necessitate extension of existing models used for assessment. In this paper, we consider whether the sampling design is relevant to conducting inference about population status and trends, and we provide a framework for addressing potential biases induced by an imbalance in spatial coverage of sampled routes.

Royle, J.A.; Sauer, J.R.

2005-01-01

154

Final report on the radiological surveys of designated DX firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

CHEMRAD was contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform USRADS{reg_sign} (UltraSonic Ranging And Data System) radiation scanning surveys at designated DX Sites at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary purpose of these scanning surveys was to identify the presence of Depleted Uranium (D-38) resulting from activities at the DX Firing Sites. This effort was conducted to update the most recent surveys of these areas. This current effort was initiated with site orientation on August 12, 1996. Surveys were completed in the field on September 4, 1996. This Executive Summary briefly presents the major findings of this work. The detail survey results are presented in the balance of this report and are organized by Technical Area and Site number in section 2. This organization is not in chronological order. USRADS and the related survey methods are described in section 3. Quality Control issues are addressed in section 4. Surveys were conducted with an array of radiation detectors either mounted on a backpack frame for man-carried use (Manual mode) or on a tricycle cart (RadCart mode). The array included radiation detectors for gamma and beta surface near surface contamination as well as dose rate at 1 meter above grade. The radiation detectors were interfaced directly to an USRADS 2100 Data Pack.

NONE

1996-09-09

155

Optical Design Trade Study for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics mission by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)-Omega payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets [via gravitational microlensing], probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of NWNH, the WFIRST project has been working with the WFIRST science definition team (SDT) to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the driving requirements. The current interim reference mission point design, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slitless spectroscopy science channels, is consistent with the requirements, requires no technology development, and out performs the JDEM-Omega design.

Content, David A.; Goullioud, R.; Lehan, John P.; Mentzell, John E.

2011-01-01

156

Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: Telescope Design and Simulated Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey proposed multiple missions with NIR focal planes and 3 mirror wide field telescopes in the 1.5m aperture range. None of them would have won as standalone missions WFIRST is a combination of these missions, created by Astro 2010 committee. WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) tasked to examine the design. Project team is a GSFC-JPL-Caltech collaboration. This interim mission design is a result of combined work by the project team with the SDT.

Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; Powell, C. A.

2012-01-01

157

A survey report on design for manufacture in the UK furniture manufacturing industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on a questionnaire survey with the aim to determine the extent of familiarity with and use of design for manufacture (DFM) in the UK furniture manufacturing industry. It was revealed that only a small proportion had experimented or applied one or more DFM techniques. The majority of them did not understand what exactly DFM was and wished

G. Q. Huang; K. L. Mak

1998-01-01

158

Decision making preferences in the medical encounter – a factorial survey design  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Up to now it has not been systematically investigated in which kind of clinical situations a consultation style based on shared decision making (SDM) is preferred by patients and physicians. We suggest the factorial survey design to address this problem. This method, which so far has hardly been used in health service research, allows to vary relevant factors describing

Meike Müller-Engelmann; Tanja Krones; Heidi Keller; Norbert Donner-Banzhoff

2008-01-01

159

NATIONAL SURVEY OF ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING (NSCAW): A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND DESIGN BASED ANALYSES  

E-print Network

NATIONAL SURVEY OF ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING (NSCAW): A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND DESIGN BASED ANALYSES with the child welfare system. This paper uses the NSCAW data to investigate the role of maternal depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Initial EDA 5 4 Data Complexities 6 5 HOME Scores 8 5.1 Maternal Depression

160

The Design and Validation of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) is a new instrument designed to measure various facets of student attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. This instrument extends previous work by probing additional facets of student attitudes and beliefs. It has been written to be suitably worded for students in a variety of different courses. This paper introduces the CLASS

W. K. Adams; K. K. Perkins; M. Dubson; N. D. Finkelstein; C. E. Wieman

161

"Is This Ethical?" A Survey of Opinion on Principles and Practices of Document Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reprints a corrected version of an article originally published in the volume 43, number 1 issue of this journal. Presents results of a national survey of technical communicators and technical communication teachers assessing the ethics of seven document design cases involving manipulation of typography, illustrations, and photographs. Offers…

Dragga, Sam

1996-01-01

162

USING GIS TO GENERATE SPATIALLY-BALANCED RANDOM SURVEY DESIGNS FOR NATURAL RESOURCE APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Sampling of a population is frequently required to understand trends and patterns in natural resource management because financial and time constraints preclude a complete census. A rigorous probability-based survey design specifies where to sample so that inferences from the sam...

163

A Survey of Recent Alumni: Design and Processing Considerations. SAIR Conference Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development, design, and results of a survey of Florida State University alumni who received their degrees during 1980-1981 are examined. The questionnaire was mailed to 4,588 students who received undergraduate or graduate degrees, and 1,533 responses were obtained. Attention was directed to whether students had achieved personal, academic,…

Gusler, Thomas E.

164

Survey Techniques for Freshwater Streams on Oceanic Islands: Important Design Considerations for the PABITRA Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fundamental differences in life history patterns of most indigenous freshwater stream species on oceanic islands and freshwater species in continen- tal stream systems require important differences in design of appropriate aquatic survey methodologies. As an example of these issues, use of Instream Flow In- cremental Methodology (IFIM) and the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) for de- scribing island stream conditions

J. E. Parham

2005-01-01

165

ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF A COASTAL PLAIN WATERSHED USING A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

Using a probabilistic survey design, we assessed the ecological condition of the Florida (USA) portion of the Escambia River watershed using selected environmental and benthic macroinvertebrate data. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 28 sites during July-August 1996, and 3414 i...

166

RESEARCH VESSEL SURVEY DESIGN FOR MONITORING DOLPHIN ABUNDANCE IN THE EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC  

E-print Network

RESEARCH VESSEL SURVEY DESIGN FOR MONITORING DOLPHIN ABUNDANCE IN THE EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC Service began conducting long-term research ship sur- veys to determine status ofspotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata. stocks in the eastern tropical Pacific. This is the main dolphin species taken incidentally

167

CONDITION ASSESSMENT FOR THE ESCAMBIA RIVER, FL, WATERSHED: BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE SURVEYS USING A PROBABILISTIC SAMPLING DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

Probabilistic sampling has been used to assess the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and the use of this survey design approach was examined for a northwest Florida watershed. Twenty-eight lotic sites within the Escambia River, Florida, watershed were randomly selected and visit...

168

Selecting a composite correlation filter design: a survey and comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Many composite correlation filter designs have been proposed for solving a wide variety of target detection and pattern recognition problems. Due to the large number of available designs, however, it is often unclear how to select the best design for a particular application. We present a theoretical survey and an empirical comparison of several popular composite correlation filter designs. Using a database of rotational target imagery, we show that some such filter designs appear to be better choices than others under computational and performance constraints. We compare filter performance in terms of noise tolerance, computational load, generalization ability, and distortion in order to provide a multifaceted examination of the characteristics of various filter designs.

Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya [Carnegie Mellon University

2008-01-01

169

Design and Synthesis of Target-Responsive Aptamer-Cross-linked Hydrogel for Visual Quantitative Detection of Ochratoxin A.  

PubMed

A target-responsive aptamer-cross-linked hydrogel was designed and synthesized for portable and visual quantitative detection of the toxin Ochratoxin A (OTA), which occurs in food and beverages. The hydrogel network forms by hybridization between one designed DNA strand containing the OTA aptamer and two complementary DNA strands grafting on linear polyacrylamide chains. Upon the introduction of OTA, the aptamer binds with OTA, leading to the dissociation of the hydrogel, followed by release of the preloaded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which can be observed by the naked eye. To enable sensitive visual and quantitative detection, we encapsulated Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (Au@PtNPs) in the hydrogel to generate quantitative readout in a volumetric bar-chart chip (V-Chip). In the V-Chip, Au@PtNPs catalyzes the oxidation of H2O2 to generate O2, which induces movement of an ink bar to a concentration-dependent distance for visual quantitative readout. Furthermore, to improve the detection limit in complex real samples, we introduced an immunoaffinity column (IAC) of OTA to enrich OTA from beer. After the enrichment, as low as 1.27 nM (0.51 ppb) OTA can be detected by the V-Chip, which satisfies the test requirement (2.0 ppb) by the European Commission. The integration of a target-responsive hydrogel with portable enrichment by IAC, as well as signal amplification and quantitative readout by a simple microfluidic device, offers a new method for portable detection of food safety hazard toxin OTA. PMID:25771715

Liu, Rudi; Huang, Yishun; Ma, Yanli; Jia, Shasha; Gao, Mingxuan; Li, Jiuxing; Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Dunming; Wu, Min; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong

2015-04-01

170

Median and quantile tests under complex survey design using SAS and R.  

PubMed

Techniques for conducting hypothesis testing on the median and other quantiles of two or more subgroups under complex survey design are limited. In this paper, we introduce programs in both SAS and R to perform such a test. A detailed illustration of the computations, macro variable definitions, input and output for the SAS and R programs are also included in the text. Urinary iodine data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are used as examples for comparing medians between females and males as well as comparing the 75th percentiles among three salt consumption groups. PMID:25123100

Pan, Yi; Caudill, Samuel P; Li, Ruosha; Caldwell, Kathleen L

2014-11-01

171

Estimation of wildlife population ratios incorporating survey design and visibility bias  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Age and sex ratio statistics are often a key component of the evaluation and management of wildlife populations. These statistics are determined from counts of animals that are commonly plagued by errors associated with either survey design or visibility bias. We present age and sex ratio estimators that incorporate both these sources of error and include the typical situation that animals are sampled in groups. Aerial surveys of elk (Cervus elaphus) in northcentral Idaho illustrate that differential visibility of age or sex classes can produce biased ratio estimates. Visibility models may be used to provide corrected estimates of ratios and their variability that incorporates errors due to sampling, visibility bias, and visibility estimation.

Samuel, M.D.; Steinhorst, R.K.; Garton, E.O.; Unsworth, J.W.

1992-01-01

172

Design, conduct and analysis of surveys on work-related asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Surveys on work-related asthma serve public health investigation, research on exposure-response relations, screening for pre-clinical\\u000a disease, and demonstrations of effectiveness of interventions. Hypotheses dictate survey design, which include cross-sectional,\\u000a case-control, cohort, and intervention studies. Tools for characterizing medical risk factors and outcomes include questionnaires,\\u000a spirometry, tests of bronchial hyperreactivity, exhaled indices, induced sputum, immunological tests, and nasal inflammatory\\u000a indices. An

Kathleen Kreiss; Dick Heederik

173

The Design of a Novel Survey for Small Objects in the Solar System  

SciTech Connect

We evaluated several concepts for a new survey for small objects in the Solar System. We designed a highly novel survey for comets in the outer region of the Solar System, which exploits the occultations of relatively bright stars to infer the presence of otherwise extremely faint objects. The populations and distributions of these objects are not known; the uncertainties span orders of magnitude! These objects are important scientifically as probes of the primordial solar system, and programmatically now that major investments may be made in the possible mitigation of the hazard of asteroid or comet collisions with the Earth.

Alcock, C.; Chen, W.P.; de Pater, I.; Lee, T.; Lissauer, J.; Rice, J.; Liang, C.; Cook, K.; Marshall, S.; Akerlof, C.

2000-08-21

174

Lessons Learned in Interdisciplinary Professional Development Designed to Promote the Teaching of Quantitative Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we will describe the challenges and insights gained from conducting professional development workshops aimed at helping faculty prepare materials to support the development of students' quantitative skills in different disciplinary contexts. We will examine some of the mistakes we made, and misconceptions we had, in conducting…

Lardner, Emily; Bookman, Jack

2013-01-01

175

Screen Design Guidelines for Motivation in Interactive Multimedia Instruction: A Survey and Framework for Designers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies guidelines from the literature relating to screen design and design of interactive instructional materials. Describes two types of guidelines--those aimed at enhancing motivation and those aimed at preventing loss of motivation--for typography, graphics, color, and animation and audio. Proposes a framework for considering motivation in…

Lee, Sung Heum; Boling, Elizabeth

1999-01-01

176

Preliminary Design of The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-print Network

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024x1024 HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47'x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE is currently in its Preliminary Design Phase, with the mission Preliminary Design Review scheduled for July, 2005. WISE is scheduled to launch in mid 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

A. K. Mainzer; P. Eisenhardt; E. L. Wright; F. Liu; W. Irace; I. Heinrichsen; R. Cutri; V. Duval

2005-08-10

177

SURVEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTBackground: Experiencing ethical problems requires both ethically problematic situations and ethical sensitivity. Ethically problematic treatment decisions are distressing and might reflect health care quality problems. Whether all physicians actually experience ethical problems, what these problems are and how they vary according to physician age, gender and work sector are largely unknown.Methods: A mail survey of all non-retired physicians licensed in

SAMULI I. SAARNI; PIITU PARMANNE; RITVA HALILA

2008-01-01

178

Surveys  

Cancer.gov

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) The world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system, tracking health conditions and risk behaviors in the United States yearly since 1984. Currently, data are collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam.

179

Quantitative Comparison of Minimum Inductance and Minimum Power Algorithms for the Design of Shim Coils for Small Animal Imaging  

PubMed Central

High-performance shim coils are required for high-field magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Complete sets of high-power and high-performance shim coils were designed using two different methods: the minimum inductance and the minimum power target field methods. A quantitative comparison of shim performance in terms of merit of inductance (ML) and merit of resistance (MR) was made for shim coils designed using the minimum inductance and the minimum power design algorithms. In each design case, the difference in ML and the difference in MR given by the two design methods was <15%. Comparison of wire patterns obtained using the two design algorithms show that minimum inductance designs tend to feature oscillations within the current density; while minimum power designs tend to feature less rapidly varying current densities and lower power dissipation. Overall, the differences in coil performance obtained by the two methods are relatively small. For the specific case of shim systems customized for small animal imaging, the reduced power dissipation obtained when using the minimum power method is judged to be more significant than the improvements in switching speed obtained from the minimum inductance method. PMID:20411157

HUDSON, PARISA; HUDSON, STEPHEN D.; HANDLER, WILLIAM B.; SCHOLL, TIMOTHY J.; CHRONIK, BLAINE A.

2010-01-01

180

A design of sample survey for estimation of cocoa production in Western Nigeria  

E-print Network

) administrative structure of the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources, (ii) crop factor - especially yield pattern and age, (iii) need for area survey, (iv) need for objective measurement, (v) need for joint use of list and area samples, (vi...) reduction of the cost of a joint list-area sampling, and (vii) available personnel. These factors are fu11y discussed in Chapter II. The present design utilizes three frames: (a) institutional frame~ (b) area frame~ and (c) list of farmers participating...

Salami, Shakiru Okunola

1973-01-01

181

Survey and design of pictographic sign messages used in the hotel/motel industry  

E-print Network

) 7 /' Rodger J. Kop (Member) Wa L. John (Member) ary L. ogg (Head of Department) May 1992 Survey and Design of Pictographic Sign Messages Used in the Hotel/Motel Industry. (May 1992) Kenneth Aaron Nichols, BBA, HardinSimmons University... Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. Dale Huchingson Individual hotels and motels use different pictographs to convey the services and facilities they offer. There is no known data that evaluates the effectiveness of these pictographs. Several...

Nichols, Kenneth Aaron

1992-01-01

182

SUMSS: A Wide-Field Radio Imaging Survey of the Southern Sky. I. Science goals, survey design and instrumentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope, operating at 843 MHz with a 5\\u000asquare degree field of view, is carrying out a radio imaging survey of the sky\\u000asouth of declination -30 deg. This survey (the Sydney University Molonglo Sky\\u000aSurvey, or SUMSS) produces images with a resolution of 43\\

D. C.-J. Bock; M. I. Large; Elaine M. Sadler

1998-01-01

183

Creel survey sampling designs for estimating effort in short-duration Chinook salmon fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sport fisheries in the Columbia River basin are commonly monitored using roving creel survey designs and require precise, unbiased catch estimates. The objective of this study was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates using various sampling designs to estimate angling effort under the assumption that mean catch rate was known. We obtained information on angling populations based on direct visual observations of portions of Chinook Salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over a 23-d period. Based on the angling population, Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the properties of effort and catch estimates for each sampling design. All sampling designs evaluated were relatively unbiased. Systematic random sampling (SYS) resulted in the most precise estimates. The SYS and simple random sampling designs had mean square error (MSE) estimates that were generally half of those observed with cluster sampling designs. The SYS design was more efficient (i.e., higher accuracy per unit cost) than a two-cluster design. Increasing the number of clusters available for sampling within a day decreased the MSE of estimates of daily angling effort, but the MSE of total catch estimates was variable depending on the fishery. The results of our simulations provide guidelines on the relative influence of sample sizes and sampling designs on parameters of interest in short-duration Chinook Salmon fisheries.

McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

184

Quantitation of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients in powder blends using designed multivariate calibration models by near-infrared spectroscopy.  

PubMed

This research note demonstrates the simultaneous quantitation of a pharmaceutical active ingredient and three excipients in a simulated powder blend containing acetaminophen, Prosolv and Crospovidone. An experimental design approach was used in generating a 5-level (%, w/w) calibration sample set that included 125 samples. The samples were prepared by weighing suitable amount of powders into separate 20-mL scintillation vials and were mixed manually. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used in calibration model development. The models generated accurate results for quantitation of Crospovidone (at 5%, w/w) and magnesium stearate (at 0.5%, w/w). Further testing of the models demonstrated that the 2-level models were as effective as the 5-level ones, which reduced the calibration sample number to 50. The models had a small bias for quantitation of acetaminophen (at 30%, w/w) and Prosolv (at 64.5%, w/w) in the blend. The implication of the bias is discussed. PMID:15848006

Li, Weiyong; Worosila, Gregory D

2005-05-13

185

The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts  

E-print Network

We describe the design and data sample from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest precision-redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey has conducted a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M_B = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the DEIMOS spectrograph at Keck Observatory. DEEP2 covers an area of 2.8 deg^2 divided into four separate fields, observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R_AB=24.1. Objects with z 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately sixty percent of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets which fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45. The DEIMOS 1200-line/mm grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R~6000), accurate and secu...

Newman, Jeffrey A; Davis, Marc; Faber, S M; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C; Phillips, Andrew C; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Gerke, Brian F; Rosario, David J; Weiner, Benjamin J; Willmer, Christopher N A; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J; Kassin, Susan A; Konidaris, Nicholas P; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S; Noeske, Kai G; Wirth, Gregory D; Connolly, Andrew J; Kaiser, Nick; Kirby, Evan N; Lemaux, Brian C; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M; Luppino, Gerard A; Marinoni, Christian; Matthews, Daniel J; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P

2012-01-01

186

SUMSS: A Wide-Field Radio Imaging Survey of the Southern Sky. I. Science goals, survey design and instrumentation  

E-print Network

The Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope, operating at 843 MHz with a 5 square degree field of view, is carrying out a radio imaging survey of the sky south of declination -30 deg. This survey (the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey, or SUMSS) produces images with a resolution of 43" x 43" cosec(Dec.) and an rms noise level of about 1 mJy/beam. SUMSS is therefore similar in sensitivity and resolution to the northern NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; Condon et al. 1998). The survey is progressing at a rate of about 1000 square degrees per year, yielding individual and statistical data for many thousands of weak radio sources. This paper describes the main characteristics of the survey, and presents sample images from the first year of observation.

D. C. -J. Bock; M. I. Large; Elaine M. Sadler

1998-12-03

187

Spatial structure of co-occurring anchovy and sardine populations from acoustic data: implications for survey design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A geostatistical analysis has been undertaken on the spatial structure of co-occurring adult and recruit populations of anchovy, Engraulis capensis, and sardine, Sardinops sagax, in the southern Benguela upwelling region, using information from two acoustic surveys. The study was prompted by the need for a more effi- cient design for surveying sardine abundance, which is increasing in relation to that

MANUEL BARANGE; IAN HAMPTON

1997-01-01

188

DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF A STRATIFIED UNEQUAL-PROBABILITY STREAM SURVEY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN  

EPA Science Inventory

A stratified random sample with unequal probability selection within strata was used to design a multipurpose survey of headwater watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Objectives for data from the survey include unbiased estimates of regional headwater watershed condition...

189

Improving the design of acoustic and midwater trawl surveys through stratification, with an application to Lake Michigan prey fishes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reliable estimates of fish biomass are vital to the management of aquatic ecosystems and their associated fisheries. Acoustic and midwater trawl surveys are an efficient sampling method for estimating fish biomass in large bodies of water. To improve the precision of biomass estimates from combined acoustic and midwater trawl surveys, sampling effort should be optimally allocated within each stage of the survey design. Based on information collected during fish surveys, we developed an approach to improve the design of combined acoustic and midwater trawl surveys through stratification. Geographic strata for acoustic surveying and depth strata for midwater trawling were defined using neighbor-restricted cluster analysis, and the optimal allocation of sampling effort for each was then determined. As an example, we applied this survey stratification approach to data from lakewide acoustic and midwater trawl surveys of Lake Michigan prey fishes. Precision of biomass estimates from surveys with and without geographic stratification was compared through resampling. Use of geographic stratification with optimal sampling allocation reduced the variance of Lake Michigan acoustic biomass estimates by 77%. Stratification and optimal allocation at each stage of an acoustic and midwater trawl survey should serve to reduce the variance of the resulting biomass estimates.

Adams, J.V.; Argyle, R.L.; Fleischer, G.W.; Curtis, G.L.; Stickel, R.G.

2006-01-01

190

Large-visual-angle microstructure inspired from quantitative design of Morpho butterflies' lamellae deviation using the FDTD/PSO method.  

PubMed

The wide angular range of the treelike structure in Morpho butterfly scales was investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)/particle-swarm-optimization (PSO) analysis. Using the FDTD method, different parameters in the Morpho butterflies' treelike structure were studied and their contributions to the angular dependence were analyzed. Then a wide angular range was realized by the PSO method from quantitatively designing the lamellae deviation (?y), which was a crucial parameter with angular range. The field map of the wide-range reflection in a large area was given to confirm the wide angular range. The tristimulus values and corresponding color coordinates for various viewing directions were calculated to confirm the blue color in different observation angles. The wide angular range realized by the FDTD/PSO method will assist us in understanding the scientific principles involved and also in designing artificial optical materials. PMID:23454951

Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Chen, Weixin; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Deng, Tao; Zhang, Di

2013-01-15

191

KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

Bickerton, S. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)], E-mail: bick@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: JJ.Kavelaars@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

2009-05-15

192

Loop Shaping Control Design for a Supersonic Propulsion System Model Using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) Specifications and Bounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper covers the propulsion system component modeling and controls development of an integrated mixed compression inlet and turbojet engine that will be used for an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. Using previously created nonlinear component-level propulsion system models, a linear integrated propulsion system model and loop shaping control design have been developed. The design includes both inlet normal shock position control and jet engine rotor speed control for a potential supersonic commercial transport. A preliminary investigation of the impacts of the aero-elastic effects on the incoming flow field to the propulsion system are discussed, however, the focus here is on developing a methodology for the propulsion controls design that prevents unstart in the inlet and minimizes the thrust oscillation experienced by the vehicle. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) specifications and bounds, and aspects of classical loop shaping are used in the control design process. Model uncertainty is incorporated in the design to address possible error in the system identification mapping of the nonlinear component models into the integrated linear model.

Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George

2010-01-01

193

A quantitative methodology for mapping project costs to engineering decisions in naval ship design and procurement  

E-print Network

Alternative methods for cost estimation are important in the early conceptual stages of a design when there is not enough detail to allow for a traditional quantity takeoff estimate to be performed. Much of the budgeting ...

Netemeyer, Kristopher David

2010-01-01

194

The Proteome of Human Liver Peroxisomes: Identification of Five New Peroxisomal Constituents by a Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Survey  

PubMed Central

The peroxisome is a key organelle of low abundance that fulfils various functions essential for human cell metabolism. Severe genetic diseases in humans are caused by defects in peroxisome biogenesis or deficiencies in the function of single peroxisomal proteins. To improve our knowledge of this important cellular structure, we studied for the first time human liver peroxisomes by quantitative proteomics. Peroxisomes were isolated by differential and Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. A label-free quantitative study of 314 proteins across the density gradient was accomplished using high resolution mass spectrometry. By pairing statistical data evaluation, cDNA cloning and in vivo colocalization studies, we report the association of five new proteins with human liver peroxisomes. Among these, isochorismatase domain containing 1 protein points to the existence of a new metabolic pathway and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 protein is likely involved in the transport or ?-oxidation of fatty acids in human peroxisomes. The detection of alcohol dehydrogenase 1A suggests the presence of an alternative alcohol-oxidizing system in hepatic peroxisomes. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase A and malate dehydrogenase 1 partially associate with human liver peroxisomes and enzyme activity profiles support the idea that NAD+ becomes regenerated during fatty acid ?-oxidation by alternative shuttling processes in human peroxisomes involving lactate dehydrogenase and/or malate dehydrogenase. Taken together, our data represent a valuable resource for future studies of peroxisome biochemistry that will advance research of human peroxisomes in health and disease. PMID:23460848

Ofman, Rob; Bunse, Christian; Pawlas, Magdalena; Hayen, Heiko; Eisenacher, Martin; Stephan, Christian; Meyer, Helmut E.; Waterham, Hans R.; Erdmann, Ralf; Wanders, Ronald J.; Warscheid, Bettina

2013-01-01

195

Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe  

PubMed Central

Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions. PMID:24957323

Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

2014-01-01

196

Implementing the World Mental Health Survey Initiative in Portugal – rationale, design and fieldwork procedures  

PubMed Central

Background The World Mental Health Survey Initiative was designed to evaluate the prevalence, the correlates, the impact and the treatment patterns of mental disorders. This paper describes the rationale and the methodological details regarding the implementation of the survey in Portugal, a country that still lacks representative epidemiological data about psychiatric disorders. Methods The World Mental Health Survey is a cross-sectional study with a representative sample of the Portuguese population, aged 18 or older, based on official census information. The WMH-Composite International Diagnostic Interview, adapted to the Portuguese language by a group of bilingual experts, was used to evaluate the mental health status, disorder severity, impairment, use of services and treatment. Interviews were administered face-to-face at respondent’s dwellings, which were selected from a nationally representative multi-stage clustered area probability sample of households. The survey was administered using computer-assisted personal interview methods by trained lay interviewers. Data quality was strictly controlled in order to ensure the reliability and validity of the collected information. Results A total of 3,849 people completed the main survey, with 2,060 completing the long interview, with a response rate of 57.3%. Data cleaning was conducted in collaboration with the WMHSI Data Analysis Coordination Centre at the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School. Collected information will provide lifetime and 12-month mental disorders diagnoses, according to the International Classification of Diseases and to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Conclusions The findings of this study could have a major influence in mental health care policy planning efforts over the next years, specially in a country that still has a significant level of unmet needs regarding mental health services organization, delivery of care and epidemiological research. PMID:23837605

2013-01-01

197

Cost-effective sib-pair designs in the mapping of quantitative-trait loci.  

PubMed Central

The extreme discordant-sib-pair design has been found to be the most powerful, across most genetic models. In this paper, we address two of the most frequently asked questions related to this design. First, under the extreme discordant-sib-pair design, a large number of people have to be screened for the phenotype of interest, before the desired number of discordant sibs can be collected for genotyping and linkage analysis. When the phenotyping cost is not negligible compared with the genotyping cost, such methods might not be cost effective. The second question is how sensitive the cost is to the genetic model and allele frequency. In this paper, we compare the cost under different sampling strategies, different genetic models, and different phenotyping:genotyping cost ratios. Because our knowledge of the underlying genetic model for a trait is limited, the discordant-sib-pair design proves to be the most robust. When the cost for screening probands is not included, the design that genotypes sibs with one sib in the top 10% and the other sib in the bottom 30% of the population with respect to the trait of interest is, across most models studied, the optimum among the designs considered in this paper. The cost under this design, across different genetic models, appears to be relatively robust to allele frequency and model type, whether additive or dominant. If probands initially must be screened as well, then 25% appears to be the optimal portions of the upper and lower distributions to be studied. PMID:9150169

Zhao, H; Zhang, H; Rotter, J I

1997-01-01

198

Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

2009-01-01

199

Cigarette pack design and adolescent smoking susceptibility: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives To compare adolescents’ responses to three different styles of cigarette packaging: novelty (branded packs designed with a distinctive shape, opening style or bright colour), regular (branded pack with no special design features) and plain (brown pack with a standard shape and opening and all branding removed, aside from brand name). Design Cross-sectional in-home survey. Setting UK. Participants Random location quota sample of 1025 never smokers aged 11–16?years. Main outcome measures Susceptibility to smoking and composite measures of pack appraisal and pack receptivity derived from 11 survey items. Results Mean responses to the three pack types were negative for all survey items. However, ‘novelty’ packs were rated significantly less negatively than the ‘regular’ pack on most items, and the novelty and regular packs were rated less negatively than the ‘plain’ pack. For the novelty packs, logistic regressions, controlling for factors known to influence youth smoking, showed that susceptibility was associated with positive appraisal and also receptivity. For example, those receptive to the innovative Silk Cut Superslims pack were more than four times as likely to be susceptible to smoking than those not receptive to this pack (AOR=4.42, 95% CI 2.50 to 7.81, p<0.001). For the regular pack, an association was found between positive appraisal and susceptibility but not with receptivity and susceptibility. There was no association with pack appraisal or receptivity for the plain pack. Conclusions Pack structure (shape and opening style) and colour are independently associated, not just with appreciation of and receptivity to the pack, but also with susceptibility to smoke. In other words, those who think most highly of novelty cigarette packaging are also the ones who indicate that they are most likely to go on to smoke. Plain packaging, in contrast, was found to directly reduce the appeal of smoking to adolescents. PMID:24056481

Ford, Allison; MacKintosh, Anne Marie; Moodie, Crawford; Richardson, Sol; Hastings, Gerard

2013-01-01

200

Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data.  

PubMed

Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km(2) of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10-120 cameras) and occasions (20-120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ?) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with low detection (i.e., bobcat and coyote) the most efficient sampling approach was to increase the number of occasions (survey days). However, for common species that are moderately detectable (i.e., cottontail rabbit and mule deer), occupancy could reliably be estimated with comparatively low numbers of cameras over a short sampling period. We provide general guidelines for reliably estimating occupancy across a range of terrestrial species (rare to common: ? = 0.175-0.970, and low to moderate detectability: p = 0.003-0.200) using motion-activated cameras. Wildlife researchers/managers with limited knowledge of the relative abundance and likelihood of detection of a particular species can apply these guidelines regardless of location. We emphasize the importance of prior biological knowledge, defined objectives and detailed planning (e.g., simulating different study-design scenarios) for designing effective monitoring programs and research studies. PMID:25210658

Shannon, Graeme; Lewis, Jesse S; Gerber, Brian D

2014-01-01

201

Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data  

PubMed Central

Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ?) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with low detection (i.e., bobcat and coyote) the most efficient sampling approach was to increase the number of occasions (survey days). However, for common species that are moderately detectable (i.e., cottontail rabbit and mule deer), occupancy could reliably be estimated with comparatively low numbers of cameras over a short sampling period. We provide general guidelines for reliably estimating occupancy across a range of terrestrial species (rare to common: ? = 0.175–0.970, and low to moderate detectability: p = 0.003–0.200) using motion-activated cameras. Wildlife researchers/managers with limited knowledge of the relative abundance and likelihood of detection of a particular species can apply these guidelines regardless of location. We emphasize the importance of prior biological knowledge, defined objectives and detailed planning (e.g., simulating different study-design scenarios) for designing effective monitoring programs and research studies. PMID:25210658

Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

2014-01-01

202

Requirements and concept design for large earth survey telescope for SEOS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The efforts of a one year program of Requirements Analysis and Conceptual Design for the Large Earth Survey Telescope for the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite is summarized. A 1.4 meter aperture Cassegrain telescope with 0.6 deg field of view is shown to do an excellent job in satisfying the observational requirements for a wide range of earth resources and meteorological applications. The telescope provides imagery or thermal mapping in ten spectral bands at one time in a field sharing grouping of linear detector arrays. Pushbroom scanning is accomplished by spacecraft slew.

Mailhot, P.; Bisbee, J.

1975-01-01

203

Questionnaire survey of customer satisfaction for product categories towards certification of ergonomic quality in design.  

PubMed

Customer satisfaction was surveyed for 6 product categories (consumer electronics, daily commodities, home equipment, information systems, cars, and health appliances) by questionnaires based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Analyzing weight of evaluation factors, the 6 product categories were reorganized into 4 categories, those were related to 4 aspects in daily living that formed by two axes: home living - mobility life and healthy life - active communication. It was found that consumers were attracted by the actual user test by public institutes for all product categories. The certification based on the design process standard established by authorities, such as EQUID was the second best attractor for consumers. PMID:22316844

Mochimaru, Masaaki; Takahashi, Miwako; Hatakenaka, Nobuko; Horiuchi, Hitoshi

2012-01-01

204

Overview of Test Design: A Survey of Black Box Software Testing Techniques  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This subset of the Black Box Software Testing collection includes resources for a broad survey of software test technique noticing different objectives, strengths, and blind spots. Materials present a few techniques more closely than the rest. Students will: gain familiarity with a variety of test techniques; learn structures for comparing objectives and strengths of different test techniques; use the Heuristic Test Strategy Model for test planning and design; and use concept mapping tools for test planning. Resources include lecture videos, slides, activities, suggested readings, and study guide materials.

Cem Kaner

2011-06-01

205

A Holistic Method to Design an Optimized Energy Scenario and Quantitatively Evaluate Promising Technologies for Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we focus on today's worldwide energy system, a fundamentally illogical and unsustainable system. Today, 85% of the world wide energy system depends on carbon-based fossil fuels. We develop a holistic method to analyze mankind's use of energy in a broad way and to design optimized, normative energy scenarios that conform to important scientific principles. The procedure is

Christian Deilmann; Klaus-Jürgen Bathe

2009-01-01

206

Statistical methods for efficient design of community surveys of response to noise: Random coefficients regression models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research studies of residents' responses to noise consist of interviews with samples of individuals who are drawn from a number of different compact study areas. The statistical techniques developed provide a basis for those sample design decisions. These techniques are suitable for a wide range of sample survey applications. A sample may consist of a random sample of residents selected from a sample of compact study areas, or in a more complex design, of a sample of residents selected from a sample of larger areas (e.g., cities). The techniques may be applied to estimates of the effects on annoyance of noise level, numbers of noise events, the time-of-day of the events, ambient noise levels, or other factors. Methods are provided for determining, in advance, how accurately these effects can be estimated for different sample sizes and study designs. Using a simple cost function, they also provide for optimum allocation of the sample across the stages of the design for estimating these effects. These techniques are developed via a regression model in which the regression coefficients are assumed to be random, with components of variance associated with the various stages of a multi-stage sample design.

Tomberlin, T. J.

1985-01-01

207

The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift errors and catastrophic failure rates are assessed through more than 2000 objects with duplicate observations. Sky subtraction is essentially photon-limited even under bright OH sky lines; we describe the strategies that permitted this, based on high image stability, accurate wavelength solutions, and powerful B-spline modeling methods. We also investigate the impact of targets that appear to be single objects in ground-based targeting imaging but prove to be composite in Hubble Space Telescope data; they constitute several percent of targets at z ~ 1, approaching ~5%-10% at z > 1.5. Summary data are given that demonstrate the superiority of DEEP2 over other deep high-precision redshift surveys at z ~ 1 in terms of redshift accuracy, sample number density, and amount of spectral information. We also provide an overview of the scientific highlights of the DEEP2 survey thus far. Based on observations taken at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology, and on observations made with the NASA/ESO Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archives at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and from the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre.

Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

2013-09-01

208

The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift errors and catastrophic failure rates are assessed through more than 2000 objects with duplicate observations. Sky subtraction is essentially photon-limited even under bright OH sky lines; we describe the strategies that permitted this, based on high image stability, accurate wavelength solutions, and powerful B-spline modeling methods. We also investigate the impact of targets that appear to be single objects in ground-based targeting imaging but prove to be composite in Hubble Space Telescope data; they constitute several percent of targets at z approx. 1, approaching approx. 5%-10% at z > 1.5. Summary data are given that demonstrate the superiority of DEEP2 over other deep high-precision redshift surveys at z approx. 1 in terms of redshift accuracy, sample number density, and amount of spectral information. We also provide an overview of the scientific highlights of the DEEP2 survey thus far.

Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

2013-01-01

209

THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift errors and catastrophic failure rates are assessed through more than 2000 objects with duplicate observations. Sky subtraction is essentially photon-limited even under bright OH sky lines; we describe the strategies that permitted this, based on high image stability, accurate wavelength solutions, and powerful B-spline modeling methods. We also investigate the impact of targets that appear to be single objects in ground-based targeting imaging but prove to be composite in Hubble Space Telescope data; they constitute several percent of targets at z {approx} 1, approaching {approx}5%-10% at z > 1.5. Summary data are given that demonstrate the superiority of DEEP2 over other deep high-precision redshift surveys at z {approx} 1 in terms of redshift accuracy, sample number density, and amount of spectral information. We also provide an overview of the scientific highlights of the DEEP2 survey thus far.

Newman, Jeffrey A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Davis, Marc [Department of Astronomy and Physics, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Dutton, Aaron A. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Finkbeiner, Douglas P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gerke, Brian F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90R4000, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rosario, David J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Yan Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Kassin, Susan A. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Konidaris, N. P., E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu, E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu, E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu, E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu, E-mail: faber@ucolick.org, E-mail: koo@ucolick.org, E-mail: raja@ucolick.org, E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

2013-09-15

210

Design and operation of the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth.  

PubMed

In the US, the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) was designed to provide richer data than previous NSFG surveys from 1973, 1976, 1982, and 1988. Planning for the 1995 NSFG took place at a series of meetings beginning in 1990. Pretesting of the expanded questionnaire, the new computer-assisted personal interviewing method, and the audio computer-assisted, self-interviewing method for sensitive topics occurred in 1993 and led to the decision to offer a cash incentive to respondents and to use the new interviewing methods. The revised questionnaire collected information on event histories, pregnancy history and family formation, partner history, sterilization and fecundity, contraception and birth expectations, use of family planning and other medical services, demographic characteristics, abortion history, number of sexual partners, and rape. The sample for the 1995 NSFG included 14,000 civilian, noninstitutionalized women of reproductive age, 13,795 of whom proved eligible. Of these, 79% completed interviews. Quality control measures included careful design and testing of the questionnaire, use of a Life History Calendar, intensive interviewer training, consistency checks, and use of the incentive. Sampling weights for each respondent were used to derive nationally representative statistical estimates. Sampling errors were created to reflect the complexity of the sample. Research based on the results of the 1995 NSFS has only begun to take advantage of the potential offered by these data. PMID:9494815

Mosher, W D

1998-01-01

211

Dealing with Trade-Offs in Destructive Sampling Designs for Occupancy Surveys  

PubMed Central

Occupancy surveys should be designed to minimise false absences. This is commonly achieved by increasing replication or increasing the efficiency of surveys. In the case of destructive sampling designs, in which searches of individual microhabitats represent the repeat surveys, minimising false absences leads to an inherent trade-off. Surveyors can sample more low quality microhabitats, bearing the resultant financial costs and producing wider-spread impacts, or they can target high quality microhabitats were the focal species is more likely to be found and risk more severe impacts on local habitat quality. We show how this trade-off can be solved with a decision-theoretic approach, using the Millewa Skink Hemiergis millewae from southern Australia as a case study. Hemiergis millewae is an endangered reptile that is best detected using destructive sampling of grass hummocks. Within sites that were known to be occupied by H. millewae, logistic regression modelling revealed that lizards were more frequently detected in large hummocks. If this model is an accurate representation of the detection process, searching large hummocks is more efficient and requires less replication, but this strategy also entails destruction of the best microhabitats for the species. We developed an optimisation tool to calculate the minimum combination of the number and size of hummocks to search to achieve a given cumulative probability of detecting the species at a site, incorporating weights to reflect the sensitivity of the results to a surveyor’s priorities. The optimisation showed that placing high weight on minimising volume necessitates impractical replication, whereas placing high weight on minimising replication requires searching very large hummocks which are less common and may be vital for H. millewae. While destructive sampling methods are sometimes necessary, surveyors must be conscious of the ecological impacts of these methods. This study provides a simple tool for identifying sampling strategies that minimise those impacts. PMID:25760868

Canessa, Stefano; Heard, Geoffrey W.; Robertson, Peter; Sluiter, Ian R. K.

2015-01-01

212

Caregiving in the Philippines: a quantitative survey on adult-child caregivers' perceptions of burden, stressors, and social support.  

PubMed

This study aims to describe the present caregiving situation of Filipino adult-child caregivers (CGs) particularly aiming to identify the predictors of CG burden and to assess the effect of social support on stressors and perception of burden. A cross-sectional survey employing face-to-face interviews with 193 adult-child CGs in Davao City, Philippines, measured the perception of burden using the Cost of Care Index (CCI) by Kosberg and Cairl. Results indicated the majority were daughter CGs living with their elderly parents, who were receiving high levels of informal social support. A moderate to high level of burden perception (mean+/-S.D. score of 47.0+/-9.1) was found among respondents. CGs with higher educational attainment showed low burden perception. However, higher family income and higher State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) anxiety scores were associated with higher burden perception. Also, longer caregiving hours, a male care recipient (CR), and the presence of CR's memory and behavior problems predicted higher CG burden. The interaction between stressors and perceived burden showed that social support provided a buffering effect for CGs experiencing higher burden perception. This suggests that respite and support resources including community-based counseling and education programs to assist CGs in dealing with stress may positively contribute to reduce burden. PMID:16982103

Varona, Rachel; Saito, Tami; Takahashi, Miyako; Kai, Ichiro

2007-01-01

213

Survey of Editors and Reviewers of High-Impact Psychology Journals: Statistical and Research Design Problems in Submitted Manuscripts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors surveyed 21 editors and reviewers from major psychology journals to identify and describe the statistical and design errors they encounter most often and to get their advice regarding prevention of these problems. Content analysis of the text responses revealed themes in 3 major areas: (a) problems with research design and reporting (e.g., lack of an a priori power

Alex Harris; Rachelle Reeder; Jenny Hyun

2011-01-01

214

Surveying determinants of protein structure designability across different energy models and amino-acid alphabets: A consensus  

E-print Network

Surveying determinants of protein structure designability across different energy models and amino energetic measures of protein folding, such as the foldability F and energy gap 10 . However, many propose a novel measure Zd k which is shown to be well correlated to designability. Finally, we

Goldstein, Richard

215

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01

216

The Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS): Survey design and deep K-band number counts  

E-print Network

We present the results of a new, ultra-deep, near-infrared imaging survey executed with the Hawk-I imager at the ESO VLT, of which we make all the data public. This survey, named HUGS (Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey), provides deep, high-quality imaging in the K and Y bands over the CANDELS UDS and GOODS-South fields. We describe here the survey strategy, the data reduction process, and the data quality. HUGS delivers the deepest and highest quality K-band images ever collected over areas of cosmological interest, and ideally complements the CANDELS data set in terms of image quality and depth. The seeing is exceptional and homogeneous, confined to the range 0.38"-0.43". In the deepest region of the GOODS-S field, (which includes most of the HUDF) the K-band exposure time exceeds 80 hours of integration, yielding a 1-sigma magnitude limit of ~28.0 mag/sqarcsec. In the UDS field the survey matches the shallower depth of the CANDELS images reaching a 1-sigma limit per sq.arcsec of ~27.3mag in the K band and ~28.3m...

Fontana, A; Paris, D; Targett, T A; Boutsia, K; Castellano, M; Galametz, A; Grazian, A; McLure, R; Merlin, E; Pentericci, L; Wuyts, S; Almaini, O; Caputi, K; Chary, R R; Cirasuolo, M; Conselice, C J; Cooray, A; Daddi, E; Dickinson, M; Faber, S M; Fazio, G; Ferguson, H C; Giallongo, E; Giavalisco, M; Grogin, N A; Hathi, N; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lucas, R A; Nonino, M; Rix, H W; Renzini, A; Rosario, D; Santini, P; Scarlata, C; Sommariva, V; Stark, D P; van der Wel, A; Vanzella, E; Wild, V; Yan, H; Zibetti, S

2014-01-01

217

THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: RATIONALE, DESIGN, AND A CENSUS OF CIRCUMGALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and methods of the COS-Halos survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos of 44 z = 0.15-0.35 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. This survey has yielded 39 spectra of z{sub em} ? 0.5 QSOs with S/N ?10-15 per resolution element. The QSO sightlines pass within 150 physical kpc of the galaxies, which span early and late types over stellar mass log M{sub *}/M{sub ?} = 9.5-11.5. We find that the circumgalactic medium exhibits strong H I, averaging ? 1 Å in Ly? equivalent width out to 150 kpc, with 100% covering fraction for star-forming galaxies and 75% covering for passive galaxies. We find good agreement in column densities between this survey and previous studies over similar range of impact parameter. There is weak evidence for a difference between early- and late-type galaxies in the strength and distribution of H I. Kinematics indicate that the detected material is bound to the host galaxy, such that ?> 90% of the detected column density is confined within ±200 km s{sup –1} of the galaxies. This material generally exists well below the halo virial temperatures at T ?< 10{sup 5} K. We evaluate a number of possible origin scenarios for the detected material, and in the end favor a simple model in which the bulk of the detected H I arises in a bound, cool, low-density photoionized diffuse medium that is generic to all L* galaxies and may harbor a total gaseous mass comparable to galactic stellar masses.

Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Sembach, Kenneth R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Meiring, Joseph D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Davé, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, South African Astronomical Observatories, and African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ford, Amanda Brady [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); O'Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT (United States); Peeples, Molly S. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

2013-11-01

218

Methodology and Accuracy of Estimation of Quantitative Trait Loci Parameters in a Half-Sib Design Using Maximum Likelihood  

PubMed Central

Maximum likelihood methods were developed for estimation of the six parameters relating to a marker-linked quantitative trait locus (QTL) segregating in a half-sib design, namely the QTL additive effect, the QTL dominance effect, the population mean, recombination between the marker and the QTL, the population frequency of the QTL alleles, and the within-family residual variance. The method was tested on simulated stochastic data with various family structures under two genetic models. A method for predicting the expected value of the likelihood was also derived and used to predict the lower bound sampling errors of the parameter estimates and the correlations between them. It was found that standard errors and confidence intervals were smallest for the population mean and variance, intermediate for QTL effects and allele frequency, and highest for recombination rate. Correlations among standard errors of the parameter estimates were generally low except for a strong negative correlation (r = -0.9) between the QTL's dominance effect and the population mean, and medium positive and negative correlations between the QTL's additive effect and, respectively, recombination rate (r = 0.5) and residual variance (r = -0.6). The implications for experimental design and method of analysis on power and accuracy of marker-QTL linkage experiments were discussed. PMID:8647408

Mackinnon, M. J.; Weller, J. I.

1995-01-01

219

Challenges and strategies in the administration of a population based mortality follow-back survey design  

PubMed Central

Population-based mortality follow-back survey designs have been used to collect information concerning end-of-life care from bereaved family members in several countries. In Canada, this design was recently employed to gather population-based information about the end-of-life care experience among adults in Nova Scotia as perceived by the decedent's family. In this article we describe challenges that emerged during the implementation of the study design and discuss resolutions strategies to help overcome them. Challenges encountered included the inability to directly contact potential participants, difficulties ascertaining eligibility, mailing strategy complications and the overall effect of these issues on response rate and subsequent sample size. Although not all challenges were amenable to resolution, strategies implemented proved beneficial to the overall process and resulted in surpassing the targeted sample size. The inability to directly contact potential participants is an increasing reality and limitations associated with this process best acknowledged during study development. Future studies should also consider addressing participant concerns pertaining to their eligibility and use of a more cost effective mailing strategy. PMID:23919380

2013-01-01

220

Design of optical frequency comb for sky survey astronomical spectrograph calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sky survey telescope is an important approach to ground-based observation of external galaxies, and further research on large-scale structure of the universe, galaxy formation and evolution. Sky survey spectrograph (SSS) with low resolution is included in such kind of telescope system. The spectral measurement accuracy of SSS will determine the accuracy and scientific value of mass spectral data. Currently iodine absorption cell or Thorium-Argon lamp is adopted as the calibration source for SSS. However, the spectral lines are sparse, with non-uniform spectral interval and intensity, and even instable over long time. The novel astro-comb cannot be applied to SSS directly because the spectral intervals are still too dense to be used in SSS with relatively lower resolution. In this paper, spectral mode filtering method with acceptable energy reduction and accurate spectral line frequency is studied to improve current astro-comb to properly distributed spectral lines and solve the above critical problem. Aiming at calibration for the measuring of the spectral lines in 3700-5900 Å region, we design an improved astro-comb system based on Erbium-doped fiber laser and Fabry-Perot filter series. Feasible systematical parameters are given. It will help develop a novel calibration approach with systematic error reduction to less than 1/10000 of that of the current calibration methods.

Hu, Yao; Wang, Xiang

2013-12-01

221

Survey of ethical issues reported by Indian medical students: basis for design of a new curriculum.  

PubMed

Education in ethics is now a formal part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. However, most courses are structured around principles and case studies more appropriate to western countries. The cultures and practices of countries like India differ from those of western countries. It is, therefore, essential that our teaching should address the issues which are the most relevant to our setting. An anonymised, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey of medical students was carried out to get a picture of the ethical problems faced by students in India. The data were categorised into issues related to professional behaviour and ethical dilemmas. Unprofessional behaviour was among the issues reported as a matter of concern by a majority of the medical students. The survey highlights the need to design the curriculum in a way that reflects the structure of medical education in India, where patients are not always considered socio-culturally equal by students or the medical staff. This perspective must underpin any further efforts to address education in ethics in India. PMID:24509105

Rose, Anuradha; George, Kuryan; T, Arul Dhas; Pulimood, Anna Benjamin

2014-01-01

222

Survey Design for Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting: A Fisher Matrix Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a galaxy contains information on the galaxy's physical properties, and multi-wavelength observations are needed in order to measure these properties via SED fitting. In planning these surveys, optimization of the resources is essential. The Fisher Matrix (FM) formalism can be used to quickly determine the best possible experimental setup to achieve the desired constraints on the SED-fitting parameters. However, because it relies on the assumption of a Gaussian likelihood function, it is in general less accurate than other slower techniques that reconstruct the probability distribution function (PDF) from the direct comparison between models and data. We compare the uncertainties on SED-fitting parameters predicted by the FM to the ones obtained using the more thorough PDF-fitting techniques. We use both simulated spectra and real data, and consider a large variety of target galaxies differing in redshift, mass, age, star formation history, dust content, and wavelength coverage. We find that the uncertainties reported by the two methods agree within a factor of two in the vast majority (~90%) of cases. If the age determination is uncertain, the top-hat prior in age used in PDF fitting to prevent each galaxy from being older than the universe needs to be incorporated in the FM, at least approximately, before the two methods can be properly compared. We conclude that the FM is a useful tool for astronomical survey design.

Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Bickerton, Steven J.; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Lee, Seong-Kook

2012-04-01

223

Developing Design Criteria for Research Facilities (A Report on a Brief Exploratory Study of Approaches to Establishing an Objective, Quantitative Data Base).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study which was concerned with establishing data and a criteria basis for evaluating and designing research and science facilities is overviewed with suggestions for facility design. The surveying method, organization, and results are all included, revealing statistical information for science facility planners. Problems and misconceptions of…

Tennant, Wesley L.

224

Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Survey Design for Monitoring Carbon Capture and Storage Sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term monitoring of sub-seabed Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) sites will require systems that are flexible, independent, and have long-endurance. In this presentation we will discuss the utility of autonomous underwater vehicles equipped with different sensor packages in monitoring storage sites. We will present data collected using Autosub AUV, as part of the ECO2 project, from the Sleipner area of the North Sea. The Autosub AUV was equipped with sidescan sonar, an EM2000 multibeam systems, a Chirp sub-bottom profiler, and a variety of chemical sensors. Our presentation will focus on survey design, and the simultaneous use of multiple sensor packages in environmental monitoring on the continental shelf.

Bull, J. M.; Cevatoglu, M.; Connelly, D.; Wright, I. C.; McPhail, S.; Shitashima, K.

2013-12-01

225

Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.  

PubMed

Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

2010-02-01

226

Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform  

PubMed Central

Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

2010-01-01

227

Optical Design for the 8.4m Large Synoptic Survey Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The proposed 8.4m Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) facility will digitally survey the entire visible sky. It will explore the nature of dark matter and dark energy, open the faint optical transient time window and catalog earth-crossing asteroids >300m in diameter. This concept was strongly endorsed by the three National Academy of Sciences reports: "Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos", "Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium" and "New Frontiers in the Solar System". In response to these endorsements we present the design of a modified 8.4m Paul-Baker or Laux(1) telescope that expands the etendue ("A - Omega") product to >300m2}deg{2, a factor of >50 beyond any existing facility. This evolved telescope design has increased etendue to meet the demanding science requirements for the LSST and simplifications in the optical prescription to enhance manufacturability. The optical design delivers a 3.5-degree diameter field of view (9.62 deg2) with superb <0.2 arcsec FWHM images over 5 spectral bands covering 400-1000 nm. The flat focal surface has a plate scale of 51 microns/arcsec (f/1.25), chosen to match the 10 microns pixel size of a large 0.65m diameter mosaic digital detector. The f/1.14 primary can be made using polishing techniques and metrology methods pioneered at the University of Arizona Mirror Lab for the 8.4m f/1.1 Large Binocular Telescope primaries. The 3.4 m convex secondary is twice the size of the largest convex secondary yet manufactured; the 1.7 m MMT f/5 secondary. We show a fabrication and testing plan for this optic. The corrective camera optics are significantly simplified from earlier designs in that all refractive elements have spherical surfaces. In addition the 3 mirror telescope system delivers, without the camera corrector optics, a spherical wavefront on axis that greatly helps in initial assembly and alignment. 1. R. N. Wilson, ``Reflecting Optical Telescopes I", Springer A&A Library, 2000, Chapter 3.6.5.

Seppala, L. G.; Liang, M.; Claver, C. F.; Burge, J.; Cook, K.; Daggert, L.; Ellis, S.; Kahn, S. M.; Krabbendam, V.; Sweeney, D.; Stubbs, C.; Wittman, D.; Tyson, J. A.

2004-12-01

228

High-Resolution Linkage and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping Aided by Genome Survey Sequencing: Building Up An Integrative Genomic Framework for a Bivalve Mollusc  

PubMed Central

Genetic linkage maps are indispensable tools in genetic and genomic studies. Recent development of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods holds great promise for constructing high-resolution linkage maps in organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present study, linkage mapping was conducted for a bivalve mollusc (Chlamys farreri) using a newly developed GBS method—2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD). Genome survey sequencing was performed to generate a preliminary reference genome that was utilized to facilitate linkage and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in C. farreri. A high-resolution linkage map was constructed with a marker density (3806) that has, to our knowledge, never been achieved in any other molluscs. The linkage map covered nearly the whole genome (99.5%) with a resolution of 0.41 cM. QTL mapping and association analysis congruously revealed two growth-related QTLs and one potential sex-determination region. An important candidate QTL gene named PROP1, which functions in the regulation of growth hormone production in vertebrates, was identified from the growth-related QTL region detected on the linkage group LG3. We demonstrate that this linkage map can serve as an important platform for improving genome assembly and unifying multiple genomic resources. Our study, therefore, exemplifies how to build up an integrative genomic framework in a non-model organism. PMID:24107803

Jiao, Wenqian; Fu, Xiaoteng; Dou, Jinzhuang; Li, Hengde; Su, Hailin; Mao, Junxia; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaoli; Huang, Xiaoting; Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

2014-01-01

229

Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01

230

Validation in Internet Survey Research: Reviews and Future Suggestions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, Internet surveys have been widely used by researchers and companies as a means of data collection. However, few IS studies have discussed the validation of Internet survey research. From the perspective of the positivist and quantitative research, studies that fail to organize a scientific and rigorous research design will harm their finding's validity, reliability and generalizability. In

Hui-chih Wang; Her-sen Doong

2007-01-01

231

Designing a Student Assessment Study: The CIRP Surveys and the Input-Environment-Outcome Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes how the Input-Environment-Outcome (IEO) model of A. Astin can be used with the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman Survey and the College Student Survey (CSS) to assess student change during college. The CIRP Freshman Survey, given to entering students, provides pretest data. The CSS, given to continuing…

Higher Education Research Inst., Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

232

Designing Shots for the 2010 Seismic Refraction and Reflection Survey in the Salton Trough, Southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NSF and the USGS have funded a large seismic refraction and reflection survey of the Salton Trough in southern California. The goals of the project are to study earthquake hazards on the San Andreas and Imperial Faults as well as rifting processes in the northernmost Gulf of California extensional province. Seismic velocity models and reflection images of the basins, whole crust, and upper mantle will constrain the structure and petrology of the rift valley, adjacent ranges and bounding faults. Fault and sedimentary basin geometry and 3-D seismic velocity will aid in the construction of seismic hazard models in an area considered at high risk. The obliquely rifted continent appears to be producing new lithosphere in the central trough by magmatic underplating and sedimentation. Interactions between extension, magmatism, sedimentation, and faulting will be constrained by the seismic images. Fieldwork is tentatively scheduled to take place in January 2010. To prepare for the upcoming fieldwork, shot design was investigated based on data from a 1979 USGS seismic survey, when 41 shots of varying sizes were detonated at 9 locations throughout the Imperial Valley. Picking errors in the first arrival travel times were correlated with source-receiver offset, shot size, and shot- hole geology. As expected, shots in the irrigated valley farmland in lake sediments produced much better shot coupling than those located in unsorted desert stream wash. This is likely due to better packing of the lake sediments and/or drilling through a shallower water table. The goals of the 2010 survey include two 250- km whole-crust refraction profiles. This would require shot sizes of 1000-1500 kg to record the entire length of these lines. Several shorter upper-crust refraction lines would require ~500-kg shots to record to distances greater than 50 km. Dense refraction and low-fold reflection shots spaced at 2-4 km in the valley floor need 100-200 kg to image both whole-crust low-fold reflectivity and refraction to distances greater than 20 km.

Feng, H. S.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.

2008-12-01

233

Optimal design of a lagrangian observing system for hydrodynamic surveys in coastal areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimization of ocean observing systems is a pressing need for scientific research. In particular, the improvement of ocean short-term observing networks is achievable by reducing the cost-benefit ratio of the field campaigns and by increasing the quality of measurements. Numerical modeling is a powerful tool for determining the appropriateness of a specific observing system and for optimizing the sampling design. This is particularly true when observations are carried out in coastal areas and lagoons where, the use satellites is prohibitive due to the water shallowness. For such areas, numerical models are the most efficient tool both to provide a preliminary assess of the local physical environment and to make short -term predictions above its change. In this context, a test case experiment was carried out within an enclosed shallow water areas, the Cabras Lagoon (Sardinia, Italy). The aim of the experiment was to explore the optimal design for a field survey based on the use of coastal lagrangian buoys. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model based on the finite element method (SHYFEM3D, Umgiesser et al., 2004) was implemented to simulate the lagoon water circulation. The model domain extent to the whole Cabras lagoon and to the whole Oristano Gulf, including the surrounding coastal area. Lateral open boundary conditions were provided by the operational ocean model system WMED and only wind forcing, provided by SKIRON atmospheric model (Kallos et al., 1997), was considered as surface boundary conditions. The model was applied to provide a number of ad hoc scenarios and to explore the efficiency of the short-term hydrodynamic survey. A first field campaign was carried out to investigate the lagrangian circulation inside the lagoon under the main wind forcing condition (Mistral wind from North-West). The trajectories followed by the lagrangian buoys and the estimated lagrangian velocities were used to calibrate the model parameters and to validate the simulation results. A set of calibration runs were performed and the model accuracy in reproducing the surface circulation were defined. Therefore, a numerical simulation was conducted to predict the wind induced lagoon water circulation and the paths followed by numerical particles inside the lagoon domain. The simulated particles paths was analyzed and the optimal configuration for the buoys deployment was designed in real-time. The selected deployment geometry was then tested during a further field campaign. The obtained dataset revealed that the chosen measurement strategy provided a near-synoptic survey with the longest records for the considered specific observing experiment. This work is aimed to emphasize the mutual usefulness of observations and numerical simulations in coastal ocean applications and it proposes an efficient approach to harmonize different expertise toward the investigation of a given specific research issue. A Cucco, M Sinerchia, A Ribotti, A Olita, L Fazioli, A Perilli, B Sorgente, M Borghini, K Schroeder, R Sorgente. 2012. A high-resolution real-time forecasting system for predicting the fate of oil spills in the Strait of Bonifacio (western Mediterranean Sea). Marine Pollution Bulletin. 64. 6, 1186-1200. Kallos, G., Nickovic, S., Papadopoulos, A., Jovic, D., Kakaliagou, O., Misirlis, N., Boukas, L., Mimikou, N., G., S., J., P., Anadranistakis, E., and Manousakis, M.. 1997. The regional weather forecasting system Skiron: An overview, in: Proceedings of the Symposium on Regional Weather Prediction on Parallel Computer Environments, 109-122, Athens, Greece. Umgiesser, G., Melaku Canu, D., Cucco, A., Solidoro, C., 2004. A finite element model for the Venice Lagoon. Development, set up, calibration and validation. Journal of Marine Systems 51, 123-145.

Cucco, Andrea; Quattrocchi, Giovanni; Antognarelli, Fabio; Satta, Andrea; Maicu, Francesco; Ferrarin, Christian; Umgiesser, Georg

2014-05-01

234

Quantitative Assessment of a Senge Learning Organization Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To quantitatively assess a Senge learning organization (LO) intervention to determine if it would result in improved employee satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach: A Senge LO intervention in Division 123 of Company ABC was undertaken in 2000. Three employee surveys using likert-scale questions over five years and correlation analysis…

Kiedrowski, P. Jay

2006-01-01

235

Design of the IL-HUMASS survey on information literacy in higher education: A self-assessment approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The IL-HUMASS survey on information literacy has been designed, based on and aimed to be applied to a population of students, teachers and librarians holding various degrees in social sciences and humanities at Spanish and Portuguese universities. The case-study method, experts’ opinions, and a literature review were used to prepare an initial version that was refined through student focus groups,

Maria Pinto

2010-01-01

236

Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power and Propulsion Systems  

E-print Network

of meeting the demands of future high-power electric propulsion missions, especially missions utilizing. Next, to evaluate the utility of Hall thrusters operating at high propellant mass flow rate1 Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power

237

Design of Gravity Survey Network using Fractal Theory to Delineate Hydrocarbon bearing Jabera Structure, Vindhyan Basin, Central India  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gravity survey network was designed using fractal dimension analysis to delineate a domal structure (Jabera dome) reported in southeastern part of the Vindhyan basin, Central India. This area is also regarded as a `high risk-high reward' frontier area for hydrocarbon exploration in previous studies, hence our aim was to delineate shape and lateral extent of the reported domal structure.

V. P. Dimri; R. P. Srivastava; N. Vedanti

2006-01-01

238

CONDITION ASSESSMENT FOR THE ESCAMBIA RIVER, FL, WATERSHED: BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE SURVEYS USING A PROBABILISTIC SAMPLING DESIGN (POSTER SESSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Probabilistic sampling has been used to assess the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and the use of this survey design approach was examined for a northwest Florida watershed. Twenty-eight lotic sites within the Escambia River, Florida, watershed were randomly selected and visit...

239

Final Design of the CARMENES M-Dwarf Radial-Velocity Survey Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation instrument being built for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. CARMENES will conduct a five-year exoplanet survey targeting ~300 M dwarfs. The CARMENES instrument consists of two separate échelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7 ?m at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. For late-M spectral types, the wavelength range around 1.0 ?m (Y band) is the most important wavelength region for radial velocity work. Therefore, the efficiency of CARMENES will be optimized in this range. Since CCDs do not provide high enough efficiency around 1.0 ?m and no signal at all beyond the Si cutoff at 1.1 ?m, a near-IR detector is required. It is thus natural to adopt an instrument concept with two spectrographs, one equipped with a CCD for the range 0.55-1.05 ?m, and one with HgCdTe detectors for the range from 0.9-1.7 ?m. Each spectrograph will be coupled to the 3.5m telescope with its own optical fiber. The front end will contain a dichroic beam splitter and an atmospheric dispersion corrector, to feed the light into the fibers leading to the spectrographs. Guiding is performed with a separate camera. Additional fibers are available for simultaneous injection of light from emission line lamps for RV calibration. The spectrographs are mounted on benches inside vacuum tanks located in the coudé laboratory of the 3.5m dome. Each vacuum tank is equipped with a temperature stabilization system capable of keeping the temperature constant to within ±0.01K over 24h. The visible-light spectrograph will be operated near room temperature, the NIR spectrograph will be cooled to 140K. The CARMENES instrument passed its preliminary design review in July 2011; the final design is just being completed. Commissioning of the instrument is planned for the first half of 2014. At least 600 useable nights have been allocated at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope for the CARMENES survey in the time frame from 2014 to 2018.

Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, P.; Seifert, W.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Mandel, H.; Caballero, J. A.; Mundt, R.; Galadí, D.; Consortium, CARMENES

2013-01-01

240

A two-phase sampling design for increasing detections of rare species in occupancy surveys  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. Occupancy estimation is a commonly used tool in ecological studies owing to the ease at which data can be collected and the large spatial extent that can be covered. One major obstacle to using an occupancy-based approach is the complications associated with designing and implementing an efficient survey. These logistical challenges become magnified when working with rare species when effort can be wasted in areas with none or very few individuals. 2. Here, we develop a two-phase sampling approach that mitigates these problems by using a design that places more effort in areas with higher predicted probability of occurrence. We compare our new sampling design to traditional single-season occupancy estimation under a range of conditions and population characteristics. We develop an intuitive measure of predictive error to compare the two approaches and use simulations to assess the relative accuracy of each approach. 3. Our two-phase approach exhibited lower predictive error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach in highly spatially correlated environments. The difference was greatest when detection probability was high (0·75) regardless of the habitat or sample size. When the true occupancy rate was below 0·4 (0·05-0·4), we found that allocating 25% of the sample to the first phase resulted in the lowest error rates. 4. In the majority of scenarios, the two-phase approach showed lower error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach suggesting our new approach is fairly robust to a broad range of conditions and design factors and merits use under a wide variety of settings. 5. Synthesis and applications. Conservation and management of rare species are a challenging task facing natural resource managers. It is critical for studies involving rare species to efficiently allocate effort and resources as they are usually of a finite nature. We believe our approach provides a framework for optimal allocation of effort while maximizing the information content of the data in an attempt to provide the highest conservation value per unit of effort.

Pacifici, Krishna; Dorazio, Robert M.; Dorazio, Michael J.

2012-01-01

241

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-print Network

ELECTRIC VEHICLES How many hybrid households are in the California new carElectric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis - A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis— A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-car-

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01

242

The Sample Design of the 2002 Cyprus Survey of Consumer Finances  

E-print Network

. Arthur Kennickell of the Division of Research and Statistics of the Federal Reserve Board, USA for his in 1946 in the USA under the sponsorship of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. In 1962, the Survey-up interview collected information on changes in consumer finances. The current series of surveys in the USA

Karagrigoriou, Alex

243

Quantitative radiography  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernable by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudocolor images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. Images are captured using DuPont NDT55 industrial x-ray film in Daypack{trademark} packages. X-ray cabinets are of custom design, with helium flight path and a filter wheel for positioning filters if desired. The cabinets contain baffles to reduce scattered radiation and are equipped with drawer for rapid load/unload of parts. Separate units with tungsten-anode or copper-anode tubes are available. The usual operating voltage is 15 to 35 kVp. Fixturing provides for rough part positioning and precise alignment with respect to the x-ray source. Areal density standards are placed at several locations on each film. In interpreting the image, we use the standards nearest the image of the part being quantified. Because of this, small variations in x-ray flux uniformity (heel effects) are unimportant. The usual standard is a step wedge of aluminum containing 13 steps. Films are permanently labeled by imaging a perforated metal numbering strip. Data such as part number, step wedge identification, etc. are read from barcode labels and transferred to a data base for later retrieval and use in quantifying the image.

Logan, C.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Devine, G.J.

1991-02-01

244

Quantitative Compliant Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

An architecture-independent analysis approach is described for evaluation of control systems designed to provide compliant manipulator\\/task interaction. Two issues are highlighted: a safety bound that provides an explicit, quantitative design objective, and an examination of typical task dynamics and their impact on the difficulty (complexity) of control design. Two examples of control design within this framework are presented, demonstrating the

Dale A. Lawrence; Jim D. Chapel

1993-01-01

245

[New design of the Health Survey of Catalonia (Spain, 2010-2014): a step forward in health planning and evaluation].  

PubMed

This article presents the genesis of the Health Survey of Catalonia (Spain, 2010-2014) with its semiannual subsamples and explains the basic characteristics of its multistage sampling design. In comparison with previous surveys, the organizational advantages of this new statistical operation include rapid data availability and the ability to continuously monitor the population. The main benefits are timeliness in the production of indicators and the possibility of introducing new topics through the supplemental questionnaire as a function of needs. Limitations consist of the complexity of the sample design and the lack of longitudinal follow-up of the sample. Suitable sampling weights for each specific subsample are necessary for any statistical analysis of micro-data. Accuracy in the analysis of territorial disaggregation or population subgroups increases if annual samples are accumulated. PMID:24472532

Alcañiz-Zanón, Manuela; Mompart-Penina, Anna; Guillén-Estany, Montserrat; Medina-Bustos, Antonia; Aragay-Barbany, Josep M; Brugulat-Guiteras, Pilar; Tresserras-Gaju, Ricard

2014-01-01

246

A Geometric Approach to Trajectory Design for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle: Surveying the Bulbous Bow of a Ship  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a control strategy design technique for an autonomous underwater vehicle based on solutions to the\\u000a motion planning problem derived from differential geometric methods. The motion planning problem is motivated by the practical\\u000a application of surveying the hull of a ship for implications of harbor and port security. In recent years, engineers and researchers\\u000a have been

Ryan N. Smith; Dario Cazzaro; Luca Invernizzi; Giacomo Marani; Song K. Choi; Monique Chyba

247

The Sample Design of the 1999 Cyprus Project on the Survey of Consumer Finances  

E-print Network

of the Division of Research and Statistics of the Federal Reserve Board, USA for his guidance and continuous in the USA with support from the Federal Reserve. The current series of surveys in the USA has been ongoing

Karagrigoriou, Alex

248

Design of a Mars Airplane Propulsion System for the Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mission Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a Mars exploration mission concept that utilizes a rocket propelled airplane to take scientific measurements of atmospheric, surface, and subsurface phenomena. The liquid rocket propulsion system design has matured through several design cycles and trade studies since the inception of the ARES concept in 2002. This paper describes the process of selecting a bipropellant system over other propulsion system options, and provides details on the rocket system design, thrusters, propellant tank and PMD design, propellant isolation, and flow control hardware. The paper also summarizes computer model results of thruster plume interactions and simulated flight performance. The airplane has a 6.25 m wingspan with a total wet mass of 185 kg and has to ability to fly over 600 km through the atmosphere of Mars with 45 kg of MMH / MON3 propellant.

Kuhl, Christopher A.

2008-01-01

249

Mail and Web Surveys: A Comparison of Demographic Characteristics and Response Quality When Respondents Self-Select the Survey Administration Mode  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to use a nonexperimental, quantitative design to compare mail and web surveys with survey mode self-selection at two data collection waves. Research questions examined differences and predictabilities among demographics (gender, ethnicity, age, and professional employment) and response quality (pronoun use, item…

Mackety, Dawn M.

2007-01-01

250

Geological and seismological survey for new design-basis earthquake ground motion of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At about 10:13 on July 16, 2007, a strong earthquake named 'Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake' of Mj6.8 on Japan Meteorological Agencyfs scale occurred offshore Niigata prefecture in Japan. However, all of the nuclear reactors at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station (KKNPS) in Niigata prefecture operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company shut down safely. In other words, automatic safety function composed of shutdown, cooling and containment worked as designed immediately after the earthquake. During the earthquake, the peak acceleration of the ground motion exceeded the design-basis ground motion (DBGM), but the force due to the earthquake applied to safety-significant facilities was about the same as or less than the design basis taken into account as static seismic force. In order to assess anew the safety of nuclear power plants, we have evaluated a new DBGM after conducting geomorphological, geological, geophysical, seismological survey and analyses. [Geomorphological, Geological and Geophysical survey] In the land area, aerial photograph interpretation was performed at least within the 30km radius to extract geographies that could possibly be tectonic reliefs as a geomorphological survey. After that, geological reconnaissance was conducted to confirm whether the extracted landforms are tectonic reliefs or not. Especially we carefully investigated Nagaoka Plain Western Boundary Fault Zone (NPWBFZ), which consists of Kakuda-Yahiko fault, Kihinomiya fault and Katakai fault, because NPWBFZ is the one of the active faults which have potential of Mj8 class in Japan. In addition to the geological survey, seismic reflection prospecting of approximate 120km in total length was completed to evaluate the geological structure of the faults and to assess the consecutiveness of the component faults of NPWBFZ. As a result of geomorphological, geological and geophysical surveys, we evaluated that the three component faults of NPWBFZ are independent to each other from the viewpoint of geological structure, however we have decided to take into consideration simultaneous movement of the three faults which is 91km long in seismic design as a case of uncertainty. In the sea area, we conducted seismic reflection prospecting with sonic wave in the area stretching for about 140km along the coastline and 50km in the direction of perpendicular to the coastline. When we analyze the seismic profiles, we evaluated the activities of faults and foldings carefully on the basis of the way of thinking of 'fault-related-fault' because the sedimentary layers in the offing of Niigata prefecture are very thick and the geological structures are characterized by foldings. As a result of the seismic reflection survey and analyses, we assess that five active faults (foldings) to be taken into consideration to seismic design in the sea area and we evaluated that the F-B fault of 36km will have the largest impact on the KKNPS. [Seismological survey] As a result of analyses of the geological survey, data from NCOE and data from 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake, it became clear that there are factors that intensifies seismic motions in this area. For each of the two selected earthquake sources, namely NPWBFZ and F-B fault, we calculated seismic ground motions on the free surface of the base stratum as the design-basis ground motion (DBGM) Ss, using both empirical and numerical ground motion evaluation method. PGA value of DBGM is 2,300Gal for unit 1 to 4 located in the southern part of the KKNPS and 1,050Gal for unit 5 to 7 in the northern part of the site.

Takao, M.; Mizutani, H.

2009-05-01

251

Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100{degree}C. 52 refs., 9 figs.

Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

1989-09-01

252

German health interview and examination survey for adults (DEGS) - design, objectives and implementation of the first data collection wave  

PubMed Central

Background The German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS) is part of the recently established national health monitoring conducted by the Robert Koch Institute. DEGS combines a nationally representative periodic health survey and a longitudinal study based on follow-up of survey participants. Funding is provided by the German Ministry of Health and supplemented for specific research topics from other sources. Methods/design The first DEGS wave of data collection (DEGS1) extended from November 2008 to December 2011. Overall, 8152 men and women participated. Of these, 3959 persons already participated in the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998 (GNHIES98) at which time they were 18–79?years of age. Another 4193 persons 18–79?years of age were recruited for DEGS1 in 2008–2011 based on two-stage stratified random sampling from local population registries. Health data and context variables were collected using standardized computer assisted personal interviews, self-administered questionnaires, and standardized measurements and tests. In order to keep survey results representative for the population aged 18–79?years, results will be weighted by survey-specific weighting factors considering sampling and drop-out probabilities as well as deviations between the design-weighted net sample and German population statistics 2010. Discussion DEGS aims to establish a nationally representative data base on health of adults in Germany. This health data platform will be used for continuous health reporting and health care research. The results will help to support health policy planning and evaluation. Repeated cross-sectional surveys will permit analyses of time trends in morbidity, functional capacity levels, disability, and health risks and resources. Follow-up of study participants will provide the opportunity to study trajectories of health and disability. A special focus lies on chronic diseases including asthma, allergies, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes mellitus, and musculoskeletal diseases. Other core topics include vaccine-preventable diseases and immunization status, nutritional deficiencies, health in older age, and the association between health-related behavior and mental health. PMID:22938722

2012-01-01

253

Design and Specification of Optical Bandpass Filters for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced optical bandpass filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) have been developed on a filter-by-filter basis through detailed studies which take into account the instrument's science goals, available optical filter fabrication technology, and developments in ACS's charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector technology. These filters include a subset of filters for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are optimized for astronomical photometry using today's charge-coupled-devices (CCD's). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements for these filters include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, a high degree of parfocality, and immunity to environmental degradation. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The highly successful paradigm in which final specifications for flight filters were derived through interaction amongst the ACS Science Team, the instrument designer, the lead optical engineer, and the filter designer and vendor is described. Examples of iterative design trade studies carried out in the context of science needs and budgetary and schedule constraints are presented. An overview of the final design specifications for the ACS bandpass and ramp filters is also presented.

Leviton, Douglas B.; Tsevetanov, Zlatan; Woodruff, Bob; Mooney, Thomas A.

1998-01-01

254

Site study plan for EDBH (Engineering Design Boreholes) seismic surveys, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes seismic reflection surveys to run north-south and east-west across the Deaf Smith County site, and intersecting near the Engineering Design Boreholes (EDBH). Both conventional and shallow high-resolution surveys will be run. The field program has been designed to acquire subsurface geologic and stratigraphic data to address information/data needs resulting from Federal and State regulations and Repository program requirements. The data acquired by the conventional surveys will be common-depth- point, seismic reflection data optimized for reflection events that indicate geologic structure near the repository horizon. The data will also resolve the basement structure and shallow reflection events up to about the top of the evaporite sequence. Field acquisition includes a testing phase to check/select parameters and a production phase. The field data will be subjected immediately to conventional data processing and interpretation to determine if there are any anamolous structural for stratigraphic conditions that could affect the choice of the EDBH sites. After the EDBH's have been drilled and logged, including vertical seismic profiling, the data will be reprocessed and reinterpreted for detailed structural and stratigraphic information to guide shaft development. The shallow high-resulition seismic reflection lines will be run along the same alignments, but the lines will be shorter and limited to immediate vicinity of the EDBH sites. These lines are planned to detect faults or thick channel sands that may be present at the EDBH sites. 23 refs. , 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Hume, H.

1987-12-01

255

Is the Linear Modeling Technique Good Enough for Optimal Form Design? A Comparison of Quantitative Analysis Models  

PubMed Central

How to design highly reputable and hot-selling products is an essential issue in product design. Whether consumers choose a product depends largely on their perception of the product image. A consumer-oriented design approach presented in this paper helps product designers incorporate consumers' perceptions of product forms in the design process. The consumer-oriented design approach uses quantification theory type I, grey prediction (the linear modeling technique), and neural networks (the nonlinear modeling technique) to determine the optimal form combination of product design for matching a given product image. An experimental study based on the concept of Kansei Engineering is conducted to collect numerical data for examining the relationship between consumers' perception of product image and product form elements of personal digital assistants (PDAs). The result of performance comparison shows that the QTTI model is good enough to help product designers determine the optimal form combination of product design. Although the PDA form design is used as a case study, the approach is applicable to other consumer products with various design elements and product images. The approach provides an effective mechanism for facilitating the consumer-oriented product design process. PMID:23258961

Lin, Yang-Cheng; Yeh, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Chen-Cheng; Wei, Chun-Chun

2012-01-01

256

Using SEM to Analyze Complex Survey Data: A Comparison between Design-Based Single-Level and Model-Based Multilevel Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both ad-hoc robust sandwich standard error estimators (design-based approach) and multilevel analysis (model-based approach) are commonly used for analyzing complex survey data with nonindependent observations. Although these 2 approaches perform equally well on analyzing complex survey data with equal between- and within-level model structures…

Wu, Jiun-Yu; Kwok, Oi-man

2012-01-01

257

Design of a detection survey for Ostreid herpesvirus-1 using hydrodynamic dispersion models to determine epidemiological units.  

PubMed

Using Ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) as a case study, this paper considers a survey design methodology for an aquatic animal pathogen that incorporates the concept of biologically independent epidemiological units. Hydrodynamically-modelled epidemiological units are used to divide marine areas into sensible sampling units for detection surveys of waterborne diseases. In the aquatic environment it is difficult to manage disease at the animal level, hence management practices are often aimed at a group of animals sharing a similar risk. Using epidemiological units is a way to define these groups, based on a similar level of probability of exposure based on the modelled potential spread of a viral particle via coastal currents, that can help inform management decisions. PMID:25746929

Pande, Anjali; Acosta, Hernando; Brangenberg, Naya Alexis; Keeling, Suzanne Elizabeth

2015-04-01

258

A design of strategic alliance based on value chain of surveying and mapping enterprises in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we use value chain and strategic alliance theories to analyzing the surveying and mapping Industry and enterprises. The value chain of surveying and mapping enterprises is highly-contacted but split by administrative interference, the enterprises are common small scale. According to the above things, we consider that establishing a nonequity- Holding strategic alliance based on value chain is an available way, it can not only let the enterprises share the superior resources in different sectors of the whole value chain each other but avoid offending the interests of related administrative departments, by this way, the surveying and mapping enterprises gain development respectively and totally. Then, we give the method to building up the strategic alliance model through parting the value chain and the using advantage of companies in different value chain sectors. Finally, we analyze the internal rule of strategic alliance and prove it is a suitable way to realize the development of surveying and mapping enterprises through game theory.

Duan, Hong; Huang, Xianfeng

2007-06-01

259

Social Science & Medicine 65 (2007) 10781081 Disease prevalence and survey design effects: A response to  

E-print Network

trend in the National Health Examination Surveys (NHANES). But given the analysis summarized here, we in the United States is probable, but the trend is likely overstated in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We show that a mistake in our earlier method does not change substantively our previous conclusion

Martinez, Tony R.

2007-01-01

260

Image resolution analysis: a new, robust approach to seismic survey design  

E-print Network

?guration, parameters such as the structure and seismic velocity also in?uence image resolution. Understanding their e?ect on image quality, allows us to better interpret the resolution results for the surveys under examination. A salt model was used to simulate...

Tzimeas, Constantinos

2005-08-29

261

The TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS): Design, Current Status, and Selected Findings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The objectives of this study were as follows: to present a concise overview of the sample, outcomes, determinants, non-response and attrition of the ongoing TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), which started in 2001; to summarize a selection of recent findings on continuity, discontinuity, risk, and protective…

Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Sijtsema, Jelle; van Oort, Floor; Raven, Dennis; Veenstra, Rene; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Verhulst, Frank C.

2012-01-01

262

Designing and Mining Multi-Terabyte Astronomy Archives: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The next -generation astronomy digital archives will cover most of the sky at fine resolution in many wavelengths, from X-rays, through ultraviolet, optical, and infrared. The ar- chives will be stored at diverse geographical locations. One of the first of the se projects, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is creating a 5 -wavelength catalog over 10,000 square degrees of

Alexander S. Szalay; Peter Z. Kunszt; Ani Thakar; Jim Gray; Donald R. Slutz; Robert J. Brunner

2000-01-01

263

A Survey of Web Log Data and their Application in Use-based Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Web-based logs contain potentially useful data with which designers can assess the usability and effectiveness of their choices. Most guides to World Wide Web (Web) design derived from artistic or usability principles feature no empirical validation, while empirical studies of Web use typically rely on observer ratings. Several sources of unobtrusive usage data are available to Web designers, including Web

Mary C. Burton; Joseph B. Walther

2001-01-01

264

Performance of small cluster surveys and the clustered LQAS design to estimate local-level vaccination coverage in Mali  

PubMed Central

Background Estimation of vaccination coverage at the local level is essential to identify communities that may require additional support. Cluster surveys can be used in resource-poor settings, when population figures are inaccurate. To be feasible, cluster samples need to be small, without losing robustness of results. The clustered LQAS (CLQAS) approach has been proposed as an alternative, as smaller sample sizes are required. Methods We explored (i) the efficiency of cluster surveys of decreasing sample size through bootstrapping analysis and (ii) the performance of CLQAS under three alternative sampling plans to classify local VC, using data from a survey carried out in Mali after mass vaccination against meningococcal meningitis group A. Results VC estimates provided by a 10 × 15 cluster survey design were reasonably robust. We used them to classify health areas in three categories and guide mop-up activities: i) health areas not requiring supplemental activities; ii) health areas requiring additional vaccination; iii) health areas requiring further evaluation. As sample size decreased (from 10 × 15 to 10 × 3), standard error of VC and ICC estimates were increasingly unstable. Results of CLQAS simulations were not accurate for most health areas, with an overall risk of misclassification greater than 0.25 in one health area out of three. It was greater than 0.50 in one health area out of two under two of the three sampling plans. Conclusions Small sample cluster surveys (10 × 15) are acceptably robust for classification of VC at local level. We do not recommend the CLQAS method as currently formulated for evaluating vaccination programmes. PMID:23057445

2012-01-01

265

Statistics of Local Public School Systems, Fall 1970: Staff. Elementary-Secondary General Information Survey Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is the fourth report in an annual survey series designed to provide reliable data on individual local public school systems for planning, policy, and research purposes. The report contains tables of national estimates and basic data tables providing quantitative staff data on the school systems in the survey. The data are derived…

Hughes, Warren A.

266

Design and prediction of new anticoagulants as a selective Factor IXa inhibitor via three-dimensional quantitative structure-property relationships of amidinobenzothiophene derivatives  

PubMed Central

Factor IXa (FIXa), a blood coagulation factor, is specifically inhibited at the initiation stage of the coagulation cascade, promising an excellent approach for developing selective and safe anticoagulants. Eighty-four amidinobenzothiophene antithrombotic derivatives targeting FIXa were selected to establish three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationship (3D-QSSR) models using comparative molecular field analysis and comparative similarity indices analysis methods. Internal and external cross-validation techniques were investigated as well as region focusing and bootstrapping. The satisfactory q2 values of 0.753 and 0.770, and r2 values of 0.940 and 0.965 for 3D-QSAR and 3D-QSSR, respectively, indicated that the models are available to predict both the inhibitory activity and selectivity on FIXa against Factor Xa, the activated status of Factor X. This work revealed that the steric, hydrophobic, and H-bond factors should appropriately be taken into account in future rational design, especially the modifications at the 2?-position of the benzene and the 6-position of the benzothiophene in the R group, providing helpful clues to design more active and selective FIXa inhibitors for the treatment of thrombosis. On the basis of the three-dimensional quantitative structure–property relationships, 16 new potent molecules have been designed and are predicted to be more active and selective than Compound 33, which has the best activity as reported in the literature. PMID:25848211

Gao, Jia-Suo; Tong, Xu-Peng; Chang, Yi-Qun; He, Yu-Xuan; Mei, Yu-Dan; Tan, Pei-Hong; Guo, Jia-Liang; Liao, Guo-Chao; Xiao, Gao-Keng; Chen, Wei-Min; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Sun, Ping-Hua

2015-01-01

267

A survey of student opinions on ethical design standards in taiwan.  

PubMed

Design ethics has been offered as a course in undergraduate design programs in Taiwan for over a decade, but research on teaching design ethics and the results of teaching these courses is scant. We conducted two tests to examine (1) the effect of an ethics course, and (2) the differences among the effects of design department, gender, and study year on student opinions regarding ethical design standards (EDSs) at the National Yunlin University of Science and Technology (YunTech) in Taiwan. The participants comprised 934 undergraduates (660 women and 274 men) from the five design departments at YunTech's College of Design from Years 1-4. The results confirmed the effect of an ethics course on student EDS opinions. In addition, we observed significant variations among students according to design departments, suggesting that the characteristics of the design departments also affected students' EDS opinions. The results indicated that gender did not significantly affect design students' EDS opinions; however, students in their early years of study produced higher scores than those in their advanced years of study did, based on the six EDS opinions. The implications of these results for teaching design ethics and future research are discussed in this paper. PMID:24744117

Lee, Yingying; You, Manlai; Yang, Ming-Ying

2015-04-01

268

Designing Messaging to Engage Patients in an Online Suicide Prevention Intervention: Survey Results From Patients With Current Suicidal Ideation  

PubMed Central

Background Computerized, Internet-delivered interventions can be efficacious; however, uptake and maintaining sustained client engagement are still big challenges. We see the development of effective engagement strategies as the next frontier in online health interventions, an area where much creative research has begun. We also argue that for engagement strategies to accomplish their purpose with novel targeted populations, they need to be tailored to such populations (ie, content is designed with the target population in mind). User-centered design frameworks provide a theoretical foundation for increasing user engagement and uptake by including users in development. However, deciding how to implement this approach to enage users in mental health intervention development is challenging. Objective The aim of this study was to get user input and feedback on acceptability of messaging content intended to engage suicidal individuals. Methods In March 2013, clinic intake staff distributed flyers announcing the study, “Your Feedback Counts” to potential participants (individuals waiting to be seen for a mental health appointment) together with the Patient Health Questionnaire. The flyer explained that a score of two or three (“more than half the days” or “nearly every day” respectively) on the suicide ideation question made them eligible to provide feedback on components of a suicide prevention intervention under development. The patient could access an anonymous online survey by following a link. After providing consent online, participants completed the anonymous survey. Results Thirty-four individuals provided data on past demographic information. Participants reported that they would be most drawn to an intervention where they knew that they were cared about, that was personalized, that others like them had found it helpful, and that included examples with real people. Participants preferred email invitations with subject lines expressing concern and availability of extra resources. Participants also provided feedback about a media prototype including a brand design and advertisement video for introducing the intervention. Conclusions This paper provides one model (including development of an engagement survey, audience for an engagement survey, methods for presenting results of an engagement survey) for including target users in the development of uptake strategies for online mental health interventions. PMID:24509475

Lungu, Anita; Richards, Julie; Simon, Gregory E; Clingan, Sarah; Siler, Jaeden; Snyder, Lorilei; Ludman, Evette

2014-01-01

269

GRAND DESIGN AND FLOCCULENT SPIRALS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)  

SciTech Connect

Spiral arm properties of 46 galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) were measured at 3.6 {mu}m, where extinction is small and the old stars dominate. The sample includes flocculent, multiple arm, and grand design types with a wide range of Hubble and bar types. We find that most optically flocculent galaxies are also flocculent in the mid-IR because of star formation uncorrelated with stellar density waves, whereas multiple arm and grand design galaxies have underlying stellar waves. Arm-interarm contrasts increase from flocculent to multiple arm to grand design galaxies and with later Hubble types. Structure can be traced further out in the disk than in previous surveys. Some spirals peak at mid-radius while others continuously rise or fall, depending on Hubble and bar type. We find evidence for regular and symmetric modulations of the arm strength in NGC 4321. Bars tend to be long, high amplitude, and flat-profiled in early-type spirals, with arm contrasts that decrease with radius beyond the end of the bar, and they tend to be short, low amplitude, and exponential-profiled in late Hubble types, with arm contrasts that are constant or increase with radius. Longer bars tend to have larger amplitudes and stronger arms.

Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Yau, Andrew [Vassar College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), UMR6110, Universite de Provence/CNRS, Technopole de Marseille Etoile, 38 rue Frederic Joliot Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Buta, Ronald J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Helou, George; Sheth, Kartik [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Department of Physical Sciences/Astronomy Division, University of Oulu, FIN 90014 (Finland); Masters, Karen L. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 2EH (United Kingdom); Meidt, Sharon E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Regan, Michael W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aravena, Manuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2011-08-10

270

A combined pulmonary -radiology workshop for visual evaluation of COPD: study design, chest CT findings and concordance with quantitative evaluation  

PubMed Central

The purposes of this study were: to describe chest CT findings in normal non-smoking controls and cigarette smokers with and without COPD; to compare the prevalence of CT abnormalities with severity of COPD; and to evaluate concordance between visual and quantitative chest CT (QCT) scoring Methods Volumetric inspiratory and expiratory CT scans of 294 subjects, including normal non-smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with GOLD Stage I-IV COPD, were scored at a multi-reader workshop using a standardized worksheet. There were fifty-eight observers (33 pulmonologists, 25 radiologists); each scan was scored by 9–11 observers. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistic. Median score of visual observations was compared with QCT measurements. Results Interobserver agreement was moderate for the presence or absence of emphysema and for the presence of panlobular emphysema; fair for the presence of centrilobular, paraseptal, and bullous emphysema subtypes and for the presence of bronchial wall thickening; and poor for gas trapping, centrilobular nodularity, mosaic attenuation, and bronchial dilation. Agreement was similar for radiologists and pulmonologists. The prevalence on CT readings of most abnormalities (e.g. emphysema, bronchial wall thickening, mosaic attenuation, expiratory gas trapping) increased significantly with greater COPD severity, while the prevalence of centrilobular nodularity decreased. Concordances between visual scoring and quantitative scoring of emphysema, gas trapping and airway wall thickening were 75%, 87% and 65%, respectively. Conclusions Despite substantial inter-observer variation, visual assessment of chest CT scans in cigarette smokers provides information regarding lung disease severity; visual scoring may be complementary to quantitative evaluation. PMID:22429093

Lynch, David A; Murphy, James R; Crapo, James D; Criner, Gerard J; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Jacobson, Francine L; Lipson, David A; Mamary, A James; Newell, John D; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; van Beek, Edwin JR

2013-01-01

271

A Quantitative Research Investigation into High School Design and Art Education in a Local High School in Texas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to explore the differences between high school teachers with art and science backgrounds in terms of curriculum and student performance in art and design education, federal educational policy, and financial support. The study took place in a local independent school district in Texarkana, Texas. The independent school…

Lin, Yi-Hsien

2013-01-01

272

Predictors of intentions to quit smoking in Aboriginal tobacco smokers of reproductive age in regional New South Wales (NSW), Australia: quantitative and qualitative findings of a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives To assess the predictors of intentions to quit smoking in a community sample of Aboriginal smokers of reproductive age, in whom smoking prevalence is slow to decline. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional survey involved 121 Aboriginal smokers, aged 18–45?years from January to May 2014, interviewed at community events on the Mid-North Coast NSW. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected on smoking and quitting attitudes, behaviours and home smoking rules. Perceived efficacy for quitting, and perceived threat from smoking, were uniquely assessed with a validated Risk Behaviour Diagnosis (RBD) Scale. Main outcome measures Logistic regression explored the impact of perceived efficacy, perceived threat and consulting previously with a doctor or health professional (HP) on self-reported intentions to quit smoking, controlling for potential confounders, that is, protection responses and fear control responses, home smoking rules, gender and age. Participants’ comments regarding smoking and quitting were investigated via inductive analysis, with the assistance of Aboriginal researchers. Results Two-thirds of smokers intended to quit within 3?months. Perceived efficacy (OR=4.8; 95% CI 1.78 to 12.93) and consulting previously with a doctor/HP about quitting (OR=3.82; 95% CI 1.43 to 10.2) were significant predictors of intentions to quit. ‘Smoking is not doing harm right now’ was inversely associated with quit intentions (OR=0.25; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.8). Among those who reported making a quit attempt, after consulting with a doctor/HP, 40% (22/60) rated the professional support received as low (0–2/10). Qualitative themes were: the negatives of smoking (ie, disgust, regret, dependence and stigma), health effects and awareness, quitting, denial, ‘smoking helps me cope’ and social aspects of smoking. Conclusions Perceived efficacy and consulting with a doctor/HP about quitting may be important predictors of intentions to quit smoking in Aboriginal smokers of reproductive age. Professional support was generally perceived to be low; thus, it could be improved for these Aboriginal smokers. Aboriginal participants expressed strong sentiments about smoking and quitting. PMID:25770232

Gould, Gillian Sandra; Watt, Kerrianne; McEwen, Andy; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Clough, Alan R

2015-01-01

273

A survey of the state-of-the-art of design automation an invited presentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a brief overview to an invited talk presented at the 9th Annual Conference on Design Automation. The work presented is based upon an extensive study of the status of industrial and government design automation systems applied to digital systems, with primary emphasis on digital cards and LSI circuits. A detailed summary of our finds can be found

Melvin A. Breuer

1982-01-01

274

A Survey on Analysis and Design of Model-Based Fuzzy Control Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fuzzy logic control was originally introduced and developed as a model free control design approach. However, it unfortunately suffers from criticism of lacking of systematic stability analysis and controller design though it has a great success in industry applications. In the past ten years or so, prevailing research efforts on fuzzy logic control have been devoted to model-based fuzzy control

Gang Feng

2006-01-01

275

Some New Bases and Needs for Interior Design from Environmental Research. A Preliminary Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research which can form new bases for interior design is being greatly accelerated. Investigations in psychology, anthropology, psychiatry, and biology, as well as interdisciplinary projects, turn up literally hundreds of studies, the results of which will vitally affect interior design. This body of research falls into two parts--(1) human…

Kleeman, Walter, Jr.

276

PROBABILITY SURVEY DESIGN ALTERNATIVES FOR WATERSHED-BASED STREAM AND RIVER MONITORING PROGRAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

National, state, and tribal nation monitoring programs are designed to address multiple objectives. One objective comes from Clean Water Act Section 305(b) and is to provide status and trend estimates of the number (or percent) of stream and river lengths that meet designated u...

277

Survey and analysis of research on supersonic drag-due-to-lift minimization with recommendations for wing design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of research on drag-due-to-lift minimization at supersonic speeds, including a study of the effectiveness of current design and analysis methods was conducted. The results show that a linearized theory analysis with estimated attainable thrust and vortex force effects can predict with reasonable accuracy the lifting efficiency of flat wings. Significantly better wing performance can be achieved through the use of twist and camber. Although linearized theory methods tend to overestimate the amount of twist and camber required for a given application and provide an overly optimistic performance prediction, these deficiencies can be overcome by implementation of recently developed empirical corrections. Numerous examples of the correlation of experiment and theory are presented to demonstrate the applicability and limitations of linearized theory methods with and without empirical corrections. The use of an Euler code for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics of a twisted and cambered wing and its application to design by iteration are discussed.

Carlson, Harry W.; Mann, Michael J.

1992-01-01

278

Quantitative molecular methods in virology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary During the past few years, significant technical effort was made to develop molecular methods for the absolute quantitation of nucleic acids in biological samples. In virology, semi-quantitative and quantitative techniques of different principle, complexity, and reliability were designed, optimized, and applied in basic and clinical researches. The principal data obtained in successful pilot applications in vivo are reported in

M. Clementi; S. Menzo; A. Manzin; P. Bagnarelli

1995-01-01

279

A Survey of Applications and Research in Integrated Design Systems Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The initial part of the study was begun with a combination of literature searches, World Wide Web searches, and contacts with individuals and companies who were known to members of our team to have an interest in topics that seemed to be related to our study. There is a long list of such topics, such as concurrent engineering, design for manufacture, life-cycle engineering, systems engineering, systems integration, systems design, design systems, integrated product and process approaches, enterprise integration, integrated product realization, and similar terms. These all capture, at least in part, the flavor of what we describe here as integrated design systems. An inhibiting factor in this inquiry was the absence of agreed terminology for the study of integrated design systems. It is common for the term to be applied to what are essentially augmented Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems, which are integrated only to the extent that agreements have been reached to attach proprietary extensions to proprietary CAD programs. It is also common for some to use the term integrated design systems to mean a system that applies only, or mainly, to the design phase of a product life cycle. It is likewise common for many of the terms listed earlier to be used as synonyms for integrated design systems. We tried to avoid this ambiguity by adopting the definition of integrated design systems that is implied in the introductory notes that we provided to our contacts, cited earlier. We thus arrived at this definition: Integrated Design Systems refers to the integration of the different tools and processes that comprise the engineering, of complex systems. It takes a broad view of the engineering of systems, to include consideration of the entire product realization process and the product life cycle. An important aspect of integrated design systems is the extent to which they integrate existing, "islands of automation" into a comprehensive design and product realization environment. As the study progressed, we relied increasingly upon a networking approach to lead us to new information. The departure point for such searches often was a government-sponsored project or a company initiative. The advantage of this approach was that short conversations with knowledgeable persons would usually cut through confusion over differences of terminology, thereby somewhat reducing the search space of the study. Even so, it was not until late in our eight-month inquiry that we began to see signs of convergence of the search, in the sense that a number of the latest inquiries began to turn up references to earlier contacts. As suggested above, this convergence often occurred with respect to particular government or company projects.

1998-01-01

280

An integrated device for magnetically-driven drug release and in situ quantitative measurements: Design, fabrication and testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a device capable of remote triggering and in situ quantification of therapeutic drugs, based on magnetically-responsive hydrogels of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and alginate (PNiPAAm). The heating efficiency of these hydrogels measured by their specific power absorption (SPA) values showed that the values between 100 and 300 W/g of the material were high enough to reach the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymeric matrix within few minutes. The drug release through application of AC magnetic fields could be controlled by time-modulated field pulses in order to deliver the desired amount of drug. Using B12 vitamin as a concept drug, the device was calibrated to measure amounts of drug released as small as 25(2)×10-9 g, demonstrating the potential of this device for very precise quantitative control of drug release.

Bruvera, I. J.; Hernández, R.; Mijangos, C.; Goya, G. F.

2015-03-01

281

A general framework for robust and efficient association analysis in family-based designs: quantitative and dichotomous phenotypes.  

PubMed

Although transmission disequilibrium tests (TDT) and the FBAT statistic are robust against population substructure, they have reduced statistical power, as compared with fully efficient tests that are not guarded against confounding because of population substructure. This has often limited the application of transmission disequilibrium tests/FBATs to candidate gene analysis, because, in a genome-wide association study, population substructure can be adjusted by approaches such as genomic control and EIGENSTRAT. Here, we provide new statistical methods for the analysis of quantitative and dichotomous phenotypes in extended families. Although the approach utilizes the polygenic model to maximize the efficiency, it still preserves the robustness to non-normality and misspecified covariance structures. In addition, the proposed method performs better than the existing methods for dichotomous phenotype, and the new transmission disequilibrium test for candidate gene analysis is more efficient than FBAT statistics. PMID:23740776

Won, Sungho; Lange, Christoph

2013-11-10

282

Advanced power generation systems for the 21st Century: Market survey and recommendations for a design philosophy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the results of a study designed to enhance the performance of future military generator sets (gen-sets) in the medium power range. The study includes a market survey of the state of the art in several key component areas and recommendations comprising a design philosophy for future military gen-sets. The market survey revealed that the commercial market is in a state of flux, but it is currently or will soon be capable of providing the technologies recommended here in a cost-effective manner. The recommendations, if implemented, should result in future power generation systems that are much more functional than today's gen-sets. The number of differing units necessary (both family sizes and frequency modes) to cover the medium power range would be decreased significantly, while the weight and volume of each unit would decrease, improving the transportability of the power source. Improved fuel economy and overall performance would result from more effective utilization of the prime mover in the generator. The units would allow for more flexibility and control, improved reliability, and more effective power management in the field.

Andriulli, J.B.; Gates, A.E.; Haynes, H.D.; Klett, L.B.; Matthews, S.N.; Nawrocki, E.A.; Otaduy, P.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Theiss, T.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Tolbert, L.M.; Yauss, M.L.; Voltz, C.A.

1999-11-01

283

Design and methods in a survey of living conditions in the Arctic – the SLiCA study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The main objective of this study is to describe the methods and design of the survey of living conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA), relevant participation rates and the distribution of participants, as applicable to the survey data in Alaska, Greenland and Norway. This article briefly addresses possible selection bias in the data and also the ways to tackle it in future studies. Study design Population-based cross-sectional survey. Methods Indigenous individuals aged 16 years and older, living in Greenland, Alaska and in traditional settlement areas in Norway, were invited to participate. Random sampling methods were applied in Alaska and Greenland, while non-probability sampling methods were applied in Norway. Data were collected in 3 periods: in Alaska, from January 2002 to February 2003; in Greenland, from December 2003 to August 2006; and in Norway, in 2003 and from June 2006 to June 2008. The principal method in SLiCA was standardised face-to-face interviews using a questionnaire. Results A total of 663, 1,197 and 445 individuals were interviewed in Alaska, Greenland and Norway, respectively. Very high overall participation rates of 83% were obtained in Greenland and Alaska, while a more conventional rate of 57% was achieved in Norway. A predominance of female respondents was obtained in Alaska. Overall, the Sami cohort is older than the cohorts from Greenland and Alaska. Conclusions Preliminary assessments suggest that selection bias in the Sami sample is plausible but not a major threat. Few or no threats to validity are detected in the data from Alaska and Greenland. Despite different sampling and recruitment methods, and sociocultural differences, a unique database has been generated, which shall be used to explore relationships between health and other living conditions variables. PMID:22456042

Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Melhus, Marita; Kruse, Jack; Poppel, Birger; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

2012-01-01

284

Iteratively constructive sequential design of experiments and surveys with nonlinear parameter-data relationships  

E-print Network

et al., 2000; Stummer et al., 2004; Wilkinson et al., 2006], geological expert elicitation pro- mental design therefore requires an understanding of how the recorded data and postexperimental parameter

285

Integrated siRNA design based on surveying of features associated with high RNAi effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Short interfering RNAs have allowed the development of clean and easily regulated methods for disruption of gene expression. However, while these methods continue to grow in popularity, designing effective siRNA experiments can be challenging. The various existing siRNA design guidelines suffer from two problems: they differ considerably from each other, and they produce high levels of false-positive predictions when

Wuming Gong; Yongliang Ren; Qiqi Xu; Yejun Wang; Dong Lin; Haiyan Zhou; Tongbin Li

2006-01-01

286

Design of the 1986 National Mortality Followback Survey: considerations on collecting data on decedents.  

PubMed

The first National Mortality Followback Survey in 18 years was conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics on a national probability sample of adult deaths in the United States in 1986. Data were collected on (a) socioeconomic differentials in mortality, (b) prevention of premature death by inquiring into the association of risk factors and cause of death, (c) health care services provided in the last year of life, and (d) the reliability of certain items reported on the death certificate. In addition to demographic characteristics of the decedent available from the death certificate and the questionnaire, information was secured on cigarette smoking practices, alcohol use, food consumption patterns, use of hospital, nursing home, and hospice care, sources of payment for care, duration of disability, and assistance with activities of daily living. A rich body of data was collected for analysis. In a large pretest, response was received from 87.3 percent of the next of kin of the decedents. The pretest included several methodologic studies to increase the level and quality of response in the main survey. Response rates were compared for data collection by mail, telephone, and personal interview. A test of certified mail and first class mail was conducted. Response to two forms of different lengths was compared. An experiment was also conducted on the effect of inclusion of boxes for a "don't know" response. A public use data tape is available from the National Center for Health Statistics. PMID:2495553

Seeman, I; Poe, G S; McLaughlin, J K

1989-01-01

287

Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

1997-01-01

288

The Mississippi Delta Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey: Study Design and Methods  

PubMed Central

Assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality in subnational areas is limited. A model for regional CVD surveillance is needed, particularly among vulnerable populations underrepresented in current monitoring systems. The Mississippi Delta Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey (CHES) is a population-based, cross-sectional study on a representative sample of adults living in the 18-county Mississippi Delta region, a rural, impoverished area with high rates of poor health outcomes and marked health disparities. The primary objectives of Delta CHES are to (1) determine the prevalence and distribution of CVD and CVD risk factors using self-reported and directly measured health metrics and (2) to assess environmental perceptions and existing policies that support or deter healthy choices. An address-based sampling frame is used for household enumeration and participant recruitment and an in-home data collection model is used to collect survey data, anthropometric measures, and blood samples from participants. Data from all sources will be merged into one analytic dataset and sample weights developed to ensure data are representative of the Mississippi Delta region adult population. Information gathered will be used to assess the burden of CVD and guide the development, implementation, and evaluation of cardiovascular health promotion and risk factor control strategies.

Short, Vanessa L.; Ivory-Walls, Tameka; Smith, Larry; Loustalot, Fleetwood

2015-01-01

289

A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Technical Report No. 1: Sample Design, Student Survey Yield and Bias.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a study of program management procedures in the campus-based and Basic Educational Opportunity Grant programs reports on the design of the site visit component of the study and the results of the student survey, both in terms of the yield obtained and the quality of the data. Chapter 2 describes the design of sampling methodology employed…

Puma, Michael J.; Ellis, Richard

290

Fitting statistical distributions to sea duck count data: implications for survey design and abundance estimation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Determining appropriate statistical distributions for modeling animal count data is important for accurate estimation of abundance, distribution, and trends. In the case of sea ducks along the U.S. Atlantic coast, managers want to estimate local and regional abundance to detect and track population declines, to define areas of high and low use, and to predict the impact of future habitat change on populations. In this paper, we used a modified marked point process to model survey data that recorded flock sizes of Common eiders, Long-tailed ducks, and Black, Surf, and White-winged scoters. The data come from an experimental aerial survey, conducted by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Division of Migratory Bird Management, during which east-west transects were flown along the Atlantic Coast from Maine to Florida during the winters of 2009–2011. To model the number of flocks per transect (the points), we compared the fit of four statistical distributions (zero-inflated Poisson, zero-inflated geometric, zero-inflated negative binomial and negative binomial) to data on the number of species-specific sea duck flocks that were recorded for each transect flown. To model the flock sizes (the marks), we compared the fit of flock size data for each species to seven statistical distributions: positive Poisson, positive negative binomial, positive geometric, logarithmic, discretized lognormal, zeta and Yule–Simon. Akaike’s Information Criterion and Vuong’s closeness tests indicated that the negative binomial and discretized lognormal were the best distributions for all species for the points and marks, respectively. These findings have important implications for estimating sea duck abundances as the discretized lognormal is a more skewed distribution than the Poisson and negative binomial, which are frequently used to model avian counts; the lognormal is also less heavy-tailed than the power law distributions (e.g., zeta and Yule–Simon), which are becoming increasingly popular for group size modeling. Choosing appropriate statistical distributions for modeling flock size data is fundamental to accurately estimating population summaries, determining required survey effort, and assessing and propagating uncertainty through decision-making processes.

Zipkin, Elise F.; Leirness, Jeffery B.; Kinlan, Brian P.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Silverman, Emily D.

2014-01-01

291

Beyond the Cost of Biologics: Employer Survey Reveals Gap in Understanding Role of Specialty Pharmacy and Benefit Design  

PubMed Central

Background Advances in biotechnology have led to the development of many new medical therapies for a variety of diseases. These agents, known as biologics or specialty drugs, represent the fastest-growing segment of pharmaceuticals. They have often proved effective in cases where conventional medications have failed; however, they can cost up to $350,000 per patient annually. Employers sponsor a significant proportion of plans that provide healthcare benefits, but surveys on benefit coverage have neglected to measure employers’ understanding of these drugs or their use. Objective To establish a baseline understanding of specialty pharmacy drug benefit coverage from the perspective of the employer (ie, commercial benefit plan sponsors). Methods The Midwest Business Group on Health (MBGH), a Chicago-based, nonprofit coalition of more than 100 large employers, in collaboration with the Institute for Integrated Healthcare, conducted a national web-based survey to determine the extent of employer understanding of specialty pharmacy drug management. MBGH, along with 15 business coalitions nationwide, distributed the survey to their employer members. A total of 120 employers, representing more than 1 million employee lives, completed the survey online. The results were then analyzed by MBGH. Results Of the 120 employers surveyed, 25% had “little to no understanding” of biologics, and only 53% claimed a “moderate understanding” of these agents. When asked to rank the effectiveness of biologics-related disease management support for their employees, 45% of the participating employers did not know whether productivity had increased, and 43% did not know whether their employees had experienced increased quality of life as a result of taking these drugs. The majority (76%) of employers continued to rely heavily on print medium to communicate with their covered population. Overall, the vast majority of employers (78%) claimed either “little to no understanding” or a “moderate understanding” of specialty pharmacy. Conclusions That the majority of employers admit they do not understand specialty pharmacy indicates that efforts are needed to fill in this knowledge gap to enable employers to design useful or appropriate drug benefit programs and manage them more effectively to control costs and optimize their employees’ healthcare outcomes. Efforts to educate employers will require continued evaluation to ensure an effective communication between them and their employees while this area of medicine continues to grow. PMID:24991308

Vogenberg, F. Randy; Larson, Cheryl; Rehayem, Margaret; Boress, Larry

2012-01-01

292

Disposable surface plasmon resonance aptasensor with membrane-based sample handling design for quantitative interferon-gamma detection.  

PubMed

ELISA and ELISPOT methods are utilized for interferon-gamma (IFN-?) release assays (IGRAs) to detect the IFN-? secreted by T lymphocytes. However, the multi-step protocols of the assays are still performed with laboratory instruments and operated by well-trained people. Here, we report a membrane-based microfluidic device integrated with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor to realize an easy-to-use and cost effective multi-step quantitative analysis. To conduct the SPR measurements, we utilized a membrane-based SPR sensing device in which a rayon membrane was located 300 ?m under the absorbent pad. The basic equation covering this type of transport is based on Darcy's law. Furthermore, the concentration of streptavidin delivered from a sucrose-treated glass pad placed alongside the rayon membrane was controlled in a narrow range (0.81 ?M ± 6%). Finally, the unbound molecules were removed by a washing buffer that was pre-packed in the reservoir of the chip. Using a bi-functional, hairpin-shaped aptamer as the sensing probe, we specifically detected the IFN-? and amplified the signal by binding the streptavidin. A high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained, in the range from 0.01 to 100 nM. A detection limit of 10 pM was achieved within 30 min. Thus, the SPR assay protocols for IFN-? detection could be performed using this simple device without an additional pumping system. PMID:24931052

Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Chang, Chia-Chen; Chu-Su, Yu; Wei, Shih-Chung; Zhao, Xi-hong; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lin, Chii-Wann

2014-08-21

293

Spectacle Design Preferences among Chinese Primary and Secondary Students and Their Parents: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To identify the specific characteristics making glasses designs, particularly those compatible with adjustable glasses, more or less appealing to Chinese children and their parents. Patients and Methods Primary and secondary school children from urban and rural China with design preference. Recordings were transcribed and coded by two independents reviewers using NVivo software. Results Among 136 urban primary school children (age range 9–11 years), 290 rural secondary school children (11–17 years) and 16 parents, all adjustable-style frames (scores on 0–100 scale 25.7–62.4) were ranked behind all conventional frames (63.0–87.5). For eight FGs including 12 primary children, 26 secondary children and 16 parents, average kappa values for NVivo coding were 0.81 (students) and 0.70 (parents). All groups agreed that the key changes to make adjustable designs more attractive were altering the round lenses to rectangular or oval shapes and adding curved earpieces for more stable wear. The thick frames of the adjustable designs were considered stylish, and children indicated they would wear them if the lens shape were modified. Conclusions Current adjustable lens designs are unattractive to Chinese children and their parents, though this study identified specific modifications which would make them more appealing. PMID:24594799

Zhou, Zhongqiang; Kecman, Maja; Chen, Tingting; Liu, Tianyu; Jin, Ling; Chen, Shangji; Chen, Qianyun; He, Mingguang; Silver, Josh; Moore, Bruce; Congdon, Nathan

2014-01-01

294

Surveying the Commons: Current Implementation of Information Commons Web sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the content of 72 academic library Information Commons (IC) Web sites using content analysis, quantitative assessment and qualitative surveys of site administrators to analyze current implementation by the academic library community. Results show that IC Web sites vary widely in content, design and functionality, with few…

Leeder, Christopher

2009-01-01

295

A survey of systems approaches to green design with illustrations from the computer industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased recognition of the importance of sustainable development is posing new challenges for industry. A systems approach provides a framework for reconciling the needs of sustainable development with all of the other demands on industry. The computer industry has been chosen to illustrate the application of a systems approach to green design in industry on account of both its increasing

Marion A. Hersh

1998-01-01

296

A Survey of Career Guidance Needs of Industrial Design Students in Taiwanese Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School pupils in Taiwan spend most of their time in studying and having examinations, and consequently many of them decide what major to study in universities rather hastily. Industrial design (ID) programs in universities nowadays recruit students from general and vocational senior high schools through a variety of channels. As a consequence, ID…

Yang, Ming-Ying; You, Manlai

2010-01-01

297

DESIGN AND INDICATOR CONSIDERATIONS FOR A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF USA GREAT RIVERS: MISSOURI, MISSISSIPPI, OHIO  

EPA Science Inventory

Great River Ecosystems (GRE) include the river channel and associated backwaters and floodplain habitats. The challenge in designing a GRE monitoring and assessment program is to choose a set of habitats, indicators, and sampling locations that reveal the ecological condition of ...

298

Computer Game Theories for Designing Motivating Educational Software: A Survey Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to evaluate computer game theories for educational software. We propose a framework for designing engaging educational games based on contemporary game studies which includes ludology and narratology. Ludology focuses on the study of computer games as play and game activities, while narratology revolves around the…

Ang, Chee Siang; Rao, G. S. V. Radha Krishna

2008-01-01

299

Research Design and Statistical Methods in Indian Medical Journals: A Retrospective Survey  

PubMed Central

Good quality medical research generally requires not only an expertise in the chosen medical field of interest but also a sound knowledge of statistical methodology. The number of medical research articles which have been published in Indian medical journals has increased quite substantially in the past decade. The aim of this study was to collate all evidence on study design quality and statistical analyses used in selected leading Indian medical journals. Ten (10) leading Indian medical journals were selected based on impact factors and all original research articles published in 2003 (N = 588) and 2013 (N = 774) were categorized and reviewed. A validated checklist on study design, statistical analyses, results presentation, and interpretation was used for review and evaluation of the articles. Main outcomes considered in the present study were – study design types and their frequencies, error/defects proportion in study design, statistical analyses, and implementation of CONSORT checklist in RCT (randomized clinical trials). From 2003 to 2013: The proportion of erroneous statistical analyses did not decrease (?2=0.592, ?=0.027, p=0.4418), 25% (80/320) in 2003 compared to 22.6% (111/490) in 2013. Compared with 2003, significant improvement was seen in 2013; the proportion of papers using statistical tests increased significantly (?2=26.96, ?=0.16, p<0.0001) from 42.5% (250/588) to 56.7 % (439/774). The overall proportion of errors in study design decreased significantly (?2=16.783, ?=0.12 p<0.0001), 41.3% (243/588) compared to 30.6% (237/774). In 2013, randomized clinical trials designs has remained very low (7.3%, 43/588) with majority showing some errors (41 papers, 95.3%). Majority of the published studies were retrospective in nature both in 2003 [79.1% (465/588)] and in 2013 [78.2% (605/774)]. Major decreases in error proportions were observed in both results presentation (?2=24.477, ?=0.17, p<0.0001), 82.2% (263/320) compared to 66.3% (325/490) and interpretation (?2=25.616, ?=0.173, p<0.0001), 32.5% (104/320) compared to 17.1% (84/490), though some serious ones were still present. Indian medical research seems to have made no major progress regarding using correct statistical analyses, but error/defects in study designs have decreased significantly. Randomized clinical trials are quite rarely published and have high proportion of methodological problems. PMID:25856194

Hassan, Shabbeer; Yellur, Rajashree; Subramani, Pooventhan; Adiga, Poornima; Gokhale, Manoj; Iyer, Manasa S.; Mayya, Shreemathi S.

2015-01-01

300

Research design and statistical methods in Indian medical journals: a retrospective survey.  

PubMed

Good quality medical research generally requires not only an expertise in the chosen medical field of interest but also a sound knowledge of statistical methodology. The number of medical research articles which have been published in Indian medical journals has increased quite substantially in the past decade. The aim of this study was to collate all evidence on study design quality and statistical analyses used in selected leading Indian medical journals. Ten (10) leading Indian medical journals were selected based on impact factors and all original research articles published in 2003 (N = 588) and 2013 (N = 774) were categorized and reviewed. A validated checklist on study design, statistical analyses, results presentation, and interpretation was used for review and evaluation of the articles. Main outcomes considered in the present study were - study design types and their frequencies, error/defects proportion in study design, statistical analyses, and implementation of CONSORT checklist in RCT (randomized clinical trials). From 2003 to 2013: The proportion of erroneous statistical analyses did not decrease (?2=0.592, ?=0.027, p=0.4418), 25% (80/320) in 2003 compared to 22.6% (111/490) in 2013. Compared with 2003, significant improvement was seen in 2013; the proportion of papers using statistical tests increased significantly (?2=26.96, ?=0.16, p<0.0001) from 42.5% (250/588) to 56.7 % (439/774). The overall proportion of errors in study design decreased significantly (?2=16.783, ?=0.12 p<0.0001), 41.3% (243/588) compared to 30.6% (237/774). In 2013, randomized clinical trials designs has remained very low (7.3%, 43/588) with majority showing some errors (41 papers, 95.3%). Majority of the published studies were retrospective in nature both in 2003 [79.1% (465/588)] and in 2013 [78.2% (605/774)]. Major decreases in error proportions were observed in both results presentation (?2=24.477, ?=0.17, p<0.0001), 82.2% (263/320) compared to 66.3% (325/490) and interpretation (?2=25.616, ?=0.173, p<0.0001), 32.5% (104/320) compared to 17.1% (84/490), though some serious ones were still present. Indian medical research seems to have made no major progress regarding using correct statistical analyses, but error/defects in study designs have decreased significantly. Randomized clinical trials are quite rarely published and have high proportion of methodological problems. PMID:25856194

Hassan, Shabbeer; Yellur, Rajashree; Subramani, Pooventhan; Adiga, Poornima; Gokhale, Manoj; Iyer, Manasa S; Mayya, Shreemathi S

2015-01-01

301

A simple taste analyzing system design for visual and quantitative analysis of different tastes using multi-array chemical sensors and pattern recognition techniques.  

PubMed

In this paper, we describe design of a simple taste analyzing system using sensory system based on a multi-array chemical sensor (MACS) and personal digital assistant (PDA) for visual and quantitative analysis of different tastes using pattern recognition techniques. The sensory system is communicated with PDA, which has several interesting benefits for data analysis and display, via wireless using the Bluetooth. A various pattern recognition techniques are adapted including spider map, principal component analysis (PCA) and fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm to classify visually data patterns detected by the sensory system. The proposed techniques can be determined the cluster centers and membership grade of patterns through the unsupervised way. The membership grade of an unknown pattern, which does not shown previously, can be visually and analytically determined. Throughout the experimental trails, the taste analyzing system is demonstrated robust performance through data acquisition via wireless communication and visual and quantitative analysis of different tastes for the liquids. The system, which is implemented as a simple hand-held taste analyzing instrument, can be applicable to on-site taste monitoring. PMID:18970806

Kim, Jeong-Do; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Kim, Dong-Jin; Ham, Yu-Kyung; Jung, Woo-Suk; Yoon, Chul-Oh

2006-10-15

302

Quantitative Analysis of Adulterations in Oat Flour by FT-NIR Spectroscopy, Incomplete Unbalanced Randomized Block Design, and Partial Least Squares  

PubMed Central

This paper developed a rapid and nondestructive method for quantitative analysis of a cheaper adulterant (wheat flour) in oat flour by NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics. Reflectance FT-NIR spectra in the range of 4000 to 12000?cm?1 of 300 oat flour objects adulterated with wheat flour were measured. The doping levels of wheat flour ranged from 5% to 50% (w/w). To ensure the generalization performance of the method, both the oat and the wheat flour samples were collected from different producing areas and an incomplete unbalanced randomized block (IURB) design was performed to include the significant variations that may be encountered in future samples. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to develop calibration models for predicting the levels of wheat flour. Different preprocessing methods including smoothing, taking second-order derivative (D2), and standard normal variate (SNV) transformation were investigated to improve the model accuracy of PLS. The root mean squared error of Monte Carlo cross-validation (RMSEMCCV) and root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) were 1.921 and 1.975 (%, w/w) by D2-PLS, respectively. The results indicate that NIR and chemometrics can provide a rapid method for quantitative analysis of wheat flour in oat flour. PMID:25143857

Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xingxiang; Yu, Zhuo; Li, Guodong; Zhou, Bin

2014-01-01

303

Cost-effective control of a quarantine disease: a quantitative exploration using "design of experiments" methodology and bio-economic modeling.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT An integrated approach to control of quarantine diseases at the level of the plant production chain is complicated. The involved actors have different interests and the system is complex. Consequently, control policies may not be cost effective. By means of a bio-economic model for brown rot in the Dutch potato production chain, the efficacy of different control options was quantitatively analyzed. An impact analysis was performed using the methodology of "design of experiments" to quantify the effect of factors in interaction on incidence and costs of brown rot. Factors can be grouped as policy, sector, economic, and exogenous factors. Results show that brown rot incidence and economic consequences are determined predominantly by policy and sector factors and, to a lesser extent, by economic and exogenous factors. Scenario studies were performed to elucidate how the government and sector can optimize the cost-effectiveness of brown rot control. Optimal cost-effectiveness of control requires cooperation of the sector and government, in which case brown rot incidence can be reduced by 75% and the costs of control can be reduced by at least 2 million euros per year. This study demonstrates quantitatively the potential contribution of an integrated approach to cost-effective disease control at chain level. PMID:18943634

Breukers, Annemarie; van der Werf, Wopke; Kleijnen, Jack P C; Mourits, Monique; Lansink, Alfons Oude

2007-08-01

304

Utility FGD survey, July 1982-March 1983. Volume 2. Design and performance data for operational FGD systems  

SciTech Connect

This two-volume report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume contains design and performance data for operational FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 106 systems in operation, 35 systems under construction, and 70 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 41,894 MW.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Pelsor, B.W.

1984-04-01

305

The Anyang Esophageal Cancer Cohort Study: Study Design, Implementation of Fieldwork, and Use of Computer-Aided Survey System  

PubMed Central

Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been observed repeatedly in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues. However, the causal relationship between HPV infection and the onset of ESCC remains unknown. A large cohort study focusing on this topic is being carried out in rural Anyang, China. Methodology/Principal Findings The Anyang Esophageal Cancer Cohort Study (AECCS) is a population-based prospective endoscopic cohort study designed to investigate the association of HPV infection and ESCC. This paper provides information regarding the design and implementation of this study. In particular we describe the recruitment strategies and quality control procedures which have been put into place, and the custom designed computer-aided survey system (CASS) used for this project. This system integrates barcode technology and unique identification numbers, and has been developed to facilitate real-time data management throughout the workflow using a wireless local area network. A total of 8,112 (75.3%) of invited subjects participated in the baseline endoscopic examination; of those invited two years later to take part in the first cycle of follow-up, 91.9% have complied. Conclusions/Significance The AECCS study has high potential for evaluating the causal relationship between HPV infection and the occurrence of ESCC. The experience in setting up the AECCS may be beneficial for others planning to initiate similar epidemiological studies in developing countries. PMID:22328939

Zhou, Yue; He, Zhonghu; Tian, Xiuyun; Guo, Chuanhai; Ning, Tao; Pan, Yaqi; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

2012-01-01

306

A survey on the design of multiprocessing systems for artificial intelligence applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some issues in designing computers for artificial intelligence (AI) processing are discussed. These issues are divided into three levels: the representation level, the control level, and the processor level. The representation level deals with the knowledge and methods used to solve the problem and the means to represent it. The control level is concerned with the detection of dependencies and parallelism in the algorithmic and program representations of the problem, and with the synchronization and sheduling of concurrent tasks. The processor level addresses the hardware and architectural components needed to evaluate the algorithmic and program representations. Solutions for the problems of each level are illustrated by a number of representative systems. Design decisions in existing projects on AI computers are classed into top-down, bottom-up, and middle-out approaches.

Wah, Benjamin W.; Li, Guo Jie

1989-01-01

307

The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS): objectives and design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article describes the objectives and design of a prospective study of the prevalence, incidence and course of psychiatric\\u000a disorders in a representative sample of non-institutionalized Dutch adults. A total of 7146 men and women aged 18–64, contacted\\u000a through a multistage sample of municipalities and households, were interviewed at home in 1996. The primary diagnostic instrument\\u000a was the CIDI, which

R. V. Bijl; G. van Zessen; A. Ravelli; C. de Rijk; Y. Langendoen

1998-01-01

308

Cross-layer design proposals for wireless mobile networks: A survey and taxonomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Third-generation (3G) and beyond 3G mobile communication systems must provide interoperability with the Internet, increase throughput for mobile devices, and optimize their operation for multimedia applications. The limited ability of traditional layered architectures to exploit the unique nature of wireless communication has fostered the introduction of cross-layer design solutions that allow optimized operation for mobile devices in the modern heterogeneous

Fotis Foukalas; Vangelis Gazis; Nancy Alonistioti

2008-01-01

309

Design on Integral Monitoring System for Subway Tunnel Construction Based on GPS and Surveying Robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a At present, the comparative deformation in the inner of the tunnel is attached more importance to during soft-soil tunnel\\u000a construction, so when taking tunnel analysis and design, we think much of comparative deformation in the inner of the tunnel.\\u000a As a matter of fact, inner and outer deformations of the tunnel are a uniform organism, none but considering and analyzing

Chen-guang Jiang; Jian-guo Peng; Bao-guo Qian

2010-01-01

310

The design and construction of an infrared detector for use with a highway traffic survey system  

E-print Network

The Optics Spectral Filtering Spatial Filtering Design Considerations Test Procedures and. Results 20 CONCLUSION APPENDIX I Basic infrared Radiation Laws APPENDIX II Baclqpound Rad. iation APPENDIX III Atmospheric Transmission... the atmosphere before it enters the detectox'. Any environment exceyt a vacuum modifies the original radi- ation by absorbing or scattering it. The radiation must then ysss through an optical system such as a protecting win4ow, a field lens, or s filter...

Mundkowsky, William Fredrick

1961-01-01

311

Design and Calibration of a Flowfield Survey Rake for Inlet Flight Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flowfield rake was designed to quantify the flowfield for inlet research underneath NASA DFRC s F-15B airplane. Detailed loads and stress analysis performed using CFD and empirical methods to assure structural integrity. Calibration data were generated through wind tunnel testing of the rake. Calibration algorithm was developed to determine the local Mach and flow angularity at each probe. RAGE was flown November, 2008. Data is currently being analyzed.

Flynn, Darin C.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.; Frederick, Michael

2009-01-01

312

Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

1997-01-01

313

Design of a Mars Airplane Propulsion System for the Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mission Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a Mars exploration mission concept with the goal of taking scientific measurements of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface of Mars by using an airplane as the payload platform. ARES team first conducted a Phase-A study for a 2007 launch opportunity, which was completed in May 2003. Following this study, significant efforts were undertaken to reduce the risk of the atmospheric flight system, under the NASA Langley Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction Project. The concept was then proposed to the Mars Scout program in 2006 for a 2011 launch opportunity. This paper summarizes the design and development of the ARES airplane propulsion subsystem beginning with the inception of the ARES project in 2002 through the submittal of the Mars Scout proposal in July 2006.

Kuhl. Christopher A.

2009-01-01

314

Survey on effect of surface winds on aircraft design and operation and recommendations for needed wind research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of the effect of environmental surface winds and gusts on aircraft design and operation is presented. A listing of the very large number of problems that are encountered is given. Attention is called to the many studies that have been made on surface winds and gusts, but development in the engineering application of these results to aeronautical problems is pointed out to be still in the embryonic stage. Control of the aircraft is of paramount concern. Mathematical models and their application in simulation studies of airplane operation and control are discussed, and an attempt is made to identify their main gaps or deficiencies. Key reference material is cited. The need for better exchange between the meteorologist and the aeronautical engineer is discussed. Suggestions for improvements in the wind and gust models are made.

Houbolt, J. C.

1973-01-01

315

Design and operation of a deep seismic survey in the Tasman Sea Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deep crustal reflections, appearing at two-way times of 6-20 s, are characterised by a low signal-to-noise ratio and a low-frequency content (~ 5-30 Hz). Optimising the visibility of these reflections requires that: (1) the source energy be concentrated in this band; (2) the receiver be as long as practically possible; (3) the shot spacing be as snail as possible. An airgun array simulation program was used to investigate the effect of operating a 10-gun array at different depths. It predicted that the source energy could be enhanced at low frequencies by running the gun array at depths of up to 25 m, which would improve the signal-to-noise ratio for deep reflectors by a factor of 2 relative to the same array at 7.5 m depth at the expense of some loss of temporal resolution. The receiver length was limited to 4.4 km by the number of cable sections available and the maximum tension allowable in the cable. It was configured as 88 channels of 50 m length. To reduce the shot spacing, minimise the tow noise and reduce tension in the cable, the ship speed was reduced to 4 knots. A cable depth of 20 m was chosen to reduce sea state noise and keep the receiver ghost notch frequency outside the frequency band of interest. A variety of operational problems was encountered. Fish bites holed 50% of the total cable inventory and cable sections were damaged when they sank below their maximum rated depth after being holed. Shot-generated noise was the limiting factor in deep water. Despite these problems, useful data were obtained over the Lord Howe Rise, Dampier Ridge, Gippsland Basin margin and the deep abyssal plain and the survey demonstrated the use of an airgun array tuned for maximum energy.

Kravis, S. P.; Coffin, M. F.; Whitworth, R.

1990-02-01

316

A survey on the design of multiprocessing systems for artificial intelligence applications  

SciTech Connect

Some issues in designing computers for artificial intelligence (A1) processing are discussed. The issues discussed are divided into three levels: the representation level, the control level, and the processor level. The representation level deals with the knowledge and methods used to solve the problem and the means to represent it. The control level is concerned with the detection of dependencies and parallelism in the algorithmic and program representations of the problem, and with the synchronization and scheduling of concurrent tasks. The processor level addresses the hardware and architectural components needed to evaluate the algorithmic and program representation. Solutions in each level are illustrated by a number of representative systems.

Wah, B.W. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Coordinated Science Lab.); Li, G.J. (Institute of Computing Technology, Academia Sinica, Bejing (CN))

1989-07-01

317

Designing for Dissemination Among Public Health Researchers: Findings From a National Survey in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We have described the practice of designing for dissemination among researchers in the United States with the intent of identifying gaps and areas for improvement. Methods. In 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 266 researchers using a search of the top 12 public health journals in PubMed and lists available from government-sponsored research. The sample involved scientists at universities, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Results. In the pooled sample, 73% of respondents estimated they spent less than 10% of their time on dissemination. About half of respondents (53%) had a person or team in their unit dedicated to dissemination. Seventeen percent of all respondents used a framework or theory to plan their dissemination activities. One third of respondents (34%) always or usually involved stakeholders in the research process. Conclusions. The current data and the existing literature suggest considerable room for improvement in designing for dissemination. PMID:23865659

Jacobs, Julie A.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

2013-01-01

318

Design and Calibration of a Flowfield Survey Rake for Inlet Flight Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is a unique test platform available for use on NASA's F-15B aircraft, tail number 836, as a modular host for a variety of aerodynamics and propulsion research. For future flight data from this platform to be valid, more information must be gathered concerning the quality of the airflow underneath the body of the F-15B at various flight conditions, especially supersonic conditions. The flow angularity and Mach number must be known at multiple locations on any test article interface plane for measurement data at these locations to be valid. To determine this prerequisite information, flight data will be gathered in the Rake Airflow Gauge Experiment using a custom-designed flowfield rake to probe the airflow underneath the F-15B at the desired flight conditions. This paper addresses the design considerations of the rake and probe assembly, including the loads and stress analysis using analytical methods, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element analysis. It also details the flow calibration procedure, including the completed wind-tunnel test and posttest data reduction, calibration verification, and preparation for flight-testing.

Flynn, Darin C.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.; Frederick, Michael

2009-01-01

319

A Quantitative Analysis Of Pre-Processing In The Coma And Perseus-Pisces Superclusters Using Galex And Wise Survey Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of massive galaxy clusters and groups at redshifts below 1 typically find environments with little-to-no star formation activity, in sharp contrast with the field. Over-dense regions are dominated by passively-evolving spheroidal (S0) and elliptical galaxies, whereas galaxies in the field tend to have spiral morphologies, younger stellar populations, and systematically higher star formation rates. Studies of the galaxy populations of clusters and massive galaxy groups have found that the increase in the fraction of spirals at higher redshifts corresponds to a decline in the fraction of S0 galaxies, which strongly suggests that field spirals are transformed into S0 galaxies at some point in their transition between field and cluster regions. This transformation necessarily involves an increase in the stellar content of the bulge relative to the disk, and then a removal of disk gas accompanied by either a rapid or gradual decline in star formation to eventually produce a red, spheroidal, passively-evolving S0 galaxy. Deep and wide area cosmological surveys such as the GOODS and COSMOS have shown that both environment and stellar mass play a distinct role in the overall galaxy evolution over a wide redshift range (to z~3). The density-morphology relation and the blue-fraction, first noted in the targeted studies of clusters and groups, also appears to be an extension of the evolutionary trends seen in the field sample. However, the trends seen in these large cosmological surveys should be taken with a caution since they are broad statistical trends of primarily massive galaxies with relatively poor sensitivity on star formation rate (SFR), associated with a relatively narrow range of sparsely sampled galaxy density. This can lead to potentially serious shortcomings when studying the role of environment because many of the physical mechanisms involved may preferentially impact the lower mass galaxies. The dominant physical mechanism(s) responsible for this transformation are still being debated, but the overwhelming evidence has shown that spirals are readily altered in groups or cluster outskirts prior to falling into a galaxy cluster (pre-processing). This implies that the best approach to catch galaxy transformation in the act is to examine galaxies in lower density environments. A complete accounting of star-formation activity for galaxies over a wide range masses and environments is needed to assess which of many possible mechanisms is the dominant cause of galaxy transformation in over-dense regions. The main goal of this proposed study is to examine the SF and quenching activities associated with galaxies using the high spatial resolution of the targeted studies of individual clusters, but covering much larger areas and density ranges (from voids to cluster cores) with the sample statistics approaching those of the cosmological surveys such as COSMOS, using exquisite stellar mass and SFR (both UV and IR) sensitivity. To achieve this, we propose a multi-wavelength study (with a specific emphasis on GALEX and WISE) of the two most prominent large scale structures in the local universe: the Coma and Perseus-Pisces Superclusters. The total sample area covers ~3000 sq. degree and contains about 7000 spectroscopically identified galaxies (from SDSS and archival spectra). In addition, we will evaluate the impacts of the high mass and SFR cut employed by deep cosmological surveys by paring down our sample in stellar mass and SFR (and resulting coarse galaxy density estimates) and examine whether any important insights are missed as a result.

Yun, Min

320

Information Presentation Features and Comprehensibility of Hospital Report Cards: Design Analysis and Online Survey Among Users  

PubMed Central

Background Improving the transparency of information about the quality of health care providers is one way to improve health care quality. It is assumed that Internet information steers patients toward better-performing health care providers and will motivate providers to improve quality. However, the effect of public reporting on hospital quality is still small. One of the reasons is that users find it difficult to understand the formats in which information is presented. Objective We analyzed the presentation of risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for coronary angiography in the 10 most commonly used German public report cards to analyze the impact of information presentation features on their comprehensibility. We wanted to determine which information presentation features were utilized, were preferred by users, led to better comprehension, and had similar effects to those reported in evidence-based recommendations described in the literature. Methods The study consisted of 5 steps: (1) identification of best-practice evidence about the presentation of information on hospital report cards; (2) selection of a single risk-adjusted quality indicator; (3) selection of a sample of designs adopted by German public report cards; (4) identification of the information presentation elements used in public reporting initiatives in Germany; and (5) an online panel completed an online questionnaire that was conducted to determine if respondents were able to identify the hospital with the lowest RAMR and if respondents’ hospital choices were associated with particular information design elements. Results Evidence-based recommendations were made relating to the following information presentation features relevant to report cards: evaluative table with symbols, tables without symbols, bar charts, bar charts without symbols, bar charts with symbols, symbols, evaluative word labels, highlighting, order of providers, high values to indicate good performance, explicit statements of whether high or low values indicate good performance, and incomplete data (“N/A” as a value). When investigating the RAMR in a sample of 10 hospitals’ report cards, 7 of these information presentation features were identified. Of these, 5 information presentation features improved comprehensibility in a manner reported previously in literature. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to systematically analyze the most commonly used public reporting card designs used in Germany. Best-practice evidence identified in international literature was in agreement with 5 findings about German report card designs: (1) avoid tables without symbols, (2) include bar charts with symbols, (3) state explicitly whether high or low values indicate good performance or provide a “good quality” range, (4) avoid incomplete data (N/A given as a value), and (5) rank hospitals by performance. However, these findings are preliminary and should be subject of further evaluation. The implementation of 4 of these recommendations should not present insurmountable obstacles. However, ranking hospitals by performance may present substantial difficulties. PMID:25782186

2015-01-01

321

Quantitative analysis of human ankle characteristics at different gait phases and speeds for utilizing in ankle-foot prosthetic design  

PubMed Central

Background Ankle characteristics vary in terms of gait phase and speed change. This study aimed to quantify the components of ankle characteristics, including quasi-stiffness and work in different gait phases and at various speeds. Methods The kinetic and kinematic data of 20 healthy participants were collected during normal gait at four speeds. Stance moment-angle curves were divided into three sub-phases including controlled plantarflexion, controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. The slope of the moment-angle curves was quantified as quasi-stiffness. The area under the curves was defined as work. Results The lowest quasi-stiffness was observed in the controlled plantarflexion. The fitted line to moment-angle curves showed R2?>?0.8 at controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. Quasi-stiffness was significantly different at different speeds (P?=?0.00). In the controlled dorsiflexion, the ankle absorbed energy; by comparison, energy was generated in the powered plantarflexion. A negative work value was recorded at slower speeds and a positive value was observed at faster speeds. Ankle peak powers were increased with walking speed (P?=?0.00). Conclusions Our findings suggested that the quasi-stiffness and work of the ankle joint can be regulated at different phases and speeds. These findings may be clinically applicable in the design and development of ankle prosthetic devices that can naturally replicate human walking at various gait speeds. PMID:24568175

2014-01-01

322

Quantitative insight into the design of compounds recognized by the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1).  

PubMed

L-Type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a transmembrane protein expressed abundantly at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where it ensures the transport of hydrophobic acids from the blood to the brain. Due to its unique substrate specificity and high expression at the BBB, LAT1 is an intriguing target for carrier-mediated transport of drugs into the brain. In this study, a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) model with considerable statistical quality (Q(2) =0.53, R(2) =0.75, Q(2) SE=0.77, R(2) SE=0.57) and good external predictivity (CCC=0.91) was generated. The model was used to guide the synthesis of eight new prodrugs whose affinity for LAT1 was tested by using an in situ rat brain perfusion technique. This resulted in the creation of a novel LAT1 prodrug with L-tryptophan as the promoiety; it also provided a better understanding of the molecular features of LAT1-targeted high-affinity prodrugs, as well as their promoiety and parent drug. The results obtained will be beneficial in the rational design of novel LAT1-binding prodrugs and other compounds that bind to LAT1. PMID:25205473

Ylikangas, Henna; Malmioja, Kalle; Peura, Lauri; Gynther, Mikko; Nwachukwu, Emmanuel O; Leppänen, Jukka; Laine, Krista; Rautio, Jarkko; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Poso, Antti

2014-12-01

323

Surveying & Mapping Surveying  

E-print Network

A Career In Surveying & Mapping Surveying Engineering Technology-of-Doors, Responsibility, Independence, and Professional Licensing? Surveying Engineering-5711 http://www.umaine.edu/set/svt About the Program The Surveying Engineering

Thomas, Andrew

324

Quantitative NMR  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features a learning module focused on principles and practice of NMR for quantitative analysis, an application less commonly associated with the technique than is structure determination. Links to simulation packages are included.

Korir, Albert K.

325

Doctoral Training in Statistics, Measurement, and Methodology in Psychology: Replication and Extension of Aiken, West, Sechrest, and Reno's (1990) Survey of PhD Programs in North America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a survey of all PhD programs in psychology in the United States and Canada, the authors documented the quantitative methodology curriculum (statistics, measurement, and research design) to examine the extent to which innovations in quantitative methodology have diffused into the training of PhDs in psychology. In all, 201 psychology PhD…

Aiken, Leona S.; West, Stephen G.; Millsap, Roger E.

2008-01-01

326

THE VIRUS-P EXPLORATION OF NEARBY GALAXIES (VENGA): SURVEY DESIGN, DATA PROCESSING, AND SPECTRAL ANALYSIS METHODS  

SciTech Connect

We present the survey design, data reduction, and spectral fitting pipeline for the VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Galaxies (VENGA). VENGA is an integral field spectroscopic survey, which maps the disks of 30 nearby spiral galaxies. Targets span a wide range in Hubble type, star formation activity, morphology, and inclination. The VENGA data cubes have 5.''6 FWHM spatial resolution, {approx}5 A FWHM spectral resolution, sample the 3600 A-6800 A range, and cover large areas typically sampling galaxies out to {approx}0.7R{sub 25}. These data cubes can be used to produce two-dimensional maps of the star formation rate, dust extinction, electron density, stellar population parameters, the kinematics and chemical abundances of both stars and ionized gas, and other physical quantities derived from the fitting of the stellar spectrum and the measurement of nebular emission lines. To exemplify our methods and the quality of the data, we present the VENGA data cube on the face-on Sc galaxy NGC 628 (a.k.a. M 74). The VENGA observations of NGC 628 are described, as well as the construction of the data cube, our spectral fitting method, and the fitting of the stellar and ionized gas velocity fields. We also propose a new method to measure the inclination of nearly face-on systems based on the matching of the stellar and gas rotation curves using asymmetric drift corrections. VENGA will measure relevant physical parameters across different environments within these galaxies, allowing a series of studies on star formation, structure assembly, stellar populations, chemical evolution, galactic feedback, nuclear activity, and the properties of the interstellar medium in massive disk galaxies.

Blanc, Guillermo A. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); Weinzirl, Tim; Song, Mimi; Heiderman, Amanda; Gebhardt, Karl; Jogee, Shardha; Evans, Neal J. II; Kaplan, Kyle; Marinova, Irina; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Van den Bosch, Remco C. E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Luo Rongxin; Hao Lei [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai (China); Drory, Niv [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Fabricius, Maximilian [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany); Fisher, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Yoachim, Peter [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

2013-05-15

327

Design, methods and demographic findings of the DEMINVALL survey: a population-based study of Dementia in Valladolid, Northwestern Spain  

PubMed Central

Background This article describes the rationale and design of a population-based survey of dementia in Valladolid (northwestern Spain). The main aim of the study was to assess the epidemiology of dementia and its subtypes. Prevalence of anosognosia in dementia patients, nutritional status, diet characteristics, and determinants of non-diagnosed dementia in the community were studied. The main sociodemographic, educational, and general health status characteristics of the study population are described. Methods Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A two-phase door-to-door study was performed. Both urban and rural environments were included. In phase 1 (February 2009 – February 2010) 28 trained physicians examined a population of 2,989 subjects (age: ? 65 years). The seven-minute screen neurocognitive battery was used. In phase 2 (May 2009 – May 2010) 4 neurologists, 1 geriatrician, and 3 neuropsychologists confirmed the diagnosis of dementia and subtype in patients screened positive by a structured neurological evaluation. Specific instruments to assess anosognosia, the nutritional status and diet characteristics were used. Of the initial sample, 2,170 subjects were evaluated (57% female, mean age 76.5?±?7.8, 5.2% institutionalized), whose characteristics are described. 227 persons were excluded for various reasons. Among those eligible were 592 non-responders. The attrition bias of non-responders was lower in rural areas. 241 screened positive (11.1%). Discussion The survey will explore some clinical, social and health related life-style variables of dementia. The population size and the diversification of social and educational backgrounds will contribute to a better knowledge of dementia in our environment. PMID:22935626

2012-01-01

328

The VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Galaxies (VENGA): Survey Design, Data Processing, and Spectral Analysis Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the survey design, data reduction, and spectral fitting pipeline for the VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Galaxies (VENGA). VENGA is an integral field spectroscopic survey, which maps the disks of 30 nearby spiral galaxies. Targets span a wide range in Hubble type, star formation activity, morphology, and inclination. The VENGA data cubes have 5.''6 FWHM spatial resolution, ~5 Å FWHM spectral resolution, sample the 3600 Å-6800 Å range, and cover large areas typically sampling galaxies out to ~0.7R 25. These data cubes can be used to produce two-dimensional maps of the star formation rate, dust extinction, electron density, stellar population parameters, the kinematics and chemical abundances of both stars and ionized gas, and other physical quantities derived from the fitting of the stellar spectrum and the measurement of nebular emission lines. To exemplify our methods and the quality of the data, we present the VENGA data cube on the face-on Sc galaxy NGC 628 (a.k.a. M 74). The VENGA observations of NGC 628 are described, as well as the construction of the data cube, our spectral fitting method, and the fitting of the stellar and ionized gas velocity fields. We also propose a new method to measure the inclination of nearly face-on systems based on the matching of the stellar and gas rotation curves using asymmetric drift corrections. VENGA will measure relevant physical parameters across different environments within these galaxies, allowing a series of studies on star formation, structure assembly, stellar populations, chemical evolution, galactic feedback, nuclear activity, and the properties of the interstellar medium in massive disk galaxies.

Blanc, Guillermo A.; Weinzirl, Tim; Song, Mimi; Heiderman, Amanda; Gebhardt, Karl; Jogee, Shardha; Evans, Neal J., II; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Luo, Rongxin; Drory, Niv; Fabricius, Maximilian; Fisher, David; Hao, Lei; Kaplan, Kyle; Marinova, Irina; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Yoachim, Peter

2013-05-01

329

Design and implementation of a GPS?based field survey system for land consolidation and rehabilitation projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field survey is a very important step in the process of land consolidation and rehabilitation. Traditional methods of field survey take much time and effort and it is difficult to locate facilities of projects, to measure area or length and to spot and record problems quickly and accurately. A global positioning system (GPS)?based field survey system is introduced. Firstly, the

Jia Wentao; Liu Junming; Yu Lina; Yan Xiang Yang; Zhang Xiaopei; L. V. Jing; Zhao Qingli; Wang Maohua

2007-01-01

330

How does the size and shape of local populations in China compare to general anthropometric surveys currently used for product design?  

PubMed

Anthropometry has long been used for a range of ergonomic applications & product design. Although products are often designed for specific cohorts, anthropometric data are typically sourced from large scale surveys representative of the general population. Additionally, few data are available for emerging markets like China and India. This study measured 80 Chinese males that were representative of a specific cohort targeted for the design of a new product. Thirteen anthropometric measurements were recorded and compared to two large databases that represented a general population, a Chinese database and a Western database. Substantial differences were identified between the Chinese males measured in this study and both databases. The subjects were substantially taller, heavier and broader than subjects in the older Chinese database. However, they were still substantially smaller, lighter and thinner than Western males. Data from current Western anthropometric surveys are unlikely to accurately represent the target population for product designers and manufacturers in emerging markets like China. PMID:22317347

Daniell, Nathan; Fraysse, François; Paul, Gunther

2012-01-01

331

Quantitative Graphics in Newspapers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of quantitative graphics in newspapers requires achieving a balance between being accurate and getting the attention of the reader. The statistical representations in newspapers are drawn by graphic designers whose key technique is fusion--the striking combination of two visual images. This technique often results in visual puns,…

Tankard, James W., Jr.

332

Quantitative habitability.  

PubMed

A framework is proposed for a quantitative approach to studying habitability. Considerations of environmental supply and organismal demand of energy lead to the conclusions that power units are most appropriate and that the units for habitability become watts per organism. Extreme and plush environments are revealed to be on a habitability continuum, and extreme environments can be quantified as those where power supply only barely exceeds demand. Strategies for laboratory and field experiments are outlined that would quantify power supplies, power demands, and habitability. An example involving a comparison of various metabolisms pursued by halophiles is shown to be well on the way to a quantitative habitability analysis. PMID:18163866

Shock, Everett L; Holland, Melanie E

2007-12-01

333

Prevalence of coronary artery disease and coronary risk factors in Kerala, South India: A population surveyDesign and methods  

PubMed Central

Background There is paucity of reliable contemporary data on prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and risk factors in Indians. Only a few studies on prevalence of CAD have been conducted in Kerala, a Southern Indian state. The main objective of the Cardiological Society of India Kerala Chapter Coronary Artery Disease and Its Risk Factors Prevalence Study (CSI Kerala CRP Study) was to determine the prevalence of CAD and risk factors of CAD in men and women aged 20–79 years in urban and rural settings of three geographical areas of Kerala. Methods The design of the study was cross-sectional population survey. We estimated the sample size based on an anticipated prevalence of 7.4% of CAD for rural and 11% for urban Kerala. The derived sample sizes for rural and urban areas were 3000 and 2400, respectively. The urban areas for sampling constituted one ward each from three municipal corporations at different parts of the state. The rural sample was drawn from two panchayats each in the same districts as the urban sample. One adult from each household in the age group of 20–59 years was selected using Kish method. All subjects between 60 and 79 years were included from each household. A detailed questionnaire was administered to assess the risk factors, history of CAD, family history, educational status, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, physical activity and treatment for CAD; anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, electrocardiogram and fasting blood levels of glucose and lipids were recorded. PMID:23809375

Zachariah, Geevar; Harikrishnan, S.; Krishnan, M.N.; Mohanan, P.P.; Sanjay, G.; Venugopal, K.; Thankappan, K.R.

2013-01-01

334

The Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-Up (CHIS.FU) Study: design, methods, and response rate  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this report is to describe the main characteristics of the design, including response rates, of the Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-up Study. Methods The original cohort consisted of 2,500 subjects (1,263 women and 1,237 men) interviewed as part of the 1994 Cornella Health Interview Study. A record linkage to update the address and vital status of the cohort members was carried out using, first a deterministic method, and secondly a probabilistic one, based on each subject's first name and surnames. Subsequently, we attempted to locate the cohort members to conduct the phone follow-up interviews. A pilot study was carried out to test the overall feasibility and to modify some procedures before the field work began. Results After record linkage, 2,468 (98.7%) subjects were successfully traced. Of these, 91 (3.6%) were deceased, 259 (10.3%) had moved to other towns, and 50 (2.0%) had neither renewed their last municipal census documents nor declared having moved. After using different strategies to track and to retain cohort members, we traced 92% of the CHIS participants. From them, 1,605 subjects answered the follow-up questionnaire. Conclusion The computerized record linkage maximized the success of the follow-up that was carried out 7 years after the baseline interview. The pilot study was useful to increase the efficiency in tracing and interviewing the respondents. PMID:12665430

Garcia, Montse; Schiaffino, Anna; Fernandez, Esteve; Marti, Merce; Salto, Esteve; Perez, Gloria; Peris, Merce; Borrell, Carme; Nieto, F Javier; Borras, Josep Maria

2003-01-01

335

A Dish-based Semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire for Assessment of Dietary Intakes in Epidemiologic Studies in Iran: Design and Development  

PubMed Central

Background: Earlier forms of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in Iran have extensive lists of foods, traditional categories and food-based design, mostly with the interviewer-administered approach. The aim of the current paper is to describe the development of a dish-based, machine-readable, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (DFQ). Methods: Within the framework of the Study on the Epidemiology of Psychological, Alimentary Health and Nutrition project, we created a novel FFQ using Harvard FFQ as a model. Results: The following steps were taken to develop the questionnaire: Construction of a list of commonly consumed Iranian foods, definition of portion sizes, design of response options for consumption frequency of each food item and finally a pilot test of the preliminary DFQ. From a comprehensive list of foods and mixed dishes, we included those that were nutrient-rich, consumed reasonably often or contributed to between-person variations. We focused on mixed dishes, rather than their ingredients, along with foods. To shorten the list, the related food items or mixed dishes were categorized together in one food group. These exclusions resulted in a list of 106 foods or dishes in the questionnaire. The portion sizes used in the FFQ were obtained from our earlier studies that used dietary recalls and food records. The frequency response options for the food list varied from 6-9 choices from “never or less than once a month” to “12 or more times per day”. Conclusions: The DFQ could be a reasonable dietary assessment tool for future epidemiological studies in the country. Validation studies are required to assess the validity and reliability of this newly developed questionnaire. PMID:24554989

Keshteli, AH; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Rajaie, Somayeh; Askari, Gholamreza; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Adibi, Peyman

2014-01-01

336

Survey Techniques to Measure and Explain Corruption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reinikka and Svensson demonstrate that, with appropriate survey methods and interview techniques, it is possible to collect quantitative micro-level data on corruption. Public expenditure tracking surveys, service provider surveys, and enterprise surveys are highlighted with several applications. While often broader in scope, these surveys permit measurement of corruption at the level of individual agents, such as schools, health clinics, or

Ritva Reinikka; Jakob Svensson

2003-01-01

337

On Quantitizing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Quantitizing", commonly understood to refer to the numerical translation, transformation, or conversion of qualitative data, has become a staple of mixed methods research. Typically glossed are the foundational assumptions, judgments, and compromises involved in converting disparate data sets into each other and whether such conversions advance…

Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Knafl, George

2009-01-01

338

QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

339

Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1980-01-01

340

A Mixed Model Design Study of RN to BS Distance Learning:Survey of Graduates' Perceptions of Strengths and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on findings from a survey administered to graduates of a distance learning RN-to-BS completion program. A questionnaire was constructed to examine graduate experiences and perceptions regarding distance learning formats, course content, time management, student empowerment, and program support. A total of 251 surveys were…

Lock, Leonard K.; Schnell, Zoanne; Pratt-Mullen, Jerrilynn

2011-01-01

341

Stream Surveying  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The class breaks into groups of 3-4. Each week we go out to the same stream channel, and perform the stream survey activities in the USFS Harrelson document, one chapter per week. After the snow flies, collected data are used to calculate channel hydrologic and hydraulic data such as bankfull flow and critical shear stress. Designed for a geomorphology course

Karen Williams

342

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey, October-December 1984. Volume 2. Part 2 of 2. Design performance data for operating FGD systems  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The two volume set summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 126 systems in operation, 24 systems under construction, and 65 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 49,574 MW.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1985-07-01

343

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey, October-December 1984. Volume 2. Part 1 of 2. Design performance data for operating FGD systems  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The two volume set summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 126 systems in operation, 24 systems under construction, and 65 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 49,574 MW.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1985-07-01

344

Comparing Model-based and Design-based Structural Equation Modeling Approaches in Analyzing Complex Survey Data  

E-print Network

Conventional statistical methods assuming data sampled under simple random sampling are inadequate for use on complex survey data with a multilevel structure and non-independent observations. In structural equation modeling (SEM) framework, a...

Wu, Jiun-Yu

2011-10-21

345

78 FR 5459 - Medicare Program; Request for Information To Aid in the Design and Development of a Survey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Development of a Survey Regarding Patient Experiences With Hospital Outpatient Surgery...Departments/Ambulatory Surgery Centers and Patient- Reported Outcomes From Surgeries and...surgery centers (ASCs), as well as patient-reported outcomes from surgeries...

2013-01-25

346

Integrating case study and survey research methods: an example in information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case for combining research methods generally, and more specifically that for combining qualitative and quantitative methods, is strong. Yet, research designs that extensively integrate both fieldwork (e.g. case studies) and survey research are rare. Moreover, some journals tend tacitly to specialize by methodology thereby encouraging purity of method. The multi-method model of research while not new, has not been

Guy G. Gable

1994-01-01

347

EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth (ENERGY) project: Design and methodology of the ENERGY cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Obesity treatment is by large ineffective long term, and more emphasis on the prevention of excessive weight gain in childhood and adolescence is warranted. To inform energy balance related behaviour (EBRB) change interventions, insight in the potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours is needed. Studies on such multilevel correlates of EBRB among schoolchildren in Europe are lacking. The ENERGY survey aims to (1) provide up-to-date prevalence rates of measured overweight, obesity, self-reported engagement in EBRBs, and objective accelerometer-based assessment of physical activity and sedentary behaviour and blood-sample biomarkers of metabolic function in countries in different regions of Europe, (2) to identify personal, family and school environmental correlates of these EBRBs. This paper describes the design, methodology and protocol of the survey. Method/Design A school-based cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010 in seven different European countries; Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, and Spain. The survey included measurements of anthropometrics, child, parent and school-staff questionnaires, and school observations to measure and assess outcomes (i.e. height, weight, and waist circumference), EBRBs and potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours including the social-cultural, physical, political, and economic environmental factors. In addition, a selection of countries conducted accelerometer measurements to objectively assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and collected blood samples to assess several biomarkers of metabolic function. Discussion The ENERGY survey is a comprehensive cross-sectional study measuring anthropometrics and biomarkers as well as assessing a range of EBRBs and their potential correlates at the personal, family and school level, among 10-12 year old children in seven European countries. This study will result in a unique dataset, enabling cross country comparisons in overweight, obesity, risk behaviours for these conditions as well as the correlates of engagement in these risk behaviours. PMID:21281466

2011-01-01

348

Design for a multifrequency high magnetic field superconducting quantum interference device-detected quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance probe: Spin-lattice relaxation of cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4.5H2O)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have designed a spectrometer for the quantitative determination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at high magnetic fields and frequencies. It uses a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) for measuring the magnetic moment as a function of the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. We used powdered 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl to demonstrate resolution of g-tensor anisotropy to 1 mT in a magnetic

Brant Cage; Stephen Russek

2004-01-01

349

Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis is a visual library of techniques used in making volumetric measurements. This 40-minute VHS videotape is designed as a resource for introducing students to proper volumetric methods and procedures. The entire tape, or relevant segments of the tape, can also be used to review procedures used in subsequent experiments that rely on the traditional art of quantitative analysis laboratory practice. The techniques included are: Quantitative transfer of a solid with a weighing spoon Quantitative transfer of a solid with a finger held weighing bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a paper strap held bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a spatula Examples of common quantitative weighing errors Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to beaker to volumetric flask Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to volumetric flask Volumetric transfer pipet A complete acid-base titration Hand technique variations The conventional view of contemporary quantitative chemical measurement tends to focus on instrumental systems, computers, and robotics. In this view, the analyst is relegated to placing standards and samples on a tray. A robotic arm delivers a sample to the analysis center, while a computer controls the analysis conditions and records the results. In spite of this, it is rare to find an analysis process that does not rely on some aspect of more traditional quantitative analysis techniques, such as careful dilution to the mark of a volumetric flask. Figure 2. Transfer of a solid with a spatula. Clearly, errors in a classical step will affect the quality of the final analysis. Because of this, it is still important for students to master the key elements of the traditional art of quantitative chemical analysis laboratory practice. Some aspects of chemical analysis, like careful rinsing to insure quantitative transfer, are often an automated part of an instrumental process that must be understood by the analyst. This video material carefully documents several options in the process of quantitatively weighing and transferring a solid, quantitatively transferring a liquid aliquot with a pipet, and the process of quantitative volumetric titration. There are many local variants in each of these procedures. For example, some prefer to transfer solid with a weighing spoon, some with a finger held bottle, and some with a paper-strap held bottle. Students should follow the local preference, but should be aware of other acceptable options. Whatever the technique option chosen, the procedure must be done reproducibly, if analysis quality is to be optimized. Acknowledgments Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis was created with support from Project SERAPHIM and the NSF Directorate for Education and Human Resources, grant MDR-9154099.

Zimmerman, John; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.

1996-12-01

350

MALAYSIAN FAMILY LIFE SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Malaysian Family Life Surveys (MFLS) comprise a pair of surveys with partially overlapping samples, designed by RAND and administered in Peninsular Malaysia in 1976-77 (MFLS-1) and 1988-89 (MFLS-2). Each survey collected detailed current and retrospective information on famil...

351

Behavioral Norms and ExpectationsA Quantitative Approach To the Assessment of Organizational Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organizational culture—the shared beliefs and values guiding the thinking and behavioral styles of members—traditionally has been assessed by qualitative methods. However, quantitative approaches such as culture surveys offer important advantages for both cross-sectional organizational research and data-based cultural change programs. The Organizational Culture Inventory, an instrument designed for such uses, profiles the culture of organizations and their subunits in terms

Robert A. Cooke; Denise M. Rousseau

1988-01-01

352

Participant Dropout as a Function of Survey Length in Internet-Mediated University Studies: Implications for Study Design and Voluntary Participation in Psychological Research  

PubMed Central

Abstract Internet-mediated research has offered substantial advantages over traditional laboratory-based research in terms of efficiently and affordably allowing for the recruitment of large samples of participants for psychology studies. Core technical, ethical, and methodological issues have been addressed in recent years, but the important issue of participant dropout has received surprisingly little attention. Specifically, web-based psychology studies often involve undergraduates completing lengthy and time-consuming batteries of online personality questionnaires, but no known published studies to date have closely examined the natural course of participant dropout during attempted completion of these studies. The present investigation examined participant dropout among 1,963 undergraduates completing one of six web-based survey studies relatively representative of those conducted in university settings. Results indicated that 10% of participants could be expected to drop out of these studies nearly instantaneously, with an additional 2% dropping out per 100 survey items included in the study. For individual project investigators, these findings hold ramifications for study design considerations, such as conducting a priori power analyses. The present results also have broader ethical implications for understanding and improving voluntary participation in research involving human subjects. Nonetheless, the generalizability of these conclusions may be limited to studies involving similar design or survey content. PMID:21142995

2010-01-01

353

Detailed flow surveys of turning vanes designed for a 0.1-scale model of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detailed flow surveys downstream of the corner turning vanes and downstream of the fan inlet guide vanes have been obtained in a 0.1-scale model of the NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel. Two turning vane designs were evaluated in both corners 1 and 2 (the corners between the test section and the drive fan). Vane A was a controlled-diffusion airfoil and vane B was a circular-arc airfoil. At given flows the turning vane wakes were surveyed to determine the vane pressure losses. For both corners the vane A turning vane configuration gave lower losses than the vane B configuration in the regions where the flow regime should be representative of two-dimensional flow. For both vane sets the vane loss coefficient increased rapidly near the walls.

Moore, Royce D.; Shyne, Rickey J.; Boldman, Donald R.; Gelder, Thomas F.

1987-01-01

354

78 FR 5458 - Medicare Program; Request for Information To Aid in the Design and Development of a Survey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Development of a Survey Regarding Patient and Family Member/Friend Experiences...is a request for information regarding patient and family member or close friend experiences...overall quality, by making health care more patient-centered, reliable, accessible,...

2013-01-25

355

A WHOLE-LAKE WATER QUALITY SURVEY OF LAKE OAHE BASED ON A SPATIALLY-BALANCED PROBABILISTIC DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessing conditions on large bodies of water presets multiple statistical and logistical challenges. As part of the Upper Missouri River Program of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Project (EMAP) we surveyed water quality of Lake Oahe in July-August, 2002 using a spat...

356

A Quantitative Multimodal Discourse Analysis of Teaching and Learning in a Web-Conferencing Environment--The Efficacy of Student-Centred Learning Designs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a quantitative approach to multimodal discourse analysis for analyzing online collaborative learning. The coding framework draws together the fields of systemic functional linguistics and Activity Theory to analyze interactions between collaborative-, content- and technology-related discourse. The approach is used to examine…

Bower, Matt; Hedberg, John G.

2010-01-01

357

Design performance data for operating FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems: Volume 2, Part 1 of 2: Utility FGD survey, January-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Utility Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 144 systems in operation, 7 systems under construction, and 52 systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 62,824 MW. This document (Volume 2, Part 1) provides design performance data for operating FGD systems arranged alphabetically from Alabama Electric to Minnkota Power. A separate document (Volume 2, Part 2) provides this data for Monongahela Power thru West Texas Utilities.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1988-04-01

358

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey, January-December 1985: Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: (Part 2 of 2)  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It sumarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 135 systems in operation, 15 systems under construction, and 56 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 57,899 MW. This report, Volume II Part 2, provides design and performance data for domestic FGD systems alphabetically M (Monogahela) thru W (West Penn Power).

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1987-04-01

359

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey, January-December 1985: Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: (Part 1 of 2)  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 135 systems in operation, 15 systems under construction, and 56 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 57,899 MW. This report, Volume II, Part 1, provides design and performance data for domestic FGD systems alphabetically A thru M (Minnkota).

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1987-04-01

360

SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning  

E-print Network

SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning A guide designed to help you understand and prepare to lead the survey feedback and action planning process, compiled is subject to change without notice. #12;Morehead Associates Page 2 of 115 Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback

Squire, Larry R.

361

1Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth  

E-print Network

1Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Tue 13th September 9.00h session 1: Survey Systems 3D Chirp Sub-Bottom Imaging System: Design and 3D Volumes Martin Gutowski*, Jonathan M acknowledge support from the EPSRC and GeoAcoustics Ltd. #12;2Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth 3D Chirp 3D High

Southampton, University of

362

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology  

E-print Network

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

Nonnecke, Blair

363

An investigation into the feasibility of designing a framework for the quantitative evaluation of the Clinical Librarian service at an NHS Trust in Brighton, UK.  

PubMed

This feature presents research undertaken by Archana Deshmukh for her MA dissertation at the University of Brighton. She worked closely with Tom Roper, the Clinical Librarian at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, in a project to explore the feasibility of applying quantitative measures to evaluate the Clinical Librarian service. The investigation used an innovative participatory approach and the findings showed that although an exclusively quantitative approach to evaluation is not feasible, using a mixed methods approach is a way forward. Agreed outputs and outcomes could be embedded in a marketing plan, and the resulting framework could provide evidence to demonstrate overall impact. Archana graduated in July 2014, gaining a Distinction in the MA in Information Studies, and she is currently looking for work in the health information sector. PMID:25443028

Deshmukh, Archana; Roper, Tom

2014-12-01

364

Comparisons among Health Behavior Surveys: Implications for the Design of Informatics Infrastructures That Support Comparative Effectiveness Research  

PubMed Central

Introduction: To address the electronic health data fragmentation that is a methodological limitation of comparative effectiveness research (CER), the Washington Heights Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project is creating a patient-centered research data warehouse (RDW) by linking electronic clinical data (ECD) from New York Presbyterian Hospital’s clinical data warehouse with ECD from ambulatory care, long-term care, and home health settings and the WICER community health survey (CHS). The purposes of the research were to identify areas of overlap between the WICER CHS and two other surveys that include health behavior data (the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey and the New York City Community Health Survey (NYC CHS)) and to identify gaps in the current WICER RDW that have the potential to affect patient-centered CER. Methods: We compared items across the three surveys at the item and conceptual levels. We also compared WICER RDW (ECD and WICER CHS), BRFSS, and NYC CHS to the County Health Ranking framework. Results: We found that 22 percent of WICER items were exact matches with BRFSS and that there were no exact matches between WICER CHS and NYC CHS items not also contained in BRFSS. Conclusions: The results suggest that BRFSS and, to a lesser extent, NYC CHS have the potential to serve as population comparisons for WICER CHS for some health behavior-related data and thus may be particularly useful for considering the generalizability of CER study findings. Except for one measure related to health behavior (motor vehicle crash deaths), the WICER RDW’s comprehensive coverage supports the mortality, morbidity, and clinical care measures specified in the County Health Ranking framework but is deficient in terms of some socioeconomic factors and descriptions of the physical environment as captured in BRFSS. Linkage of these data in the WICER RDW through geocoding can potentially facilitate patient-centered CER that integrates important socioeconomic and physical environment influences on health outcomes. The research methods and findings may be relevant to others interested in either integrating health behavior data into RDWs to support patient-centered CER or conducting population-level comparisons.

Yoon, Sunmoo; Wilcox, Adam B.; Bakken, Suzanne

2013-01-01

365

Design and Implementation of a Comprehensive Web-based Survey for Ovarian Cancer Survivorship with an Analysis of Prediagnosis Symptoms via Text Mining.  

PubMed

Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the most lethal gynecologic disease in the United States, with an overall 5-year survival rate of 44.5%, about half of the 89.2% for all breast cancer patients. To identify factors that possibly contribute to the long-term survivorship of women with OvCa, we conducted a comprehensive online Ovarian Cancer Survivorship Survey from 2009 to 2013. This paper presents the design and implementation of our survey, introduces its resulting data source, the OVA-CRADLE™ (Clinical Research Analytics and Data Lifecycle Environment), and illustrates a sample application of the survey and data by an analysis of prediagnosis symptoms, using text mining and statistics. The OVA-CRADLE™ is an application of our patented Physio-MIMI technology, facilitating Web-based access, online query and exploration of data. The prediagnostic symptoms and association of early-stage OvCa diagnosis with endometriosis provide potentially important indicators for future studies in this field. PMID:25861211

Sun, Jiayang; Bogie, Kath M; Teagno, Joe; Sun, Yu-Hsiang Sam; Carter, Rebecca R; Cui, Licong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

2014-01-01

366

Design and Implementation of a Comprehensive Web-based Survey for Ovarian Cancer Survivorship with an Analysis of Prediagnosis Symptoms via Text Mining  

PubMed Central

Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the most lethal gynecologic disease in the United States, with an overall 5-year survival rate of 44.5%, about half of the 89.2% for all breast cancer patients. To identify factors that possibly contribute to the long-term survivorship of women with OvCa, we conducted a comprehensive online Ovarian Cancer Survivorship Survey from 2009 to 2013. This paper presents the design and implementation of our survey, introduces its resulting data source, the OVA-CRADLE™ (Clinical Research Analytics and Data Lifecycle Environment), and illustrates a sample application of the survey and data by an analysis of prediagnosis symptoms, using text mining and statistics. The OVA-CRADLE™ is an application of our patented Physio-MIMI technology, facilitating Web-based access, online query and exploration of data. The prediagnostic symptoms and association of early-stage OvCa diagnosis with endometriosis provide potentially important indicators for future studies in this field. PMID:25861211

Sun, Jiayang; Bogie, Kath M; Teagno, Joe; Sun, Yu-Hsiang (Sam); Carter, Rebecca R; Cui, Licong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

2014-01-01

367

Implementation and experimental survey of passive design specifications used in new low-cost housing under tropical climates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with a global approach in the thermal and airflow design of new dwellings and specially low-cost housing built in the French tropical overseas islands. The sizing of passive cooling techniques has been evaluated thanks to a simulation code. The solutions have been edited in a reference document that serves as work-base for the design of dwellings developments

François Garde; Laetitia Adelard; H. Boyer; C. Rat

2004-01-01

368

EPA utility FGD survey, October-December 1981. Volume I. Categorical summaries of FGD systems. Volume II. Design and performance data for operational FGD system. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The report is the first full compilation (not a supplement) since the October-December 1980 report (EPA-600/7-81-012a and -12b). Because the next three reports are to be supplements, this issue should be retained for reference throughout the year. The report, generated by a computerized data base system, presents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms. Domestic FGD systems are tabulated alphabetically by development status (operational, under construction, or in planning stages), utility company, process supplier, process, and waste disposal practice. It presents data on boiler design, FGD system design, fuel characteristics, and actual performance. Process flow diagrams and FGD system economic data are appended. Section 3 of the report, because of its length, appears in Volume II.

Melia, M.T.; Bruck, N.G.

1982-09-01

369

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey: October 1983-September 1984. Volume 2. Design performance data for operating FGD systems (part 1). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The three volume set summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 124 systems in operation, 25 systems under construction, and 68 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 47,255 MW.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Pelsor, B.W.

1984-10-01

370

Utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey: October 1983-September 1984. Volume 2. Design performance data for operating FGD systems (Part 2). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The three volume set summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 124 systems in operation, 25 systems under construction, and 68 systems planned. The current FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 47,255 MW.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Pelsor, B.W.

1984-10-01

371

Design performance data for operating FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems: Volume 2, Part 2 of 2: Utility FGD survey, January-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Utility Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by the utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show 144 systems in operation, 7 systems under construction, and 52 systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 62,824 MW. This document (Volume 2, Part 2) provides design performance data for operating FGD systems arranged alphabetically from Monongahela Power to West Texas Utilities. A separate document (Volume 2, Part 1) provides this data for Alabama Electric thru Monnkota Power.

Melia, M.T.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1988-04-01

372

Cartography at the U.S. Geological Survey: the National Mapping Division's cartographic programs, products, design, and technology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the prime source of many kinds of topographic and special-purpose maps of the United States and its outlying areas. It is also a prime source of digital map data. One main goal of the USGS is to provide large-scale topographic map coverage of the entire United States. Most of the Nation is already covered. We expect that initial coverage will be completed by 1991. For many purposes, many public agencies, private organizations, and individuals need reliable cartographic and geographic knowledge about our Nation. To serve such needs, all USGS maps are compiled to exacting standards of accuracy and content.

Ogrosky, Charles; Gwynn, William; Jannace, Richard

1989-01-01

373

Effectiveness of Facebook Based Learning to Enhance Creativity among Islamic Studies Students by Employing Isman Instructional Design Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examines the effectiveness of Facebook based learning to enhance creativity among Islamic Studies students in the secondary educational setting in Malaysia. It describes the design process by employing the Isman Instructional Design Model. A quantitative study was carried out using experimental method and background survey. The…

Alias, Norlidah; Siraj, Saedah; Daud, Mohd Khairul Azman Md; Hussin, Zaharah

2013-01-01

374

A Retrospective Survey of Research Design and Statistical Analyses in Selected Chinese Medical Journals in 1998 and 2008  

PubMed Central

Background High quality clinical research not only requires advanced professional knowledge, but also needs sound study design and correct statistical analyses. The number of clinical research articles published in Chinese medical journals has increased immensely in the past decade, but study design quality and statistical analyses have remained suboptimal. The aim of this investigation was to gather evidence on the quality of study design and statistical analyses in clinical researches conducted in China for the first decade of the new millennium. Methodology/Principal Findings Ten (10) leading Chinese medical journals were selected and all original articles published in 1998 (N?=?1,335) and 2008 (N?=?1,578) were thoroughly categorized and reviewed. A well-defined and validated checklist on study design, statistical analyses, results presentation, and interpretation was used for review and evaluation. Main outcomes were the frequencies of different types of study design, error/defect proportion in design and statistical analyses, and implementation of CONSORT in randomized clinical trials. From 1998 to 2008: The error/defect proportion in statistical analyses decreased significantly (?=?12.03, p<0.001), 59.8% (545/1,335) in 1998 compared to 52.2% (664/1,578) in 2008. The overall error/defect proportion of study design also decreased (?=?21.22, p<0.001), 50.9% (680/1,335) compared to 42.40% (669/1,578). In 2008, design with randomized clinical trials remained low in single digit (3.8%, 60/1,578) with two-third showed poor results reporting (defects in 44 papers, 73.3%). Nearly half of the published studies were retrospective in nature, 49.3% (658/1,335) in 1998 compared to 48.2% (761/1,578) in 2008. Decreases in defect proportions were observed in both results presentation (?=?93.26, p<0.001), 92.7% (945/1,019) compared to 78.2% (1023/1,309) and interpretation (?=?27.26, p<0.001), 9.7% (99/1,019) compared to 4.3% (56/1,309), some serious ones persisted. Conclusions/Significance Chinese medical research seems to have made significant progress regarding statistical analyses, but there remains ample room for improvement regarding study designs. Retrospective clinical studies are the most often used design, whereas randomized clinical trials are rare and often show methodological weaknesses. Urgent implementation of the CONSORT statement is imperative. PMID:20520824

Jin, Zhichao; Yu, Danghui; Zhang, Luoman; Meng, Hong; Lu, Jian; Gao, Qingbin; Cao, Yang; Ma, Xiuqiang; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Rui; He, Jia

2010-01-01

375

Designing an Environment for Learning. Proceedings of a Conference of Educational Survey Directors of Member Universities of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, (Madison, Wisconsin, April 27-28, 1967).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three topics are discussed--(1) designing the environment of educational enterprises, (2) capabilities and promise of data processing in comprehending the educational environment, and (3) optimum learning environments - design mechanisms, principles, and application. Consultants for the first topic were Sydney H. Williams, who surveyed the state…

Wakefield, Howard E.

376

The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) is a new ground-based sky survey designed to find transiting Neptunes and super-Earths. By covering at least sixteen times the sky area of Kepler we will find small planets around stars that are sufficiently bright for atmospheric characterization with facilities such as JWST, EChO and the E-ELT. The bright host stars will also allow radial velocity confirmation and mass determination, providing the first statistical sample of super-Earth densities and bulk compositions. This sample will place key constraints on models of small planet formation and evolution. I will describe the NGTS facility, which is being constructed at the ESO Paranal observatory during 2013, and present data from our prototype instruments as well as the results of quantitative simulations of our planet catch. These show the potential to measure masses and densities of around thirty bright super-Earths and over two hundred Neptunes.

Wheatley, P.

2013-09-01

377

NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY OF BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The annual Beach Survey is designed to gather information about beach water quality, standards, monitoring, and beach health advisories or closures issued during the previous year's bathing season. Each year the survey updates previously submitted beach i...

378

The Math You Need, When You Need It: Student-Centered Web Resources Designed to Decrease Math Review and Increase Quantitative Geology in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introductory geoscience courses are rife with quantitative concepts from graphing to rates to unit conversions. Recent research suggests that supplementary mathematical instruction increases post-secondary students' retention and performance in science courses. Nonetheless, many geoscience faculty feel that they do not have enough time to cover all the geoscience content, let alone covering the math they often feel students should have learned before reaching their classes. We present our NSF-funded effort to create web modules for students that address these concerns. Our web resources focus on both student performance and faculty time issues by building students' quantitative skills through web-based, self-paced modular tutorials. Each module can be assigned to individual students who have demonstrated on a pre-test that they are in need of supplemental instruction. The pre-test involves problems that place mathematical concepts in a geoscience context and determines the students who need the most support with these skills. Students needing support are asked to complete a three-pronged web-based module just before the concept is needed in class. The three parts of each tutorial include: an explanation of the mathematics, a page of practice problems and an on-line quiz that is graded and sent to the instructor. Each of the modules is steeped in best practices in mathematics and geoscience education, drawing on multiple contexts and utilizing technology. The tutorials also provide students with further resources so that they can explore the mathematics in more depth. To assess the rigor of this program, students are given the pre-test again at the end of the course. The uniqueness of this program lies in a rich combination of mathematical concepts placed in multiple geoscience contexts, giving students the opportunity to explore the way that math relates to the physical world. We present several preliminary modules dealing with topics common in introductory geoscience courses. We seek feedback from faculty teaching all levels of geoscience addressing several questions: In what math/geoscience topics do you feel students need supplemental instruction? Where do students come up against quantitative topics that make them drop the class or perform poorly? Would you be willing to review or help us to test these modules in your class?

Wenner, J. M.; Baer, E. M.

2007-12-01

379

Reflective Filters Design for Self-Filtering Narrowband Ultraviolet Imaging Experiment Wide-Field Surveys (NUVIEWS) Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We report the design of multilayer reflective filters for the self-filtering cameras of the NUVIEWS project. Wide angle self-filtering cameras were designed to image the C IV (154.9 nm) line emission, and H2 Lyman band fluorescence (centered at 161 nm) over a 20 deg x 30 deg field of view. A key element of the filter design includes the development of pi-multilayers optimized to provide maximum reflectance at 154.9 nm and 161 nm for the respective cameras without significant spectral sensitivity to the large cone angle of the incident radiation. We applied self-filtering concepts to design NUVIEWS telescope filters that are composed of three reflective mirrors and one folding mirror. The filters with narrowband widths of 6 and 8 rim at 154.9 and 161 nm, respectively, have net throughputs of more than 50 % with average blocking of out-of-band wavelengths better than 3 x 10(exp -4)%.

Park, Jung- Ho; Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

1994-01-01

380

Web Survey Design in ASP.Net 2.0: A Simple Task with One Line of Code  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past few years, more and more companies have been investing in electronic commerce (EC) by designing and implementing Web-based applications. In the world of practice, the importance of using Web technology to reach individual customers has been presented by many researchers. This paper presents an easy way of conducting marketing…

Liu, Chang

2007-01-01

381

Nonmetallic heat exchangers: a survey of current and potential designs for dry-cooling systems. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential use of nonmetallic materials for the heat exchange surfaces of dry cooling towers is evaluated. Relevant industrial experience with nonmetallic heat exchangers is reviewed for application to the special technical and economic requirements of dry cooling surfaces. Candidate thermoplastic materials are identified and the important thermal and strength limitations on design are described. Several concepts for improving the

E. C. Guyer; G. P. Mullen; D. L. Brownell

1984-01-01

382

INCLUDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN PRODUCT SIMULATIONS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF USE PROCESSES IN CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: A SURVEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, approaches for behavioral simulation of humans and human-artifact systems are reviewed The objective was to explore available knowledge for the development of a new method and system for the simulation of use processes of consumer durables in conceptual design. A key issue is to resolve the trade-off between minimizing the modeling and computing effort on the one

Imre Horváth

383

Teaching quantitative biology: goals, assessments, and resources  

PubMed Central

More than a decade has passed since the publication of BIO2010, calling for an increased emphasis on quantitative skills in the undergraduate biology curriculum. In that time, relatively few papers have been published that describe educational innovations in quantitative biology or provide evidence of their effects on students. Using a “backward design” framework, we lay out quantitative skill and attitude goals, assessment strategies, and teaching resources to help biologists teach more quantitatively. Collaborations between quantitative biologists and education researchers are necessary to develop a broader and more appropriate suite of assessment tools, and to provide much-needed evidence on how particular teaching strategies affect biology students' quantitative skill development and attitudes toward quantitative work. PMID:25368425

Aikens, Melissa L.; Dolan, Erin L.

2014-01-01

384

Doctoral training in statistics, measurement, and methodology in psychology: replication and extension of Aiken, West, Sechrest, and Reno's (1990) survey of PhD programs in North America.  

PubMed

In a survey of all PhD programs in psychology in the United States and Canada, the authors documented the quantitative methodology curriculum (statistics, measurement, and research design) to examine the extent to which innovations in quantitative methodology have diffused into the training of PhDs in psychology. In all, 201 psychology PhD programs (86%) participated. This survey replicated and extended a previous survey (L. S. Aiken, S. G. West, L. B. Sechrest, & R. R. Reno, 1990), permitting examination of curriculum development. Most training supported laboratory and not field research. The median of 1.6 years of training in statistics and measurement was mainly devoted to the modally 1-year introductory statistics course, leaving little room for advanced study. Curricular enhancements were noted in statistics and to a minor degree in measurement. Additional coverage of both fundamental and innovative quantitative methodology is needed. The research design curriculum has largely stagnated, a cause for great concern. Elite programs showed no overall advantage in quantitative training. Forces that support curricular innovation are characterized. Human capital challenges to quantitative training, including recruiting and supporting young quantitative faculty, are discussed. Steps must be taken to bring innovations in quantitative methodology into the curriculum of PhD programs in psychology. PMID:18193979

Aiken, Leona S; West, Stephen G; Millsap, Roger E

2008-01-01

385

Towards a flexible online mixed method design with a feedback loop  

Microsoft Academic Search

The notion of mixed methods design relates to the research studies that combine qualitative and quantitative approaches. However,\\u000a most of these studies are tailored to specific research problem in a particular study and are typically limited to a fixed\\u000a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches (e.g. qualitative interviews followed by a survey or vice-versa). This\\u000a limitation historically arises from time,

Bojana Lobe; Vasja Vehovar

2009-01-01

386

Instrument Development, Study Design Implementation, and Survey Conduct for the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project  

PubMed Central

The National Opinion Research Center, led by a team of investigators at the University of Chicago, conducted more than 3,000 in-person interviews with a nationally representative sample of adults aged 57–85 years. Data collection included in-person questionnaire items, an extensive array of biomeasures, and a postinterview self-administered questionnaire. The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) interview included the collection of 13 biomeasures: weight, waist circumference, height, blood pressure, smell, saliva collection, taste, a self-administered vaginal swab for female respondents, “Get Up and Go,” distance vision, touch, oral mucosal transudate (Orasure®) human immunodeficiency virus test, and blood spots. This article discusses the development of NSHAP’s instruments and implementation of the study design. Measures, such as response and cooperation rates, are also provided to evaluate the effectiveness of the design and implementation. PMID:19357076

Jaszczak, Angela; Graber, Jessica; Lundeen, Katie; Leitsch, Sara; Wargo, Erin; O’Muircheartaigh, Colm

2009-01-01

387

The Cross-Generational Mother–Daughter–Aunt–Niece Design: Establishing Validity of the MDAN Design with NLSY Fertility Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) fertility variables, we introduce and illustrate a new genetically-informative\\u000a design. First, we develop a kinship linking algorithm, using the NLSY79 and the NLSY-Children data to link mothers to daughters\\u000a and aunts to nieces. Then we construct mother–daughter correlations to compare to aunt–niece correlations, an MDAN design,\\u000a within the context of the quantitative genetic

Joseph Lee Rodgers; David E. Bard; Amber Johnson; Brian D’Onofrio; Warren B. Miller

2008-01-01

388

Photoelectric AFP quantitative detection of immunochromatographic assay strip  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) system for quantitative determination of analyte in sample is described in this paper. The designed system not only quantitatively detect target analytes in sample but also enhance detection precision in immunochromatographic assay technique.

Du, Min; Jiang, Hai-yan

2006-09-01

389

Problems with Institutional Surveys.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey done properly by accepted and scientifically justifiable techniques can provide information on behalf of the goals of institutional advancement in academe. Deficiencies in institutional research are seen as the result of the lack of guidance on survey design, questionnaire construction, or problem definition in education research texts.…

Frey, James H.

1979-01-01

390

NATIONAL COMORBIDITY SURVEY (NCS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) was a collaborative epidemiologic investigation designed to study the prevalence and correlates of DSM III-R disorders and patterns and correlates of service utilization for these disorders. The NCS was the first survey to administer a struct...

391

Secure computation of surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We describe the design and implementation,of a system for conducting surveys while hiding the information provided by the respondents. We use the CRA Taulbee Survey of faculty salaries in computer science departments as a concrete example in which there are real privacy concerns but in which participation is too large and uncoordinated,for direct application of known secure multiparty function

J. Feigenbaum; B. Pinkas; R. Ryger; F. Saint-jean

2004-01-01

392

Bilingualism. Survey Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation 2002 National Survey of Latinos explored the attitudes and experiences of Latinos on a wide variety of topics. The survey sample was designed to include enough Hispanics from various backgrounds and national origin groups so that in addition to describing Latinos overall, comparisons also could be…

Pew Hispanic Center, 2004

2004-01-01

393

Detecting population declines over large areas with presence-absence, time-to-encounter, and count survey methods.  

PubMed

Ecologists often discount presence-absence surveys as a poor way to gain insight into population dynamics, in part because these surveys are not amenable to many standard statistical tests. Still, presence-absence surveys are sometimes the only feasible alternative for monitoring large areas when funds are limited, especially for sparse or difficult-to-detect species. I undertook a detailed simulation study to compare the power of presence-absence, count, and time-to-encounter surveys to detect regional declines in a population. I used a modeling approach that simulates both population numbers and the monitoring process, accounting for observation and other measurement errors. In gauging the efficacy of presence-absence surveys versus other approaches, I varied the number of survey sites, the spatial variation in encounter rate, the mean encounter rate, and the type of population loss. My results showed that presence-absence data can be as or more powerful than count data in many cases. Quantitative guidelines for choosing between presence-absence surveys and count surveys depend on the biological and logistical constraints governing a conservation monitoring situation. Generally, presence-absence surveys work best when there is little variability in abundance among the survey sites, the organism is rare, and the species is difficult to detect so that the time spent getting to each survey site is less than or equal to the time spent surveying each site. Count surveys work best otherwise. I present a case study with count data on the Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) from the North American Breeding Bird Survey to illustrate how the method might be used with field-survey data. The case study demonstrates that a count survey would be the most cost-effective design but would entail reduction in the number of sites. If this site reduction is not desirable, a presence-absence survey would be the most cost-effective survey. PMID:16909580

Pollock, Jacob E

2006-06-01

394

Doing Quantitative Research in Education with SPSS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book looks at quantitative research methods in education. The book is structured to start with chapters on conceptual issues and designing quantitative research studies before going on to data analysis. While each chapter can be studied separately, a better understanding will be reached by reading the book sequentially. This book is intended…

Muijs, Daniel

2004-01-01

395

The path of placement of a removable partial denture: a microscope based approach to survey and design.  

PubMed

This article reviews the topic of how to identify and develop a removable partial denture (RPD) path of placement, and provides a literature review of the concept of the RPD path of placement, also known as the path of insertion. An optimal RPD path of placement, guided by mutually parallel guide planes, ensures that the RPD flanges fit intimately over edentulous ridge structures and that the framework fits intimately with guide plane surfaces, which prevents food collecting empty spaces between the intaglio surface of the framework and intraoral surfaces, and ensures that RPD clasps engage adequate numbers of tooth undercuts to ensure RPD retention. The article covers topics such as the causes of obstructions to RPD intra-oral seating, the causes of food collecting empty spaces that may exist around an RPD, and how to identify if a guide plane is parallel with the projected RPD path of placement. The article presents a method of using a surgical operating microscope, or high magnification (6-8x or greater) binocular surgical loupes telescopes, combined with co-axial illumination, to identify a preliminary path of placement for an arch. This preliminary path of placement concept may help to guide a dentist or a dental laboratory technician when surveying a master cast of the arch to develop an RPD path of placement, or in verifying that intra-oral contouring has aligned teeth surfaces optimally with the RPD path of placement. In dentistry, a well-fitting RPD reduces long-term periodontal or structural damage to abutment teeth. PMID:25722842

Mamoun, John Sami

2015-02-01

396

Flat conductor cable survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design handbook contains data and illustrations concerned with commercial and Government flat-conductor-cable connecting and terminating hardware. Material was obtained from a NASA-sponsored industry-wide survey of approximately 150 companies and Government agencies.

Swanson, C. R.; Walker, G. L.

1973-01-01

397

DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

Cusick L.T.

2002-09-25

398

Study Quality in SLA: A Cumulative and Developmental Assessment of Designs, Analyses, Reporting Practices, and Outcomes in Quantitative L2 Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

I began this study with two assumptions. Assumption 1: Study quality matters. If the means by which researchers design, carry out, and report on their studies lack in rigor or transparency, theory and practice are likely to be misguided or at least decelerated. Assumption 2 is an implication of Assumption 1: Quality should be measured rather than…

Plonsky, Luke

2011-01-01

399

Quantitative impurity analysis of monoclonal antibody size heterogeneity by CE-LIF: example of development and validation through a quality-by-design framework.  

PubMed

This paper describes the framework of quality by design applied to the development, optimization and validation of a sensitive capillary electrophoresis-sodium dodecyl sulfate (CE-SDS) assay for monitoring impurities that potentially impact drug efficacy or patient safety produced in the manufacture of therapeutic MAb products. Drug substance or drug product samples are derivatized with fluorogenic 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde and nucleophilic cyanide before separation by CE-SDS coupled to LIF detection. Three design-of-experiments enabled critical labeling parameters to meet method requirements for detecting minor impurities while building precision and robustness into the assay during development. The screening design predicted optimal conditions to control labeling artifacts while two full factorial designs demonstrated method robustness through control of temperature and cyanide parameters within the normal operating range. Subsequent validation according to the guidelines of the International Committee of Harmonization showed the CE-SDS/LIF assay was specific, accurate, and precise (RSD ? 0.8%) for relative peak distribution and linear (R > 0.997) between the range of 0.5-1.5 mg/mL with LOD and LOQ of 10 ng/mL and 35 ng/mL, respectively. Validation confirmed the system suitability criteria used as a level of control to ensure reliable method performance. PMID:22430180

Michels, David A; Parker, Monica; Salas-Solano, Oscar

2012-03-01

400

A Linkage Strategy for Detection of Human Quantitative-Trait Loci. II. Optimization of Study Designs Based on Extreme Sib Pairs and Generalized Relative Risk Ratios  

Microsoft Academic Search

eral, combining reasonable numbers of both extremely Elston 1994) motivated our current work in design opti- discordant and extremely concordant sib pairs that were mization of human QTL studies based on ESP methods. available in the sample is more powerful and more cost We proposed a test (called ''the EDAC test,'' which is effective than pursuing only a single type

Chi Gu; D. C. Rao

1997-01-01

401

Conduct a state-of-the-art survey of existing knowledge for the design of ground-source heat pumps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Horizontal serpentine coils have been and are at present the most common coil configuration. Best design data exist for horizontal coils in heating only applications with moist soil. Applications in dry soil or where significant summer cooling is required are not as well understood at this time. A seasonal performance factor of about 3.0 can be expected for a properly designed and installed residential ground-coupled heat-pump system. Long-term durability of buried steel and cooper tubing has been demonstrated. Life expectancy of thin-walled polyethylene tubing in the heating-only application is expected to be equally as good: however, present experience is limited to less than five years. In the cooling application with heat-rejection temperatures exceeding 100 F, some cracking has been experienced upon subsequent cool-down for heating operation due to localized stresses induced by conformity of the tubing to bedding material (stones) when hot. Receding of the soil from the pipe after a period of several years was experienced in the late 1940's. An understanding of this phenomenon may be crucial to the long-term operating success of these systems.

Ball, D. A.

1982-03-01

402

Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors.  

PubMed

Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux). A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R(2) = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model. PMID:25709964

Chandra De, Utpal; Debnath, Tanusree; Sen, Debanjan; Debnath, Sudhan

2015-01-01

403

Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux). A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R2 = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model. PMID:25709964

Chandra De, Utpal; Debnath, Tanusree; Sen, Debanjan; Debnath, Sudhan

2015-01-01

404

Quantitative models for reverse logistics: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article surveys the recently emerged field of reverse logistics. The management of return flows induced by the various forms of reuse of products and materials in industrial production processes has received growing attention throughout this decade. Many authors have proposed quantitative models taking those changes in the logistics environment into account. However, no general framework has been suggested yet.

Moritz Fleischmann; Jacqueline M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard; Rommert Dekker; Erwin van der Laan; Jo A. E. E. van Nunen; Luk N. Van Wassenhove

1997-01-01

405

GUIDELINES FOR ZOOPLANKTON SAMPLING IN QUANTITATIVE BASELINE AND MONITORING PROGRAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methods applicable to zooplankton sampling and analysis in quantitative baseline and monitoring surveys are evaluated and summarized. Specific recommendations by managers must take into account characteristics of the water mass under investigation, the abundance of contained zoop...

406

Quantitative research and issues of political sensitivity in rural China  

E-print Network

Political sensitivity is always a challenge for the scholar doing fieldwork in nondemocratic and transitional systems, especially when doing surveys and quantitative research. Not only are more research topics likely to ...

Tsai, Lily L.

407

EPA utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey: October-December 1980. Volume II. Design and performance data for operational FGD systems. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first full compilation (not a supplement) since the October-December 1979 report (EPA-600/7-80-029a). Because the next three reports are to be supplements, this issue should be retained for reference throughout the year. The report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, presents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, terminated domestic utility FGD systems, operational domestic particle scrubbers, and Japanese coal-fired utility boiler FGD installations. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms. Domestic FGD systems are tabulated alphabetically by development status (operational, under construction, or in planning stages), utility company, process supplier, process, and waste disposal practice. It presents data on boiler design, FGD system design, fuel characteristics, and actual performance. It includes unit by unit dependability parameters and discusses problems and solutions associated with the boilers and FGD systems. Process flow diagrams and FGD system economic data are appended. Because of its length, Section 3 of this report is published as a separate volume; the remainder of the report is in Volume I (PB81-187783). The report Front Matter and Appendices B, C, and D are repeated here to assist the reader.

Smith, M.; Melia, M.; Gregory, N.; Scalf, K.

1981-01-01

408

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) utility FGD (flue gas desulfurization) survey. Volume II. Design and performance data for operational FGD systems. Quarterly report Oct-Dec 1981  

SciTech Connect

The report is the first full compilation (not a supplement) since the October-December 1980 report (PB81-187783). Because the next three reports are to be supplements, this issue should be retained for reference throughout the year. The report, generated by a computerized data base system, presents a survey of operational domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms. Domestic FGD systems are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. It presents data on boiler design, FGD system design, fuel characteristics, and actual performance. It includes unit by unit dependability parameters and discusses problems and solutions associated with the boilers of the FGD systems. Process flow diagrams and definitions are appended. Because of its length, Section 3 of the report is published as a separate volume; the remainder of the report is in Volume I. The report Front Matter and Appendices B, C, and D are repeated in Volume II to assist the reader.

Melia, M.T.; Bruck, N.G.

1982-09-01

409

Streamlining volcano-related, web-based data display and design with a new U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center website  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of the newly designed U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Science Center website is to provide a reliable, easy to understand, and accessible format to display volcano monitoring data and scientific information on US volcanoes and their hazards. There are greater than 150 active or potentially active volcanoes in the United States, and the Volcano Science Center aims to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes at these volcanoes and to lessen the harmful impacts of potential volcanic activity. To fulfill a Congressional mandate, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program must communicate scientific findings to authorities and the public in a timely and understandable form. The easiest and most efficient way to deliver this information is via the Internet. We implemented a new database model to organize website content, ensuring consistency, accuracy, and timeliness of information display. Real-time monitoring data is available for over 50 volcanoes in the United States, and web-site visitors are able to interact with a dynamic, map-based display system to access and analyze these data, which are managed by scientists from the five USGS volcano observatories. Helicorders, recent hypocenters, webcams, tilt measurements, deformation, gas emissions, and changes in hydrology can be viewed for any of the real-time instruments. The newly designed Volcano Science Center web presence streamlines the display of research findings, hazard assessments, and real-time monitoring data for the U.S. volcanoes.

Stovall, W. K.; Randall, M. J.; Cervelli, P. F.

2011-12-01

410

Developing Geoscience Students' Quantitative Skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sophisticated quantitative skills are an essential tool for the professional geoscientist. While students learn many of these sophisticated skills in graduate school, it is increasingly important that they have a strong grounding in quantitative geoscience as undergraduates. Faculty have developed many strong approaches to teaching these skills in a wide variety of geoscience courses. A workshop in June 2005 brought together eight faculty teaching surface processes and climate change to discuss and refine activities they use and to publish them on the Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences website (serc.Carleton.edu/quantskills) for broader use. Workshop participants in consultation with two mathematics faculty who have expertise in math education developed six review criteria to guide discussion: 1) Are the quantitative and geologic goals central and important? (e.g. problem solving, mastery of important skill, modeling, relating theory to observation); 2) Does the activity lead to better problem solving? 3) Are the quantitative skills integrated with geoscience concepts in a way that makes sense for the learning environment and supports learning both quantitative skills and geoscience? 4) Does the methodology support learning? (e.g. motivate and engage students; use multiple representations, incorporate reflection, discussion and synthesis) 5) Are the materials complete and helpful to students? 6) How well has the activity worked when used? Workshop participants found that reviewing each others activities was very productive because they thought about new ways to teach and the experience of reviewing helped them think about their own activity from a different point of view. The review criteria focused their thinking about the activity and would be equally helpful in the design of a new activity. We invite a broad international discussion of the criteria(serc.Carleton.edu/quantskills/workshop05/review.html).The Teaching activities can be found on the Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences website (serc.Carleton.edu/quantskills/). In addition to the teaching activity collection (85 activites), this site contains a variety of resources to assist faculty with the methods they use to teach quantitative skills at both the introductory and advanced levels; information about broader efforts in quantitative literacy involving other science disciplines, and a special section of resources for students who are struggling with their quantitative skills. The site is part of the Digital Library for Earth Science Education and has been developed by geoscience faculty in collaboration with mathematicians and mathematics educators with funding from the National Science Foundation.

Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

2005-12-01

411

Developing a weighting strategy to include mobile phone numbers into an ongoing population health survey using an overlapping dual-frame design with limited benchmark information  

PubMed Central

Background In 2012 mobile phone numbers were included into the ongoing New South Wales Population Health Survey (NSWPHS) using an overlapping dual-frame design. Previously in the NSWPHS the sample was selected using random digit dialing (RDD) of landline phone numbers. The survey was undertaken using computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The weighting strategy needed to be significantly expanded to manage the differing probabilities of selection by frame, including that of children of mobile-only phone users, and to adjust for the increased chance of selection of dual-phone users. This paper describes the development of the final weighting strategy to properly combine the data from two overlapping sample frames accounting for the fact that population benchmarks for the different sampling frames were not available at the state or regional level. Methods Estimates of the number of phone numbers for the landline and mobile phone frames used to calculate the differing probabilities of selection by frame, for New South Wales (NSW) and by stratum, were obtained by apportioning Australian estimates as none were available for NSW. The weighting strategy was then developed by calculating person selection probabilities, selection weights, applying a constant composite factor to the dual-phone users sample weights, and benchmarking to the latest NSW population by age group, sex and stratum. Results Data from the NSWPHS for the first quarter of 2012 was used to test the weighting strategy. This consisted of data on 3395 respondents with 2171 (64%) from the landline frame and 1224 (36%) from the mobile frame. However, in order to calculate the weights, data needed to be available for all core weighting variables and so 3378 respondents, 2933 adults and 445 children, had sufficient data to be included. Average person weights were 3.3 times higher for the mobile-only respondents, 1.3 times higher for the landline-only respondents and 1.7 times higher for dual-phone users in the mobile frame compared to the dual-phone users in the landline frame. The overall weight effect for the first quarter of 2012 was 1.93 and the coefficient of variation of the weights was 0.96. The weight effects for 2012 were similar to, and in many cases less than, the effects found in the corresponding quarter of the 2011 NSWPHS when only a landline based sample was used. Conclusions The inclusion of mobile phone numbers, through an overlapping dual-frame design, improved the coverage of the survey and an appropriate weighing procedure is feasible, although it added substantially to the complexity of the weighting strategy. Access to accurate Australian, State and Territory estimates of the number of landline and mobile phone numbers and type of phone use by at least age group and sex would greatly assist in the weighting of dual-frame surveys in Australia. PMID:25189826

2014-01-01

412

Bayesian adaptive survey protocols for resource management  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Transparency in resource management decisions requires a proper accounting of uncertainty at multiple stages of the decision-making process. As information becomes available, periodic review and updating of resource management protocols reduces uncertainty and improves management decisions. One of the most basic steps to mitigating anthropogenic effects on populations is determining if a population of a species occurs in an area that will be affected by human activity. Species are rarely detected with certainty, however, and falsely declaring a species absent can cause improper conservation decisions or even extirpation of populations. We propose a method to design survey protocols for imperfectly detected species that accounts for multiple sources of uncertainty in the detection process, is capable of quantitatively incorporating expert opinion into the decision-making process, allows periodic updates to the protocol, and permits resource managers to weigh the severity of consequences if the species is falsely declared absent. We developed our method using the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas), a threatened species precinctive to the Central Valley of California, as a case study. Survey date was negatively related to the probability of detecting the giant gartersnake, and water temperature was positively related to the probability of detecting the giant gartersnake at a sampled location. Reporting sampling effort, timing and duration of surveys, and water temperatures would allow resource managers to evaluate the probability that the giant gartersnake occurs at sampled sites where it is not detected. This information would also allow periodic updates and quantitative evaluation of changes to the giant gartersnake survey protocol. Because it naturally allows multiple sources of information and is predicated upon the idea of updating information, Bayesian analysis is well-suited to solving the problem of developing efficient sampling protocols for species of conservation concern.

Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.

2011-01-01

413

BIOAMBIENT.ES study protocol: rationale and design of a cross-sectional human biomonitoring survey in Spain.  

PubMed

Human biomonitoring (HBM), defined as the measurement of concentrations of chemicals or of their metabolites in human biological matrices, is considered the method of choice for determining internal exposures in individuals. HBM is part of environmental exposure surveillance systems in several countries. In 2007, the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment promoted BIOAMBIENT.ES project, a national-level HBM study on environmental pollutants carried out in Spain to estimate levels of heavy metals, persistent organic pollutants, and other substances on the Spanish active workforce. BIOAMBIENT.ES is a nationwide cross-sectional study, with a stratified cluster sampling designed to cover all geographical areas, sex and occupational sectors, and aimed to obtain a representative sample of the Spanish workforce. Participants were recruited among people residing in Spain for 5 years or more, which underwent their annual occupational medical check-up in the health facilities of the Societies for Prevention of IBERMUTUAMUR, MUTUALIA, MC-PREVENCIÓN, MUGATRA, UNIMAT PREVENCIÓN, and PREVIMAC (March 2009-July 2010). A total of 1,892 subjects fulfilled the criteria for inclusion, donated biological samples (1,880 blood, 1,770 urine, and 577 hair) and completed a short self-administrated epidemiological questionnaire on environmental and lifestyle-related exposures. Additionally, clinical information from participant's health exams was obtained. This project will provide a first overview of the body burden of selected pollutants in a representative sample of the Spanish-occupied population. This information will be useful to establish reference values of the studied population and, eventually, to evaluate temporal trends and the effectiveness of environmental and health policies. PMID:23184128

Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Cervantes-Amat, Marta; Esteban, Marta; Ruiz-Moraga, Montserrat; Aragonés, Nuria; Pollán, Marina; Navarro, Carmen; Calvo, Eva; Román, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Castaño, Argelia

2013-02-01

414

NATIONAL MORTALITY FOLLOWBACK SURVEY (NMFS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The 1993 National Mortality Followback Survey (NMFS) is the latest in a series of periodic surveys designed to supplement information routinely collected on the death certificate. The Mortality Followback Survey Program, begun in the 1960's by the National Center for Health Stati...

415

National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to collect information about ambulatory medical care services in the United States. Patient data is collected from physicians primarily engaged in direct patient care, excluding those in the specialties of anesthesiology, pathology, and radiology. The survey was conducted annually from 1973 to 1981, in 1985, and annually since 1989.

416

Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence  

E-print Network

Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence Jared C. Carbone NicholasRivers July 2014 Abstract When considering adoption of a domestic climate change policy survey the literature on the quantitative impacts of unilateral climate change policy derived from

417

Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an annotated bibliography of resources on this month's theme "Design" for K-8 language arts, art and architecture, music and dance, science, math, social studies, health, and physical education. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audiotapes, magazines, professional resources and classroom activities. Features Art…

Online-Offline, 1998

1998-01-01

418

Appendix of Surveys from the Provider Survey Methods Workshop  

Cancer.gov

In November 2010, ARP sponsored a Provider Survey Methods Workshop to review and discuss current methodologies in designing and fielding large-scale surveys of physicians and medical group practices. The workshop included a review of methods used in fielding and reporting on large-scale provider surveys over the decade 2000-2010. The following is an Appendix of the 117 surveys included in the review.

419

Approaches to quality management in the UK: survey evidence and implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to shift the focus to the implications of various quality management systems, as a pervasive feature of modern organisational life, for business excellence. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A mail-based survey is conducted among a total of 150 UK-based European Foundation for Quality Management-affiliated organisations. This quantitative methodology sounds appropriate, given that there is a relative dearth of

Ebrahim Soltani; Pei-Chun Lai

2007-01-01

420

Survey Breakoff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Survey respondents may start the survey but fail to complete it, resulting in breakoff. This behavior occurs in interviewer-administered surveys but it occurs at high rates in web surveys, necessitating further attention. Breakoff is one of multiple response behaviors, each of which can be affected by unique and common causes. We present a framework within which to study different response

Andy Peytchev

2009-01-01

421

HPLC and HPTLC methods by design for quantitative characterization and in vitro anti-oxidant activity of polyherbal formulation containing Rheum emodi.  

PubMed

Safoof-e-Pathar phori (SPP) is a traditional polyherbal formulation and has been used since long time for its anti-urolithiatic activity. It contains three plant constituents Didymocarpous pedicellata, Dolichous biflorus and Rheum emodi. Emodin and chrysophanic acid were selected as chemical markers for SPP and quantified using simultaneous HPTLC and RP-HPLC methods in R. emodi and in SPP. The simultaneous methods were found linear r(2) = 0.991 in a wide range (10-800 ng spot(-1) with HPTLC, 5-500 µg mL(-1) with HPLC) precise, accurate and robust for both the drugs. Anti-oxidant activity of SPP, R. emodi as well as standard emodin and chrysophanic acid were determined by using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical), which showed better activity of R. emodi (IC50 = 12.27) extract when compared with SPP (IC50 = 32.99) and standard drugs (IC50 = 66.81). The robustness of methods were proved by applying the Box-Behnken response surface design software and other validation parameters evaluated were satisfactorily met; hence, the developed method found suitable for application in the quality control of several formulations containing emodin and chrysophanic acid. PMID:23978770

Ahmad, Wasim; Zaidi, Syed Mohammad Arif; Mujeeb, Mohd; Ansari, Shahid Hussain; Ahmad, Sayeed

2014-09-01

422

Design of multiplex calibrant plasmids, their use in GMO detection and the limit of their applicability for quantitative purposes owing to competition effects.  

PubMed

Five double-target multiplex plasmids to be used as calibrants for GMO quantification were constructed. They were composed of two modified targets associated in tandem in the same plasmid: (1) a part of the soybean lectin gene and (2) a part of the transgenic construction of the GTS40-3-2 event. Modifications were performed in such a way that each target could be amplified with the same primers as those for the original target from which they were derived but such that each was specifically detected with an appropriate probe. Sequence modifications were done to keep the parameters of the new target as similar as possible to those of its original sequence. The plasmids were designed to be used either in separate reactions or in multiplex reactions. Evidence is given that with each of the five different plasmids used in separate wells as a calibrant for a different copy number, a calibration curve can be built. When the targets were amplified together (in multiplex) and at different concentrations inside the same well, the calibration curves showed that there was a competition effect between the targets and this limits the range of copy numbers for calibration over a maximum of 2 orders of magnitude. Another possible application of multiplex plasmids is discussed. PMID:20099062

Debode, Frédéric; Marien, Aline; Janssen, Eric; Berben, Gilbert

2010-03-01

423

A Survey of Systemic Risk Analytics  

E-print Network

We provide a survey of 31 quantitative measures of systemic risk in the economics and finance literature, chosen to span key themes and issues in systemic risk measurement and management. We motivate these measures from ...

Bisias, Dimitrios

424

A New Approach for the Quantitative Evaluation of Storm Disasters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper has put forward the concept of storm magnitude and disaster intensity and designed a kind of new method by quantitative calculation. Storm magnitude is the quantitative index that describes the scale of a storm, and disaster intensity of storm is the quantitative index to describe the loss caused by a storm flood. Both indices have many theoretical and

Lihua Feng

2009-01-01

425

Hypertext: An Introduction and Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a survey of existing hypertext systems, their applications, and their design. It is both an introduction to the world of hypertext and, at a deeper cut, a survey of some of the most important design issues that go into fashioning a hypertext environment. The concept of hypertext is quite simple: Windows on the screen are associated with

Jeff Conklin

1987-01-01

426

Development and validation of a real-time two-step RT-qPCR TaqMan(®) assay for quantitation of Sacbrood virus (SBV) and its application to a field survey of symptomatic honey bee colonies.  

PubMed

Sacbrood virus (SBV) is the causal agent of a disease of honey bee larvae, resulting in failure to pupate and causing death. The typical clinical symptom of SBV is an accumulation of SBV-rich fluid in swollen sub-cuticular pouches, forming the characteristic fluid-filled sac that gives its name to the disease. Outbreaks of the disease have been reported in different countries, affecting the development of the brood and causing losses in honey bee colonies. Today, few data are available on the SBV viral load in the case of overt disease in larvae, or for the behavioural changes of SBV-infected adult bees. A two-step real-time RT-PCR assay, based on TaqMan(®) technology using a fluorescent probe (FAM-TAMRA) was therefore developed to quantify Sacbrood virus in larvae, pupae and adult bees from symptomatic apiaries. This assay was first validated according to the recent XP-U47-600 standard issued by the French Standards Institute, where the reliability and the repeatability of the results and the performance of the assay were confirmed. The performance of the qPCR assay was validated over the 6 log range of the standard curve (i.e. from 10(2) to 10(8) copies per well) with a measurement uncertainty evaluated at 0.11log10. The detection and quantitation limits were established respectively at 50 copies and 100 copies of SBV genome, for a template volume of 5?l of cDNA. The RT-qPCR assay was applied during a French SBV outbreak in 2012 where larvae with typical SBV signs were collected, along with individuals without clinical signs. The SBV quantitation revealed that, in symptomatic larvae, the virus load was significantly higher than in samples without clinical signs. Combining quantitation with clinical data, a threshold of SBV viral load related to an overt disease was proposed (10(10) SBV genome copies per individual). PMID:24121133

Blanchard, Philippe; Guillot, Sylvain; Antùnez, Karina; Köglberger, Hemma; Kryger, Per; de Miranda, Joachim R; Franco, Stéphanie; Chauzat, Marie-Pierre; Thiéry, Richard; Ribière, Magali

2014-03-01

427

Quantitative Gram Stain Interpretation Criteria Used by Microbiology Laboratories in Alberta, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbiology laboratories in Alberta, Canada, were surveyed to determine the quantitative interpretive criteria used to routinely read and report Gram stains. There was a wide variability in the quantitative reporting criteria cited for both cells and bacteria, with only 11 of 32 (34.4%) laboratories surveyed using the criteria recommended by the external proficiency-testing program. Lack of standardized criteria not only

DEIRDRE CHURCH; ELIZABETH MELNYK; BARBARA UNGER

2000-01-01

428

Design, Data Collection, Monitoring, Interview Administration Time, and Data Editing in the 1993 National Household Education Survey (NHES:93). Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Household Education Survey (NHES) is a data collection system of the National Center for Education Statistics that collects and publishes data on the condition of education in the United States. It is a telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized population of the country, and it focuses on issues that are best studied through…

Brick, J. Michael; Collins, Mary A.; Nolin, Mary Jo; Davies, Elizabeth; Feibus, Mary L.

429

Montana State University 1 Land Surveying Minor  

E-print Network

Montana State University 1 Land Surveying Minor This minor is designed to provide students with perspective and skills to pursue a successful career in surveying or a surveying related field. The focus is on courses related to surveying such as photogrammetry, global positioning systems

Maxwell, Bruce D.

430

PANELS AND OTHER SURVEY EXTENSIONS TO THE  

E-print Network

-Based Survey Methods 25 6. PANEL SURVEY OPTIONS 26 6.1 Introduction 26 6.2 Design Options 27 6.3 Cost. The purpose of this report is to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of alternative survey methods collection program. At the same time, however, a number of other travel behaviour survey methods exist which

Toronto, University of

431

Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey

Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

2012-01-01

432

Slone Survey  

Cancer.gov

The Slone Survey, run by the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, is an ongoing telephone survey of medication use in the U.S. population. The survey began in 1998 and to date over 19,500 subjects have been interviewed.

433

Prototype ultrasonic instrument for quantitative testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype ultrasonic instrument has been designed and developed for quantitative testing. The complete delivered instrument consists of a pulser/receiver which plugs into a standard oscilloscope, an rf power amplifier, a standard decade oscillator, and a set of broadband transducers for typical use at 1, 2, 5 and 10 MHz. The system provides for its own calibration, and on the oscilloscope, presents a quantitative (digital) indication of time base and sensitivity scale factors and some measurement data.

Lynnworth, L. C.; Dubois, J. L.; Kranz, P. R.

1972-01-01

434

Towards global benchmarking of food environments and policies to reduce obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases: design and methods for nation-wide surveys  

PubMed Central

Introduction Unhealthy diets are heavily driven by unhealthy food environments. The International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Research, Monitoring and Action Support (INFORMAS) has been established to reduce obesity, NCDs and their related inequalities globally. This paper describes the design and methods of the first-ever, comprehensive national survey on the healthiness of food environments and the public and private sector policies influencing them, as a first step towards global monitoring of food environments and policies. Methods and analysis A package of 11 substudies has been identified: (1) food composition, labelling and promotion on food packages; (2) food prices, shelf space and placement of foods in different outlets (mainly supermarkets); (3) food provision in schools/early childhood education (ECE) services and outdoor food promotion around schools/ECE services; (4) density of and proximity to food outlets in communities; food promotion to children via (5) television, (6) magazines, (7) sport club sponsorships, and (8) internet and social media; (9) analysis of the impact of trade and investment agreements on food environments; (10) government policies and actions; and (11) private sector actions and practices. For the substudies on food prices, provision, promotion and retail, ‘environmental equity’ indicators have been developed to check progress towards reducing diet-related health inequalities. Indicators for these modules will be assessed by tertiles of area deprivation index or school deciles. International ‘best practice benchmarks’ will be identified, against which to compare progress of countries on improving the healthiness of their food environments and policies. Dissemination This research is highly original due to the very ‘upstream’ approach being taken and its direct policy relevance. The detailed protocols will be offered to and adapted for countries of varying size and income in order to establish INFORMAS globally as a new monitoring initiative to reduce obesity and diet-related NCDs. PMID:24833697

Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Swinburn, Boyd

2014-01-01

435

Quantitative Review of a Political Science Documentary/Movie  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This assignment is designed to introduce quantitative reasoning and critical thinking in viewing documentary videos on the issues of development. Students will write a review essay about one of three designated documentaries for the course.

Tun Myint

436

Very large radio surveys of the sky  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in electronics and computing have made possible a new generation of large radio surveys of the sky that yield an order-of-magnitude higher sensitivity and positional accuracy. Combined with the unique properties of the radio universe, these quantitative improvements open up qualitatively different and exciting new scientific applications of radio surveys. PMID:10220365

Condon, J. J.

1999-01-01

437

Do College Student Surveys Have Any Validity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the field of higher education, the majority of quantitative research focuses on college students. Given the limitations of institutional databases, surveys of college students have become one of the largest and most frequently used data sources. In addition, surveys of college students play an increasingly important role in evaluating…

Porter, Stephen R.

2010-01-01

438

A Mixed Quantitative/Qualitative Method Evaluating Compromise Solutions  

E-print Network

A Mixed Quantitative/Qualitative Method for Evaluating Compromise Solutions to Conflicts by allowing expressed preferences of design teams to be qualitative as well as quantitative, by allowing teams engineering is an approach to design in which, in order to avoid costly redesign, aspects of the product life

Bahler, Dennis R.

439

Measuring our universe from galaxy redshift surveys  

E-print Network

Galaxy redshift surveys have achieved significant progress over the last couple of decades. Those surveys tell us in the most straightforward way what our local universe looks like. While the galaxy distribution traces the bright side of the universe, detailed quantitative analyses of the data have even revealed the dark side of the universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter as well as more mysterious dark energy (or Einstein's cosmological constant). We describe several methodologies of using galaxy redshift surveys as cosmological probes, and then summarize the recent results from the existing surveys. Finally we present our views on the future of redshift surveys in the era of Precision Cosmology.

Ofer Lahav; Yasushi Suto

2004-08-04

440

National Home and Hospice Care Survey  

MedlinePLUS

... National Home Health Aide Survey The first national probability survey of home health aides, was designed to ... More Print page Contact Us: Long-term Care Statistics Branch Division of Health Care Statistics National Center ...

441

Quick statistics Survey 55563 'Privacy Survey'  

E-print Network

Quick statistics Survey 55563 'Privacy Survey' Results Survey 55563 Number of records in this query: 277 Total records in survey: 277 Percentage of total: 100.00% Page 1 / 94 #12;Quick statistics Survey 55563 'Privacy Survey' Page 2 / 94 #12;Quick statistics Survey 55563 'Privacy Survey' Field summary

Kaiser, Gail E.

442

Online Interactive Teaching Modules Enhance Quantitative Proficiency of Introductory Biology Students  

PubMed Central

There is widespread agreement within the scientific and education communities that undergraduate biology curricula fall short in providing students with the quantitative and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and be prepared fully to contribute to future scientific inquiry. MathBench Biology Modules were designed to address these needs through a series of interactive, Web-based modules that can be used to supplement existing course content across the biological sciences curriculum. The effect of the modules was assessed in an introductory biology course at the University of Maryland. Over the course of the semester, students showed significant increases in quantitative skills that were independent of previous math course work. Students also showed increased comfort with solving quantitative problems, whether or not they ultimately arrived at the correct answer. A survey of spring 2009 graduates indicated that those who had experienced MathBench in their course work had a greater appreciation for the role of mathematics in modern biology than those who had not used MathBench. MathBench modules allow students from diverse educational backgrounds to hone their quantitative skills, preparing them for more complex mathematical approaches in upper-division courses. PMID:20810959

Nelson, Kären C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Keller, Michael; Fagan, William F.

2010-01-01

443