Science.gov

Sample records for quantum computing based

  1. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  2. Acausal measurement-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of by-product operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, by-product operators cannot be avoided. Here we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner, Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing restricting local operations to projective measurements. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the standard causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that if we restrict local operations to projective measurements the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing. We also show that it is possible to consider a causal game whose causal inequality is violated by acausal measurement-based quantum computing.

  3. Waveguide-QED-Based Photonic Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a new scheme for quantum computation using flying qubits—propagating photons in a one-dimensional waveguide interacting with matter qubits. Photon-photon interactions are mediated by the coupling to a four-level system, based on which photon-photon π-phase gates (controlled-not) can be implemented for universal quantum computation. We show that high gate fidelity is possible, given recent dramatic experimental progress in superconducting circuits and photonic-crystal waveguides. The proposed system can be an important building block for future on-chip quantum networks.

  4. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-09-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3×10-3, which is comparable to that (7.5×10-3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10-3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  5. Symmetrically private information retrieval based on blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Jianping; Wang, Ping; Xu, Lingling

    2015-05-01

    Universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) is a new secure quantum computing protocol which allows a user Alice who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology to delegate her computing to a server Bob without leaking any privacy. Using the features of UBQC, we propose a protocol to achieve symmetrically private information retrieval, which allows a quantum limited Alice to query an item from Bob with a fully fledged quantum computer; meanwhile, the privacy of both parties is preserved. The security of our protocol is based on the assumption that malicious Alice has no quantum computer, which avoids the impossibility proof of Lo. For the honest Alice, she is almost classical and only requires minimal quantum resources to carry out the proposed protocol. Therefore, she does not need any expensive laboratory which can maintain the coherence of complicated quantum experimental setups.

  6. Milestones toward Majorana-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicea, Jason

    Experiments on nanowire-based Majorana platforms now appear poised to move beyond the preliminary problem of zero-mode detection and towards loftier goals of realizing non-Abelian statistics and quantum information applications. Using an approach that synthesizes recent materials growth breakthroughs with tools long successfully deployed in quantum-dot research, I will outline a number of relatively modest milestones that progressively bridge the gap between the current state of the art and these grand longer-term challenges. The intermediate Majorana experiments surveyed in this talk should be broadly adaptable to other approaches as well. Supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1341822), Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, and Walter Burke Institute at Caltech.

  7. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  8. Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    Quantum mechanics plays a crucial role in many day-to-day products, and has been successfully used to explain a wide variety of observations in Physics. While some quantum effects such as tunneling limit the degree to which modern CMOS devices can be scaled to ever reducing dimensions, others may potentially be exploited to build an entirely new computing architecture: The quantum computer. In this talk I will review several basic concepts of a quantum computer. Why quantum computing and how do we do it? What is the status of several (but not all) approaches towards building a quantum computer, including IBM's approach using superconducting qubits? And what will it take to build a functional machine? The promise is that a quantum computer could solve certain interesting computational problems such as factoring using exponentially fewer computational steps than classical systems. Although the most sophisticated modern quantum computing experiments to date do not outperform simple classical computations, it is increasingly becoming clear that small scale demonstrations with as many as 100 qubits are beginning to be within reach over the next several years. Such a demonstration would undoubtedly be a thrilling feat, and usher in a new era of controllably testing quantum mechanics or quantum computing aspects. At the minimum, future demonstrations will shed much light on what lies ahead.

  9. Could one make a diamond-based quantum computer?

    PubMed

    Stoneham, A Marshall; Harker, A H; Morley, Gavin W

    2009-09-01

    We assess routes to a diamond-based quantum computer, where we specifically look towards scalable devices, with at least 10 linked quantum gates. Such a computer should satisfy the deVincenzo rules and might be used at convenient temperatures. The specific examples that we examine are based on the optical control of electron spins. For some such devices, nuclear spins give additional advantages. Since there have already been demonstrations of basic initialization and readout, our emphasis is on routes to two-qubit quantum gate operations and the linking of perhaps 10-20 such gates. We analyse the dopant properties necessary, especially centres containing N and P, and give results using simple scoping calculations for the key interactions determining gate performance. Our conclusions are cautiously optimistic: it may be possible to develop a useful quantum information processor that works above cryogenic temperatures. PMID:21832328

  10. Entanglement-Based Machine Learning on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.-D.; Wu, D.; Su, Z.-E.; Chen, M.-C.; Wang, X.-L.; Li, Li; Liu, N.-L.; Lu, C.-Y.; Pan, J.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  11. Entanglement-based machine learning on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Wu, D; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Wang, X-L; Li, Li; Liu, N-L; Lu, C-Y; Pan, J-W

    2015-03-20

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning. PMID:25839250

  12. Optimized entanglement purification schemes for modular based quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastanov, Stefan; Jiang, Liang

    The choice of entanglement purification scheme strongly depends on the fidelities of quantum gates and measurements, as well as the imperfection of initial entanglement. For instance, the purification scheme optimal at low gate fidelities may not necessarily be the optimal scheme at higher gate fidelities. We employ an evolutionary algorithm that efficiently optimizes the entanglement purification circuit for given system parameters. Such optimized purification schemes will boost the performance of entanglement purification, and consequently enhance the fidelity of teleportation-based non-local coupling gates, which is an indispensible building block for modular-based quantum computers. In addition, we study how these optimized purification schemes affect the resource overhead caused by error correction in modular based quantum computers.

  13. Closed timelike curves in measurement-based quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Raphael; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2011-01-15

    Many results have been recently obtained regarding the power of hypothetical closed timelike curves (CTCs) in quantum computation. Here we show that the one-way model of measurement-based quantum computation encompasses in a natural way the CTC model proposed by Bennett, Schumacher, and Svetlichny. We identify a class of CTCs in this model that can be simulated deterministically and point to a fundamental limitation of Deutsch's CTC model which leads to predictions conflicting with those of the one-way model.

  14. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  15. Quantum Computation and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2010-12-01

    Part I. Fundamental Concepts: 1. Introduction and overview; 2. Introduction to quantum mechanics; 3. Introduction to computer science; Part II. Quantum Computation: 4. Quantum circuits; 5. The quantum Fourier transform and its application; 6. Quantum search algorithms; 7. Quantum computers: physical realization; Part III. Quantum Information: 8. Quantum noise and quantum operations; 9. Distance measures for quantum information; 10. Quantum error-correction; 11. Entropy and information; 12. Quantum information theory; Appendices; References; Index.

  16. Phonon-based scalable quantum computing and sensing (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kady, Ihab

    2015-04-01

    Quantum computing fundamentally depends on the ability to concurrently entangle and individually address/control a large number of qubits. In general, the primary inhibitors of large scale entanglement are qubit dependent; for example inhomogeneity in quantum dots, spectral crowding brought about by proximity-based entanglement in ions, weak interactions of neutral atoms, and the fabrication tolerances in the case of Si-vacancies or SQUIDs. We propose an inherently scalable solid-state qubit system with individually addressable qubits based on the coupling of a phonon with an acceptor impurity in a high-Q Phononic Crystal resonant cavity. Due to their unique nonlinear properties, phonons enable new opportunities for quantum devices and physics. We present a phononic crystal-based platform for observing the phonon analogy of cavity quantum electrodynamics, called phonodynamics, in a solid-state system. Practical schemes involve selective placement of a single acceptor atom in the peak of the strain field in a high-Q phononic crystal cavity that enables strong coupling of the phonon modes to the energy levels of the atom. A qubit is then created by entangling a phonon at the resonance frequency of the cavity with the atomic acceptor states. We show theoretical optimization of the cavity design and excitation waveguides, along with estimated performance figures of the phoniton system. Qubits based on this half-sound, half-matter quasi-particle, may outcompete other quantum architectures in terms of combined emission rate, coherence lifetime, and fabrication demands.

  17. Novel schemes for measurement-based quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Gross, D; Eisert, J

    2007-06-01

    We establish a framework which allows one to construct novel schemes for measurement-based quantum computation. The technique develops tools from many-body physics-based on finitely correlated or projected entangled pair states-to go beyond the cluster-state based one-way computer. We identify resource states radically different from the cluster state, in that they exhibit nonvanishing correlations, can be prepared using nonmaximally entangling gates, or have very different local entanglement properties. In the computational models, randomness is compensated in a different manner. It is shown that there exist resource states which are locally arbitrarily close to a pure state. We comment on the possibility of tailoring computational models to specific physical systems. PMID:17677826

  18. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  19. Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, Artur

    1994-08-01

    As computers become faster they must become smaller because of the finiteness of the speed of light. The history of computer technology has involved a sequence of changes from one type of physical realisation to another - from gears to relays to valves to transistors to integrated circuits and so on. Quantum mechanics is already important in the design of microelectronic components. Soon it will be necessary to harness quantum mechanics rather than simply take it into account, and at that point it will be possible to give data processing devices new functionality.

  20. Quantum Nondeterministic Computation based on Statistics Superselection Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnoli, G.

    Quantum states which obey certain symmetry superselection rules under identical particles permutation can be interpreted as computational states satisfying corresponding Boolean predicates. Given the NP-complete problem of testing the satisfiability of a generic Boolean predicate P, we investigate the possibility of achieving quantum nondeterministic computation by deriving, from P, a physical situation in which the computational states satisfy P iff they satisfy a special fermion statistics.

  1. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  2. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  3. Photonic Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. In this talk I will present a series of experiments in the field of photonic quantum computing. The first experiment is in the field of photonic state engineering and realizes the generation of heralded polarization-entangled photon pairs. It overcomes the limited applicability of photon-based schemes for quantum information processing tasks, which arises from the probabilistic nature of photon generation. The second experiment uses polarization-entangled photonic qubits to implement ``blind quantum computing,'' a new concept in quantum computing. Blind quantum computing enables a nearly-classical client to access the resources of a more computationally-powerful quantum server without divulging the content of the requested computation. Finally, the concept of blind quantum computing is applied to the field of verification. A new method is developed and experimentally demonstrated, which verifies the entangling capabilities of a quantum computer based on a blind Bell test.

  4. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems. PMID:27174302

  5. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-05-01

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems.

  6. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems. PMID:27174302

  7. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via its bifurcation with a slowly varying parameter. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing. To distinguish them, we refer to the present approach as bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical simulation results suggest that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions.

  8. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  9. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

  10. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

  11. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  12. Spin-based all-optical quantum computation with quantum dots: Understanding and suppressing decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Calarco, T.; Datta, A.; Fedichev, P.; Zoller, P.; Pazy, E.

    2003-07-01

    We present an all-optical implementation of quantum computation using semiconductor quantum dots. Quantum memory is represented by the spin of an excess electron stored in each dot. Two-qubit gates are realized by switching on trion-trion interactions between different dots. State selectivity is achieved via conditional laser excitation exploiting Pauli exclusion principle. Read out is performed via a quantum-jump technique. We analyze the effect on our scheme's performance of the main imperfections present in real quantum dots: exciton decay, hole mixing, and phonon decoherence. We introduce an adiabatic gate procedure that allows one to circumvent these effects and evaluate quantitatively its fidelity.

  13. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  14. Teleportation-based quantum computation, extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and Yang-Baxter equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Kun; Pang, Jinglong

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of topological features in teleportation-based quantum computation and aims at presenting a detailed review on teleportation-based quantum computation (Gottesman and Chuang in Nature 402: 390, 1999). In the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, we clearly show that such topological features bring about the fault-tolerant construction of both universal quantum gates and four-partite entangled states more intuitive and simpler. Furthermore, we describe the Yang-Baxter gate by its extended Temperley-Lieb configuration and then study teleportation-based quantum circuit models using the Yang-Baxter gate. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and the Yang-Baxter gate approach. With these research results, we propose a worthwhile subject, the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, for physicists in quantum information and quantum computation.

  15. Nanoscale phosphorus atom arrays created using STM for the fabrication of a silicon based quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, R. G.; Dzurak, A. S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, B. E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, M. E.; Brown, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer 'resist' with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites. Keywords: Quantum computing, nanotechriology scanning turincling microscopy, hydrogen lithography

  16. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  17. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  18. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence. PMID:26899997

  19. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  20. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence. PMID:26899997

  1. Quantum information and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Quantum Computing since Democritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    1. Atoms and the void; 2. Sets; 3. Gödel, Turing, and friends; 4. Minds and machines; 5. Paleocomplexity; 6. P, NP, and friends; 7. Randomness; 8. Crypto; 9. Quantum; 10. Quantum computing; 11. Penrose; 12. Decoherence and hidden variables; 13. Proofs; 14. How big are quantum states?; 15. Skepticism of quantum computing; 16. Learning; 17. Interactive proofs and more; 18. Fun with the Anthropic Principle; 19. Free will; 20. Time travel; 21. Cosmology and complexity; 22. Ask me anything.

  3. Simulation of Si:P spin-based quantum computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiachung; Fang Angbo

    2008-11-07

    We present realistic simulation for single and double phosphorous donors in a silicon-based quantum computer design by solving a valley-orbit coupled effective-mass equation for describing phosphorous donors in strained silicon quantum well (QW). Using a generalized unrestricted Hartree-Fock method, we solve the two-electron effective-mass equation with quantum well confinement and realistic gate potentials. The effects of QW width, gate voltages, donor separation, and donor position shift on the lowest singlet and triplet energies and their charge distributions for a neighboring donor pair in the quantum computer(QC) architecture are analyzed. The gate tunability are defined and evaluated for a typical QC design. Estimates are obtained for the duration of spin half-swap gate operation.

  4. Quantum Dots Based Rad-Hard Computing and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Klimeck, G.; Leon, R.; Qiu, Y.; Toomarian, N.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are solid-state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well-conducting region. Thus, they can be viewed as artificial atoms. They therefore represent the ultimate limit of the semiconductor device scaling. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  6. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  7. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  8. Efficient universal blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G

    2013-12-01

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation. PMID:24476238

  9. Efficient Universal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G.

    2013-12-01

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party’s quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party’s computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog⁡2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

  10. Architecture Framework for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computer based on Performance Simulation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Muhammad

    The challenge of building scalable quantum computer lies in striking appropriate balance between designing a reliable system architecture from large number of faulty computational resources and improving the physical quality of system components. The detailed investigation of performance variation with physics of the components and the system architecture requires adequate performance simulation tool. In this thesis we demonstrate a software tool capable of (1) mapping and scheduling the quantum circuit on a realistic quantum hardware architecture with physical resource constraints, (2) evaluating the performance metrics such as the execution time and the success probability of the algorithm execution, and (3) analyzing the constituents of these metrics and visualizing resource utilization to identify system components which crucially define the overall performance. Using this versatile tool, we explore vast design space for modular quantum computer architecture based on trapped ions. We find that while success probability is uniformly determined by the fidelity of physical quantum operation, the execution time is a function of system resources invested at various layers of design hierarchy. At physical level, the number of lasers performing quantum gates, impact the latency of the fault-tolerant circuit blocks execution. When these blocks are used to construct meaningful arithmetic circuit such as quantum adders, the number of ancilla qubits for complicated non-clifford gates and entanglement resources to establish long-distance communication channels, become major performance limiting factors. Next, in order to factorize large integers, these adders are assembled into modular exponentiation circuit comprising bulk of Shor's algorithm. At this stage, the overall scaling of resource-constraint performance with the size of problem, describes the effectiveness of chosen design. By matching the resource investment with the pace of advancement in hardware technology

  11. Toward a superconducting quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers. PMID:20431256

  12. Continuous-Variable Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2012-12-01

    Blind quantum computation is a secure delegated quantum computing protocol where Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, delegates her computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice’s input, output, and algorithm. Protocols of blind quantum computation have been proposed for several qudit measurement-based computation models, such as the graph state model, the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, and the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal topological model. Here, we consider blind quantum computation for the continuous-variable measurement-based model. We show that blind quantum computation is possible for the infinite squeezing case. We also show that the finite squeezing causes no additional problem in the blind setup apart from the one inherent to the continuous-variable measurement-based quantum computation.

  13. Quantum computation using geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Douglas James

    This dissertation reports that arbitrary Boolean logic equations and operators can be represented in geometric algebra as linear equations composed entirely of orthonormal vectors using only addition and multiplication Geometric algebra is a topologically based algebraic system that naturally incorporates the inner and anticommutative outer products into a real valued geometric product, yet does not rely on complex numbers or matrices. A series of custom tools was designed and built to simplify geometric algebra expressions into a standard sum of products form, and automate the anticommutative geometric product and operations. Using this infrastructure, quantum bits (qubits), quantum registers and EPR-bits (ebits) are expressed symmetrically as geometric algebra expressions. Many known quantum computing gates, measurement operators, and especially the Bell/magic operators are also expressed as geometric products. These results demonstrate that geometric algebra can naturally and faithfully represent the central concepts, objects, and operators necessary for quantum computing, and can facilitate the design and construction of quantum computing tools.

  14. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  15. Quantum computation: Honesty test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2013-11-01

    Alice does not have a quantum computer so she delegates a computation to Bob, who does own one. But how can Alice check whether the computation that Bob performs for her is correct? An experiment with photonic qubits demonstrates such a verification protocol.

  16. Quantum computation and hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    Many physicists limit oneself to an instrumentalist description of quantum phenomena and ignore the problems of foundation and interpretation of quantum mechanics. This instrumentalist approach results to "specialization barbarism" and mass delusion concerning the problem, how a quantum computer can be made. The idea of quantum computation can be described within the limits of quantum formalism. But in order to understand how this idea can be put into practice one should realize the question: "What could the quantum formalism describe?", in spite of the absence of an universally recognized answer. Only a realization of this question and the undecided problem of quantum foundations allows to see in which quantum systems the superposition and EPR correlation could be expected. Because of the "specialization barbarism" many authors are sure that Bell proved full impossibility of any hidden-variables interpretation. Therefore it is important to emphasize that in reality Bell has restricted to validity limits of the no-hidden-variables proof and has shown that two-state quantum system can be described by hidden variables. The later means that no experimental result obtained on two-state quantum system can prove the existence of superposition and violation of the realism. One should not assume before unambiguous experimental evidence that any two-state quantum system is quantum bit. No experimental evidence of superposition of macroscopically distinct quantum states and of a quantum bit on base of superconductor structure was obtained for the present. Moreover same experimental results can not be described in the limits of the quantum formalism.

  17. Physical Architecture for a Universal Topological Quantum Computer based on a Network of Majorana Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay; Barkeshli, Maissam

    The idea of topological quantum computation (TQC) is to encode and manipulate quantum information in an intrinsically fault-tolerant manner by utilizing the physics of topologically ordered phases of matter. Currently, the most promising platforms for a topological qubit are either in terms of Majorana fermion zero modes (MZMs) in spin-orbit coupled superconducting nanowires or in terms of the Kitaev Z2 surface code. However, the topologically robust operations that are possible in these systems are not sufficient for realizing a universal gate set for topological quantum computation. Here, we show that an array of coupled semiconductor/superconductor nanowires with MZM edge states can be used to realize a more sophisticated type of non-Abelian defect, a genon in an Ising X Ising topological state. This leads to a possible implementation of the missing topologically protected pi/8 phase gate and thus paves a path for universal topological quantum computation based on semiconductor-superconductor nanowire technology. We provide detailed numerical estimates of the relevant energy scales, which we show to lie within accessible ranges. J. S. was supported by Microsoft Station Q, startup funds from the University of Maryland and NSF-JQI-PFC.

  18. Quantum Computation and Quantum Metrology based on Single Electron Spin in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-03-01

    It is of great challenge to perform the accurate controlling the electron spin qubits in realistic system, due to the noises aroused from the noisy spin bath and the driving field. Firstly, we adopted dynamically corrected gates to realize robust and high-fidelity quantum gates. In this work, the quantum gate's performance was pushed to T1r limit. Then, a new Rabi Oscillations (ROs) resulting from Landau-Zener (LZ) transitions is observed useful to suppress the fluctuations of the driving field. Besides, quantum error correction is experimentally employed to overcome the noise effect in diamonds. Precise quantum control and effectively supressing noise of the environment are of great importance for quantum metrology. We succeeded in sensing and atomic-scale analysis of single nuclear spin clusters in diamond at room temperature, and also have succeed to detect a few nuclear spins with single spin sensitivity.

  19. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  20. Verifiable Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Elham

    Over the next five to ten years we will see a state of flux as quantum devices become part of the mainstream computing landscape. However adopting and applying such a highly variable and novel technology is both costly and risky as this quantum approach has an acute verification and validation problem: On the one hand, since classical computations cannot scale up to the computational power of quantum mechanics, verifying the correctness of a quantum-mediated computation is challenging; on the other hand, the underlying quantum structure resists classical certification analysis. Our grand aim is to settle these key milestones to make the translation from theory to practice possible. Currently the most efficient ways to verify a quantum computation is to employ cryptographic methods. I will present the current state of the art of various existing protocols where generally there exists a trade-off between the practicality of the scheme versus their generality, trust assumptions and security level. EK gratefully acknowledges funding through EPSRC Grants EP/N003829/1 and EP/M013243/1.

  1. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gui-Lu

    2006-05-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of the sub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer, the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer, it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented: the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  2. Universal measurement-based quantum computation with spin-2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Raussendorf, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate that the spin-2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state on a square lattice is a universal resource for measurement-based quantum computation. Our proof is done by locally converting the AKLT to two-dimensional random planar graph states and by certifying that with a high probability the resulting random graphs are in the supercritical phase of percolation using Monte Carlo simulations. One key enabling point is the exact weight formula that we derive for arbitrary measurement outcomes according to a spin-2 positive operator-valued measure on all spins. We also argue that the spin-2 AKLT state on a three-dimensional diamond lattice is a universal resource, the advantage of which would be the possibility of implementing fault-tolerant quantum computation with topological protection. In addition, as we deform the AKLT Hamiltonian, there is a finite region in which the ground state can still support a universal resource before making a transition in its quantum computational power.

  3. Programming Non-Trivial Algorithms in the Measurement Based Quantum Computation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Alsing, Paul; Fanto, Michael; Lott, Capt. Gordon; Tison, Christoper C.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a quantum circuit model algorithm as measurement based quantum computing (MBQC) algorithm1, 2 via a large cluster state. As means of illustration we draw upon our numerical modeling experience to describe a large graph state capable of searching a logical 8 element list (a non-trivial version of Grover's algorithm3 with feedforward). We develop several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of cluster states and graph state equations which can be generalized into any circuit model operations. Such a resulting cluster state will be able to carry out the desired operation with appropriate measurements and feed forward error correction. We also discuss the physical implementation and the analysis of the principal 3-qubit entangling gate (Toffoli) required for a non-trivial feedforward realization of an 8-element Grover search algorithm.

  4. Quantum Computing using Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhalawany, Ahmed; Leuenberger, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model of two-quantum bit gates for quantum computation using the polarization states of two photons in a microcavity. By letting the two photons interact non-resonantly with four quantum dots inside the cavity, we obtain an effective photon-photon interaction which we exploit for the implementation of an universal XOR gate. The two-photon Hamiltonian is written in terms of the photons' total angular momentum operators and their states are written using the Schwinger representation of the total angular momentum.

  5. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with

  7. Analysis of the trade-off between spatial and temporal resources for measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Jisho; Hajdušek, Michal; Murao, Mio

    2015-05-01

    In measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC), elementary quantum operations can be more parallelized than the quantum circuit model by employing a larger Hilbert space of graph states used as the resource. Thus MBQC can be regarded as a method of quantum computation where the temporal resource described by the depth of quantum operations can be reduced compared to the quantum circuit model by using the extra spatial resource described by graph states. To analyze the trade-off relationship of the spatial and temporal resources, we consider a method to obtain quantum circuit decompositions of general unitary transformations represented by MBQC on graph states with a certain underlying geometry called generalized flow. We present a method to translate any MBQC with generalized flow into quantum circuits without extra spatial resource. We also show an explicit way to unravel acausal gates without postselection that appear in the quantum circuit decomposition derived by a translation method [V. Danos and E. Kashefi, Phys. Rev. A 74, 052310 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevA.74.052310] and that represents an effect of the reduction of the temporal resource in MBQC. Finally, by considering a way to deterministically simulate these acausal gates, we investigate a general framework to analyze the trade-off between the spatial and temporal resources for quantum computation.

  8. Undergraduate computational physics projects on quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, D.

    2015-08-01

    Computational projects on quantum computing suitable for students in a junior-level quantum mechanics course are described. In these projects students write their own programs to simulate quantum computers. Knowledge is assumed of introductory quantum mechanics through the properties of spin 1/2. Initial, more easily programmed projects treat the basics of quantum computation, quantum gates, and Grover's quantum search algorithm. These are followed by more advanced projects to increase the number of qubits and implement Shor's quantum factoring algorithm. The projects can be run on a typical laptop or desktop computer, using most programming languages. Supplementing resources available elsewhere, the projects are presented here in a self-contained format especially suitable for a short computational module for physics students.

  9. Universal quantum computation using the discrete-time quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, Neil B.; Cooper, Sally; Everitt, Matthew; Trevers, Matthew; Kendon, Viv

    2010-04-15

    A proof that continuous-time quantum walks are universal for quantum computation, using unweighted graphs of low degree, has recently been presented by A. M. Childs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 180501 (2009)]. We present a version based instead on the discrete-time quantum walk. We show that the discrete-time quantum walk is able to implement the same universal gate set and thus both discrete and continuous-time quantum walks are computational primitives. Additionally, we give a set of components on which the discrete-time quantum walk provides perfect state transfer.

  10. Layered Architectures for Quantum Computers and Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nathan C.

    This chapter examines how to organize quantum computers and repeaters using a systematic framework known as layered architecture, where machine control is organized in layers associated with specialized tasks. The framework is flexible and could be used for analysis and comparison of quantum information systems. To demonstrate the design principles in practice, we develop architectures for quantum computers and quantum repeaters based on optically controlled quantum dots, showing how a myriad of technologies must operate synchronously to achieve fault-tolerance. Optical control makes information processing in this system very fast, scalable to large problem sizes, and extendable to quantum communication.

  11. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-15

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

  12. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

  13. Quantum computing on encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, K. A. G.; Broadbent, A.; Shalm, L. K.; Yan, Z.; Lavoie, J.; Prevedel, R.; Jennewein, T.; Resch, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  14. Quantum computing on encrypted data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems. PMID:24445949

  15. Quantum Computing's Classical Problem, Classical Computing's Quantum Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    Tasked with the challenge to build better and better computers, quantum computing and classical computing face the same conundrum: the success of classical computing systems. Small quantum computing systems have been demonstrated, and intermediate-scale systems are on the horizon, capable of calculating numeric results or simulating physical systems far beyond what humans can do by hand. However, to be commercially viable, they must surpass what our wildly successful, highly advanced classical computers can already do. At the same time, those classical computers continue to advance, but those advances are now constrained by thermodynamics, and will soon be limited by the discrete nature of atomic matter and ultimately quantum effects. Technological advances benefit both quantum and classical machinery, altering the competitive landscape. Can we build quantum computing systems that out-compute classical systems capable of some logic gates per month? This article will discuss the interplay in these competing and cooperating technological trends.

  16. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  17. Molecular Realizations of Quantum Computing 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Mikio; Ota, Yukihiro; Rahimi, Robabeh; Kondo, Yasushi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito

    2009-06-01

    Liquid-state NMR quantum computer: working principle and some examples / Y. Kondo -- Flux qubits, tunable coupling and beyond / A. O. Niskanen -- Josephson phase qubits, and quantum communication via a resonant cavity / M. A. Sillanpää -- Quantum computing using pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR): molecular spin-qubits / K. Sato ... [et al.] -- Fullerene C[symbol]: a possible molecular quantum computer / T. Wakabayashi -- Molecular magnets for quantum computation / T. Kuroda -- Errors in a plausible scheme of quantum gates in Kane's model / Y. Ota -- Yet another formulation for quantum simultaneous noncooperative bimatrix games / A. SaiToh, R. Rahimi, M. Nakahara -- Continuous-variable teleportation of single-photon states and an accidental cloning of a photonic qubit in two-channel teleportation / T. Ide.

  18. An improved formalism for quantum computation based on geometric algebra—case study: Grover's search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, James M.; Iqbal, Azhar; Lohe, M. A.; von Smekal, Lorenz; Abbott, Derek

    2013-04-01

    The Grover search algorithm is one of the two key algorithms in the field of quantum computing, and hence it is desirable to represent it in the simplest and most intuitive formalism possible. We show firstly, that Clifford's geometric algebra, provides a significantly simpler representation than the conventional bra-ket notation, and secondly, that the basis defined by the states of maximum and minimum weight in the Grover search space, allows a simple visualization of the Grover search analogous to the precession of a spin-{1/2} particle. Using this formalism we efficiently solve the exact search problem, as well as easily representing more general search situations. We do not claim the development of an improved algorithm, but show in a tutorial paper that geometric algebra provides extremely compact and elegant expressions with improved clarity for the Grover search algorithm. Being a key algorithm in quantum computing and one of the most studied, it forms an ideal basis for a tutorial on how to elucidate quantum operations in terms of geometric algebra—this is then of interest in extending the applicability of geometric algebra to more complicated problems in fields of quantum computing, quantum decision theory, and quantum information.

  19. Nanoscale phosphorous atom arrays created using STM for the fabricaton of a silicon-based quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, Robert G.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, Bruce E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, Marilyn E.; Brown, Geoffrey W.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer resist with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites.

  20. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  1. Communication Capacity of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Rallan, L.; Vedral, V.

    2000-12-01

    By considering quantum computation as a communication process, we relate its efficiency to its classical communication capacity. This formalism allows us to derive lower bounds on the complexity of search algorithms in the most general context. It enables us to link the mixedness of a quantum computer to its efficiency and also allows us to derive the critical level of mixedness beyond which there is no quantum advantage in computation.

  2. Deterministic linear-optics quantum computing based on a hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2014-12-04

    We suggest a scheme for all-optical quantum computation using hybrid qubits. It enables one to efficiently perform universal linear-optical gate operations in a simple and near-deterministic way using hybrid entanglement as off-line resources.

  3. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  4. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  5. Towards Quantum Computing With Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysher, Matthew

    This thesis presents experimental progress towards the realization of an optical quantum computer. Quantum computers replace the bits used in classical computing with quantum systems and promise an exponential speedup over their classical counterparts for certain tasks such as integer factoring and the simulation of quantum systems. A recently proposed quantum computing protocol known as one-way quantum computing has paved the way for the use of light in a functional quantum computer. One-way quantum computing calls for the generation of a large (consisting of many subsystems) entangled state known as a cluster state to serve as a quantum register. Entangled states are comprised of subsystems linked in such a way that the state cannot be separated into individual components. A recent proposal has shown that is possible to make arbitrarily large cluster states by linking the resonant frequency modes of a single optical parametric oscillator (OPO). In this thesis, we present two major steps towards the creation of such a cluster state. Namely, we successfully design and test the exotic nonlinear crystal needed in this proposal and use a slight variation on this proposal to simultaneously create over 15 four-mode cluster states in a single OPO. We also explore the possibility of scaling down the physical size of an optical quantum computer by generating squeezed states of light in a compact optical waveguide. Additionally, we investigate photon-number-resolving measurements on continuous quantum light sources, which will be necessary to obtain the desired speedups for a quantum computer over a classical computer.

  6. A direct approach to fault-tolerance in measurement-based quantum computation via teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marcus; Danos, Vincent; Kashefi, Elham; Ollivier, Harold

    2007-06-01

    We discuss a simple variant of the one-way quantum computing model (Raussendorf R and Briegel H-J 2001 Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 5188), called the Pauli measurement model, where measurements are restricted to be along the eigenbases of the Pauli X and Y operators, while qubits can be initially prepared both in the {|}{+_{\\pi\\over 4}}\\rangle:={1/\\sqrt{2}}({|}0\\rangle+\\e^{i(\\pi/4)}{|}{1}\\rangle) state and the usual {|}{+}\\rangle:={1/ \\sqrt{2}}({|}{0}\\rangle+{|}{1}\\rangle) state. We prove the universality of this quantum computation model, and establish a standardization procedure which permits all entanglement and state preparation to be performed at the beginning of computation. This leads us to develop a direct approach to fault-tolerance by simple transformations of the entanglement graph and preparation operations, while error correction is performed naturally via syndrome-extracting teleportations.

  7. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  8. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  9. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  10. Quantum Nash Equilibria and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos

    In 2004, At the Fifth International Conference on Complex Systems, we drew attention to some remarkable findings by researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (Sato, Farmer and Akiyama, 2001) about hitherto unsuspected complexity in the Nash Equilibrium. As we progressed from these findings about heteroclinic Hamiltonians and chaotic transients hidden within the learning patterns of the simple rock-paper-scissors game to some related findings on the theory of quantum computing, one of the arguments we put forward was just as in the late 1990's a number of new Nash equilibria were discovered in simple bi-matrix games (Shubik and Quint, 1996; Von Stengel, 1997, 2000; and McLennan and Park, 1999) we would begin to see new Nash equilibria discovered as the result of quantum computation. While actual quantum computers remain rather primitive (Toibman, 2004), and the theory of quantum computation seems to be advancing perhaps a bit more slowly than originally expected, there have, nonetheless, been a number of advances in computation and some more radical advances in an allied field, quantum game theory (Huberman and Hogg, 2004) which are quite significant. In the course of this paper we will review a few of these discoveries and illustrate some of the characteristics of these new "Quantum Nash Equilibria". The full text of this research can be found at http://necsi.org/events/iccs6/viewpaper.php?id-234

  11. Quantum computing with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  12. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2009-09-01

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  13. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-12

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  14. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-11

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  15. The Physics of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falci, Giuseppe; Paladino, Elisabette

    2015-10-01

    Quantum Computation has emerged in the past decades as a consequence of down-scaling of electronic devices to the mesoscopic regime and of advances in the ability of controlling and measuring microscopic quantum systems. QC has many interdisciplinary aspects, ranging from physics and chemistry to mathematics and computer science. In these lecture notes we focus on physical hardware, present day challenges and future directions for design of quantum architectures.

  16. Video Encryption and Decryption on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Yang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    A method for video encryption and decryption on quantum computers is proposed based on color information transformations on each frame encoding the content of the encoding the content of the video. The proposed method provides a flexible operation to encrypt quantum video by means of the quantum measurement in order to enhance the security of the video. To validate the proposed approach, a tetris tile-matching puzzle game video is utilized in the experimental simulations. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method enhances the security and speed of quantum video encryption and decryption, both properties required for secure transmission and sharing of video content in quantum communication.

  17. Universal quantum computation with weakly integral anyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shawn X.; Hong, Seung-Moon; Wang, Zhenghan

    2015-08-01

    Harnessing non-abelian statistics of anyons to perform quantum computational tasks is getting closer to reality. While the existence of universal anyons by braiding alone such as the Fibonacci anyon is theoretically a possibility, accessible anyons with current technology all belong to a class that is called weakly integral—anyons whose squared quantum dimensions are integers. We analyze the computational power of the first non-abelian anyon system with only integral quantum dimensions—, the quantum double of . Since all anyons in have finite images of braid group representations, they cannot be universal for quantum computation by braiding alone. Based on our knowledge of the images of the braid group representations, we set up three qutrit computational models. Supplementing braidings with some measurements and ancillary states, we find a universal gate set for each model.

  18. Duality quantum computer and the efficient quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-03-01

    Duality quantum computing is a new mode of a quantum computer to simulate a moving quantum computer passing through a multi-slit. It exploits the particle wave duality property for computing. A quantum computer with n qubits and a qudit simulates a moving quantum computer with n qubits passing through a d-slit. Duality quantum computing can realize an arbitrary sum of unitaries and therefore a general quantum operator, which is called a generalized quantum gate. All linear bounded operators can be realized by the generalized quantum gates, and unitary operators are just the extreme points of the set of generalized quantum gates. Duality quantum computing provides flexibility and a clear physical picture in designing quantum algorithms, and serves as a powerful bridge between quantum and classical algorithms. In this paper, after a brief review of the theory of duality quantum computing, we will concentrate on the applications of duality quantum computing in simulations of Hamiltonian systems. We will show that duality quantum computing can efficiently simulate quantum systems by providing descriptions of the recent efficient quantum simulation algorithm of Childs and Wiebe (Quantum Inf Comput 12(11-12):901-924, 2012) for the fast simulation of quantum systems with a sparse Hamiltonian, and the quantum simulation algorithm by Berry et al. (Phys Rev Lett 114:090502, 2015), which provides exponential improvement in precision for simulating systems with a sparse Hamiltonian.

  19. Quantum Information and Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, L.; Ohya, Masanori; Watanabe, N.

    2006-03-01

    Preface -- Coherent quantum control of [symbol]-atoms through the stochastic limit / L. Accardi, S. V. Kozyrev and A. N. Pechen -- Recent advances in quantum white noise calculus / L. Accardi and A. Boukas -- Control of quantum states by decoherence / L. Accardi and K. Imafuku -- Logical operations realized on the Ising chain of N qubits / M. Asano, N. Tateda and C. Ishii -- Joint extension of states of fermion subsystems / H. Araki -- Quantum filtering and optimal feedback control of a Gaussian quantum free particle / S. C. Edwards and V. P. Belavkin -- On existence of quantum zeno dynamics / P. Exner and T. Ichinose -- Invariant subspaces and control of decoherence / P. Facchi, V. L. Lepore and S. Pascazio -- Clauser-Horner inequality for electron counting statistics in multiterminal mesoscopic conductors / L. Faoro, F. Taddei and R. Fazio -- Fidelity of quantum teleportation model using beam splittings / K.-H. Fichtner, T. Miyadera and M. Ohya -- Quantum logical gates realized by beam splittings / W. Freudenberg ... [et al.] -- Information divergence for quantum channels / S. J. Hammersley and V. P. Belavkin -- On the uniqueness theorem in quantum information geometry / H. Hasegawa -- Noncanonical representations of a multi-dimensional Brownian motion / Y. Hibino -- Some of future directions of white noise theory / T. Hida -- Information, innovation and elemental random field / T. Hida -- Generalized quantum turing machine and its application to the SAT chaos algorithm / S. Iriyama, M. Ohya and I. Volovich -- A Stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography / A. Jamiolkowski -- Positive maps and separable states in matrix algebras / A. Kossakowski -- Simulating open quantum systems with trapped ions / S. Maniscalco -- A purification scheme and entanglement distillations / H. Nakazato, M. Unoki and K. Yuasa -- Generalized sectors and adjunctions to control micro-macro transitions / I. Ojima -- Saturation of an entropy bound and quantum Markov states / D. Petz -- An

  20. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  1. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-07-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  2. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  3. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  4. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alan C.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts. PMID:26511064

  5. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Alan C.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2015-10-01

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts.

  6. Using computer algebra in quantum computation and quantum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolívar, David A.

    2011-05-01

    Research in contemporary physics is emphasizing the development and evolution of computer systems to facilitate the calculations. Quantum computing is a branch of modern physics is believed promising results for the future, Thanks to the ability of qubits to store more information than a bit. The work of this paper focuses on the simulation of certain quantum algorithms such as the prisoner's dilemma in its quantum version using the MATHEMATICA® software and implementing stochastic version of the software MAPLE ® and the Grover search algorithm that simulates finding a needle in a haystack.

  7. Hybrid quantum computing: semicloning for general database retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2005-05-01

    Quantum computing (QC) has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing (CC). In particular, QC is able to exploit the special properties of quantum superposition to achieve computational parallelism beyond what can be achieved with parallel CC computers. However, these special properties are not applicable for general computation. Therefore, we propose the use of "hybrid quantum computers" (HQCs) that combine both classical and quantum computing architectures in order to leverage the benefits of both. We demonstrate how an HQC can exploit quantum search to support general database operations more efficiently than is possible with CC. Our solution is based on new quantum results that are of independent significance to the field of quantum computing. More specifically, we demonstrate that the most restrictive implications of the quantum No-Cloning Theorem can be avoided through the use of semiclones.

  8. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  9. Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bao-Cang; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF.

  10. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  11. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements. PMID:26196609

  12. Faster quantum chemistry simulation on fault-tolerant quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody Jones, N.; Whitfield, James D.; McMahon, Peter L.; Yung, Man-Hong; Van Meter, Rodney; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-11-01

    Quantum computers can in principle simulate quantum physics exponentially faster than their classical counterparts, but some technical hurdles remain. We propose methods which substantially improve the performance of a particular form of simulation, ab initio quantum chemistry, on fault-tolerant quantum computers; these methods generalize readily to other quantum simulation problems. Quantum teleportation plays a key role in these improvements and is used extensively as a computing resource. To improve execution time, we examine techniques for constructing arbitrary gates which perform substantially faster than circuits based on the conventional Solovay-Kitaev algorithm (Dawson and Nielsen 2006 Quantum Inform. Comput. 6 81). For a given approximation error ɛ, arbitrary single-qubit gates can be produced fault-tolerantly and using a restricted set of gates in time which is O(log ɛ) or O(log log ɛ) with sufficient parallel preparation of ancillas, constant average depth is possible using a method we call programmable ancilla rotations. Moreover, we construct and analyze efficient implementations of first- and second-quantized simulation algorithms using the fault-tolerant arbitrary gates and other techniques, such as implementing various subroutines in constant time. A specific example we analyze is the ground-state energy calculation for lithium hydride.

  13. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray X1E, a SGI Altix 3700 and clusters of PCs running Windows XP. We study the performance of the software by simulating quantum computers containing up to 36 qubits, using up to 4096 processors and up to 1 TB of memory. Our results demonstrate that the simulator exhibits nearly ideal scaling as a function of the number of processors and suggest that the simulation software described in this paper may also serve as benchmark for testing high-end parallel computers.

  14. Semiconductor-inspired superconducting quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yun-Pil

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit based quantum computing. Here we present an architecture for superconducting quantum computing based on selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems. We propose an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is especially suited to qubits based on variable super-semi junctions.

  15. Pfaffian States: Quantum Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2009-09-14

    The Pfaffian determinant is sometimes used to multiply the Laughlin's wave function at the half filled Landau level. The square of the Pfaffian gives the ordinary determinant. We find that the Pfaffian wave function leads to four times larger energies and two times faster time. By the same logic, the Pfaffian breaks the supersymmetry of the Dirac equation. By using the spin properties and the Landau levels, we correctly interpret the state with 5/2 filling. The quantum numbers which represent the state vectors are now products of n (Landau level quantum number), l(orbital angular momentum quantum number and the spin, s |n, l, s>. In a circuit, the noise measures the resistivity and hence the charge. The Pfaffian velocity is different from that of the single-particle states and hence it has important consequences in the measurement of the charge of the quasiparticles.

  16. Topological Code Architectures for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Christopher Anthony

    This dissertation is concerned with quantum computation using many-body quantum systems encoded in topological codes. The interest in these topological systems has increased in recent years as devices in the lab begin to reach the fidelities required for performing arbitrarily long quantum algorithms. The most well-studied system, Kitaev's toric code, provides both a physical substrate for performing universal fault-tolerant quantum computations and a useful pedagogical tool for explaining the way other topological codes work. In this dissertation, I first review the necessary formalism for quantum information and quantum stabilizer codes, and then I introduce two families of topological codes: Kitaev's toric code and Bombin's color codes. I then present three chapters of original work. First, I explore the distinctness of encoding schemes in the color codes. Second, I introduce a model of quantum computation based on the toric code that uses adiabatic interpolations between static Hamiltonians with gaps constant in the system size. Lastly, I describe novel state distillation protocols that are naturally suited for topological architectures and show that they provide resource savings in terms of the number of required ancilla states when compared to more traditional approaches to quantum gate approximation.

  17. Phase modulation at the few-photon level for weak-nonlinearity-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Vivek; Saha, Kasturi; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2013-02-01

    The ability of a few-photon light field to impart an appreciable phase shift on another light field is critical for many quantum information applications. A recently proposed paradigm for quantum computation utilizes weak nonlinearities, where a strong field mediates such cross-phase shifts between single photons. Such a protocol promises to be feasible in terms of scalability to many qubits if a cross-phase shift of 10-5 to 10-2 radians per photon can be achieved. A promising platform to achieve such cross-phase shifts is the hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre, which can highly confine atomic vapours and light over distances much greater than the diffraction length. Here, we produce large cross-phase shifts of 0.3 mrad per photon with a fast response time (<5 ns) using rubidium atoms confined to a hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre, which represents, to our knowledge, the largest such nonlinear phase shift induced in a single pass through a room-temperature medium.

  18. Milestones toward Majorana-based quantum computing: Fusion rule detection and topological qubit validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishmash, Ryan V.; Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and readout of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires coated with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate-control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. Recently, we have outlined a sequence of relatively modest milestones which interpolate between zero-mode detection and longer term quantum computing applications. In this talk, I will discuss two of these milestones: (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensing or Majorana-mediated charge pumping and (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit via unconventional scaling relations between the time-averaged qubit splitting and its decoherence times T1 and T2. Both of these proposed experiments require only a single wire with two islands--a hardware configuration already available in the laboratory. Furthermore, these pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and readout schemes as well.

  19. Quantumness, Randomness and Computability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Aldo; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2015-06-01

    Randomness plays a central role in the quantum mechanical description of our interactions. We review the relationship between the violation of Bell inequalities, non signaling and randomness. We discuss the challenge in defining a random string, and show that algorithmic information theory provides a necessary condition for randomness using Borel normality. We close with a view on incomputablity and its implications in physics.

  20. Prospects for quantum computing: Extremely doubtful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakonov, M. I.

    2014-09-01

    The quantum computer is supposed to process information by applying unitary transformations to 2N complex amplitudes defining the state of N qubits. A useful machine needing N 103 or more, the number of continuous parameters describing the state of a quantum computer at any given moment is at least 21000 10300 which is much greater than the number of protons in the Universe. However, the theorists believe that the feasibility of large-scale quantum computing has been proved via the “threshold theorem”. Like for any theorem, the proof is based on a number of assumptions considered as axioms. However, in the physical world none of these assumptions can be fulfilled exactly. Any assumption can be only approached with some limited precision. So, the rather meaningless “error per qubit per gate” threshold must be supplemented by a list of the precisions with which all assumptions behind the threshold theorem should hold. Such a list still does not exist. The theory also seems to ignore the undesired free evolution of the quantum computer caused by the energy differences of quantum states entering any given superposition. Another important point is that the hypothetical quantum computer will be a system of 103 -106 qubits PLUS an extremely complex and monstrously sophisticated classical apparatus. This huge and strongly nonlinear system will generally exhibit instabilities and chaotic behavior.

  1. Universal quantum computation with unlabelled qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severini, Simone

    2006-06-01

    We show that an nth root of the Walsh-Hadamard transform (obtained from the Hadamard gate and a cyclic permutation of the qubits), together with two diagonal matrices, namely a local qubit-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary qubit) and a non-local phase-flip (for a fixed but arbitrary coefficient), can do universal quantum computation on n qubits. A quantum computation, making use of n qubits and based on these operations, is then a word of variable length, but whose letters are always taken from an alphabet of cardinality three. Therefore, in contrast with other universal sets, no choice of qubit lines is needed for the application of the operations described here. A quantum algorithm based on this set can be interpreted as a discrete diffusion of a quantum particle on a de Bruijn graph, corrected on-the-fly by auxiliary modifications of the phases associated with the arcs.

  2. Power of one qumode for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nana; Thompson, Jayne; Weedbrook, Christian; Lloyd, Seth; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan

    2016-05-01

    Although quantum computers are capable of solving problems like factoring exponentially faster than the best-known classical algorithms, determining the resources responsible for their computational power remains unclear. An important class of problems where quantum computers possess an advantage is phase estimation, which includes applications like factoring. We introduce a computational model based on a single squeezed state resource that can perform phase estimation, which we call the power of one qumode. This model is inspired by an interesting computational model known as deterministic quantum computing with one quantum bit (DQC1). Using the power of one qumode, we identify that the amount of squeezing is sufficient to quantify the resource requirements of different computational problems based on phase estimation. In particular, we can use the amount of squeezing to quantitatively relate the resource requirements of DQC1 and factoring. Furthermore, we can connect the squeezing to other known resources like precision, energy, qudit dimensionality, and qubit number. We show the circumstances under which they can likewise be considered good resources.

  3. Computations in quantum mechanics made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsch, H. J.; Rapedius, K.

    2016-09-01

    Convenient and simple numerical techniques for performing quantum computations based on matrix representations of Hilbert space operators are presented and illustrated by various examples. The applications include the calculations of spectral and dynamical properties for one-dimensional and two-dimensional single-particle systems as well as bosonic many-particle and open quantum systems. Due to their technical simplicity these methods are well suited as a tool for teaching quantum mechanics to undergraduates and graduates. Explicit implementations of the presented numerical methods in Matlab are given.

  4. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding.

  5. Accelerating commutation circuits in quantum computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Huang, Xu; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2012-12-01

    In a high speed and packet-switched quantum computer network, a packet routing delay often leads to traffic jams, becoming a severe bottleneck for speeding up the transmission rate. Based on the delayed commutation circuit proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110502 (2006), we present an improved scheme for accelerating network transmission. For two more realistic scenarios, we utilize the characteristic of a quantum state to simultaneously implement a data switch and transmission that makes it possible to reduce the packet delay and route a qubit packet even before its address is determined. This circuit is further extended to the quantum network for the transmission of the unknown quantum information. The analysis demonstrates that quantum communication technology can considerably reduce the processing delay time and build faster and more efficient packet-switched networks.

  6. Biologically inspired path to quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogryzko, Vasily; Ozhigov, Yuri

    2014-12-01

    We describe an approach to quantum computer inspired by the information processing at the molecular level in living cells. It is based on the separation of a small ensemble of qubits inside the living system (e.g., a bacterial cell), such that coherent quantum states of this ensemble remain practically unchanged for a long time. We use the notion of a quantum kernel to describe such an ensemble. Quantum kernel is not strictly connected with certain particles; it permanently exchanges atoms and molecules with the environment, which makes quantum kernel a virtual notion. There are many reasons to expect that the state of quantum kernel of a living system can be treated as the stationary state of some Hamiltonian. While the quantum kernel is responsible for the stability of dynamics at the time scale of cellular life, at the longer inter-generation time scale it can change, varying smoothly in the course of biological evolution. To the first level of approximation, quantum kernel can be described in the framework of qubit modification of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the relaxation corresponds to the exchange of matter between quantum kernel and the rest of the cell and is represented as Lindblad super-operators.

  7. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1998-05-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) [Science {bold 275}, 350 (1997)] and Cory {ital et al.} (spatial averaging) [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA {bold 94}, 1634 (1997)] for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla quantum bits, and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high-temperature and low-temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal-to-noise behavior of each. Most of these algorithms require only a constant multiple of the number of experiments needed by the other methods for creating effective pure states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Quantum Computing and Number Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-01

    The prime factorization can be efficiently solved on a quantum computer. This result was given by Shor in 1994. In the first half of this article, a review of Shor's algorithm with mathematical setups is given. In the second half of this article, the prime number theorem which is an essential tool to understand the distribution of prime numbers is given.

  9. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward; Gaitan, Frank; Humble, Travis; Jordan, Stephen; Landahl, Andrew J; Love, Peter; Lucas, Robert; Preskill, John; Muller, Richard P.; Svore, Krysta; Wiebe, Nathan; Williams, Carl

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  10. Trading Classical and Quantum Computational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose examples of a hybrid quantum-classical simulation where a classical computer assisted by a small quantum processor can efficiently simulate a larger quantum system. First, we consider sparse quantum circuits such that each qubit participates in O (1 ) two-qubit gates. It is shown that any sparse circuit on n +k qubits can be simulated by sparse circuits on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ) . Second, we study Pauli-based computation (PBC), where allowed operations are nondestructive eigenvalue measurements of n -qubit Pauli operators. The computation begins by initializing each qubit in the so-called magic state. This model is known to be equivalent to the universal quantum computer. We show that any PBC on n +k qubits can be simulated by PBCs on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ). Finally, we propose a purely classical algorithm that can simulate a PBC on n qubits in a time 2α npoly (n ) , where α ≈0.94 . This improves upon the brute-force simulation method, which takes time 2npoly (n ). Our algorithm exploits the fact that n -fold tensor products of magic states admit a low-rank decomposition into n -qubit stabilizer states.

  11. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  12. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  13. Translating non-trivial algorithms from the circuit model to the measurement-based quantum computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, P. M.; Lott, G. E.; Fanto, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a circuit model algorithm as measurement-based quantum computing algorithm via a large discrete cluster state constructed sequentially, from qubits implemented as single photons. We describe a large optical discrete graph state capable of searching logical 4 and 8 element lists as an example. To do so we have developed several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of the evolution of discrete cluster states and graph state equations. We describe the cluster state as a sequence of repeated entanglement and measurement steps using a small number of single photons for each step. These prescriptions can be generalized to implement any logical circuit model operation with appropriate single-photon measurements and feed forward error corrections. Such a cluster state is not guaranteed to be optimal (i.e. minimum number of photons, measurements, run time).

  14. Quantum computing with parafermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Adrian; Loss, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Zd parafermions are exotic non-Abelian quasiparticles generalizing Majorana fermions, which correspond to the case d =2 . In contrast to Majorana fermions, braiding of parafermions with d >2 allows one to perform an entangling gate. This has spurred interest in parafermions, and a variety of condensed matter systems have been proposed as potential hosts for them. In this work, we study the computational power of braiding parafermions more systematically. We make no assumptions on the underlying physical model but derive all our results from the algebraical relations that define parafermions. We find a family of 2 d representations of the braid group that are compatible with these relations. The braiding operators derived this way reproduce those derived previously from physical grounds as special cases. We show that if a d -level qudit is encoded in the fusion space of four parafermions, braiding of these four parafermions allows one to generate the entire single-qudit Clifford group (up to phases), for any d . If d is odd, then we show that in fact the entire many-qudit Clifford group can be generated.

  15. Microring resonator-based diamond optothermal switch: a building block for a quantum computing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Faraon, Andrei; Santori, Charles; Acosta, Victor; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2013-03-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond has motivated many groups building scalable quantum information processors based on diamond photonics. This is owning to the long-lived electronic spin coherence and the capability for spin manipulation and readout of NV centers.1-4 The primitive operation is to create entanglement between two NV centers, based on schemes such as 'atom-photon entanglement' proposed by Cabrillo et al.5To scale this type of scheme beyond two qubits, one important component is an optical switch that allows light emitted from a particular device to be routed to multiple locations. With such a switch, one has choices of routing photons to specified paths and has the benefit of improving the entanglement speed by entangling multiple qubits at the same time. Yield of the existing diamond cavities coupled with NV centers are inevitably low, due to the nature of randomness for NV placement and orientation, variation of spectral stability, and variation of cavity resonance frequency and quality factor. An optical switch provides the capability to tolerate a large fraction of defective devices by routing only to the working devices. Many type of switching devices were built on conventional semiconductor materials with mechanisms from mechanical, thermal switching to carrier injection, photonics crystal, and polymer refractive index tuning .6-8 In this paper, we build an optical-thermal switch on diamond with micro-ring waveguides, mainly for the simplicity of the diamond fabrication. The the switching function was realized by locally tuning the temperature of the diamond waveguides. Switching efficiency of 31% at 'drop' port and 73% at 'through' port were obtained.

  16. Quantum dissonance and deterministic quantum computation with a single qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar

    2014-11-01

    Mixed state quantum computation can perform certain tasks which are believed to be efficiently intractable on a classical computer. For a specific model of mixed state quantum computation, namely, deterministic quantum computation with a single qubit (DQC1), recent investigations suggest that quantum correlations other than entanglement might be responsible for the power of DQC1 model. However, strictly speaking, the role of entanglement in this model of computation was not entirely clear. We provide conclusive evidence that there are instances where quantum entanglement is not present in any part of this model, nevertheless we have advantage over classical computation. This establishes the fact that quantum dissonance (a kind of quantum correlations) present in fully separable (FS) states provide power to DQC1 model.

  17. Atomic-scale investigations of current and future devices: from nitride-based transistors to quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Luke

    Our era is defined by its technology, and our future is dependent on its continued evolution. Over the past few decades, we have witnessed the expansion of advanced technology into all walks of life and all industries, driven by the exponential increase in the speed and power of semiconductor-based devices. However, as the length scale of devices reaches the atomic scale, a deep understanding of atomistic theory and its application is increasingly crucial. In order to illustrate the power of an atomistic approach to understanding devices, we will present results and conclusions from three interlinked projects: n-type doping of III-nitride semiconductors, defects for quantum computing, and macroscopic simulations of devices. First, we will study effective n-type doping of III-nitride semiconductors and their alloys, and analyze the barriers to effective n-type doping of III-nitrides and their alloys. In particular, we will study the formation of DX centers, and predict alloy composition onsets for various III-nitride alloys. In addition, we will perform a comprehensive study of alternative dopants, and provide potential alternative dopants to improve n-type conductivity in AlN and wide-band-gap nitride alloys. Next, we will discuss how atomic-scale defects can act as a curse for the development of quantum computers by contributing to decoherence at an atomic scale, specifically investigating the effect of two-level state defects (TLS) systems in alumina as a source of decoherence in superconducting qubits based on Josephson junctions; and also as a blessing, by allowing the identification of wholly new qubits in different materials, specifically showing calculations on defects in SiC for quantum computing applications. Finally, we will provide examples of recent calculations we have performed for devices using macrosopic device simulations, largely in conjunction with first-principles calculations. Specifically, we will discuss the power of using a multi

  18. Quantum fully homomorphic encryption scheme based on universal quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Fully homomorphic encryption enables arbitrary computation on encrypted data without decrypting the data. Here it is studied in the context of quantum information processing. Based on universal quantum circuit, we present a quantum fully homomorphic encryption (QFHE) scheme, which permits arbitrary quantum transformation on any encrypted data. The QFHE scheme is proved to be perfectly secure. In the scheme, the decryption key is different from the encryption key; however, the encryption key cannot be revealed. Moreover, the evaluation algorithm of the scheme is independent of the encryption key, so it is suitable for delegated quantum computing between two parties.

  19. Novel Image Encryption based on Quantum Walks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Pan, Qing-Xiang; Sun, Si-Jia; Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computation has achieved a tremendous success during the last decades. In this paper, we investigate the potential application of a famous quantum computation model, i.e., quantum walks (QW) in image encryption. It is found that QW can serve as an excellent key generator thanks to its inherent nonlinear chaotic dynamic behavior. Furthermore, we construct a novel QW-based image encryption algorithm. Simulations and performance comparisons show that the proposal is secure enough for image encryption and outperforms prior works. It also opens the door towards introducing quantum computation into image encryption and promotes the convergence between quantum computation and image processing. PMID:25586889

  20. Novel image encryption based on quantum walks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Pan, Qing-Xiang; Sun, Si-Jia; Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computation has achieved a tremendous success during the last decades. In this paper, we investigate the potential application of a famous quantum computation model, i.e., quantum walks (QW) in image encryption. It is found that QW can serve as an excellent key generator thanks to its inherent nonlinear chaotic dynamic behavior. Furthermore, we construct a novel QW-based image encryption algorithm. Simulations and performance comparisons show that the proposal is secure enough for image encryption and outperforms prior works. It also opens the door towards introducing quantum computation into image encryption and promotes the convergence between quantum computation and image processing. PMID:25586889

  1. Computer Visualization of Many-Particle Quantum Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozhigov, A. Y.

    2009-03-10

    In this paper I show the importance of computer visualization in researching of many-particle quantum dynamics. Such a visualization becomes an indispensable illustrative tool for understanding the behavior of dynamic swarm-based quantum systems. It is also an important component of the corresponding simulation framework, and can simplify the studies of underlying algorithms for multi-particle quantum systems.

  2. Computer Visualization of Many-Particle Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhigov, A. Y.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper I show the importance of computer visualization in researching of many-particle quantum dynamics. Such a visualization becomes an indispensable illustrative tool for understanding the behavior of dynamic swarm-based quantum systems. It is also an important component of the corresponding simulation framework, and can simplify the studies of underlying algorithms for multi-particle quantum systems.

  3. Universal computation by multiparticle quantum walk.

    PubMed

    Childs, Andrew M; Gosset, David; Webb, Zak

    2013-02-15

    A quantum walk is a time-homogeneous quantum-mechanical process on a graph defined by analogy to classical random walk. The quantum walker is a particle that moves from a given vertex to adjacent vertices in quantum superposition. We consider a generalization to interacting systems with more than one walker, such as the Bose-Hubbard model and systems of fermions or distinguishable particles with nearest-neighbor interactions, and show that multiparticle quantum walk is capable of universal quantum computation. Our construction could, in principle, be used as an architecture for building a scalable quantum computer with no need for time-dependent control. PMID:23413349

  4. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers.

    PubMed

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S; Amin, Mohammad H; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  5. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  6. Quantum computing with photons: introduction to the circuit model, the one-way quantum computer, and the fundamental principles of photonic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. This tutorial reviews the fundamental tools of photonic quantum information processing. The basics of theoretical quantum computing are presented and the quantum circuit model as well as measurement-based models of quantum computing are introduced. Furthermore, it is shown how these concepts can be implemented experimentally using photonic qubits, where information is encoded in the photons’ polarization.

  7. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  8. Ion photon networks for quantum computing and quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Susan; Hayes, David; Hucul, David; Inlek, I. Volkan; Monroe, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Quantum information based on ion-trap technology is well regarded for its stability, high detection fidelity, and ease of manipulation. Here we demonstrate a proof of principle experiment for scaling this technology to large numbers of ions in separate traps by linking the ions via photons. We give results for entanglement between distant ions via probabilistic photonic gates that is then swapped between ions in the same trap via deterministic Coulombic gates. We report fidelities above 65% and show encouraging preliminary results for the next stage of experimental improvement. Such a system could be used for quantum computing requiring large numbers of qubits or for quantum repeaters requiring the qubits to be separated by large distances.

  9. Quantum game simulator, using the circuit model of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Panagiotis; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general two-player quantum game simulator that can simulate any two-player quantum game described by a 2×2 payoff matrix (two strategy games).The user can determine the payoff matrices for both players, their strategies and the amount of entanglement between their initial strategies. The outputs of the simulator are the expected payoffs of each player as a function of the other player's strategy parameters and the amount of entanglement. The simulator also produces contour plots that divide the strategy spaces of the game in regions in which players can get larger payoffs if they choose to use a quantum strategy against any classical one. We also apply the simulator to two well-known quantum games, the Battle of Sexes and the Chicken game. Program summaryProgram title: Quantum Game Simulator (QGS) Catalogue identifier: AEED_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEED_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3416 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 583 553 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab R2008a (C) Computer: Any computer that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Operating system: Any system that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Classification: 4.15 Nature of problem: Simulation of two player quantum games described by a payoff matrix. Solution method: The program calculates the matrices that comprise the Eisert setup for quantum games based on the quantum circuit model. There are 5 parameters that can be altered. We define 3 of them as constant. We play the quantum game for all possible values for the other 2 parameters and store the results in a matrix. Unusual features: The software provides an easy way of simulating any two-player quantum games. Running time: Approximately

  10. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding. PMID:27424767

  11. Quantum computation based on photonic systems with two degrees of freedom assisted by the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Most of previous quantum computations only take use of one degree of freedom (DoF) of photons. An experimental system may possess various DoFs simultaneously. In this paper, with the weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we investigate the parallel quantum computation dependent on photonic systems with two DoFs. We construct nearly deterministic controlled-not (CNOT) gates operating on the polarization spatial DoFs of the two-photon or one-photon system. These CNOT gates show that two photonic DoFs can be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoF in theory. Only the coherent states are required. Thus one half of quantum simulation resources may be saved in quantum applications if more complicated circuits are involved. Hence, one may trade off the implementation complexity and simulation resources by using different photonic systems. These CNOT gates are also used to complete various applications including the quantum teleportation and quantum superdense coding. PMID:27424767

  12. Quantum evolution: The case of weak localization for a 3D alloy-type Anderson model and application to Hamiltonian based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenwei

    Over the years, people have found Quantum Mechanics to be extremely useful in explaining various physical phenomena from a microscopic point of view. Anderson localization, named after physicist P. W. Anderson, states that disorder in a crystal can cause non-spreading of wave packets, which is one possible mechanism (at single electron level) to explain metal-insulator transitions. The theory of quantum computation promises to bring greater computational power over classical computers by making use of some special features of Quantum Mechanics. The first part of this dissertation considers a 3D alloy-type model, where the Hamiltonian is the sum of the finite difference Laplacian corresponding to free motion of an electron and a random potential generated by a sign-indefinite single-site potential. The result shows that localization occurs in the weak disorder regime, i.e., when the coupling parameter lambda is very small, for energies E ≤ --Clambda 2. The second part of this dissertation considers adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) algorithms for the unstructured search problem to the case when the number of marked items is unknown. In an ideal situation, an explicit quantum algorithm together with a counting subroutine are given that achieve the optimal Grover speedup over classical algorithms, i.e., roughly speaking, reduce O(2n) to O(2n/2), where n is the size of the problem. However, if one considers more realistic settings, the result shows this quantum speedup is achievable only under a very rigid control precision requirement (e.g., exponentially small control error).

  13. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  14. Gate sequence for continuous variable one-way quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaolong; Hao, Shuhong; Deng, Xiaowei; Ma, Lingyu; Wang, Meihong; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2013-01-01

    Measurement-based one-way quantum computation using cluster states as resources provides an efficient model to perform computation and information processing of quantum codes. Arbitrary Gaussian quantum computation can be implemented sufficiently by long single-mode and two-mode gate sequences. However, continuous variable gate sequences have not been realized so far due to an absence of cluster states larger than four submodes. Here we present the first continuous variable gate sequence consisting of a single-mode squeezing gate and a two-mode controlled-phase gate based on a six-mode cluster state. The quantum property of this gate sequence is confirmed by the fidelities and the quantum entanglement of two output modes, which depend on both the squeezing and controlled-phase gates. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of implementing Gaussian quantum computation by means of accessible gate sequences.

  15. Zeno effect for quantum computation and control.

    PubMed

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A; Rezakhani, A T; Dominy, Jason M; Lidar, D A

    2012-02-24

    It is well known that the quantum Zeno effect can protect specific quantum states from decoherence by using projective measurements. Here we combine the theory of weak measurements with stabilizer quantum error correction and detection codes. We derive rigorous performance bounds which demonstrate that the Zeno effect can be used to protect appropriately encoded arbitrary states to arbitrary accuracy while at the same time allowing for universal quantum computation or quantum control. PMID:22463507

  16. Computation of the thermal conductivity using methods based on classical and quantum molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya-Martínez, O. N.; Barrat, Jean-Louis; Rodney, David

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of a model for solid argon is investigated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods, as well as the traditional Boltzmann transport equation approach with input from molecular dynamics calculations, both with classical and quantum thermostats. A surprising result is that, at low temperatures, only the classical molecular dynamics technique is in agreement with the experimental data. We argue that this agreement is due to a compensation of errors and raise the issue of an appropriate method for calculating thermal conductivities at low (below Debye) temperatures.

  17. Contextuality supplies the `magic' for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via `magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple `hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

  18. Contextuality supplies the 'magic' for quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

    2014-06-19

    Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via 'magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple 'hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms. PMID:24919152

  19. Quantum Computation: Theory, Practice, and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Isaac

    2000-03-01

    Information is physical, and computation obeys physical laws. Ones and zeros -- elementary classical bits of information -- must be represented in physical media to be stored and processed. Traditionally, these objects are well described by classical physics, but increasingly, as we edge towards the limits of semiconductor technology, we reach a new regime where the laws of quantum physics become dominant. Strange new phenomena, like entanglement and quantum coherence, become available as new resources. How can such resources be utilized for computation? What physical systems allow construction and control of quantum phenomena? How is this relevant to future directions in information technology? The theoretical promise of quantum computation is polynomial speedup of searches, and exponentially speedups for other certain problems such as factoring. But the experimental challenge to realize such algorithms in practice is enormous: to date, quantum computers with only a handful of quantum bits have been realized in the laboratory, using electromagnetically trapped ions, and with magnetic resonance techniques. On the other hand, quantum information has been communicated over long distances using single photons. The future of quantum computation is currently subject to intense scrutiny. It may well be that these machines will not be practical. More quantum algorithms must be discovered, and new physical implementations must be realized. Quantum computation and quantum information are young fields with major issues to be overcome, but already, they have forever changed the way we think of the physical world and what can be computed with it.

  20. Heterotic quantum and classical computing on convergence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, D. R.; Jakel, D. W.; Irwin, R. J.; Blair, H. A.

    2015-05-01

    Category-theoretic characterizations of heterotic models of computation, introduced by Stepney et al., combine computational models such as classical/quantum, digital/analog, synchronous/asynchronous, etc. to obtain increased computational power. A highly informative classical/quantum heterotic model of computation is represented by Abramsky's simple sequential imperative quantum programming language which extends the classical simple imperative programming language to encompass quantum computation. The mathematical (denotational) semantics of this classical language serves as a basic foundation upon which formal verification methods can be developed. We present a more comprehensive heterotic classical/quantum model of computation based on heterotic dynamical systems on convergence spaces. Convergence spaces subsume topological spaces but admit finer structure from which, in prior work, we obtained differential calculi in the cartesian closed category of convergence spaces allowing us to define heterotic dynamical systems, given by coupled systems of first order differential equations whose variables are functions from the reals to convergence spaces.

  1. Popescu-Rohrlich correlations imply efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne

    2016-08-01

    In instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation, two parties cooperate in order to perform a quantum computation on their joint inputs, while being restricted to a single round of simultaneous communication. Previous results showed that instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation is possible, at the cost of an exponential amount of prior shared entanglement (in the size of the input). Here, we show that a linear amount of entanglement suffices, (in the size of the computation), as long as the parties share nonlocal correlations as given by the Popescu-Rohrlich box. This means that communication is not required for efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation. Exploiting the well-known relation to position-based cryptography, our result also implies the impossibility of secure position-based cryptography against adversaries with nonsignaling correlations. Furthermore, our construction establishes a quantum analog of the classical communication complexity collapse under nonsignaling correlations.

  2. Scheme for Quantum Computing Immune to Decoherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin; Vatan, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    A constructive scheme has been devised to enable mapping of any quantum computation into a spintronic circuit in which the computation is encoded in a basis that is, in principle, immune to quantum decoherence. The scheme is implemented by an algorithm that utilizes multiple physical spins to encode each logical bit in such a way that collective errors affecting all the physical spins do not disturb the logical bit. The scheme is expected to be of use to experimenters working on spintronic implementations of quantum logic. Spintronic computing devices use quantum-mechanical spins (typically, electron spins) to encode logical bits. Bits thus encoded (denoted qubits) are potentially susceptible to errors caused by noise and decoherence. The traditional model of quantum computation is based partly on the assumption that each qubit is implemented by use of a single two-state quantum system, such as an electron or other spin-1.2 particle. It can be surprisingly difficult to achieve certain gate operations . most notably, those of arbitrary 1-qubit gates . in spintronic hardware according to this model. However, ironically, certain 2-qubit interactions (in particular, spin-spin exchange interactions) can be achieved relatively easily in spintronic hardware. Therefore, it would be fortunate if it were possible to implement any 1-qubit gate by use of a spin-spin exchange interaction. While such a direct representation is not possible, it is possible to achieve an arbitrary 1-qubit gate indirectly by means of a sequence of four spin-spin exchange interactions, which could be implemented by use of four exchange gates. Accordingly, the present scheme provides for mapping any 1-qubit gate in the logical basis into an equivalent sequence of at most four spin-spin exchange interactions in the physical (encoded) basis. The complexity of the mathematical derivation of the scheme from basic quantum principles precludes a description within this article; it must suffice to report

  3. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question. PMID:25061205

  4. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  5. Quantum Computational Logics and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Giuntini, Roberto; Leporini, Roberto; di Francia, Giuliano Toraldo

    2008-01-01

    In quantum computational logics meanings of formulas are identified with quantum information quantities: systems of qubits or, more generally, mixtures of systems of qubits. We consider two kinds of quantum computational semantics: (1) a compositional semantics, where the meaning of a compound formula is determined by the meanings of its parts; (2) a holistic semantics, which makes essential use of the characteristic “holistic” features of the quantum-theoretic formalism. The compositional and the holistic semantics turn out to characterize the same logic. In this framework, one can introduce the notion of quantum-classical truth table, which corresponds to the most natural way for a quantum computer to calculate classical tautologies. Quantum computational logics can be applied to investigate different kinds of semantic phenomena where holistic, contextual and gestaltic patterns play an essential role (from natural languages to musical compositions).

  6. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990. PMID:25571750

  7. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Quantum Image XOR Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Li-Hua; He, Xiang-Tao; Cheng, Shan; Hua, Tian-Xiang; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-03-01

    A novel encryption algorithm for quantum images based on quantum image XOR operations is designed. The quantum image XOR operations are designed by using the hyper-chaotic sequences generated with the Chen's hyper-chaotic system to control the control-NOT operation, which is used to encode gray-level information. The initial conditions of the Chen's hyper-chaotic system are the keys, which guarantee the security of the proposed quantum image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and theoretical analyses demonstrate that the proposed quantum image encryption algorithm has larger key space, higher key sensitivity, stronger resistance of statistical analysis and lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  8. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Quantum Image XOR Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Li-Hua; He, Xiang-Tao; Cheng, Shan; Hua, Tian-Xiang; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-07-01

    A novel encryption algorithm for quantum images based on quantum image XOR operations is designed. The quantum image XOR operations are designed by using the hyper-chaotic sequences generated with the Chen's hyper-chaotic system to control the control-NOT operation, which is used to encode gray-level information. The initial conditions of the Chen's hyper-chaotic system are the keys, which guarantee the security of the proposed quantum image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and theoretical analyses demonstrate that the proposed quantum image encryption algorithm has larger key space, higher key sensitivity, stronger resistance of statistical analysis and lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  9. Some Thoughts Regarding Practical Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Debabrata; Gomez, Richard; Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    Quantum computing has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing. The ability of performing parallel operations over an exponentially large computational space has proved to be the main advantage of the quantum computing model. In this regard, we are particularly interested in the potential applications of quantum computers to enhance real software systems of interest to the defense, industrial, scientific and financial communities. However, while much has been written in popular and scientific literature about the benefits of the quantum computational model, several of the problems associated to the practical implementation of real-life complex software systems in quantum computers are often ignored. In this presentation we will argue that practical quantum computation is not as straightforward as commonly advertised, even if the technological problems associated to the manufacturing and engineering of large-scale quantum registers were solved overnight. We will discuss some of the frequently overlooked difficulties that plague quantum computing in the areas of memories, I/O, addressing schemes, compilers, oracles, approximate information copying, logical debugging, error correction and fault-tolerant computing protocols.

  10. A scheme for efficient quantum computation with linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.; Milburn, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers promise to increase greatly the efficiency of solving problems such as factoring large integers, combinatorial optimization and quantum physics simulation. One of the greatest challenges now is to implement the basic quantum-computational elements in a physical system and to demonstrate that they can be reliably and scalably controlled. One of the earliest proposals for quantum computation is based on implementing a quantum bit with two optical modes containing one photon. The proposal is appealing because of the ease with which photon interference can be observed. Until now, it suffered from the requirement for non-linear couplings between optical modes containing few photons. Here we show that efficient quantum computation is possible using only beam splitters, phase shifters, single photon sources and photo-detectors. Our methods exploit feedback from photo-detectors and are robust against errors from photon loss and detector inefficiency. The basic elements are accessible to experimental investigation with current technology.

  11. Possible topological quantum computation via Khovanov homology: D-brane topological quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2009-05-01

    A model of a D-Brane Topological Quantum Computer (DBTQC) is presented and sustained. The model is based on four-dimensional TQFTs of the Donaldson-Witten and Seiber-Witten kinds. It is argued that the DBTQC is able to compute Khovanov homology for knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC physically incorporates the mathematical process of categorification according to which the invariant polynomials for knots, links and graphs such as Jones, HOMFLY, Tutte and Bollobás-Riordan polynomials can be computed as the Euler characteristics corresponding to special homology complexes associated with knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC is conjectured as a powerful universal quantum computer in the sense that the DBTQC computes Khovanov homology which is considered like powerful that the Jones polynomial.

  12. The Heisenberg representation of quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesman, D.

    1998-06-24

    Since Shor`s discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers--the difficulty of describing them on classical computers--also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A formalism describing the evolution of operators rather than states has proven extremely fruitful in understanding an important class of quantum operations. States used in error correction and certain communication protocols can be described by their stabilizer, a group of tensor products of Pauli matrices. Even this simple group structure is sufficient to allow a rich range of quantum effects, although it falls short of the full power of quantum computation.

  13. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  14. Cluster State Quantum Computation and the Repeat-Until Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwek, L. C.

    Cluster state computation or the one way quantum computation (1WQC) relies on an initially highly entangled state (called a cluster state) and an appropriate sequence of single qubit measurements along different directions, together with feed-forward based on the measurement results, to realize a quantum computation process. The final result of the computation is obtained by measuring the last remaining qubits in the computational basis. In this short tutorial on cluster state quantum computation, we will also describe the basic ideas of a cluster state and proceed to describe how a single qubit operation can be done on a cluster state. Recently, we proposed a repeat-until-success (RUS) scheme that could effectively be used to realize one-way quantum computer on a hybrid system of photons and atoms. We will briefly describe this RUS scheme and show how it can be used to entangled two distant stationary qubits.

  15. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-Hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics.

  16. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics. PMID:26792197

  17. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics. PMID:26792197

  18. Geometry of Quantum Computation with Qudits

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    The circuit complexity of quantum qubit system evolution as a primitive problem in quantum computation has been discussed widely. We investigate this problem in terms of qudit system. Using the Riemannian geometry the optimal quantum circuits are equivalent to the geodetic evolutions in specially curved parametrization of SU(dn). And the quantum circuit complexity is explicitly dependent of controllable approximation error bound. PMID:24509710

  19. Determining Ramsey numbers on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hefeng

    2016-03-01

    We present a quantum algorithm for computing the Ramsey numbers whose computational complexity grows superexponentially with the number of vertices of a graph on a classical computer. The problem is mapped to a decision problem on a quantum computer, and a probe qubit is coupled to a register that represents the problem and detects the energy levels of the problem Hamiltonian. The decision problem is solved by detecting the decay dynamics of the probe qubit.

  20. Computable measure of total quantum correlations of multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behdani, Javad; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Quantum discord as a measure of the quantum correlations cannot be easily computed for most of density operators. In this paper, we present a measure of the total quantum correlations that is operationally simple and can be computed effectively for an arbitrary mixed state of a multipartite system. The measure is based on the coherence vector of the party whose quantumness is investigated as well as the correlation matrix of this part with the remainder of the system. Being able to detect the quantumness of multipartite systems, such as detecting the quantum critical points in spin chains, alongside with the computability characteristic of the measure, makes it a useful indicator to be exploited in the cases which are out of the scope of the other known measures.

  1. Measurement-Based Classical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoban, Matty J.; Wallman, Joel J.; Anwar, Hussain; Usher, Naïri; Raussendorf, Robert; Browne, Dan E.

    2014-04-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation, in which computation proceeds via adaptive single qubit measurements on a multiqubit quantum state. It is computationally equivalent to the circuit model. Unlike the circuit model, however, its classical analog is little studied. Here we present a classical analog of MBQC whose computational complexity presents a rich structure. To do so, we identify uniform families of quantum computations [refining the circuits introduced by Bremner et al. Proc. R. Soc. A 467, 459 (2010)] whose output is likely hard to exactly simulate (sample) classically. We demonstrate that these circuit families can be efficiently implemented in the MBQC model without adaptive measurement and, thus, can be achieved in a classical analog of MBQC whose resource state is a probability distribution which has been created quantum mechanically. Such states (by definition) violate no Bell inequality, but, if widely held beliefs about computational complexity are true, they, nevertheless, exhibit nonclassicality when used as a computational resource—an imprint of their quantum origin.

  2. Universal quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically show that a nonlinear oscillator network with controllable parameters can be used for universal quantum computation. The initialization is achieved by a quantum-mechanical bifurcation based on quantum adiabatic evolution, which yields a Schrödinger cat state. All the elementary quantum gates are also achieved by quantum adiabatic evolution, in which dynamical phases accompanying the adiabatic evolutions are controlled by the system parameters. Numerical simulation results indicate that high gate fidelities can be achieved, where no dissipation is assumed.

  3. Experimental demonstration of deterministic one-way quantum computation on a NMR quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Chenyong; Zhu Jing; Peng Xinhua; Chong Bo; Zhou Xianyi; Du Jiangfeng

    2010-01-15

    One-way quantum computing is an important and novel approach to quantum computation. By exploiting the existing particle-particle interactions, we report an experimental realization of the complete process of deterministic one-way quantum Deutsch-Josza algorithm in NMR, including graph state preparation, single-qubit measurements, and feed-forward corrections. The findings in our experiment may shed light on the future scalable one-way quantum computation.

  4. Endo-Fullerene and Doped Diamond Nanocrystallite Based Models of Qubits for Solid-State Quantum Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Seongjun; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Models of encapsulated 1/2 nuclear spin H-1 and P-31 atoms in fullerene and diamond nanocrystallite, respectively, are proposed and examined with ab-initio local density functional method for possible applications as single quantum bits (qubits) in solid-state quantum computers. A H-1 atom encapsulated in a fully deuterated fullerene, C(sub 20)D(sub 20), forms the first model system and ab-initio calculation shows that H-1 atom is stable in atomic state at the center of the fullerene with a barrier of about 1 eV to escape. A P-31 atom positioned at the center of a diamond nanocrystallite is the second model system, and 3 1P atom is found to be stable at the substitutional site relative to interstitial sites by 15 eV, Vacancy formation energy is 6 eV in diamond so that substitutional P-31 atom will be stable against diffusion during the formation mechanisms within the nanocrystallite. The coupling between the nuclear spin and weakly bound (valance) donor electron coupling in both systems is found to be suitable for single qubit applications, where as the spatial distributions of (valance) donor electron wave functions are found to be preferentially spread along certain lattice directions facilitating two or more qubit applications. The feasibility of the fabrication pathways for both model solid-state qubit systems within practical quantum computers is discussed with in the context of our proposed solid-state qubits.

  5. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-02-01

    In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G →G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap Δ (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ≫1. Calculating Δ (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

  6. Numerical computation for teaching quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Tyson; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2013-11-01

    The study of ideal quantum gases reveals surprising quantum effects that can be observed in macroscopic systems. The properties of bosons are particularly unusual because a macroscopic number of particles can occupy a single quantum state. We describe a computational approach that supplements the usual analytic derivations applicable in the thermodynamic limit. The approach involves directly summing over the quantum states for finite systems and avoids the need for doing difficult integrals. The results display the unusual behavior of quantum gases even for relatively small systems.

  7. Fast graph operations in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liming; Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2016-03-01

    The connection between certain entangled states and graphs has been heavily studied in the context of measurement-based quantum computation as a tool for understanding entanglement. Here we show that this correspondence can be harnessed in the reverse direction to yield a graph data structure, which allows for more efficient manipulation and comparison of graphs than any possible classical structure. We introduce efficient algorithms for many transformation and comparison operations on graphs represented as graph states, and prove that no classical data structure can have similar performance for the full set of operations studied.

  8. A genetic-algorithm-based method to find unitary transformations for any desired quantum computation and application to a one-bit oracle decision problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Yoo, Seokwon

    2014-12-01

    We propose a genetic-algorithm-based method to find the unitary transformations for any desired quantum computation. We formulate a simple genetic algorithm by introducing the "genetic parameter vector" of the unitary transformations to be found. In the genetic algorithm process, all components of the genetic parameter vectors are supposed to evolve to the solution parameters of the unitary transformations. We apply our method to find the optimal unitary transformations and to generalize the corresponding quantum algorithms for a realistic problem, the one-bit oracle decision problem, or the often-called Deutsch problem. By numerical simulations, we can faithfully find the appropriate unitary transformations to solve the problem by using our method. We analyze the quantum algorithms identified by the found unitary transformations and generalize the variant models of the original Deutsch's algorithm.

  9. Concatenated codes for fault tolerant quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.; Zurek, W.

    1995-05-01

    The application of concatenated codes to fault tolerant quantum computing is discussed. We have previously shown that for quantum memories and quantum communication, a state can be transmitted with error {epsilon} provided each gate has error at most c{epsilon}. We show how this can be used with Shor`s fault tolerant operations to reduce the accuracy requirements when maintaining states not currently participating in the computation. Viewing Shor`s fault tolerant operations as a method for reducing the error of operations, we give a concatenated implementation which promises to propagate the reduction hierarchically. This has the potential of reducing the accuracy requirements in long computations.

  10. One-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunwang; Han Yang; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu; Zhong Xiaojun

    2010-03-15

    In this Brief Report, we propose a potential scheme to implement one-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Large cluster states of charge qubits can be generated in just one step with a superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR) playing the role of a dispersive coupler. A single-qubit measurement in the arbitrary basis can be implemented using a single electron transistor with the help of one-qubit gates. By examining the main decoherence sources, we show that circuit QED is a promising architecture for one-way quantum computation.

  11. Protecting software agents from malicious hosts using quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, John; Donkor, Eric

    2000-07-01

    We evaluate how quantum computing can be applied to security problems for software agents. Agent-based computing, which merges technological advances in artificial intelligence and mobile computing, is a rapidly growing domain, especially in applications such as electronic commerce, network management, information retrieval, and mission planning. System security is one of the more eminent research areas in agent-based computing, and the specific problem of protecting a mobile agent from a potentially hostile host is one of the most difficult of these challenges. In this work, we describe our agent model, and discuss the capabilities and limitations of classical solutions to the malicious host problem. Quantum computing may be extremely helpful in addressing the limitations of classical solutions to this problem. This paper highlights some of the areas where quantum computing could be applied to agent security.

  12. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane; Sarrao, John Louis; Richardson, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their origins in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.

  13. Symbolic Quantum Computation Simulation in SymPy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugini, Addison; Curry, Matt; Granger, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging field which aims to use quantum mechanics to solve difficult computational problems with greater efficiency than on a classical computer. There is a need to create software that i) helps newcomers to learn the field, ii) enables practitioners to design and simulate quantum circuits and iii) provides an open foundation for further research in the field. Towards these ends we have created a package, in the open-source symbolic computation library SymPy, that simulates the quantum circuit model of quantum computation using Dirac notation. This framework builds on the extant powerful symbolic capabilities of SymPy to preform its simulations in a fully symbolic manner. We use object oriented design to abstract circuits as ordered collections of quantum gate and qbit objects. The gate objects can either be applied directly to the qbit objects or be represented as matrices in different bases. The package is also capable of performing the quantum Fourier transform and Shor's algorithm. A notion of measurement is made possible through the use of a non-commutative gate object. In this talk, we describe the software and show examples of quantum circuits on single and multi qbit states that involve common algorithms, gates and measurements.

  14. Reducing computational complexity of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Titas; Das, Tamoghna; Sadhukhan, Debasis; Pal, Amit Kumar; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-12-01

    We address the issue of reducing the resource required to compute information-theoretic quantum correlation measures such as quantum discord and quantum work deficit in two qubits and higher-dimensional systems. We show that determination of the quantum correlation measure is possible even if we utilize a restricted set of local measurements. We find that the determination allows us to obtain a closed form of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for several classes of states, with a low error. We show that the computational error caused by the constraint over the complete set of local measurements reduces fast with an increase in the size of the restricted set, implying usefulness of constrained optimization, especially with the increase of dimensions. We perform quantitative analysis to investigate how the error scales with the system size, taking into account a set of plausible constructions of the constrained set. Carrying out a comparative study, we show that the resource required to optimize quantum work deficit is usually higher than that required for quantum discord. We also demonstrate that minimization of quantum discord and quantum work deficit is easier in the case of two-qubit mixed states of fixed ranks and with positive partial transpose in comparison to the corresponding states having nonpositive partial transpose. Applying the methodology to quantum spin models, we show that the constrained optimization can be used with advantage in analyzing such systems in quantum information-theoretic language. For bound entangled states, we show that the error is significantly low when the measurements correspond to the spin observables along the three Cartesian coordinates, and thereby we obtain expressions of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for these bound entangled states.

  15. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  16. Algorithms Bridging Quantum Computation and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod Ryan

    The design of new materials and chemicals derived entirely from computation has long been a goal of computational chemistry, and the governing equation whose solution would permit this dream is known. Unfortunately, the exact solution to this equation has been far too expensive and clever approximations fail in critical situations. Quantum computers offer a novel solution to this problem. In this work, we develop not only new algorithms to use quantum computers to study hard problems in chemistry, but also explore how such algorithms can help us to better understand and improve our traditional approaches. In particular, we first introduce a new method, the variational quantum eigensolver, which is designed to maximally utilize the quantum resources available in a device to solve chemical problems. We apply this method in a real quantum photonic device in the lab to study the dissociation of the helium hydride (HeH+) molecule. We also enhance this methodology with architecture specific optimizations on ion trap computers and show how linear-scaling techniques from traditional quantum chemistry can be used to improve the outlook of similar algorithms on quantum computers. We then show how studying quantum algorithms such as these can be used to understand and enhance the development of classical algorithms. In particular we use a tool from adiabatic quantum computation, Feynman's Clock, to develop a new discrete time variational principle and further establish a connection between real-time quantum dynamics and ground state eigenvalue problems. We use these tools to develop two novel parallel-in-time quantum algorithms that outperform competitive algorithms as well as offer new insights into the connection between the fermion sign problem of ground states and the dynamical sign problem of quantum dynamics. Finally we use insights gained in the study of quantum circuits to explore a general notion of sparsity in many-body quantum systems. In particular we use

  17. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  18. Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks.

    PubMed

    García-Escartín, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2006-09-15

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communication. We propose a nonclassical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes, we can route a qubit packet after part of it has left the network node. PMID:17025870

  19. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  20. Quantum computation for large-scale image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yue; Chen, Hanwu; Tan, Jianing; Li, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Due to the lack of an effective quantum feature extraction method, there is currently no effective way to perform quantum image classification or recognition. In this paper, for the first time, a global quantum feature extraction method based on Schmidt decomposition is proposed. A revised quantum learning algorithm is also proposed that will classify images by computing the Hamming distance of these features. From the experimental results derived from the benchmark database Caltech 101, and an analysis of the algorithm, an effective approach to large-scale image classification is derived and proposed against the background of big data.

  1. Universal linear Bogoliubov transformations through one-way quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ukai, Ryuji; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Iwata, Noriaki; Furusawa, Akira; Loock, Peter van

    2010-03-15

    We show explicitly how to realize an arbitrary linear unitary Bogoliubov (LUBO) transformation on a multimode quantum state through homodyne-based one-way quantum computation. Any LUBO transformation can be approximated by means of a fixed, finite-sized, sufficiently squeezed Gaussian cluster state that allows for the implementation of beam splitters (in form of three-mode connection gates) and general one-mode LUBO transformations. In particular, we demonstrate that a linear four-mode cluster state is a sufficient resource for an arbitrary one-mode LUBO transformation. Arbitrary-input quantum states including non-Gaussian states could be efficiently attached to the cluster through quantum teleportation.

  2. The geometric approach to quantum correlations: computability versus reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufarelli, Tommaso; MacLean, Tom; Girolami, Davide; Vasile, Ruggero; Adesso, Gerardo

    2013-07-01

    We propose a modified metric based on the Hilbert-Schmidt norm and adopt it to define a rescaled version of the geometric measure of quantum discord. Such a measure is found not to suffer from pathological dependence on state purity. Although the employed metric is still non-contractive under quantum operations, we show that the resulting indicator of quantum correlations is in agreement with other bona fide discord measures in a number of physical examples. We present a critical assessment of the requirements of reliability versus computability when approaching the task of quantifying, or measuring, general quantum correlations in a bipartite state.

  3. Continuous-Variable Quantum Computation of Oracle Decision Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Mark R. A.

    Quantum information processing is appealing due its ability to solve certain problems quantitatively faster than classical information processing. Most quantum algorithms have been studied in discretely parameterized systems, but many quantum systems are continuously parameterized. The field of quantum optics in particular has sophisticated techniques for manipulating continuously parameterized quantum states of light, but the lack of a code-state formalism has hindered the study of quantum algorithms in these systems. To address this situation, a code-state formalism for the solution of oracle decision problems in continuously-parameterized quantum systems is developed. Quantum information processing is appealing due its ability to solve certain problems quantitatively faster than classical information processing. Most quantum algorithms have been studied in discretely parameterized systems, but many quantum systems are continuously parameterized. The field of quantum optics in particular has sophisticated techniques for manipulating continuously parameterized quantum states of light, but the lack of a code-state formalism has hindered the study of quantum algorithms in these systems. To address this situation, a code-state formalism for the solution of oracle decision problems in continuously-parameterized quantum systems is developed. In the infinite-dimensional case, we study continuous-variable quantum algorithms for the solution of the Deutsch--Jozsa oracle decision problem implemented within a single harmonic-oscillator. Orthogonal states are used as the computational bases, and we show that, contrary to a previous claim in the literature, this implementation of quantum information processing has limitations due to a position-momentum trade-off of the Fourier transform. We further demonstrate that orthogonal encoding bases are not unique, and using the coherent states of the harmonic oscillator as the computational bases, our formalism enables quantifying

  4. Hamiltonian quantum computer in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Liang, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum computation can be achieved by preparing an appropriate initial product state of qudits and then letting it evolve under a fixed Hamiltonian. The readout is made by measurement on individual qudits at some later time. This approach is called the Hamiltonian quantum computation and it includes, for example, the continuous-time quantum cellular automata and the universal quantum walk. We consider one spatial dimension and study the compromise between the locality k and the local Hilbert space dimension d . For geometrically 2-local (i.e., k =2 ), it is known that d =8 is already sufficient for universal quantum computation but the Hamiltonian is not translationally invariant. As the locality k increases, it is expected that the minimum required d should decrease. We provide a construction of a Hamiltonian quantum computer for k =3 with d =5 . One implication is that simulating one-dimensional chains of spin-2 particles is BQP-complete (BQP denotes "bounded error, quantum polynomial time"). Imposing translation invariance will increase the required d . For this we also construct another 3-local (k =3 ) Hamiltonian that is invariant under translation of a unit cell of two sites but that requires d to be 8.

  5. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. PMID:26878722

  6. Entanglement-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement, to Erwin Schroedinger the essential feature of quantum mechanics, has become a central resource in various quantum communication protocols including quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. From a fundamental point of view what is exploited in these experiments is the very fact which led Schroedinger to his statement namely that in entangled states joint properties of the entangled systems may be well defined while the individual subsystems may carry no information at all. In entanglement-based quantum cryptography it leads to the most elegant possible solution of the classic key distribution problem. It implies that the key comes into existence at spatially distant location at the same time and does not need to be transported. A number recent developments include for example highly efficient, robust and stable sources of entangled photons with a broad bandwidth of desired features. Also, entanglement-based quantum cryptography is successfully joining other methods in the work towards demonstrating quantum key distribution networks. Along that line recently decoy-state quantum cryptography over a distance of 144 km between two Canary Islands was demonstrated successfully. Such experiments also open up the possibility of quantum communication on a really large scale using LEO satellites. Another important possible future branch of quantum communication involves quantum repeaters in order to cover larger distances with entangled states. Recently the connection of two fully independent lasers in an entanglement swapping experiment did demonstrate that the timing control of such systems on a femtosecond time scale is possible. A related development includes recent demonstrations of all-optical one-way quantum computation schemes with the extremely short cycle time of only 100 nanoseconds.

  7. Simulating physical phenomena with a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    In a keynote speech at MIT in 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the exact simulation of physical systems using a special device named a ``quantum computer'' (QC). At the time it was known that deterministic simulations of quantum phenomena in classical computers required a number of resources that scaled exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, and also that the probabilistic simulation of certain quantum problems were limited by the so-called sign or phase problem, a problem believed to be of exponential complexity. Such a QC was intended to mimick physical processes exactly the same as Nature. Certainly, remarks coming from such an influential figure generated widespread interest in these ideas, and today after 21 years there are still some open questions. What kind of physical phenomena can be simulated with a QC?, How?, and What are its limitations? Addressing and attempting to answer these questions is what this talk is about. Definitively, the goal of physics simulation using controllable quantum systems (``physics imitation'') is to exploit quantum laws to advantage, and thus accomplish efficient imitation. Fundamental is the connection between a quantum computational model and a physical system by transformations of operator algebras. This concept is a necessary one because in Quantum Mechanics each physical system is naturally associated with a language of operators and thus can be considered as a possible model of quantum computation. The remarkable result is that an arbitrary physical system is naturally simulatable by another physical system (or QC) whenever a ``dictionary'' between the two operator algebras exists. I will explain these concepts and address some of Feynman's concerns regarding the simulation of fermionic systems. Finally, I will illustrate the main ideas by imitating simple physical phenomena borrowed from condensed matter physics using quantum algorithms, and present experimental

  8. Irreconcilable difference between quantum walks and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Meyer, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous-time quantum walks and adiabatic quantum evolution are two general techniques for quantum computing, both of which are described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolutions by Schrödinger's equation. In the former, the Hamiltonian is fixed, while in the latter, the Hamiltonian varies with time. As a result, their formulations of Grover's algorithm evolve differently through Hilbert space. We show that this difference is fundamental; they cannot be made to evolve along each other's path without introducing structure more powerful than the standard oracle for unstructured search. For an adiabatic quantum evolution to evolve like the quantum walk search algorithm, it must interpolate between three fixed Hamiltonians, one of which is complex and introduces structure that is stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Conversely, for a quantum walk to evolve along the path of the adiabatic search algorithm, it must be a chiral quantum walk on a weighted, directed star graph with structure that is also stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Thus, the two techniques, although similar in being described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolution, compute by fundamentally irreconcilable means.

  9. Quantum-cellular-automata quantum computing with endohedral fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twamley, J.

    2003-05-01

    We present a scheme to perform universal quantum computation using global addressing techniques as applied to a physical system of endohedrally doped fullerenes. The system consists of an ABAB linear array of group-V endohedrally doped fullerenes. Each molecule spin site consists of a nuclear spin coupled via a hyperfine interaction to an electron spin. The electron spin of each molecule is in a quartet ground state S=3/2. Neighboring molecular electron spins are coupled via a magnetic dipole interaction. We find that an all-electron construction of a quantum cellular automaton is frustrated due to the degeneracy of the electronic transitions. However, we can construct a quantum-cellular-automata quantum computing architecture using these molecules by encoding the quantum information on the nuclear spins while using the electron spins as a local bus. We deduce the NMR and ESR pulses required to execute the basic cellular automaton operation and obtain a rough figure of merit for the number of gate operations per decoherence time. We find that this figure of merit compares well with other physical quantum computer proposals. We argue that the proposed architecture meets well the first four DiVincenzo criteria and we outline various routes toward meeting the fifth criterion: qubit readout.

  10. Surface code quantum computing by lattice surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsman, Clare; Fowler, Austin G.; Devitt, Simon; Van Meter, Rodney

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, surface codes have become a leading method for quantum error correction in theoretical large-scale computational and communications architecture designs. Their comparatively high fault-tolerant thresholds and their natural two-dimensional nearest-neighbour (2DNN) structure make them an obvious choice for large scale designs in experimentally realistic systems. While fundamentally based on the toric code of Kitaev, there are many variants, two of which are the planar- and defect-based codes. Planar codes require fewer qubits to implement (for the same strength of error correction), but are restricted to encoding a single qubit of information. Interactions between encoded qubits are achieved via transversal operations, thus destroying the inherent 2DNN nature of the code. In this paper we introduce a new technique enabling the coupling of two planar codes without transversal operations, maintaining the 2DNN of the encoded computer. Our lattice surgery technique comprises splitting and merging planar code surfaces, and enables us to perform universal quantum computation (including magic state injection) while removing the need for braided logic in a strictly 2DNN design, and hence reduces the overall qubit resources for logic operations. Those resources are further reduced by the use of a rotated lattice for the planar encoding. We show how lattice surgery allows us to distribute encoded GHZ states in a more direct (and overhead friendly) manner, and how a demonstration of an encoded CNOT between two distance-3 logical states is possible with 53 physical qubits, half of that required in any other known construction in 2D.

  11. Classical versus quantum errors in quantum computation of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Davide; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2004-11-01

    We analyze the stability of a quantum algorithm simulating the quantum dynamics of a system with different regimes, ranging from global chaos to integrability. We compare, in these different regimes, the behavior of the fidelity of quantum motion when the system's parameters are perturbed or when there are unitary errors in the quantum gates implementing the quantum algorithm. While the first kind of errors has a classical limit, the second one has no classical analog. It is shown that, whereas in the first case ("classical errors") the decay of fidelity is very sensitive to the dynamical regime, in the second case ("quantum errors") it is almost independent of the dynamical behavior of the simulated system. Therefore, the rich variety of behaviors found in the study of the stability of quantum motion under "classical" perturbations has no correspondence in the fidelity of quantum computation under its natural perturbations. In particular, in this latter case it is not possible to recover the semiclassical regime in which the fidelity decays with a rate given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. PMID:15600737

  12. Qubus ancilla-driven quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Katherine Louise; De, Suvabrata; Kendon, Viv; Munro, Bill

    2014-12-04

    Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to quantum computation. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We demonstrate how using a continuous variable qubus as the ancilla provides savings in the total number of operations required when computing with many qubits.

  13. Spin Glass a Bridge Between Quantum Computation and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    quantum annealing. The most typical instance is quantum adiabatic computation based on the adiabatic theorem. The quantum adiabatic computation as discussed in the other chapter, unfortunately, has a crucial bottleneck for a part of the optimization problems. We here introduce several recent trials to overcome such a weakpoint by use of developments in statistical mechanics. Through both of the topics, we would shed light on the birth of the interdisciplinary field between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  14. Quantum computations: algorithms and error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaev, A. Yu

    1997-12-01

    Contents §0. Introduction §1. Abelian problem on the stabilizer §2. Classical models of computations2.1. Boolean schemes and sequences of operations2.2. Reversible computations §3. Quantum formalism3.1. Basic notions and notation3.2. Transformations of mixed states3.3. Accuracy §4. Quantum models of computations4.1. Definitions and basic properties4.2. Construction of various operators from the elements of a basis4.3. Generalized quantum control and universal schemes §5. Measurement operators §6. Polynomial quantum algorithm for the stabilizer problem §7. Computations with perturbations: the choice of a model §8. Quantum codes (definitions and general properties)8.1. Basic notions and ideas8.2. One-to-one codes8.3. Many-to-one codes §9. Symplectic (additive) codes9.1. Algebraic preparation9.2. The basic construction9.3. Error correction procedure9.4. Torus codes §10. Error correction in the computation process: general principles10.1. Definitions and results10.2. Proofs §11. Error correction: concrete procedures11.1. The symplecto-classical case11.2. The case of a complete basis Bibliography

  15. Blind quantum computation over a collective-noise channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Fujii, Keisuke; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client (Alice), who only possesses relatively poor quantum devices, to delegate universal quantum computation to a server (Bob) in such a way that Bob cannot know Alice's inputs, algorithm, and outputs. The quantum channel between Alice and Bob is noisy, and the loss over the long-distance quantum communication should also be taken into account. Here we propose to use decoherence-free subspace (DFS) to overcome the collective noise in the quantum channel for BQC, which we call DFS-BQC. We propose three variations of DFS-BQC protocols. One of them, a coherent-light-assisted DFS-BQC protocol, allows Alice to faithfully send the signal photons with a probability proportional to a transmission rate of the quantum channel. In all cases, we combine the ideas based on DFS and the Broadbent-Fitzsimons-Kashefi protocol, which is one of the BQC protocols, without degrading unconditional security. The proposed DFS-based schemes are generic and hence can be applied to other BQC protocols where Alice sends quantum states to Bob.

  16. Analysis of an Atom-Optical Architecture for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    Quantum technology based on photons has emerged as one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing, having already been used in proof-of-principle demonstrations of quantum communication and quantum computation. However, the scalability of this technology depends on the successful integration of experimentally feasible devices in an architecture that tolerates realistic errors and imperfections. Here, we analyse an atom-optical architecture for quantum computation designed to meet the requirements of scalability. The architecture is based on a modular atom-cavity device that provides an effective photon-photon interaction, allowing for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled states. We begin our analysis at the physical level, where we outline the experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics requirements of the basic device. Then, we describe how a scalable network of these devices can be used to prepare a three-dimensional topological cluster state, sufficient for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. We conclude at the application level, where we estimate the system-level requirements of the architecture executing an algorithm compiled for compatibility with the topological cluster state.

  17. Quantum learning in a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-04-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. At low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  18. Quantum learning for a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-03-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. In low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  19. Entanglement and Quantum Computation: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R.B.

    2000-06-27

    This report presents a selective compilation of basic facts from the fields of particle entanglement and quantum information processing prepared for those non-experts in these fields that may have interest in an area of physics showing counterintuitive, ''spooky'' (Einstein's words) behavior. In fact, quantum information processing could, in the near future, provide a new technology to sustain the benefits to the U.S. economy due to advanced computer technology.

  20. Information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality and quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikoshi, Fumiaki

    2006-05-15

    An information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality is formulated to contrast classical and quantum computations. Any classical algorithm satisfies the inequality, while quantum ones can violate it. Therefore, the violation of the inequality is an immediate consequence of the quantumness in the computation. Furthermore, this approach suggests a notion of temporal nonlocality in quantum computation.

  1. Applications of computational quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Burcin

    This original research dissertation is composed of a new numerical technique based on Chebyshev polynomials that is applied on scattering problems, a phenomenological kinetics study for CO oxidation on RuO2 surface, and an experimental study on methanol coupling with doped metal oxide catalysts. Minimum Error Method (MEM), a least-squares minimization method, provides an efficient and accurate alternative to solve systems of ordinary differential equations. Existing methods usually utilize matrix methods which are computationally costful. MEM, which is based on the Chebyshev polynomials as a basis set, uses the recursion relationships and fast Chebyshev transforms which scale as O(N). For large basis set calculations this provides an enormous computational efficiency in the calculations. Chebyshev polynomials are also able to represent non-periodic problems very accurately. We applied MEM on elastic and inelastic scattering problems: it is more efficient and accurate than traditionally used Kohn variational principle, and it also provides the wave function in the interaction region. Phenomenological kinetics (PK) is widely used in industry to predict the optimum conditions for a chemical reaction. PK neglects the fluctuations, assumes no lateral interactions, and considers an ideal mix of reactants. The rate equations are tested by fitting the rate constants to the results of the experiments. Unfortunately, there are numerous examples where a fitted mechanism was later shown to be erroneous. We have undertaken a thorough comparison between the phenomenological equations and the results of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations performed on the same system. The PK equations are qualitatively consistent with the KMC results but are quantitatively erroneous as a result of interplays between the adsorption and desorption events. The experimental study on methanol coupling with doped metal oxide catalysts demonstrates the doped metal oxides as a new class of catalysts

  2. Silicon enhancement mode nanostructures for quantum computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-03-01

    Development of silicon, enhancement mode nanostructures for solid-state quantum computing will be described. A primary motivation of this research is the recent unprecedented manipulation of single electron spins in GaAs quantum dots, which has been used to demonstrate a quantum bit. Long spin decoherence times are predicted possible in silicon qubits. This talk will focus on silicon enhancement mode quantum dot structures that emulate the GaAs lateral quantum dot qubit but use an enhancement mode field effect transistor (FET) structure. One critical concern for silicon quantum dots that use oxides as insulators in the FET structure is that defects in the metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) stack can produce both detrimental electrostatic and paramagnetic effects on the qubit. Understanding the implications of defects in the Si MOS system is also relevant for other qubit architectures that have nearby dielectric passivated surfaces. Stable, lithographically defined, single-period Coulomb-blockade and single-electron charge sensing in a quantum dot nanostructure using a MOS stack will be presented. A combination of characterization of defects, modeling and consideration of modified approaches that incorporate SiGe or donors provides guidance about the enhancement mode MOS approach for future qubits and quantum circuit micro-architecture.

  3. Computational Modeling: From Remote Sensing to Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Dennis

    2001-03-01

    Recent DARPA investments have contributed to significant advances in numerically sound and computationally efficient physics-based modeling, enabling a wide variety of applications of critical interest to the DoD and Industry. Specific examples may be found in a wide variety of applications ranging from the design and operation of advanced synthetic aperture radar systems to the virtual integrated prototyping of reactors and control loops for the manufacture of thin-film functional material systems. This talk will survey the development and application of well-conditioned fast operators for particular physical problems and their critical contributions to various real world problems. We'll conclude with an indication of how these methods may contribute to exploring the revolutionary potential of quantum information theory.

  4. Quantum Computing Without Wavefunctions: Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, David G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  5. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  6. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  7. Towards universal quantum computation through relativistic motion

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Kok, Pieter; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per; Fuentes, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    We show how to use relativistic motion to generate continuous variable Gaussian cluster states within cavity modes. Our results can be demonstrated experimentally using superconducting circuits where tuneable boundary conditions correspond to mirrors moving with velocities close to the speed of light. In particular, we propose the generation of a quadripartite square cluster state as a first example that can be readily implemented in the laboratory. Since cluster states are universal resources for universal one-way quantum computation, our results pave the way for relativistic quantum computation schemes. PMID:26860584

  8. Using graph states for quantum computation and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Kovid

    In this work, we describe a method to achieve fault tolerant measurement based quantum computation in two and three dimensions. The proposed scheme has an threshold of 7.8*10^-3 and poly-logarithmic overhead scaling. The overhead scaling below the threshold is also studied. The scheme uses a combination of topological error correction and magic state distillation to construct a universal quantum computer on a qubit lattice. The chapters on measurement based quantum computation are written in review form with extensive discussion and illustrative examples.In addition, we describe and analyze a family of entanglement purification protocols that provide a flexible trade-off between overhead, threshold and output quality. The protocols are studied analytically, with closed form expressions for their threshold.

  9. QCMPI: A parallel environment for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    QCMPI is a quantum computer (QC) simulation package written in Fortran 90 with parallel processing capabilities. It is an accessible research tool that permits rapid evaluation of quantum algorithms for a large number of qubits and for various "noise" scenarios. The prime motivation for developing QCMPI is to facilitate numerical examination of not only how QC algorithms work, but also to include noise, decoherence, and attenuation effects and to evaluate the efficacy of error correction schemes. The present work builds on an earlier Mathematica code QDENSITY, which is mainly a pedagogic tool. In that earlier work, although the density matrix formulation was featured, the description using state vectors was also provided. In QCMPI, the stress is on state vectors, in order to employ a large number of qubits. The parallel processing feature is implemented by using the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. A description of how to spread the wave function components over many processors is provided, along with how to efficiently describe the action of general one- and two-qubit operators on these state vectors. These operators include the standard Pauli, Hadamard, CNOT and CPHASE gates and also Quantum Fourier transformation. These operators make up the actions needed in QC. Codes for Grover's search and Shor's factoring algorithms are provided as examples. A major feature of this work is that concurrent versions of the algorithms can be evaluated with each version subject to alternate noise effects, which corresponds to the idea of solving a stochastic Schrödinger equation. The density matrix for the ensemble of such noise cases is constructed using parallel distribution methods to evaluate its eigenvalues and associated entropy. Potential applications of this powerful tool include studies of the stability and correction of QC processes using Hamiltonian based dynamics. Program summaryProgram title: QCMPI Catalogue identifier: AECS_v1_0 Program summary URL

  10. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  11. Mimicking time evolution within a quantum ground state: Ground-state quantum computation, cloning, and teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizel, Ari

    2004-07-01

    Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum-mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

  12. Symmetry-protected topologically ordered states for universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen Nautrup, Hendrik; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) is a model for quantum information processing utilizing only local measurements on suitably entangled resource states for the implementation of quantum gates. A complete characterization for universal resource states is still missing. It has been shown that symmetry-protected topological order (SPTO) in one dimension can be exploited for the protection of certain quantum gates in MBQC. Here we investigate whether any 2D nontrivial SPTO states can serve as resource for MBQC. In particular, we show that the nontrivial SPTO ground state of the CZX model on the square lattice by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. B 84, 235141 (2011)] can be reduced to a 2D cluster state by local measurement, hence a universal resource state. Such ground states have been generalized to qudits with symmetry action described by three cocycles of a finite group G of order d and shown to exhibit nontrivial SPTO. We also extend these to arbitary lattices and show that the generalized two-dimensional plaquette states on arbitrary lattices exhibit nontrivial SPTO in terms of symmetry fractionalization and that they are universal resource states for quantum computation. SPTO states therefore can provide a new playground for measurement-based quantum computation. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  13. Universality of computation in real quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, A.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2013-10-01

    Recently de la Torre et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 109 (2012) 090403) reconstructed Quantum Theory from its local structure on the basis of local discriminability and the existence of a one-parameter group of bipartite transformations containing an entangling gate. This result relies on universality of any entangling gate for quantum computation. Here we prove universality of C-NOT with local gates for Real Quantum Theory (RQT), showing that the universality requirement would not be sufficient for the result, whereas local discriminability and the local qubit structure play a crucial role. For reversible computation, generally an extra rebit is needed for RQT. As a by-product we also provide a short proof of universality of C-NOT for CQT.

  14. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  15. The quantum computer game: citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Sidse; Mølmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Progress in the field of quantum computation is hampered by daunting technical challenges. Here we present an alternative approach to solving these by enlisting the aid of computer players around the world. We have previously examined a quantum computation architecture involving ultracold atoms in optical lattices and strongly focused tweezers of light. In The Quantum Computer Game (see http://www.scienceathome.org/), we have encapsulated the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the problem in a graphical user interface allowing for easy user input. Players can then search the parameter space with real-time graphical feedback in a game context with a global high-score that rewards short gate times and robustness to experimental errors. The game which is still in a demo version has so far been tried by several hundred players. Extensions of the approach to other models such as Gross-Pitaevskii and Bose-Hubbard are currently under development. The game has also been incorporated into science education at high-school and university level as an alternative method for teaching quantum mechanics. Initial quantitative evaluation results are very positive. AU Ideas Center for Community Driven Research, CODER.

  16. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  17. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  18. Degree of quantum correlation required to speed up a computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    The one-clean-qubit model of quantum computation (DQC1) efficiently implements a computational task that is not known to have a classical alternative. During the computation, there is never more than a small but finite amount of entanglement present, and it is typically vanishingly small in the system size. In this paper, we demonstrate that there is nothing unexpected hidden within the DQC1 model—Grover's search, when acting on a mixed state, provably exhibits a speedup over classical, with guarantees as to the presence of only vanishingly small amounts of quantum correlations (entanglement and quantum discord)—while arguing that this is not an artifact of the oracle-based construction. We also present some important refinements in the evaluation of how much entanglement may be present in the DQC1 and how the typical entanglement of the system must be evaluated.

  19. Deterministic quantum computation with one photonic qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor-Meyll, M.; Tasca, D. S.; Walborn, S. P.; Ribeiro, P. H. Souto; Santos, M. M.; Duzzioni, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    We show that deterministic quantum computing with one qubit (DQC1) can be experimentally implemented with a spatial light modulator, using the polarization and the transverse spatial degrees of freedom of light. The scheme allows the computation of the trace of a high-dimension matrix, being limited by the resolution of the modulator panel and the technical imperfections. In order to illustrate the method, we compute the normalized trace of unitary matrices and implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm. The largest matrix that can be manipulated with our setup is 1080 ×1920 , which is able to represent a system with approximately 21 qubits.

  20. Quantum Computation with Phase Drift Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, César; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    1997-05-01

    We numerically simulate the evolution of an ion trap quantum computer made out of 18 ions subject to a sequence of nearly 15 000 laser pulses in order to find the prime factors of N = 15. We analyze the effect of random and systematic phase drift errors arising from inaccuracies in the laser pulses which induce over (under) rotation of the quantum state. Simple analytic estimates of the tolerance for the quality of driving pulses are presented. We examine the use of watchdog stabilization to partially correct phase drift errors concluding that, in the regime investigated, it is rather inefficient.

  1. Discrete Wigner functions and quantum computational speedup

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, Ernesto F.

    2005-04-01

    Gibbons et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] have recently defined a class of discrete Wigner functions W to represent quantum states in a finite Hilbert space dimension d. I characterize the set C{sub d} of states having non-negative W simultaneously in all definitions of W in this class. For d{<=}5 I show C{sub d} is the convex hull of stabilizer states. This supports the conjecture that negativity of W is necessary for exponential speedup in pure-state quantum computation.

  2. Graphene-based qubits in quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. Y.; Lue, N.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the potential application of graphene-based qubits in photonic quantum communications. In particular, the valley pair qubit in double quantum dots of gapped graphene is investigated as a quantum memory in the implementation of quantum repeaters. For the application envisioned here, our work extends the recent study of the qubit [Wu , arXiv:1104.0443; Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.84.195463 84, 195463 (2011)] to the case where the qubit is placed in an in-plane magnetic field configuration. It develops, for the configuration, a method of qubit manipulation, based on a unique ac electric field-induced, valley-orbit interaction-derived mechanism in gapped graphene. It also studies the optical response of graphene quantum dots in the configuration, in terms of valley excitation with respect to photonic polarization, and illustrates faithful photon ↔ valley quantum state transfers. This work suggests the interesting prospect of an all-graphene approach for the solid state components of a quantum network, e.g., quantum computers and quantum memories in communications.

  3. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin–orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin–orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin–orbit induced dipole–dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin–orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin–orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  4. Scalable neutral atom quantum computing with MEMS micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Lu, Felix; Ryu, Hoon; Feng, Michael; Kim, Jungsang

    2010-03-01

    In order to realize a useful atom-based quantum computer, a means to efficiently distribute critical laser resources to multiple trap locations is essential. Optical micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) can provide the scalability, flexibility, and stability needed to help bridge the gap between fundamental demonstrations of quantum gates to large scale quantum computing of multiple qubits. Using controllable, broadband micromirrors, an arbitrary atom in a 1, 2, or 3 dimensional optical lattice can be addressed with a single laser source. It is straightforward to scale this base system to address n arbitrary set of atoms simultaneously using n laser sources. We explore on-demand addressability of individual atoms trapped in a 1D lattice, as well as investigate the effect the micromirrors have on the laser beam quality and phase stability.

  5. Measurement and Information Extraction in Complex Dynamics Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Montangero, Simone

    Quantum Information processing has several di.erent applications: some of them can be performed controlling only few qubits simultaneously (e.g. quantum teleportation or quantum cryptography) [1]. Usually, the transmission of large amount of information is performed repeating several times the scheme implemented for few qubits. However, to exploit the advantages of quantum computation, the simultaneous control of many qubits is unavoidable [2]. This situation increases the experimental di.culties of quantum computing: maintaining quantum coherence in a large quantum system is a di.cult task. Indeed a quantum computer is a many-body complex system and decoherence, due to the interaction with the external world, will eventually corrupt any quantum computation. Moreover, internal static imperfections can lead to quantum chaos in the quantum register thus destroying computer operability [3]. Indeed, as it has been shown in [4], a critical imperfection strength exists above which the quantum register thermalizes and quantum computation becomes impossible. We showed such e.ects on a quantum computer performing an e.cient algorithm to simulate complex quantum dynamics [5,6].

  6. Quantum computation: algorithms and implementation in quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King

    In this thesis, we explore several aspects of both the software and hardware of quantum computation. First, we examine the computational power of multi-particle quantum random walks in terms of distinguishing mathematical graphs. We study both interacting and non-interacting multi-particle walks on strongly regular graphs, proving some limitations on distinguishing powers and presenting extensive numerical evidence indicative of interactions providing more distinguishing power. We then study the recently proposed adiabatic quantum algorithm for Google PageRank, and show that it exhibits power-law scaling for realistic WWW-like graphs. Turning to hardware, we next analyze the thermal physics of two nearby 2D electron gas (2DEG), and show that an analogue of the Coulomb drag effect exists for heat transfer. In some distance and temperature, this heat transfer is more significant than phonon dissipation channels. After that, we study the dephasing of two-electron states in a single silicon quantum dot. Specifically, we consider dephasing due to the electron-phonon coupling and charge noise, separately treating orbital and valley excitations. In an ideal system, dephasing due to charge noise is strongly suppressed due to a vanishing dipole moment. However, introduction of disorder or anharmonicity leads to large effective dipole moments, and hence possibly strong dephasing. Building on this work, we next consider more realistic systems, including structural disorder systems. We present experiment and theory, which demonstrate energy levels that vary with quantum dot translation, implying a structurally disordered system. Finally, we turn to the issues of valley mixing and valley-orbit hybridization, which occurs due to atomic-scale disorder at quantum well interfaces. We develop a new theoretical approach to study these effects, which we name the disorder-expansion technique. We demonstrate that this method successfully reproduces atomistic tight-binding techniques

  7. Scalable Quantum Computing Over the Rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Olivier; Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2011-03-01

    The physical implementation of nontrivial quantum computing is an experimental challenge due to decoherence and the need for scalability. Recently we proved a novel theoretical scheme for realizing a scalable quantum register of very large size, entangled in a cluster state, in the optical frequency comb (OFC) defined by the eigenmodes of a single optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The classical OFC is well known as implemented by the femtosecond, carrier-envelope-phase- and mode-locked lasers which have redefined frequency metrology in recent years. The quantum OFC is a set of harmonic oscillators, or Qmodes, whose amplitude and phase quadratures are continuous variables, the manipulation of which is a mature field for one or two Qmodes. We have shown that the nonlinear optical medium of a single OPO can be engineered, in a sophisticated but already demonstrated manner, so as to entangle in constant time the OPO's OFC into a finitely squeezed, Gaussian cluster state suitable for universal quantum computing over continuous variables. Here we summarize our theoretical result and survey the ongoing experimental efforts in this direction.

  8. Dual field theories of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Given two quantum states of N q-bits we are interested to find the shortest quantum circuit consisting of only one- and two- q-bit gates that would transfer one state into another. We call it the quantum maze problem for the reasons described in the paper. We argue that in a large N limit the quantum maze problem is equivalent to the problem of finding a semiclassical trajectory of some lattice field theory (the dual theory) on an N +1 dimensional space-time with geometrically flat, but topologically compact spatial slices. The spatial fundamental domain is an N dimensional hyper-rhombohedron, and the temporal direction describes transitions from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary target state and so the initial and final dual field theory conditions are described by these two quantum computational states. We first consider a complex Klein-Gordon field theory and argue that it can only be used to study the shortest quantum circuits which do not involve generators composed of tensor products of multiple Pauli Z matrices. Since such situation is not generic we call it the Z-problem. On the dual field theory side the Z-problem corresponds to massless excitations of the phase (Goldstone modes) that we attempt to fix using Higgs mechanism. The simplest dual theory which does not suffer from the massless excitation (or from the Z-problem) is the Abelian-Higgs model which we argue can be used for finding the shortest quantum circuits. Since every trajectory of the field theory is mapped directly to a quantum circuit, the shortest quantum circuits are identified with semiclassical trajectories. We also discuss the complexity of an actual algorithm that uses a dual theory prospective for solving the quantum maze problem and compare it with a geometric approach. We argue that it might be possible to solve the problem in sub-exponential time in 2 N , but for that we must consider the Klein-Gordon theory on curved spatial geometry and/or more complicated (than N -torus

  9. Toward Practical Solid-State Based Quantum Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshami, Khabat

    Quantum information processing promises to have transformative impacts on information and communication science and technology. Photonic implementation of quantum information processing is among successful candidates for implementation of quantum computation and is an essential part of quantum communication. Linear optical quantum computation, specifically the KLM scheme [1], and quantum repeaters [2, 3] are prominent candidates for practical photonic quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication. Quantum memories for photons are key elements for any practical implementation of these schemes. Practical quantum memories require theoretical and experimental investigations into quantum memory protocols and physical systems for implementations. The present thesis is focused on studying new approaches toward practical solid-state based quantum memories. First, I present a proposal for a new quantum memory protocol called the controllable-dipole quantum memory [4]. It represents a protocol, in a two-level system, without any optical control that is shown to be equivalent to the Raman type-quantum memory. Then I include our studies on the quantum memory based on the refractive index modulation of the host medium [5]. It is shown that it can resemble the gradient echo quantum memory without a spatial gradient in the external field. These two protocols can be implemented in rare-earth doped crystals. With regards to using new physical systems, I present a proposal based on nitrogen vacancy centers [6]. This may pave the way toward micron-scale on-chip quantum memories that may contribute to the implementation of integrated quantum photonics. Finally, I studied the precision requirements for the spin echo technique [7]. This technique is necessary to extend the storage time in solid-state quantum memories, in which the coherence times are limited by spin inhomogeneous broadening.

  10. Measurement-based quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  11. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  12. Quantum computing with quantum dots using the Heisenberg exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, Nick J.

    One of the most promising systems for creating a working quantum computer is the triple quantum dots in a linear semiconductor. One of the biggest advantages is that we are able to perform Heisenberg exchange gates on the physical qubits. These exchanges are both fast and relatively low energy. Which means that they would be excellent for producing fast and accurate operations. In order to prevent leakage errors we use a 3 qubit DFS to encode a logical qubit. Here we determine the theoretical time dependent affects of applying the Heisenberg exchange gates in the DFS basis as well as the effect of applying multiple exchange gates at the same time. we also find that applying two heisenberg exchange gates at the same time is an effective way of implementing a leakage elimination operator.

  13. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  14. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  15. Universal quantum computation with metaplectic anyons

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shawn X.; Wang, Zhenghan E-mail: zhenghwa@microsoft.com

    2015-03-15

    We show that braidings of the metaplectic anyons X{sub ϵ} in SO(3){sub 2} = SU(2){sub 4} with their total charge equal to the metaplectic mode Y supplemented with projective measurements of the total charge of two metaplectic anyons are universal for quantum computation. We conjecture that similar universal anyonic computing models can be constructed for all metaplectic anyon systems SO(p){sub 2} for any odd prime p ≥ 5. In order to prove universality, we find new conceptually appealing universal gate sets for qutrits and qupits.

  16. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  17. Hard chaos, quantum billiards, and quantum dot computers

    SciTech Connect

    Mainieri, R.; Cvitanovic, P.; Hasslacher, B.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research was performed in analytic and computational techniques for dealing with hard chaos, especially the powerful tool of cycle expansions. This work has direct application to the understanding of electrons in nanodevices, such as junctions of quantum wires, or in arrays of dots or antidots. We developed a series of techniques for computing the properties of quantum systems with hard chaos, in particular the flow of electrons through nanodevices. These techniques are providing the insight and tools to design computers with nanoscale components. Recent efforts concentrated on understanding the effects of noise and orbit pruning in chaotic dynamical systems. We showed that most complicated chaotic systems (not just those equivalent to a finite shift) will develop branch points in their cycle expansion. Once the singularity is known to exist, it can be removed with a dramatic increase in the speed of convergence of quantities of physical interest.

  18. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  19. Secret sharing based on quantum Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Huang, Liusheng; Shi, Runhua; He, Libao

    2013-07-01

    Secret sharing plays a fundamental role in both secure multi-party computation and modern cryptography. We present a new quantum secret sharing scheme based on quantum Fourier transform. This scheme enjoys the property that each share of a secret is disguised with true randomness, rather than classical pseudorandomness. Moreover, under the only assumption that a top priority for all participants (secret sharers and recovers) is to obtain the right result, our scheme is able to achieve provable security against a computationally unbounded attacker.

  20. Novel systems and methods for quantum communication, quantum computation, and quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Alexey Vyacheslavovich

    Precise control over quantum systems can enable the realization of fascinating applications such as powerful computers, secure communication devices, and simulators that can elucidate the physics of complex condensed matter systems. However, the fragility of quantum effects makes it very difficult to harness the power of quantum mechanics. In this thesis, we present novel systems and tools for gaining fundamental insights into the complex quantum world and for bringing practical applications of quantum mechanics closer to reality. We first optimize and show equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage of photons in atomic ensembles. We describe experiments demonstrating the potential of our optimization algorithms for quantum communication and computation applications. Next, we combine the technique of photon storage with strong atom-atom interactions to propose a robust protocol for implementing the two-qubit photonic phase gate, which is an important ingredient in many quantum computation and communication tasks. In contrast to photon storage, many quantum computation and simulation applications require individual addressing of closely-spaced atoms, ions, quantum dots, or solid state defects. To meet this requirement, we propose a method for coherent optical far-field manipulation of quantum systems with a resolution that is not limited by the wavelength of radiation. While alkali atoms are currently the system of choice for photon storage and many other applications, we develop new methods for quantum information processing and quantum simulation with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices. We show how multiple qubits can be encoded in individual alkaline-earth atoms and harnessed for quantum computing and precision measurements applications. We also demonstrate that alkaline-earth atoms can be used to simulate highly symmetric systems exhibiting spin-orbital interactions and capable of providing valuable insights into strongly

  1. Communication: Spin-free quantum computational simulations and symmetry adapted states.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, James Daniel

    2013-07-14

    The ideas of digital simulation of quantum systems using a quantum computer parallel the original ideas of numerical simulation using a classical computer. In order for quantum computational simulations to advance to a competitive point, many techniques from classical simulations must be imported into the quantum domain. In this article, we consider the applications of symmetry in the context of quantum simulation. Building upon well established machinery, we propose a form of first quantized simulation that only requires the spatial part of the wave function, thereby allowing spin-free quantum computational simulations. We go further and discuss the preparation of N-body states with specified symmetries based on projection techniques. We consider two simple examples, molecular hydrogen and cyclopropenyl cation, to illustrate the ideas. The methods here are the first to explicitly deal with preparing N-body symmetry-adapted states and open the door for future investigations into group theory, chemistry, and quantum simulation. PMID:23862919

  2. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  3. Multiple-server Flexible Blind Quantum Computation in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqin; Li, Qin; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Fang; He, Jinjun; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2016-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) can allow a client with limited quantum power to delegate his quantum computation to a powerful server and still keep his own data private. In this paper, we present a multiple-server flexible BQC protocol, where a client who only needs the ability of accessing qua ntum channels can delegate the computational task to a number of servers. Especially, the client's quantum computation also can be achieved even when one or more delegated quantum servers break down in networks. In other words, when connections to certain quantum servers are lost, clients can adjust flexibly and delegate their quantum computation to other servers. Obviously it is trivial that the computation will be unsuccessful if all servers are interrupted.

  4. Multiple-server Flexible Blind Quantum Computation in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqin; Li, Qin; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Fang; He, Jinjun; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) can allow a client with limited quantum power to delegate his quantum computation to a powerful server and still keep his own data private. In this paper, we present a multiple-server flexible BQC protocol, where a client who only needs the ability of accessing qua ntum channels can delegate the computational task to a number of servers. Especially, the client's quantum computation also can be achieved even when one or more delegated quantum servers break down in networks. In other words, when connections to certain quantum servers are lost, clients can adjust flexibly and delegate their quantum computation to other servers. Obviously it is trivial that the computation will be unsuccessful if all servers are interrupted.

  5. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions. PMID:26983379

  6. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions. PMID:26983379

  7. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  8. Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant topological quantum computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Thalakulam, Madhu; Shi, Xiaoyan; Crawford, Matthew; Nielsen, Erik; Cederberg, Jeffrey George

    2013-10-01

    Topological quantum computation (TQC) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches to quantum computation. Under this approach, the topological properties of a non-Abelian quantum system, which are insensitive to local perturbations, are utilized to process and transport quantum information. The encoded information can be protected and rendered immune from nearly all environmental decoherence processes without additional error-correction. It is believed that the low energy excitations of the so-called =5/2 fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state may obey non-Abelian statistics. Our goal is to explore this novel FQH state and to understand and create a scientific foundation of this quantum matter state for the emerging TQC technology. We present in this report the results from a coherent study that focused on obtaining a knowledge base of the physics that underpins TQC. We first present the results of bulk transport properties, including the nature of disorder on the 5/2 state and spin transitions in the second Landau level. We then describe the development and application of edge tunneling techniques to quantify and understand the quasiparticle physics of the 5/2 state.

  9. Minimal computational-space implementation of multiround quantum protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Chiribella, Giulio

    2011-02-15

    A single-party strategy in a multiround quantum protocol can be implemented by sequential networks of quantum operations connected by internal memories. Here, we provide an efficient realization in terms of computational-space resources.

  10. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution.

  11. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a "classical" party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  12. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  13. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  14. Realization of a holonomic quantum computer in a chain of three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Holonomic quantum computation is the idea to use non-Abelian geometric phases to implement universal quantum gates that are robust to fluctuations in control parameters. Here, we propose a compact design for a holonomic quantum computer based on coupled three-level systems. The scheme does not require adiabatic evolution and can be implemented in arrays of atoms or ions trapped in tailored standing wave potentials.

  15. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  16. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  17. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  18. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.

  19. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  20. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  1. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-09-01

    Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  2. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2012-01-01

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems. PMID:22946034

  3. Measurement-only topological quantum computation via anyonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa Freedman, Michael Nayak, Chetan

    2009-04-15

    We describe measurement-only topological quantum computation using both projective and interferometrical measurement of topological charge. We demonstrate how anyonic teleportation can be achieved using 'forced measurement' protocols for both types of measurement. Using this, it is shown how topological charge measurements can be used to generate the braiding transformations used in topological quantum computation, and hence that the physical transportation of computational anyons is unnecessary. We give a detailed discussion of the anyonics for implementation of topological quantum computation (particularly, using the measurement-only approach) in fractional quantum Hall systems.

  4. Reliability/redundancy trade-off evaluation for multiplexed architectures used to implement quantum dot based computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, D.; Shukla, S. K.; Graham, P. S.; Gokhale, M.

    2004-01-01

    With the advent of nanocomputing, researchers have proposed Quantum Dot Cellular Automata (QCA) as one of the implementation technologies. The majority gate is one of the fundamental gates implementable with QCAs. Moreover, majority gates play an important role in defect-tolerant circuit implementations for nanotechnologies due to their use in redundancy mechanisms such as TMR, CTMR etc. Therefore, providing reliable implementation of majority logic using some redundancy mechanism is extremely important. This problem was addressed by von Neumann in 1956, in the form of 'majority multiplexing' and since then several analytical probabilistic models have been proposed to analyze majority multiplexing circuits. However, such analytical approaches are extremely challenging combinatorially and error prone. Also the previous analyses did not distinguish between permanent faults at the gates and transient faults due to noisy interconnects or noise effects on gates. In this paper, we provide explicit fault models for transient and permanent errors at the gates and noise effects at the interconnects. We model majority multiplexing in a probabilistic system description language, and use probabilistic model checking to analyze the effects of our fault models on the different reliability/redundancy trade-offs for majority multiplexing configurations. We also draw parallels with another fundamental logic gate multiplexing technique, namely NAND multiplexing. Tools and methodologies for analyzing redundant architectures that use majority gates will help logic designers to quickly evaluate the amount of redundancy needed to achieve a given level of reliability. VLSI designs at the nanoscale will utilize implementation fabrics prone to faults of permanent and transient nature, and the interconnects will be extensively affected by noise, hence the need for tools that can capture probabilistically quantified fault models and provide quick evaluation of the trade-offs. A comparative

  5. Quantum computation of multifractal exponents through the quantum wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier; Georgeot, Bertrand

    2009-05-15

    We study the use of the quantum wavelet transform to extract efficiently information about the multifractal exponents for multifractal quantum states. We show that, combined with quantum simulation algorithms, it enables to build quantum algorithms for multifractal exponents with a polynomial gain compared to classical simulations. Numerical results indicate that a rough estimate of fractality could be obtained exponentially fast. Our findings are relevant, e.g., for quantum simulations of multifractal quantum maps and of the Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition.

  6. Mixed Species Ion Chains for Scalable Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John Albert

    Mixed species chains of barium and ytterbium ions are investigated as a tool for building scalable quantum computation devices. Ytterbium ions provide a stable, environmentally-insensitive qubit that is easily initialized and manipulated, while barium ions are easily entangled with photons that can allow quantum information to be transmitted between systems in modular quantum computation units. Barium and ytterbium are trapped together in a linear chain in a linear rf trap and their normal mode structure and the thermal occupation numbers of these modes are measured with a narrow band laser addressing an electric quadrupole transition in barium ions. Before these measurements, barium ions are directly cooled using Doppler cooling, while the ytterbium ions are sympathetically cooled by the barium. For radial modes strongly coupled to ytterbium ions the average thermal occupation numbers vary between 400 and 12,000 depending on ion species configuration and trap parameters. Ion chain temperatures are also measured using a technique based on ion species reordering. Surface traps with many dc electrodes provide the ability to controllably reorder the chain to optimize normal mode cooling, and initial work towards realizing this capability are discussed. Quantum information can be transferred between ions in a linear chain using an optical system that is well coupled to the motional degrees of freedom of the chain. For this reason, a 532 nm Raman system is developed and its expected performance is evaluated.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    David Ceperley

    2011-03-02

    CUDA GPU platform. We restructured the CPU algorithms to express additional parallelism, minimize GPU-CPU communication, and efficiently utilize the GPU memory hierarchy. Using mixed precision on GT200 GPUs and MPI for intercommunication and load balancing, we observe typical full-application speedups of approximately 10x to 15x relative to quad-core Xeon CPUs alone, while reproducing the double-precision CPU results within statistical error. We developed an all-electron quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for solids that does not rely on pseudopotentials, and used it to construct a primary ultra-high-pressure calibration based on the equation of state of cubic boron nitride. We computed the static contribution to the free energy with the QMC method and obtained the phonon contribution from density functional theory, yielding a high-accuracy calibration up to 900 GPa usable directly in experiment. We computed the anharmonic Raman frequency shift with QMC simulations as a function of pressure and temperature, allowing optical pressure calibration. In contrast to present experimental approaches, small systematic errors in the theoretical EOS do not increase with pressure, and no extrapolation is needed. This all-electron method is applicable to first-row solids, providing a new reference for ab initio calculations of solids and benchmarks for pseudopotential accuracy. We compared experimental and theoretical results on the momentum distribution and the quasiparticle renormalization factor in sodium. From an x-ray Compton-profile measurement of the valence-electron momentum density, we derived its discontinuity at the Fermi wavevector finding an accurate measure of the renormalization factor that we compared with quantum-Monte-Carlo and G0W0 calculations performed both on crystalline sodium and on the homogeneous electron gas. Our calculated results are in good agreement with the experiment. We have been studying the heat of formation for various Kubas complexes of molecular

  8. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  9. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  10. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  11. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  12. Enhanced Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing in d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.

    2014-12-01

    Error-correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transversal non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for d -level qudit systems with prime d . The codes use n =d -1 qudits and can detect up to ˜d /3 errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation known as magic-state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing d .

  13. Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, David

    2009-03-01

    The simulation of quantum many-body systems is a notoriously hard problem in condensed matter physics, but it could easily be handled by a quantum computer [4,1]. There is however one catch: while a quantum computer can naturally implement the dynamics of a quantum system --- i.e. solve Schr"odinger's equation --- there was until now no general method to initialize the computer in a low-energy state of the simulated system. We present a quantum algorithm [5] that can prepare the ground state and thermal states of a quantum many-body system in a time proportional to the square-root of its Hilbert space dimension. This is the same scaling as required by the best known algorithm to prepare the ground state of a classical many-body system on a quantum computer [3,2]. This provides strong evidence that for a quantum computer, preparing the ground state of a quantum system is in the worst case no more difficult than preparing the ground state of a classical system. 1 D. Aharonov and A. Ta-Shma, Adiabatic quantum state generation and statistical zero knowledge, Proc. 35th Annual ACM Symp. on Theo. Comp., (2003), p. 20. F. Barahona, On the computational complexity of ising spin glass models, J. Phys. A. Math. Gen., 15 (1982), p. 3241. C. H. Bennett, E. Bernstein, G. Brassard, and U. Vazirani, Strengths and weaknessess of quantum computing, SIAM J. Comput., 26 (1997), pp. 1510--1523, quant-ph/9701001. S. Lloyd, Universal quantum simulators, Science, 273 (1996), pp. 1073--1078. D. Poulin and P. Wocjan, Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer, 2008, arXiv:0809.2705.

  14. Parallel Photonic Quantum Computation Assisted by Quantum Dots in One-Side Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-07-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm.

  15. Parallel photonic quantum computation assisted by quantum dots in one-side optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm. PMID:25030424

  16. Entertainment Computing, Social Transformation and the Quantum Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauterberg, Matthias

    The abstract should summaritinment computing is on its way getting an established academic discipline. The scope of entertainment computing is quite broad (see the scope of the international journal Entertainment Computing). One unifying idea in this diverse community of entertainment researchers and developers might be a normative position to enhance human living through social transformation. One possible option in this direction is a shared ‘conscious’ field. Several ideas about a new kind of field based on quantum effects are presented and discussed. Assuming that social transformation is based on a shared collective unconscious I propose designing entertainment technology for a new kind of user experience that can transform in a positive manner the individual unconscious and therefore the collective unconscious as well. Our ALICE project can be seen as a first attempt in this direction.

  17. The Brain Is both Neurocomputer and Quantum Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hameroff, Stuart R.

    2007-01-01

    In their article, "Is the Brain a Quantum Computer,?" Litt, Eliasmith, Kroon, Weinstein, and Thagard (2006) criticize the Penrose-Hameroff "Orch OR" quantum computational model of consciousness, arguing instead for neurocomputation as an explanation for mental phenomena. Here I clarify and defend Orch OR, show how Orch OR and neurocomputation are…

  18. Scalable quantum computation via local control of only two qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Burgarth, Daniel; Maruyama, Koji; Murphy, Michael; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso; Nori, Franco; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-04-15

    We apply quantum control techniques to a long spin chain by acting only on two qubits at one of its ends, thereby implementing universal quantum computation by a combination of quantum gates on these qubits and indirect swap operations across the chain. It is shown that the control sequences can be computed and implemented efficiently. We discuss the application of these ideas to physical systems such as superconducting qubits in which full control of long chains is challenging.

  19. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    : The notebooks generate analytical expressions for quantum transition matrix elements required in diverse atomic processes: ionization by ion, electron, or photon impact and ionization within the framework of strong field physics. In charged-particle collisions approaches based on perturbation theory enjoy widespread utilization. Accordingly, we have chosen the First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave theories as examples. In light-matter interactions, the main ingredient for many types of calculations is the dipole transition matrix in its different formulations, i.e. length, velocity, and acceleration gauges. In all these cases the transitions of interest occur between a bound state and a continuum state which can be described in different ways. With the notebooks developed in the present work it is possible to calculate transition matrix elements analytically for any set of quantum numbers nlm of initial hydrogenic states or Slater-Type Orbitals and for plane waves or Coulomb waves as final continuum states. Solution method: The notebooks employ symbolic computation to generate analytical expressions for transition matrix elements used in both collision and light-matter interaction physics. fba_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions for the transition matrix of collision-induced ionization in the First Born Approximation (FBA). The transitions considered are from a bound hydrogenic state with arbitrary quantum numbers nlm to a continuum state represented by a plane wave (PW) or a Coulomb wave (CW). distorted_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions for the transition matrix of collision-induced ionization in Distorted Wave (DW) theories. The transitions considered are from a (distorted) bound hydrogenic state with arbitrary quantum numbers nlm to a distorted-wave continuum state. The computations are based on scalar and vectorial integrals (see the text for details). dipoleLength_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions

  20. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels. PMID:27488798

  1. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch–Jozsa and Bernstein–Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubos Mitas

    2011-01-26

    NCSU research group has been focused on accomplising the key goals of this initiative: establishing new generation of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) computational tools as a part of Endstation petaflop initiative for use at the DOE ORNL computational facilities and for use by computational electronic structure community at large; carrying out high accuracy quantum Monte Carlo demonstration projects in application of these tools to the forefront electronic structure problems in molecular and solid systems; expanding the impact of QMC methods and approaches; explaining and enhancing the impact of these advanced computational approaches. In particular, we have developed quantum Monte Carlo code (QWalk, www.qwalk.org) which was significantly expanded and optimized using funds from this support and at present became an actively used tool in the petascale regime by ORNL researchers and beyond. These developments have been built upon efforts undertaken by the PI's group and collaborators over the period of the last decade. The code was optimized and tested extensively on a number of parallel architectures including petaflop ORNL Jaguar machine. We have developed and redesigned a number of code modules such as evaluation of wave functions and orbitals, calculations of pfaffians and introduction of backflow coordinates together with overall organization of the code and random walker distribution over multicore architectures. We have addressed several bottlenecks such as load balancing and verified efficiency and accuracy of the calculations with the other groups of the Endstation team. The QWalk package contains about 50,000 lines of high quality object-oriented C++ and includes also interfaces to data files from other conventional electronic structure codes such as Gamess, Gaussian, Crystal and others. This grant supported PI for one month during summers, a full-time postdoc and partially three graduate students over the period of the grant duration, it has resulted in 13

  3. Quantum morphology operations based on quantum representation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Suzhen; Mao, Xia; Li, Tian; Xue, Yuli; Chen, Lijiang; Xiong, Qingxu

    2015-05-01

    Quantum morphology operations are proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation model. Two kinds of quantum morphology operations are included: quantum binary and grayscale morphology operations. Dilation and erosion operations are fundamental to morphological operations. Consequently, we focus on quantum binary and flat grayscale dilation and erosion operations and their corresponding circuits. As the basis of designing of binary morphology operations, three basic quantum logic operations AND, OR, and NOT involving two binary images are presented. Thus, quantum binary dilation and erosion operations can be realized based on these logic operations supplemented by quantum measurement operations. As to the design of flat grayscale dilation and erosion operations, the searching for maxima or minima in a certain space is involved; here, we use Grover's search algorithm to get these maxima and minima. With respect that the grayscale is represented by quantum bit string, the quantum bit string comparator is used as an oracle in Grover's search algorithm. In these quantum morphology operations, quantum parallelism is well utilized. The time complexity analysis shows that quantum morphology operations' time complexity is much lower or equal to the classical morphology operations.

  4. The Power of Qutrit Logic for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    The critical merits acquired from quantum computation require running in parallel, which cannot be benefited from previous multi-level extensions and are exact our purposes. In this paper, with qutrit subsystems the general quantum computation further reduces into qutrit gates or its controlled operations. This extension plays parallizable and integrable with same construction independent of the qutrit numbers. The qutrit swapping as its basic operations for controlling can be integrated into quantum computers with present physical techniques. Our generalizations are free of elevating the system spaces, and feasible for the universal computation.

  5. Noisy one-way quantum computations: The role of correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, Rafael; Melo, Fernando de

    2011-08-15

    A scheme to evaluate computation fidelities within the one-way model is developed and explored to understand the role of correlations in the quality of noisy quantum computations. The formalism is promptly applied to many computation instances and unveils that a higher amount of entanglement in the noisy resource state does not necessarily imply a better computation.

  6. Analog quantum computing (AQC) by revisiting the underlying physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbos, Paul J.

    2015-05-01

    It has been proven that universal quantum computers based on qubits and classical analog networks both have superTuring capabilities. It is a grand challenge to computer science to prove that the combination of the two, in analog (continuous variable) quantum computing, offers supersuperTuring capability, the best we can achieve. Computing with continuous spins is now the most promising path AQC. Two papers at SPIE2014 described unbreakable quantum codes using continuous spins beyond what traditional qubits allow. To make this real, we must first develop a realistic ability to model and predict the behavior of networks of spin gates which act in part as polarizers. Last year I proposed a triphoton experiment, where three entangled photons go to linear polarizers set to angles θa, θb and θc. Assuming a "collapse of the wave function" yields predictions for the coincidence detection rate, R3/R0(θa, θb, θc) significantly different from the prediction of a new family of models based on classical Markov Random Fields (MRF) across space time, even though both yield the same correct prediction in the two-photon case. We cannot expect to predict systems of 100 entangled photons correctly if we cannot even predict three yet. Yanhua Shih is currently performing this experiment, as a first step to demonstrating a new technology to produce 100 entangled photons (collaborating with Scully) and understanding larger systems. I have also developed continuous-time versions of the MRF models and of "collapse of the wave function", so as to eliminate the need to assume metaphysical observers in general.

  7. Cryogenic Control Architecture for Large-Scale Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, J. M.; Colless, J. I.; Conway Lamb, I. D.; Pauka, S. J.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Watson, J. D.; Gardner, G. C.; Fallahi, S.; Manfra, M. J.; Reilly, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    Solid-state qubits have recently advanced to the level that enables them, in principle, to be scaled up into fault-tolerant quantum computers. As these physical qubits continue to advance, meeting the challenge of realizing a quantum machine will also require the development of new supporting devices and control architectures with complexity far beyond the systems used in today's few-qubit experiments. Here, we report a microarchitecture for controlling and reading out qubits during the execution of a quantum algorithm such as an error-correcting code. We demonstrate the basic principles of this architecture using a cryogenic switch matrix implemented via high-electron-mobility transistors and a new kind of semiconductor device based on gate-switchable capacitance. The switch matrix is used to route microwave waveforms to qubits under the control of a field-programmable gate array, also operating at cryogenic temperatures. Taken together, these results suggest a viable approach for controlling large-scale quantum systems using semiconductor technology.

  8. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi–Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources.

  9. Quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Gao, Ming; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of physical unclonable functions (PUFs), PUF-based quantum authentication systems have been proposed for security purposes, and recently, proof-of-principle experiment has been demonstrated. As a further step toward completing the security analysis, we investigate quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems and prove that quantum cloning attacks outperform the so-called challenge-estimation attacks. We present the analytical expression of the false-accept probability by use of the corresponding optimal quantum cloning machines and extend the previous results in the literature. In light of these findings, an explicit comparison is made between PUF-based quantum authentication systems and quantum key distribution protocols in the context of cloning attacks. Moreover, from an experimental perspective, a trade-off between the average photon number and the detection efficiency is discussed in detail.

  10. Quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Gao, Ming; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of physical unclonable functions (PUFs), PUF-based quantum authentication systems have been proposed for security purposes, and recently, proof-of-principle experiment has been demonstrated. As a further step toward completing the security analysis, we investigate quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems and prove that quantum cloning attacks outperform the so-called challenge-estimation attacks. We present the analytical expression of the false-accept probability by use of the corresponding optimal quantum cloning machines and extend the previous results in the literature. In light of these findings, an explicit comparison is made between PUF-based quantum authentication systems and quantum key distribution protocols in the context of cloning attacks. Moreover, from an experimental perspective, a trade-off between the average photon number and the detection efficiency is discussed in detail.

  11. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable. PMID:27279216

  12. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O’Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  13. Holonomic quantum computation on microwave photons with all resonant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ping; Yu, Long-Bao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsic difficulties of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting circuits are originated from the use of three levels in superconducting transmon qubits and the complicated dispersive interaction between them. Due to the limited anharmonicity of transmon qubits, the experimental realization seems to be very challenging. However, with recent experimental progress, coherent control over microwave photons in superconducting circuit cavities is well achieved, and thus provides a promising platform for quantum information processing with photonic qubits. Here, with all resonant inter-cavity photon–photon interactions, we propose a scheme for implementing scalable holonomic quantum computation on a circuit QED lattice. In our proposal, three cavities, connected by a SQUID, are used to encode a logical qubit. By tuning the inter-cavity photon–photon interaction, we can construct all the holonomies needed for universal quantum computation in a non-adiabatic way. Therefore, our scheme presents a promising alternative for robust quantum computation with microwave photons.

  14. Quantum Computing in Silicon with Donor Electron Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Extremely long electron and nuclear spin coherence times have recently been demonstrated in isotopically pure Si-28 making silicon one of the most promising semiconductor materials for spin based quantum information. The two level spin state of single electrons bound to shallow phosphorus donors in silicon in particular provide well defined, reproducible qubits and represent a promising system for a scalable quantum computer in silicon. An important challenge in these systems is the realisation of an architecture, where we can position donors within a crystalline environment with approx. 20-50nm separation, individually address each donor, manipulate the electron spins using ESR techniques and read-out their spin states. We have developed a unique fabrication strategy for a scalable quantum computer in silicon using scanning tunneling microscope hydrogen lithography to precisely position individual P donors in a Si crystal aligned with nanoscale precision to local control gates necessary to initialize, manipulate, and read-out the spin states. During this talk I will focus on demonstrating electronic transport characteristics and single-shot spin read-out of precisely-positioned P donors in Si. Additionally I will report on our recent progress in performing single spin rotations by locally applying oscillating magnetic fields and initial characterization of transport devices with two and three single donors. The challenges of scaling up to practical 2D architectures will also be discussed.

  15. Superconducting electronics: Prospects for digital and quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Andrea Marie

    Quantum computation has the potential to provide an efficient means of solving certain problems which are intractable on classical machines. Superconducting electronics may enable a solid state quantum computer of macroscopic dimensions. The first step is to demonstrate macroscopic quantum coherence in a single superconducting rf-SQUID qubit, manifest as the tunneling of magnetic flux in and out of the SQUID loop, or equivalently, the phase across the junction alternately increasing and decreasing by 2pi. This will likely require improvements in the current fabrication technology, as it will require submicron junctions with extremely low leakage current. We propose a scheme to experimentally demonstrate macroscopic quantum coherence in the rf-SQUID qubit by speeding up the time evolution of the system by momentarily suppressing the junction critical current through the application of a series of single flux quantum (SFQ) pulses. The precise timing of the perturbing pulses and the subsequent measurement of the qubit state would be performed using rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) circuitry. Conventional digital electronics based on the single flux quantum offers very low power dissipation and high operating frequency. These same features, however, make timing of clock and data signals difficult. Circuits with recurrent data paths, such as the circular shift register (CSR) have the most stringent timing requirements. A 64-bit CSR composed of approximately 425 Josephson junctions was designed and successfully demonstrated. The CSR has an area of 0.8 mm2 and consumes approximately 80 muW of power. The circuit showed correct operation at low speed with a critical margin of +/-7.5%, and operated correctly at frequencies up to 18 GHz. The bit-error rate (BER) of the 64-bit CSR, i.e. the probability that an error in circuit operation will occur during any single circulation of the data through all 64 register stages, was measured as a function of clock frequency, and the

  16. Quantum annealing: The fastest route to quantum computation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δ g/ g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.

  17. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    : The notebooks generate analytical expressions for quantum transition matrix elements required in diverse atomic processes: ionization by ion, electron, or photon impact and ionization within the framework of strong field physics. In charged-particle collisions approaches based on perturbation theory enjoy widespread utilization. Accordingly, we have chosen the First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave theories as examples. In light-matter interactions, the main ingredient for many types of calculations is the dipole transition matrix in its different formulations, i.e. length, velocity, and acceleration gauges. In all these cases the transitions of interest occur between a bound state and a continuum state which can be described in different ways. With the notebooks developed in the present work it is possible to calculate transition matrix elements analytically for any set of quantum numbers nlm of initial hydrogenic states or Slater-Type Orbitals and for plane waves or Coulomb waves as final continuum states. Solution method: The notebooks employ symbolic computation to generate analytical expressions for transition matrix elements used in both collision and light-matter interaction physics. fba_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions for the transition matrix of collision-induced ionization in the First Born Approximation (FBA). The transitions considered are from a bound hydrogenic state with arbitrary quantum numbers nlm to a continuum state represented by a plane wave (PW) or a Coulomb wave (CW). distorted_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions for the transition matrix of collision-induced ionization in Distorted Wave (DW) theories. The transitions considered are from a (distorted) bound hydrogenic state with arbitrary quantum numbers nlm to a distorted-wave continuum state. The computations are based on scalar and vectorial integrals (see the text for details). dipoleLength_hyd.nb - This notebook computes analytical expressions

  18. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J; Nordholt, Jane E; McCabe, Kevin P; Newell, Raymond T; Peterson, Charles G

    2010-09-20

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  19. Heralded quantum repeater for a quantum communication network based on quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater protocol based on the general interface between the circularly polarized photon and the quantum dot embedded in a double-sided optical microcavity. Our effective time-bin encoding on photons results in the deterministic faithful entanglement distribution with one optical fiber for the transmission of each photon in our protocol, not two or more. Our efficient parity-check detector implemented with only one input-output process of a single photon as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics makes the entanglement channel extension and entanglement purification in quantum repeater far more efficient than others, and it has the potential application in fault-tolerant quantum computation as well. Meanwhile, the deviation from a collective-noise channel leads to some phase-flip errors on the nonlocal electron spins shared by the parties and these errors can be depressed by our simplified entanglement purification process. Finally, we discuss the performance of our proposal, concluding that it is feasible with current technology.

  20. Multilevel distillation of magic states for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cody

    2013-04-01

    We develop a procedure for distilling magic states used in universal quantum computing that requires substantially fewer initial resources than prior schemes. Our distillation circuit is based on a family of concatenated quantum codes that possess a transversal Hadamard operation, enabling each of these codes to distill the eigenstate of the Hadamard operator. A crucial result of this design is that low-fidelity magic states can be consumed to purify other high-fidelity magic states to even higher fidelity, which we call multilevel distillation. When distilling in the asymptotic regime of infidelity ɛ→0 for each input magic state, the number of input magic states consumed on average to yield an output state with infidelity O(ɛ2r) approaches 2r+1, which comes close to saturating the conjectured bound in another investigation [Bravyi and Haah, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.86.052329 86, 052329 (2012)]. We show numerically that there exist multilevel protocols such that the average number of magic states consumed to distill from error rate ɛin=0.01 to ɛout in the range 10-5-10-40 is about 14log10(1/ɛout)-40; the efficiency of multilevel distillation dominates all other reported protocols when distilling Hadamard magic states from initial infidelity 0.01 to any final infidelity below 10-7. These methods are an important advance for magic-state distillation circuits in high-performance quantum computing and provide insight into the limitations of nearly resource-optimal quantum error correction.

  1. Electroluminescence of quantum-dash-based quantum cascade laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liverini, V.; Bismuto, A.; Nevou, L.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.

    2011-12-23

    We developed two mid-infrared quantum cascade structures based on InAs quantum dashes. The dashes were embedded either in AlInGaAs lattice-matched to InP or in tensile-strained AlInAs. The devices emit between 7 and 11 {mu}m and are a step forward in the development of quantum cascade lasers based on 3-D confined active regions.

  2. Quantum transport modelling of silicon nanobeams using heterogeneous computing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb, M.; Michaud-Rioux, V.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhang, L.; Guo, H.

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a powerful method for quantum transport calculations of nanowire/nanobeam structures with large cross sectional area. Our approach to quantum transport is based on Green's functions and tight-binding potentials. A linear algebraic formulation allows us to harness the massively parallel nature of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and our implementation is based on a heterogeneous parallel computing scheme with traditional processors and GPUs working together. Using our software tool, the electronic and quantum transport properties of silicon nanobeams with a realistic cross sectional area of ˜22.7 nm2 and a length of ˜81.5 nm—comprising 105 000 Si atoms and 24 000 passivating H atoms in the scattering region—are investigated. The method also allows us to perform significant averaging over impurity configurations—all possible configurations were considered in the case of single impurities. Finally, the effect of the position and number of vacancy defects on the transport properties was considered. It is found that the configurations with the vacancies lying closer to the local density of states (LDOS) maxima have lower transmission functions than the configurations with the vacancies located at LDOS minima or far away from LDOS maxima, suggesting both a qualitative method to tune or estimate optimal impurity configurations as well as a physical picture that accounts for device variability. Finally, we provide performance benchmarks for structures as large as ˜42.5 nm2 cross section and ˜81.5 nm length.

  3. Experimental test of Mermin inequalities on a five-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsina, Daniel; Latorre, José Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    Violation of Mermin inequalities is tested on the five-qubit IBM quantum computer. For three, four, and five parties, quantum states that violate the corresponding Mermin inequalities are constructed using quantum circuits on superconducting qubits. Measurements on different bases are included as additional final gates in the circuits. The experimental results obtained using the quantum computer show violation of all Mermin inequalities, with a clear degradation of the results in the five-qubit case. Though this quantum computer is not competitive to test Mermin inequalities as compared to other techniques when applied to a few qubits, it does offer the opportunity to explore multipartite entanglement for four and five qubits beyond the reach of other alternative technologies.

  4. Computer Based Library Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents computer-based lessons used to teach basic library skills to college students at York College of the City University of New York. The information for library orientation has been entered on a disk which must be used in conjunction with a word processing program, the Applewriter IIe, and an Apple IIe microcomputer. The…

  5. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  6. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation. PMID:25511387

  7. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  8. Experimental demonstration of a teleportation-based programmable quantum gate

    SciTech Connect

    Slodicka, Lukas; Jezek, Miroslav; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a programmable quantum gate that applies a sign flip operation to data qubit in an arbitrary basis fully specified by the quantum state of a two-qubit program register. Our linear-optical implementation is inspired by teleportation-based schemes for quantum computing and relies on multiphoton interference and coincidence detection. We confirm the programmability of the gate and its high-fidelity performance by carrying out full quantum process tomography of the resulting operation on data qubit for several different programs.

  9. An XQDD-Based Verification Method for Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiou-An; Lu, Chin-Yung; Tsai, I.-Ming; Kuo, Sy-Yen

    Synthesis of quantum circuits is essential for building quantum computers. It is important to verify that the circuits designed perform the correct functions. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which can be used to verify the quantum circuits synthesized by any method. The proposed algorithm is based on BDD (Binary Decision Diagram) and is called X-decomposition Quantum Decision Diagram (XQDD). In this method, quantum operations are modeled using a graphic method and the verification process is based on comparing these graphic diagrams. We also develop an algorithm to verify reversible circuits even if they have a different number of garbage qubits. In most cases, the number of nodes used in XQDD is less than that in other representations. In general, the proposed method is more efficient in terms of space and time and can be used to verify many quantum circuits in polynomial time.

  10. Time independent universal computing with spin chains: quantum plinko machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. F.; Gokler, C.; Lloyd, S.; Shor, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for universal quantum computing using XY Heisenberg spin chains. Information is encoded into packets propagating down these chains, and they interact with each other to perform universal quantum computation. A circuit using g gate blocks on m qubits can be encoded into chains of length O({g}3+δ {m}3+δ ) for all δ \\gt 0 with vanishingly small error.

  11. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  12. Quantum Chemistry on Quantum Computers: A Polynomial-Time Quantum Algorithm for Constructing the Wave Functions of Open-Shell Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2016-08-18

    Quantum computers are capable to efficiently perform full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations of atoms and molecules by using the quantum phase estimation (QPE) algorithm. Because the success probability of the QPE depends on the overlap between approximate and exact wave functions, efficient methods to prepare accurate initial guess wave functions enough to have sufficiently large overlap with the exact ones are highly desired. Here, we propose a quantum algorithm to construct the wave function consisting of one configuration state function, which is suitable for the initial guess wave function in QPE-based FCI calculations of open-shell molecules, based on the addition theorem of angular momentum. The proposed quantum algorithm enables us to prepare the wave function consisting of an exponential number of Slater determinants only by a polynomial number of quantum operations. PMID:27499026

  13. Computing the rates of measurement-induced quantum jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Tilloy, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Small quantum systems can now be continuously monitored experimentally which allows for the reconstruction of quantum trajectories. A peculiar feature of these trajectories is the emergence of jumps between the eigenstates of the observable which is measured. Using the stochastic master equation (SME) formalism for continuous quantum measurements, we show that the density matrix of a system indeed shows a jumpy behaviour when it is subjected to a tight measurement (even if the noise in the SME is Gaussian). We are able to compute the jump rates analytically for any system evolution, i.e. any Lindbladian, and we illustrate how our general recipe can be applied to two simple examples. We then discuss the mathematical, foundational and practical applications of our results. The analysis we present is based on a study of the strong noise limit of a class of stochastic differential equations (the SME) and as such the method may be applicable to other physical situations in which a strong noise limit plays a role.

  14. Continuous-variable quantum identity authentication based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongxin; Huang, Peng; Bao, Wansu; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-03-01

    A continuous-variable quantum identity authentication protocol, which is based on quantum teleportation, is presented by employing two-mode squeezed vacuum state and coherent state. The proposed protocol can verify user's identity efficiently with a new defined fidelity parameter. Update of authentication key can also be implemented in our protocol. Moreover, the analysis shows its feasibility and security under the general Gaussian-cloner attack on authentication key, which is guaranteed by quantum entanglement, insertion of decoy state and random displacement.

  15. Continuous-variable quantum identity authentication based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongxin; Huang, Peng; Bao, Wansu; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-06-01

    A continuous-variable quantum identity authentication protocol, which is based on quantum teleportation, is presented by employing two-mode squeezed vacuum state and coherent state. The proposed protocol can verify user's identity efficiently with a new defined fidelity parameter. Update of authentication key can also be implemented in our protocol. Moreover, the analysis shows its feasibility and security under the general Gaussian-cloner attack on authentication key, which is guaranteed by quantum entanglement, insertion of decoy state and random displacement.

  16. Paramagnetic materials and practical algorithmic cooling for NMR quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose M.; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2003-08-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method devised by Boykin, Mor Rowchodhury, Vatan and Vrijen (PNAS Mar '02) for initializing NMR systems in general and NMR quantum computers in particular. The algorithm recursively employs two steps. The first is an adiabatic entropy compression of the computation qubits of the system. The second step is an isothermal heat transfer from the system to the environment through a set of reset qubits that reach thermal relaxation rapidly. To allow experimental algorithmic cooling, the thermalization time of the reset qubits must be much shorter than the thermalization time of the computation qubits. We investigated the effect of the paramagnetic material Chromium Acetylacetonate on the thermalization times of computation qubits (carbons) and reset qubit (hydrogen). We report here the accomplishment of an improved ratio of the thermalization times from T1(H)/T1(C) of approximately 5 to around 15. The magnetic ions from the Chromium Acetylacetonate interact with the reset qubit reducing their thermalization time, while their effect on the less exposed computation qubits is found to be weaker. An experimental demonstrating of non adiabatic cooling by thermalization and magnetic ion is currently performed by our group based on these results.

  17. Conduction pathways in microtubules, biological quantum computation, and consciousness.

    PubMed

    Hameroff, Stuart; Nip, Alex; Porter, Mitchell; Tuszynski, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Technological computation is entering the quantum realm, focusing attention on biomolecular information processing systems such as proteins, as presaged by the work of Michael Conrad. Protein conformational dynamics and pharmacological evidence suggest that protein conformational states-fundamental information units ('bits') in biological systems-are governed by quantum events, and are thus perhaps akin to quantum bits ('qubits') as utilized in quantum computation. 'Real time' dynamic activities within cells are regulated by the cell cytoskeleton, particularly microtubules (MTs) which are cylindrical lattice polymers of the protein tubulin. Recent evidence shows signaling, communication and conductivity in MTs, and theoretical models have predicted both classical and quantum information processing in MTs. In this paper we show conduction pathways for electron mobility and possible quantum tunneling and superconductivity among aromatic amino acids in tubulins. The pathways within tubulin match helical patterns in the microtubule lattice structure, which lend themselves to topological quantum effects resistant to decoherence. The Penrose-Hameroff 'Orch OR' model of consciousness is reviewed as an example of the possible utility of quantum computation in MTs. PMID:11755497

  18. QDENSITY/QCWAVE: A Mathematica quantum computer simulation update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The Mathematica quantum computer simulation packages QDENSITY and QCWAVE are updated for Mathematica 9-10.3. An overview is given of the new QDensity, QCWave, BTSystem and Circuits packages, which includes: (1) improved treatment of tensor products of states and density matrices, (2) major extension to include qutrit (triplet), as well as qubit (binary) and hybrid qubit/qutrit systems in the associated BTSystem package, (3) updated sample quantum computation algorithms, (4) entanglement studies, including Schmidt decomposition, entropy, mutual information, partial transposition, and calculation of the quantum discord. Examples of Bell's theorem and concurrence are also included. This update will hopefully aid in studies of QC dynamics.

  19. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections

    PubMed Central

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once ‘observed’ as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be ‘purified’ into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

  20. Scalable digital hardware for a trapped ion quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Emily; Gaultney, Daniel; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2015-09-01

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for loading, cooling, initialization, and detection of the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  1. Quantum logic gates based on ballistic transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents various configurations for the implementation of graphene-based Hadamard, C-phase, controlled-NOT, and Toffoli gates working at room temperature. These logic gates, essential for any quantum computing algorithm, involve ballistic graphene devices for qubit generation and processing and can be fabricated using existing nanolithographical techniques. All quantum gate configurations are based on the very large mean-free-paths of carriers in graphene at room temperature.

  2. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news. All of the quantum computing resources described in this article are freely available, English-language web sites that fall into one…

  3. Classical Emulation of a Two-Qubit Quantum Computer with Analog Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian; Ostrove, Corey; Ott, Granville; Starkey, Michael; Wilson, Gary

    Abstract: The Hilbert space mathematical structure of a gate-based quantum computer may be reproduced by mapping the computational basis states to corresponding functions in the space of complex exponentials and identifying an inner product between any two such functions. The span of these complex basis exponentials may then identified with the finite-dimensional Hilbert space of a gate-based quantum computer. By using classical analog electronic components, such as four-quadrant multipliers and operational amplifiers, voltage signals representing arbitrary four-dimensional quantum states, along with the equivalent gate and measurement operations of a quantum computer have been physically realized through the corresponding circuitry. The fidelity of the emulation is measured using both a direct evaluation of the signal as well as through an emulation of quantum state tomography to infer the quantum state. We demonstrate that for both state synthesis and gate operations, our quantum emulation device is capable of achieving over 99% fidelity. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under Grant No. N00014-14-1-0323.

  4. Solving strongly correlated electron models on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecker, Dave; Hastings, Matthew B.; Wiebe, Nathan; Clark, Bryan K.; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    One of the main applications of future quantum computers will be the simulation of quantum models. While the evolution of a quantum state under a Hamiltonian is straightforward (if sometimes expensive), using quantum computers to determine the ground-state phase diagram of a quantum model and the properties of its phases is more involved. Using the Hubbard model as a prototypical example, we here show all the steps necessary to determine its phase diagram and ground-state properties on a quantum computer. In particular, we discuss strategies for efficiently determining and preparing the ground state of the Hubbard model starting from various mean-field states with broken symmetry. We present an efficient procedure to prepare arbitrary Slater determinants as initial states and present the complete set of quantum circuits needed to evolve from these to the ground state of the Hubbard model. We show that, using efficient nesting of the various terms, each time step in the evolution can be performed with just O (N ) gates and O (logN ) circuit depth. We give explicit circuits to measure arbitrary local observables and static and dynamic correlation functions, in both the time and the frequency domains. We further present efficient nondestructive approaches to measurement that avoid the need to reprepare the ground state after each measurement and that quadratically reduce the measurement error.

  5. A pseudo-spin surface-acoustic-wave quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C H W

    2003-07-15

    A modification to the surface-acoustic-wave quantum computer is described. The use of pseudo-spin qubits is introduced as a way to simplify the fabrication and programming of the computer. A form of optical readout that relies on the electrons in each surface-acoustic-wave minimum recombining with holes in a two-dimensional hole gas is suggested as a means to measure the output. The suggested modification would allow the quantum computer to be made smaller and to operate faster. PMID:12869323

  6. Quantum reactive scattering on innovative computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifici, Leonardo; Nalli, Danilo; Laganà, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    The possibility of implementing quantum reactive scattering programs on cheap platforms, originally used for graphic purposes only, has been investigated using a NVIDIA GPU. After a conversion of the code considered from Fortran to C and its deep restructuring for exploiting the GPU key features, significant speedups have been obtained for RWAVEPR, a time dependent quantum reactive scattering code propagating in time a complex wavepacket. As benchmark calculations those concerned with the evaluation of the reactive probabilities of the Cl+H2 and the N+N2 reactions have been considered.

  7. Teradata data base computer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    To meet the growing demand for information management of large databases, Teradata Corporation has introduced the DBC/1012 data base computer, an IBM plug-compatible system that can handle data volumes up to a trillion bytes. Teradata estimates the DBC/1012 to be one-third the cost of an all-software relational system on a general purpose mainframe. Cost effectiveness, as well as fault tolerance, is achieved by a parallel architecture which processes data asynchronously using multiple independent microprocessors. Another cost saving results from the resources on the host mainframe that become available once the mainframe is relieved of the burden of maintaining the database.

  8. On the 'principle of the quantumness', the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-05-04

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational 'principles of the quantumness', I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm 'the universe is a huge quantum computer', reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe.Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.

  9. On the ``principle of the quantumness,'' the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-05-01

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational "principles of the quantumness," I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm "the universe is a huge quantum computer," reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe. Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.

  10. Computing Entanglement Entropy in Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2012-02-01

    The scaling of entanglement entropy in quantum many-body wavefunctions is expected to be a fruitful resource for studying quantum phases and phase transitions in condensed matter. However, until the recent development of estimators for Renyi entropy in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), we have been in the dark about the behaviour of entanglement in all but the simplest two-dimensional models. In this talk, I will outline the measurement techniques that allow access to the Renyi entropies in several different QMC methodologies. I will then discuss recent simulation results demonstrating the richness of entanglement scaling in 2D, including: the prevalence of the ``area law''; topological entanglement entropy in a gapped spin liquid; anomalous subleading logarithmic terms due to Goldstone modes; universal scaling at critical points; and examples of emergent conformal-like scaling in several gapless wavefunctions. Finally, I will explore the idea that ``long range entanglement'' may complement the notion of ``long range order'' for quantum phases and phase transitions which lack a conventional order parameter description.

  11. Data Assimilation on a Quantum Annealing Computer: Feasibility and Scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, G. S.; Halem, M.; Chapman, D. R.; Pelissier, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Data assimilation is one of the ubiquitous and computationally hard problems in the Earth Sciences. In particular, ensemble-based methods require a large number of model evaluations to estimate the prior probability density over system states, and variational methods require adjoint calculations and iteration to locate the maximum a posteriori solution in the presence of nonlinear models and observation operators. Quantum annealing computers (QAC) like the new D-Wave housed at the NASA Ames Research Center can be used for optimization and sampling, and therefore offers a new possibility for efficiently solving hard data assimilation problems. Coding on the QAC is not straightforward: a problem must be posed as a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) and mapped to a spherical Chimera graph. We have developed a method for compiling nonlinear 4D-Var problems on the D-Wave that consists of five steps: Emulating the nonlinear model and/or observation function using radial basis functions (RBF) or Chebyshev polynomials. Truncating a Taylor series around each RBF kernel. Reducing the Taylor polynomial to a quadratic using ancilla gadgets. Mapping the real-valued quadratic to a fixed-precision binary quadratic. Mapping the fully coupled binary quadratic to a partially coupled spherical Chimera graph using ancilla gadgets. At present the D-Wave contains 512 qbits (with 1024 and 2048 qbit machines due in the next two years); this machine size allows us to estimate only 3 state variables at each satellite overpass. However, QAC's solve optimization problems using a physical (quantum) system, and therefore do not require iterations or calculation of model adjoints. This has the potential to revolutionize our ability to efficiently perform variational data assimilation, as the size of these computers grows in the coming years.

  12. Quantum computation in the analysis of hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Richard B.; Ghoshal, Debabrata; Jayanna, Anil

    2004-08-01

    Recent research on the topic of quantum computation provides us with some quantum algorithms with higher efficiency and speedup compared to their classical counterparts. In this paper, it is our intent to provide the results of our investigation of several applications of such quantum algorithms - especially the Grover's Search algorithm - in the analysis of Hyperspectral Data. We found many parallels with Grover's method in existing data processing work that make use of classical spectral matching algorithms. Our efforts also included the study of several methods dealing with hyperspectral image analysis work where classical computation methods involving large data sets could be replaced with quantum computation methods. The crux of the problem in computation involving a hyperspectral image data cube is to convert the large amount of data in high dimensional space to real information. Currently, using the classical model, different time consuming methods and steps are necessary to analyze these data including: Animation, Minimum Noise Fraction Transform, Pixel Purity Index algorithm, N-dimensional scatter plot, Identification of Endmember spectra - are such steps. If a quantum model of computation involving hyperspectral image data can be developed and formalized - it is highly likely that information retrieval from hyperspectral image data cubes would be a much easier process and the final information content would be much more meaningful and timely. In this case, dimensionality would not be a curse, but a blessing.

  13. Quantum Dynamics with Gaussian Bases Defined by the Quantum Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Garashchuk, Sophya

    2016-05-19

    Development of a general approach to construction of efficient high-dimensional bases is an outstanding challenge in quantum dynamics describing large amplitude motion of molecules and fragments. A number of approaches, proposed over the years, utilize Gaussian bases whose parameters are somehow-usually by propagating classical trajectories or by solving coupled variational equations-tailored to the shape of a wave function evolving in time. In this paper we define the time-dependent Gaussian bases through an ensemble of quantum or Bohmian trajectories, known to provide a very compact representation of a wave function due to conservation of the probability density associated with each trajectory. Though the exact numerical implementation of the quantum trajectory dynamics itself is, generally, impractical, the quantum trajectories can be obtained from the wave function expanded in a basis. The resulting trajectories are used to guide compact Gaussian bases, as illustrated on several model problems. PMID:26735750

  14. Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Hui Khoon; Preskill, John; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-07-15

    We study how dynamical decoupling (DD) pulse sequences can improve the reliability of quantum computers. We prove upper bounds on the accuracy of DD-protected quantum gates and derive sufficient conditions for DD-protected gates to outperform unprotected gates. Under suitable conditions, fault-tolerant quantum circuits constructed from DD-protected gates can tolerate stronger noise and have a lower overhead cost than fault-tolerant circuits constructed from unprotected gates. Our accuracy estimates depend on the dynamics of the bath that couples to the quantum computer and can be expressed either in terms of the operator norm of the bath's Hamiltonian or in terms of the power spectrum of bath correlations; we explain in particular how the performance of recursively generated concatenated pulse sequences can be analyzed from either viewpoint. Our results apply to Hamiltonian noise models with limited spatial correlations.

  15. Fast two-qubit gates for quantum computing in semiconductor quantum dots using a photonic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solenov, Dmitry; Economou, Sophia E.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2013-01-01

    Implementations for quantum computing require fast single- and multiqubit quantum gate operations. In the case of optically controlled quantum dot qubits, theoretical designs for long-range two- or multiqubit operations satisfying all the requirements in quantum computing are not yet available. We have developed a design for a fast, long-range two-qubit gate mediated by a photonic microcavity mode using excited states of the quantum-dot-cavity system that addresses these needs. This design does not require identical qubits, it is compatible with available optically induced single-qubit operations, and it advances opportunities for scalable architectures. We show that the gate fidelity can exceed 90% in experimentally accessible systems.

  16. Universal quantum computation with hybrid spin-Majorana qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Silas; Schrade, Constantin; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically propose a set of universal quantum gates acting on a hybrid qubit formed by coupling a quantum-dot spin qubit and Majorana fermion qubit. First, we consider a quantum dot that is tunnel coupled to two topological superconductors. The effective spin-Majorana exchange facilitates a hybrid cnot gate for which either qubit can be the control or target. The second setup is a modular scalable network of topological superconductors and quantum dots. As a result of the exchange interaction between adjacent spin qubits, a cnot gate is implemented that acts on neighboring Majorana qubits and eliminates the necessity of interqubit braiding. In both setups, the spin-Majorana exchange interaction allows for a phase gate, acting on either the spin or the Majorana qubit, and for a swap or hybrid swap gate which is sufficient for universal quantum computation without projective measurements.

  17. Scheme for Entering Binary Data Into a Quantum Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin

    2005-01-01

    A quantum algorithm provides for the encoding of an exponentially large number of classical data bits by use of a smaller (polynomially large) number of quantum bits (qubits). The development of this algorithm was prompted by the need, heretofore not satisfied, for a means of entering real-world binary data into a quantum computer. The data format provided by this algorithm is suitable for subsequent ultrafast quantum processing of the entered data. Potential applications lie in disciplines (e.g., genomics) in which one needs to search for matches between parts of very long sequences of data. For example, the algorithm could be used to encode the N-bit-long human genome in only log2N qubits. The resulting log2N-qubit state could then be used for subsequent quantum data processing - for example, to perform rapid comparisons of sequences.

  18. Quantum algorithms for spin models and simulable gate sets for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Nest, M.; Dür, W.; Raussendorf, R.; Briegel, H. J.

    2009-11-01

    We present simple mappings between classical lattice models and quantum circuits, which provide a systematic formalism to obtain quantum algorithms to approximate partition functions of lattice models in certain complex-parameter regimes. We, e.g., present an efficient quantum algorithm for the six-vertex model as well as a two-dimensional Ising-type model. We show that classically simulating these (complex-parameter) spin models is as hard as simulating universal quantum computation, i.e., BQP complete (BQP denotes bounded-error quantum polynomial time). Furthermore, our mappings provide a framework to obtain efficiently simulable quantum gate sets from exactly solvable classical models. We, e.g., show that the simulability of Valiant’s match gates can be recovered by using the solvability of the free-fermion eight-vertex model.

  19. An Invitation to the Mathematics of Topological Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowell, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional topological states of matter offer a route to quantum computation that would be topologically protected against the nemesis of the quantum circuit model: decoherence. Research groups in industry, government and academic institutions are pursuing this approach. We give a mathematician's perspective on some of the advantages and challenges of this model, highlighting some recent advances. We then give a short description of how we might extend the theory to three-dimensional materials.

  20. One- and two-dimensional ensemble quantum computing in spin Liouville space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mádi, Z. L.; Brüschweiler, R.; Ernst, R. R.

    1998-12-01

    New concepts are described for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) implementations of spin ensemble quantum computing in one and two dimensions. Similarities and differences between ensemble and pure state quantum computing are discussed by using a Liouville space formalism based on polarization and single transition operators. The introduction of an observer spin, that is coupled to the spins carrying the quantum bits, allows a mapping of the states of a quantum computer on a set of transitions between energy levels. This is spectroscopically favorable compared to a mapping on the energy levels themselves. Two complementary parallelization schemes for quantum computing are presented: one exploits the parallel processing feature inherent in multidimensional NMR, while the other employs mixed superposition states represented by operators in Liouville space. The spin swap operation, introduced in this paper, allows a convenient extension of quantum computing to spin systems where not all spin-spin couplings are resolved. The concepts are illustrated by implementations of logic operations and identities consisting of a sequence of basic logic gate operations.

  1. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-07-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  2. Fault tolerance in parity-state linear optical quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A. J. F.; Ralph, T. C.; Haselgrove, H. L.; Gilchrist, Alexei

    2010-08-15

    We use a combination of analytical and numerical techniques to calculate the noise threshold and resource requirements for a linear optical quantum computing scheme based on parity-state encoding. Parity-state encoding is used at the lowest level of code concatenation in order to efficiently correct errors arising from the inherent nondeterminism of two-qubit linear-optical gates. When combined with teleported error-correction (using either a Steane or Golay code) at higher levels of concatenation, the parity-state scheme is found to achieve a saving of approximately three orders of magnitude in resources when compared to the cluster state scheme, at a cost of a somewhat reduced noise threshold.

  3. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment.

  4. Universal Matchgate Quantum Computing With Cold Polar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    Polar molecules in optical lattices are attractive for quantum simulation and computation due to the ability to implement a variety of spin-lattice models using static, microwave and optical fields to engineer the long-range dipolar interaction between molecular qubits. Quantum simulation of spin models requires global control over the molecular ensemble, while quantum computation requires control of individual molecules with sub-wavelength resolution. In this talk, we describe the implementation of a matchgate quantum processor with an ensemble of polar molecules in an optical lattice. The scheme uses few-body qubit encoding and sequential control of two-body dipolar interactions over small plaquetes on a square lattice to perform universal quantum computing without single-site addressing. Effective spin-spin interactions with matchgate symmetry between open-shell polar molecules (e.g., SrF, OH) are driven by two infrared control pulses in the absence of static electric fields. The resulting matchgates are robust with respect to realistic imperfections in the driving fields and lattice trapping. Applications of the architecture for the simulation of interacting fermions in quantum chemistry are discussed, considering an imperfect lattice filling.

  5. Kitaev models based on unitary quantum groupoids

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Liang

    2014-04-15

    We establish a generalization of Kitaev models based on unitary quantum groupoids. In particular, when inputting a Kitaev-Kong quantum groupoid H{sub C}, we show that the ground state manifold of the generalized model is canonically isomorphic to that of the Levin-Wen model based on a unitary fusion category C. Therefore, the generalized Kitaev models provide realizations of the target space of the Turaev-Viro topological quantum field theory based on C.

  6. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, David

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss how the theorems of TDDFT can be applied to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, I will discuss how TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions.

  7. Exploring quantum computing application to satellite data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2015-12-01

    This is an exploring work on potential application of quantum computing to a scientific data optimization problem. On classical computational platforms, the physical domain of a satellite data assimilation problem is represented by a discrete variable transform, and classical minimization algorithms are employed to find optimal solution of the analysis cost function. The computation becomes intensive and time-consuming when the problem involves large number of variables and data. The new quantum computer opens a very different approach both in conceptual programming and in hardware architecture for solving optimization problem. In order to explore if we can utilize the quantum computing machine architecture, we formulate a satellite data assimilation experimental case in the form of quadratic programming optimization problem. We find a transformation of the problem to map it into Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) framework. Binary Wavelet Transform (BWT) will be applied to the data assimilation variables for its invertible decomposition and all calculations in BWT are performed by Boolean operations. The transformed problem will be experimented as to solve for a solution of QUBO instances defined on Chimera graphs of the quantum computer.

  8. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  9. Computational spectroscopy using the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, S.; Giannozzi, P.

    2009-12-01

    Quantum ESPRESSO (QE) [1,2] is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling, based on density-functional theory, plane waves, and pseudopotentials. QE freely available to researchers around the world under the terms of the GNU general public licence. In this talk I will introduce the QE distribution, with emphasis on some of its features that may appeal to the Earth Sciences and Mineralogy communities. I will focus on the determination of vibrational frequencies to be used for spectroscopic purposes, for the determination of soft modes leading to mechanical instabilities, and as ingredients for the simulation of thermal properties in the (quasi-) harmonic approximations. I will conclude with some recent developments which are allowing for the simulation of electronic (absorption and photo-emission) spectroscopies, using many-body and time-dependent density-functional perturbation theories. [1] P. Giannozzi et al. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21, 395502 (2009); http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0953-8984/21/39/395502 [2] http://www.quantum-espresso.org

  10. Efficient computations of quantum canonical Gibbs state in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Denys I.; Campos, Andre G.; Cabrera, Renan; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-06-01

    The Gibbs canonical state, as a maximum entropy density matrix, represents a quantum system in equilibrium with a thermostat. This state plays an essential role in thermodynamics and serves as the initial condition for nonequilibrium dynamical simulations. We solve a long standing problem for computing the Gibbs state Wigner function with nearly machine accuracy by solving the Bloch equation directly in the phase space. Furthermore, the algorithms are provided yielding high quality Wigner distributions for pure stationary states as well as for Thomas-Fermi and Bose-Einstein distributions. The developed numerical methods furnish a long-sought efficient computation framework for nonequilibrium quantum simulations directly in the Wigner representation.

  11. Hierarchy of Efficiently Computable and Faithful Lower Bounds to Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Quantum discord expresses a fundamental nonclassicality of correlations that is more general than entanglement, but that, in its standard definition, is not easily evaluated. We derive a hierarchy of computationally efficient lower bounds to the standard quantum discord. Every nontrivial element of the hierarchy constitutes by itself a valid discordlike measure, based on a fundamental feature of quantum correlations: their lack of shareability. Our approach emphasizes how the difference between entanglement and discord depends on whether shareability is intended as a static property or as a dynamical process.

  12. Hierarchy of Efficiently Computable and Faithful Lower Bounds to Quantum Discord.

    PubMed

    Piani, Marco

    2016-08-19

    Quantum discord expresses a fundamental nonclassicality of correlations that is more general than entanglement, but that, in its standard definition, is not easily evaluated. We derive a hierarchy of computationally efficient lower bounds to the standard quantum discord. Every nontrivial element of the hierarchy constitutes by itself a valid discordlike measure, based on a fundamental feature of quantum correlations: their lack of shareability. Our approach emphasizes how the difference between entanglement and discord depends on whether shareability is intended as a static property or as a dynamical process. PMID:27588837

  13. Optically driven nanostructures as the basis for large-scale quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexander V.

    2008-03-01

    We propose a large-scale quantum computer architecture based upon the regular arrays of dopant atoms implanted into the semiconductor host matrix. The singly-ionized pairs of donors represent charge qubits on which arbitrary quantum operations can be achieved by application of two strongly detuned laser pulses. The implementation of two-qubit operations as well as the qubit read-out utilize the intermediate circuit containing a probe electron that is able to shuttle along the array of ionized ancilla donors providing the indirect conditional coupling between the qubits. The quantum bus strategy enables us to handle the qubits connected in parallel and enhances the efficiency of the quantum information processing. We demonstrate that non-trivial multi-qubit operations in the quantum register (e.g., an entanglement generation) can be accomplished by the sequence of the optical pulses combined with an appropriate voltage gate pattern.

  14. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, George I

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  15. Bound on quantum computation time: Quantum error correction in a critical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Novais, E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2010-08-15

    We obtain an upper bound on the time available for quantum computation for a given quantum computer and decohering environment with quantum error correction implemented. First, we derive an explicit quantum evolution operator for the logical qubits and show that it has the same form as that for the physical qubits but with a reduced coupling strength to the environment. Using this evolution operator, we find the trace distance between the real and ideal states of the logical qubits in two cases. For a super-Ohmic bath, the trace distance saturates, while for Ohmic or sub-Ohmic baths, there is a finite time before the trace distance exceeds a value set by the user.

  16. Investigations in quantum computing: Causality and graph isomorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckman, David Eugene

    In this thesis I explore two different types of limits on the time complexity of quantum computation---that is, limits on how much time is required to perform a given class of quantum operations on a quantum system. Upper limits can be found by explicit construction; I explore this approach for the problem of determining whether two graphs are isomorphic. Finding lower limits, on the other hand, usually requires appeal to some fundamental principle of the operation under consideration; I use this approach to derive lower limits placed by the requirements of relativistic causality on the time required for implementation of some nonlocal quantum operations. In some situations these limits are attainable, but for other physical spacetime geometries we exhibit classes of operations which do not violate relativistic causality but which are nevertheless not implementable.

  17. QPSO-Based Adaptive DNA Computing Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm. PMID:23935409

  18. CALL FOR PAPERS: Optical implementation of quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rarity, John; Weinfurter, Harald

    2004-09-01

    A topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will be devoted to recent advances in optical implementation of quantum computers. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bullet Linear optics quantum gates bullet Progress towards nonlinear optics quantum gates bullet Interface between optical qubits and atomic/solid state qubits bullet Novel architectures bullet Single-photon sources and detectors bullet Photonic quantum networks bullet Few-qubit applications The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 15 January 2005 to allow the topical issue to be published in about October 2005. All contributions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Submissions should preferably be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. There are no page charges for publication. The corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should preferably be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the electronic code) to: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher), Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics, Institute of Physics Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. All contributions should be accompanied by a readme file or covering letter, quoting `JOPB Topical Issue - Optical implementation of quantum computers', giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. Any subsequent change of address should be notified to the publishing office. We look forward to receiving your contribution to this topical issue.

  19. Reducing the overhead for quantum computation when noise is biased

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Paul; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Poulin, David

    2015-12-01

    We analyze a model for fault-tolerant quantum computation with low overhead suitable for situations where the noise is biased. The basis for this scheme is a gadget for the fault-tolerant preparation of magic states that enable universal fault-tolerant quantum computation using only Clifford gates that preserve the noise bias. We analyze the distillation of |T > -type magic states using this gadget at the physical level, followed by concatenation with the 15-qubit quantum Reed-Muller code, and comparing our results with standard constructions. In the regime where the noise bias (rate of Pauli Z errors relative to other single-qubit errors) is greater than a factor of 10, our scheme has lower overhead across a broad range of relevant noise rates.

  20. Indications for quantum computation requirements from comparative brain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernroider, Gustav; Baer, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    Whether or not neuronal signal properties can engage 'non-trivial', i.e. functionally significant, quantum properties, is the subject of an ongoing debate. Here we provide evidence that quantum coherence dynamics can play a functional role in ion conduction mechanism with consequences on the shape and associative character of classical membrane signals. In particular, these new perspectives predict that a specific neuronal topology (e.g. the connectivity pattern of cortical columns in the primate brain) is less important and not really required to explain abilities in perception and sensory-motor integration. Instead, this evidence is suggestive for a decisive role of the number and functional segregation of ion channel proteins that can be engaged in a particular neuronal constellation. We provide evidence from comparative brain studies and estimates of computational capacity behind visual flight functions suggestive for a possible role of quantum computation in biological systems.

  1. Optical quantum computation with cavities in the intermediate coupling region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Yu, Y. F.; Feng, X. L.; Zhu, S. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2010-07-01

    Large-scale quantum computation is currently a hot area of research. The scalable quantum computation scheme with cavities originally proposed by Duan and Kimble (Phys. Rev. Lett., 92 (2004) 127902) is further developed here to operate in the intermediate coupling region, which not only greatly relaxes experimental demands on the Purcell factor, but also eliminates the need to consider internal trade-off between cavity quality and efficiency. In our scheme, by controlling the reflectivity of the input single-photon pulse in the cavity, we can realize local atom-photon and nonlocal atom-atom controlled phase-flip (CPF) gates. We also introduce a theoretical model to analyze the performance of our scheme under practical noise. Furthermore, we show that the nonlocal CPF gate can be used to realize a quantum repeater.

  2. Quantum key distribution based on quantum dimension and independent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol based on only a two-dimensional Hilbert space encoding a quantum system and independent devices between the equipment for state preparation and measurement. Our protocol is inspired by the fully device-independent quantum key distribution (FDI-QKD) protocol and the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol. Our protocol only requires the state to be prepared in the two-dimensional Hilbert space, which weakens the state preparation assumption in the original MDI-QKD protocol. More interestingly, our protocol can overcome the detection loophole problem in the FDI-QKD protocol, which greatly limits the application of FDI-QKD. Hence our protocol can be implemented with practical optical components.

  3. Ultrafast quantum random number generation based on quantum phase fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feihu; Qi, Bing; Ma, Xiongfeng; Xu, He; Zheng, Haoxuan; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2012-05-21

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) can generate true randomness by exploiting the fundamental indeterminism of quantum mechanics. Most approaches to QRNG employ single-photon detection technologies and are limited in speed. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast QRNG at a rate over 6 Gbits/s based on the quantum phase fluctuations of a laser operating near threshold. Moreover, we consider a potential adversary who has partial knowledge on the raw data and discuss how one can rigorously remove such partial knowledge with postprocessing. We quantify the quantum randomness through min-entropy by modeling our system and employ two randomness extractors--Trevisan's extractor and Toeplitz-hashing--to distill the randomness, which is information-theoretically provable. The simplicity and high-speed of our experimental setup show the feasibility of a robust, low-cost, high-speed QRNG. PMID:22714224

  4. QNIX: A Linear Optical Architecture for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno-Segovia, Mercedes; Shadbolt, Peter J.; Rudolph, Terry G.; Browne, Dan E.; Mendoza, Gabriel; Russell, Nicholas J.; Silverstone, Joshua W.; Santamato, Alberto; Carolan, Jacques; O'Brien, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    There is currently a great deal of effort to develop a large-scale quantum computer, and one of the most promising platforms to do so is integrated linear optics. We present a proposal for a dynamical scheme for an integrated linear optics implementation of a one-way quantum computer. We go beyond the purely theoretical work and address practical issues in order to create a physically realistic design. We describe every step of cluster state construction and processing, showing the outstanding issues left to be addressed and our contributions to the different stages of the dynamical process. These include optimised interferometers for the generation of GHZ states, a universal and scalable architecture which requires entangled sources of no more than 3 photons with no active feed-forward, and loss-tolerant and fault-tolerant strategies specifically tailored to our proposed architecture. Our work demonstrates that building a linear optical quantum computer need be less challenging than previously thought, and brings large-scale switch-free linear optical architectures for quantum computing much closer to experimental realisation.

  5. Adapting the traveling salesman problem to an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to guide a quantum computer to select an optimal tour for the traveling salesman. This is significant because it opens a rapid solution method for the wide range of applications of the traveling salesman problem, which include vehicle routing, job sequencing and data clustering.

  6. Automatic computation of quantum-mechanical bound states and wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, V.; Van Daele, M.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the automatic solution of the multichannel Schrödinger equation. The proposed approach is based on the use of a CP method for which the step size is not restricted by the oscillations in the solution. Moreover, this CP method turns out to form a natural scheme for the integration of the Riccati differential equation which arises when introducing the (inverse) logarithmic derivative. A new Prüfer type mechanism which derives all the required information from the propagation of the inverse of the log-derivative, is introduced. It improves and refines the eigenvalue shooting process and implies that the user may specify the required eigenvalue by its index. Catalogue identifier: AEON_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEON_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/license/license.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3822 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 119814 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab. Computer: Personal computer architectures. Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed). RAM: Depends on the problem size. Classification: 4.3. Nature of problem: Computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of multichannel Schrödinger equations appearing in quantum mechanics. Solution method: A CP-based propagation scheme is used to advance the R-matrix in a shooting process. The shooting algorithm is supplemented by a Prüfer type mechanism which allows the eigenvalues to be computed according to index: the user specifies an integer k≥0, and the code computes an approximation to the kth eigenvalue. Eigenfunctions are also available through an auxiliary routine, called after the eigenvalue has been determined. Restrictions: The program can only deal with non-singular problems. Additional

  7. LSB Based Quantum Image Steganography Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Na; Wang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum steganography is the technique which hides a secret message into quantum covers such as quantum images. In this paper, two blind LSB steganography algorithms in the form of quantum circuits are proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation (NEQR) for quantum images. One algorithm is plain LSB which uses the message bits to substitute for the pixels' LSB directly. The other is block LSB which embeds a message bit into a number of pixels that belong to one image block. The extracting circuits can regain the secret message only according to the stego cover. Analysis and simulation-based experimental results demonstrate that the invisibility is good, and the balance between the capacity and the robustness can be adjusted according to the needs of applications.

  8. Quantum computation with coherent spin states and the close Hadamard problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Mark R. A.; Høyer, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-04-01

    We study a model of quantum computation based on the continuously parameterized yet finite-dimensional Hilbert space of a spin system. We explore the computational powers of this model by analyzing a pilot problem we refer to as the close Hadamard problem. We prove that the close Hadamard problem can be solved in the spin system model with arbitrarily small error probability in a constant number of oracle queries. We conclude that this model of quantum computation is suitable for solving certain types of problems. The model is effective for problems where symmetries between the structure of the information associated with the problem and the structure of the unitary operators employed in the quantum algorithm can be exploited.

  9. Average-Case Complexity Versus Approximate Simulation of Commuting Quantum Computations.

    PubMed

    Bremner, Michael J; Montanaro, Ashley; Shepherd, Dan J

    2016-08-19

    We use the class of commuting quantum computations known as IQP (instantaneous quantum polynomial time) to strengthen the conjecture that quantum computers are hard to simulate classically. We show that, if either of two plausible average-case hardness conjectures holds, then IQP computations are hard to simulate classically up to constant additive error. One conjecture relates to the hardness of estimating the complex-temperature partition function for random instances of the Ising model; the other concerns approximating the number of zeroes of random low-degree polynomials. We observe that both conjectures can be shown to be valid in the setting of worst-case complexity. We arrive at these conjectures by deriving spin-based generalizations of the boson sampling problem that avoid the so-called permanent anticoncentration conjecture. PMID:27588839

  10. Human-competitive evolution of quantum computing artefacts by Genetic Programming.

    PubMed

    Massey, Paul; Clark, John A; Stepney, Susan

    2006-01-01

    We show how Genetic Programming (GP) can be used to evolve useful quantum computing artefacts of increasing sophistication and usefulness: firstly specific quantum circuits, then quantum programs, and finally system-independent quantum algorithms. We conclude the paper by presenting a human-competitive Quantum Fourier Transform (QFT) algorithm evolved by GP. PMID:16536889

  11. Computing and the electrical transport properties of coupled quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Casey Andrew

    In this dissertation a number of investigations were conducted on ballistic quantum networks in the mesoscopic range. In this regime, the wave nature of electron transport under the influence of transverse magnetic fields leads to interesting applications for digital logic and computing circuits. The work specifically looks at characterizing a few main areas that would be of interest to experimentalists who are working in nanostructure devices, and is organized as a series of papers. The first paper analyzes scaling relations and normal mode charge distributions for such circuits in both isolated and open (terminals attached) form. The second paper compares the flux-qubit nature of quantum networks to the well-established spintronics theory. The results found exactly contradict the conventional school of thought for what is required for quantum computation. The third paper investigates the requirements and limitations of extending the Thevenin theorem in classic electric circuits to ballistic quantum transport. The fourth paper outlines the optimal functionally complete set of quantum circuits that can completely satisfy all sixteen Boolean logic operations for two variables.

  12. Towards bulk based preconditioning for quantum dotcomputations

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, Jack; Langou, Julien; Tomov, Stanimire; Channing,Andrew; Marques, Osni; Vomel, Christof; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-05-25

    This article describes how to accelerate the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) type eigensolvers for the computation of several states around the band gap of colloidal quantum dots. Our new approach uses the Hamiltonian from the bulk materials constituent for the quantum dot to design an efficient preconditioner for the folded spectrum PCG method. The technique described shows promising results when applied to CdSe quantum dot model problems. We show a decrease in the number of iteration steps by at least a factor of 4 compared to the previously used diagonal preconditioner.

  13. Ant-based computing.

    PubMed

    Michael, Loizos

    2009-01-01

    A biologically and physically plausible model for ants and pheromones is proposed. It is argued that the mechanisms described in this model are sufficiently powerful to reproduce the necessary components of universal computation. The claim is supported by illustrating the feasibility of designing arbitrary logic circuits, showing that the interactions of ants and pheromones lead to the expected behavior, and presenting computer simulation results to verify the circuits' working. The conclusions of this study can be taken as evidence that coherent deterministic and centralized computation can emerge from the collective behavior of simple distributed Markovian processes such as those followed by biological ants, but also, more generally, by artificial agents with limited computational and communication abilities. PMID:19239348

  14. Quantum computation mediated by ancillary qudits and spin coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Dooley, Shane; Kendon, Viv

    2015-01-01

    Models of universal quantum computation in which the required interactions between register (computational) qubits are mediated by some ancillary system are highly relevant to experimental realizations of a quantum computer. We introduce such a universal model that employs a d -dimensional ancillary qudit. The ancilla-register interactions take the form of controlled displacements operators, with a displacement operator defined on the periodic and discrete lattice phase space of a qudit. We show that these interactions can implement controlled phase gates on the register by utilizing geometric phases that are created when closed loops are traversed in this phase space. The extra degrees of freedom of the ancilla can be harnessed to reduce the number of operations required for certain gate sequences. In particular, we see that the computational advantages of the quantum bus (qubus) architecture, which employs a field-mode ancilla, are also applicable to this model. We then explore an alternative ancilla-mediated model which employs a spin ensemble as the ancillary system and again the interactions with the register qubits are via controlled displacement operators, with a displacement operator defined on the Bloch sphere phase space of the spin coherent states of the ensemble. We discuss the computational advantages of this model and its relationship with the qubus architecture.

  15. Optimizing Quantum Simulation for Heterogeneous Computing: a Hadamard Transformation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avila, Anderson B.; Schumalfuss, Murilo F.; Reiser, Renata H. S.; Pilla, Mauricio L.; Maron, Adriano K.

    2015-10-01

    The D-GM execution environment improves distributed simulation of quantum algorithms in heterogeneous computing environments comprising both multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The main contribution of this work consists in the optimization of the environment VirD-GM, conceived in three steps: (i) the theoretical studies and implementation of the abstractions of the Mixed Partial Process defined in the qGM model, focusing on the reduction of the memory consumption regarding multidimensional QTs; (ii) the distributed/parallel implementation of such abstractions allowing its execution on clusters of GPUs; (iii) and optimizations that predict multiplications by zero-value of the quantum states/transformations, implying reduction in the number of computations. The results obtained in this work embrace the distribute/parallel simulation of Hadamard gates up to 21 qubits, showing scalability with the increase in the number of computing nodes.

  16. Computational complexity of nonequilibrium steady states of quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzolino, Ugo; Prosen, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We study nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) of spin chains with boundary Markovian dissipation from the computational complexity point of view. We focus on X X chains whose NESS are matrix product operators, i.e., with coefficients of a tensor operator basis described by transition amplitudes in an auxiliary space. Encoding quantum algorithms in the auxiliary space, we show that estimating expectations of operators, being local in the sense that each acts on disjoint sets of few spins covering all the system, provides the answers of problems at least as hard as, and believed by many computer scientists to be much harder than, those solved by quantum computers. We draw conclusions on the hardness of the above estimations.

  17. Pen-based computers: Computers without keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Cheryl L.

    1994-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is comprised of many diverse and highly complex systems incorporating the latest technologies. Data collection associated with ground processing of the various Space Shuttle system elements is extremely challenging due to the many separate processing locations where data is generated. This presents a significant problem when the timely collection, transfer, collation, and storage of data is required. This paper describes how new technology, referred to as Pen-Based computers, is being used to transform the data collection process at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Pen-Based computers have streamlined procedures, increased data accuracy, and now provide more complete information than previous methods. The end results is the elimination of Shuttle processing delays associated with data deficiencies.

  18. Effect of noise on geometric logic gates for quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Blais, A.; Tremblay, A.-M.S.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the nonadiabatic, or Aharonov-Anandan, geometric phase as a tool for quantum computation and show how this phase on one qubit can be monitored by a second qubit without any dynamical contribution. We also discuss how this geometric phase could be implemented with superconducting charge qubits. While the nonadiabatic geometric phase may circumvent many of the drawbacks related to the adiabatic (Berry) version of geometric gates, we show that the effect of fluctuations of the control parameters on nonadiabatic phase gates is more severe than for the standard dynamic gates. Similarly, fluctuations also affect to a greater extent quantum gates that use the Berry phase instead of the dynamic phase.

  19. A Novel LSB Based Quantum Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Shahrokh; Naseri, Mosayeb

    2016-06-01

    Quantum watermarking is a technique which embeds the invisible quantum signal such as the owners identification into quantum multimedia data (such as audio, video and image) for copyright protection. In this paper, using a quantum representation of digital images a new quantum watermarking protocol including quantum image scrambling based on Least Significant Bit (LSB) is proposed. In this protocol, by using m-bit embedding key K 1 and m-bit extracting key K 2 a m-pixel gray scale image is watermarked in a m-pixel carrier image by the original owner of the carrier image. For validation of the presented scheme the peak-signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and histogram graphs of the images are analyzed.

  20. Computation with spin foam models of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    The focus of this thesis is the study of spin foam models of quantum gravity on a computer. These models include the standard Barrett-Crane (BC) spin foam model, as well as the new Engle-Pereira-Rovelli (EPR) and Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. New numerical algorithms are developed and implemented, based on the existing Christensen-Egan (CE) algorithm, to allow computations with the BC model in the presence of a cosmological constant (implemented through q-deformation) and to allow computations with the recently proposed EPR and FK models. For the first time, we show that the inclusion of a positive cosmological constant, a long standing open problem for spin foams, curiously changes the behavior of the BC model, rendering the expectation values of its observables discontinuous in the limit of zero cosmological constant. Also, unlike previous work, this investigation was carried out on large triangulations, which are Gloser to large semiclassical space-times. Efficient numerical algorithms are described and implemented, for the first time, allowing the evaluation of the EPR and FK spin foam vertex amplitudes. An initial application of these algorithms is the study of the effective single vertex large spin asymptotics of the new models. Their asymptotic behavior is found to be qualitatively similar to that of the BC model. The leading asymptotic behavior does not exhibit the oscillatory character expected by analogy with the Ponzano-Regge model. Two important tests of the spin foam semiclassical limit are wave packet propagation and evaluation of the graviton propagator matrix elements. These tests are generalized to encompass the three major spin foam models. The wave packet propagation test is carried out in greater generality than previously. The results indicate that conjectures about good semiclassical behavior of the new spin foam models may have been premature.

  1. Universal topological quantum computation from a superconductor/Abelian quantum Hall heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Non-Abelian anyons promise to reveal spectacular features of quantum mechanics that could ultimately provide the foundation for a decoherence-free quantum computer. A key breakthrough in the pursuit of these exotic particles originated from Read and Green's observation that the Moore-Read quantum Hall state and a (relatively simple) two-dimensional p + ip superconductor both support so-called Ising non-Abelian anyons. Here we establish a similar correspondence between the Z3 Read-Rezayi quantum Hall state and a novel two-dimensional superconductor in which charge- 2 e Cooper pairs are built from fractionalized quasiparticles. In particular, both phases harbor Fibonacci anyons that--unlike Ising anyons--allow for universal topological quantum computation solely through braiding. Using a variant of Teo and Kane's construction of non-Abelian phases from weakly coupled chains, we provide a blueprint for such a superconductor using Abelian quantum Hall states interlaced with an array of superconducting islands. These results imply that one can, in principle, combine well-understood and widely available phases of matter to realize non-Abelian anyons with universal braid statistics.

  2. Universal Topological Quantum Computation from a Superconductor-Abelian Quantum Hall Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Roger S. K.; Clarke, David J.; Alicea, Jason; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fendley, Paul; Nayak, Chetan; Oreg, Yuval; Stern, Ady; Berg, Erez; Shtengel, Kirill; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Abelian anyons promise to reveal spectacular features of quantum mechanics that could ultimately provide the foundation for a decoherence-free quantum computer. A key breakthrough in the pursuit of these exotic particles originated from Read and Green's observation that the Moore-Read quantum Hall state and a (relatively simple) two-dimensional p+ip superconductor both support so-called Ising non-Abelian anyons. Here, we establish a similar correspondence between the Z3 Read-Rezayi quantum Hall state and a novel two-dimensional superconductor in which charge-2e Cooper pairs are built from fractionalized quasiparticles. In particular, both phases harbor Fibonacci anyons that—unlike Ising anyons—allow for universal topological quantum computation solely through braiding. Using a variant of Teo and Kane's construction of non-Abelian phases from weakly coupled chains, we provide a blueprint for such a superconductor using Abelian quantum Hall states interlaced with an array of superconducting islands. Fibonacci anyons appear as neutral deconfined particles that lead to a twofold ground-state degeneracy on a torus. In contrast to a p+ip superconductor, vortices do not yield additional particle types, yet depending on nonuniversal energetics can serve as a trap for Fibonacci anyons. These results imply that one can, in principle, combine well-understood and widely available phases of matter to realize non-Abelian anyons with universal braid statistics. Numerous future directions are discussed, including speculations on alternative realizations with fewer experimental requirements.

  3. Resource quality of a symmetry-protected topologically ordered phase for quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacob; Miyake, Akimasa

    2015-03-27

    We investigate entanglement naturally present in the 1D topologically ordered phase protected with the on-site symmetry group of an octahedron as a potential resource for teleportation-based quantum computation. We show that, as long as certain characteristic lengths are finite, all its ground states have the capability to implement any unit-fidelity one-qubit gate operation asymptotically as a key computational building block. This feature is intrinsic to the entire phase, in that perfect gate fidelity coincides with perfect string order parameters under a state-insensitive renormalization procedure. Our approach may pave the way toward a novel program to classify quantum many-body systems based on their operational use for quantum information processing. PMID:25860730

  4. Quantum speed meter based on dissipative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyatchanin, Sergey P.; Matsko, Andrey B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that generalized dissipative optomechanical coupling enables a direct quantum measurement of speed of a free test mass. An optical detection of a weak classical mechanical force based on this interaction is proposed. The sensitivity of the force measurement can be better than the standard quantum limit.

  5. QUANTUM OPTICS AND QUANTUM COMPUTATION: Analysis of limiting information characteristics of quantum-cryptography protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, D. V.; Grishanin, Boris A.; Zadkov, Viktor N.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of increasing the critical error rate of quantum-cryptography protocols by varying a set of letters in a quantum alphabet for space of a fixed dimensionality is studied. Quantum alphabets forming regular polyhedra on the Bloch sphere and the continual alphabet equally including all the quantum states are considered. It is shown that, in the absence of basis reconciliation, a protocol with the tetrahedral alphabet has the highest critical error rate among the protocols considered, while after the basis reconciliation, a protocol with the continual alphabet possesses the highest critical error rate.

  6. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes. PMID:23938640

  7. Quantum Revivals, Quantum Fractals, and Possible Base-N Quantum Registers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, William G.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum revivals (not to be confused with "spin echoes") were first noticed by Eberly(J. H. Eberly, Phys. Rev. A 23, 236(1981)) in studies of atom-cavity QED and Fermi Golden Rule violation. Fractional revivals have appeared more recently(I. S. Averbukh and N. F. Perelman, Phys. Letters 139, 449 (1989)) in systems with quadratic quantum level structure such as molecular rotors or particles-in-a-box. The latter seem to undergo a quasi-chaotic time dependence which Berry called a quantum fractal.( M. V. Berry, J. Phys, A: Math. Gen. 29, 6617 (1996)) Two complimentary approaches to theory of revivals are described. The first approach is a semi-classical theory(F. Grosmann, J. M. Rost, and W. P. Schleich , J. Phys A. :Math. Gen. 30 L277 (1997)) of phase and group velocity for wave nodes. The second approach is a quantum and group theory(W. G. Harter, Phys. Rev. A64 012312 (2001)) of wave phase at wave peaks. Either approach uses a physical analogy with resonance of multiple coupled pendulums as will be shown by computer simulation. The semi-classical approach uses a Farey sum-tree to catalog quantum revivals. The quantum approach uses group characters of nested Cn groups to analyze revival dynamics. Models of Cn circuits are shown which factor small integers and might serve as quantum computer registers.

  8. Quantum computation of the electromagnetic cross section of dielectric targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Jitrik, Oliverio; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Wiesman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The Radar Cross Section (RCS) is a crucial element for assessing target visibility and target characterization, and it depends not only on the target's geometry but also on its composition. However, the calculation of the RCS is a challenging task due to the mathematical description of electromagnetic phenomena as well as the computational resources needed. In this paper, we will introduce two ideas for the use of quantum information processing techniques to calculate the RCS of dielectric targets. The first is to use toolboxes of quantum functions to determine the geometric component of the RCS. The second idea is to use quantum walks, expressed in terms of scattering processes, to model radar absorbing materials.

  9. A Many Body Eigenvalue Problem for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershfield, Selman

    2008-03-01

    A one dimensional many body Hamiltonian is presented whose eigenvalues are related to the order of GN. This is the same order of GN used to decode the RSA algorithm. For some values of N the Hamiltonian is a noninteracting fermion problem. For other values of N the Hamiltonian is a quantum impurity problem with fermions interacting with a spin-like object. However, the generic case has fermions or spins interacting with higher order interactions beyond two body interactions. Because this is a mapping between two different classes of problems, one of interest in quantum computing and the other a more traditional condensed matter physics Hamiltonian, we will show (i) how knowledge of the order of GN can be used to solve some novel one dimensional strongly correlated problems and (ii) how numerical techniques, particularly for quantum impurity limit, can be used to find the order of GN.

  10. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W. H.; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-04-01

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. ‘Gamification’—the application of game elements in a non-game context—is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond.

  11. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W H; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F

    2016-04-14

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. 'Gamification'--the application of game elements in a non-game context--is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond. PMID:27075097

  12. Quantum computer simulation using the CUDA programming model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Eladio; Romero, Sergio; Trenas, María A.; Zapata, Emilio L.

    2010-02-01

    Quantum computing emerges as a field that captures a great theoretical interest. Its simulation represents a problem with high memory and computational requirements which makes advisable the use of parallel platforms. In this work we deal with the simulation of an ideal quantum computer on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), as such a problem can benefit from the high computational capacities of Graphics Processing Units (GPU). After all, modern GPUs are becoming very powerful computational architectures which is causing a growing interest in their application for general purpose. CUDA provides an execution model oriented towards a more general exploitation of the GPU allowing to use it as a massively parallel SIMT (Single-Instruction Multiple-Thread) multiprocessor. A simulator that takes into account memory reference locality issues is proposed, showing that the challenge of achieving a high performance depends strongly on the explicit exploitation of memory hierarchy. Several strategies have been experimentally evaluated obtaining good performance results in comparison with conventional platforms.

  13. Using computer algebra for Yang-Baxterization applied to quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2006-05-01

    Using Computer Algebra Software (Mathematica and Maple), the recently introduced topic of Yang- Baxterization applied to quantum computing, is explored from the mathematical and computational views. Some algorithms of computer algebra were elaborated with the aim to make the calculations to obtain some of results that were originally presented in the paper by Shang-Kauffman-Ge. Also certain new results about computational Yang-baxterization are presented. We obtain some Hamiltonians for hypothetical physical systems which can be realized within the domain of spin chains and certain diffusion process. We conclude that it is possible to have real physical systems on which implement, via Yang-baxterization, the standard quantum gates with topological protection. Finally some lines for future research are deligned.

  14. Numerical analysis of boosting scheme for scalable NMR quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    SaiToh, Akira; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Among initialization schemes for ensemble quantum computation beginning at thermal equilibrium, the scheme proposed by Schulman and Vazirani [in Proceedings of the 31st ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC'99) (ACM Press, New York, 1999), pp. 322-329] is known for the simple quantum circuit to redistribute the biases (polarizations) of qubits and small time complexity. However, our numerical simulation shows that the number of qubits initialized by the scheme is rather smaller than expected from the von Neumann entropy because of an increase in the sum of the binary entropies of individual qubits, which indicates a growth in the total classical correlation. This result--namely, that there is such a significant growth in the total binary entropy--disagrees with that of their analysis.

  15. Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Architectures that would exploit the distinct characteristics of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed for digital communication networks that connect advanced digital computing circuits. In comparison with networks of wires in conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry, the networks according to the proposed architectures would be more compact. The proposed architectures would make it possible to implement complex interconnection schemes that are required for some advanced parallel-computing algorithms and that are difficult (and in many cases impractical) to implement in VLSI circuitry. The difficulty of implementation in VLSI and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA were described previously in Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42. To recapitulate: Wherever two wires in a conventional VLSI circuit cross each other and are required not to be in electrical contact with each other, there must be a layer of electrical insulation between them. This, in turn, makes it necessary to resort to a noncoplanar and possibly a multilayer design, which can be complex, expensive, and even impractical. As a result, much of the cost of designing VLSI circuits is associated with minimization of data routing and assignment of layers to minimize crossing of wires. Heretofore, these considerations have impeded the development of VLSI circuitry to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. On the other hand, with suitable design and under suitable operating conditions, QCA-based signal paths can be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. The proposed architectures require two advances in QCA-based circuitry beyond basic QCA-based binary

  16. Teleportation-based realization of an optical quantum two-qubit entangling gate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-Bo; Goebel, Alexander M.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Dai, Han-Ning; Wagenknecht, Claudia; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Bo; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been heightened interest in quantum teleportation, which allows for the transfer of unknown quantum states over arbitrary distances. Quantum teleportation not only serves as an essential ingredient in long-distance quantum communication, but also provides enabling technologies for practical quantum computation. Of particular interest is the scheme proposed by D. Gottesman and I. L. Chuang [(1999) Nature 402:390–393], showing that quantum gates can be implemented by teleporting qubits with the help of some special entangled states. Therefore, the construction of a quantum computer can be simply based on some multiparticle entangled states, Bell-state measurements, and single-qubit operations. The feasibility of this scheme relaxes experimental constraints on realizing universal quantum computation. Using two different methods, we demonstrate the smallest nontrivial module in such a scheme—a teleportation-based quantum entangling gate for two different photonic qubits. One uses a high-fidelity six-photon interferometer to realize controlled-NOT gates, and the other uses four-photon hyperentanglement to realize controlled-Phase gates. The results clearly demonstrate the working principles and the entangling capability of the gates. Our experiment represents an important step toward the realization of practical quantum computers and could lead to many further applications in linear optics quantum information processing. PMID:21098305

  17. Teleportation-based realization of an optical quantum two-qubit entangling gate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei-Bo; Goebel, Alexander M; Lu, Chao-Yang; Dai, Han-Ning; Wagenknecht, Claudia; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Bo; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, there has been heightened interest in quantum teleportation, which allows for the transfer of unknown quantum states over arbitrary distances. Quantum teleportation not only serves as an essential ingredient in long-distance quantum communication, but also provides enabling technologies for practical quantum computation. Of particular interest is the scheme proposed by D. Gottesman and I. L. Chuang [(1999) Nature 402:390-393], showing that quantum gates can be implemented by teleporting qubits with the help of some special entangled states. Therefore, the construction of a quantum computer can be simply based on some multiparticle entangled states, Bell-state measurements, and single-qubit operations. The feasibility of this scheme relaxes experimental constraints on realizing universal quantum computation. Using two different methods, we demonstrate the smallest nontrivial module in such a scheme--a teleportation-based quantum entangling gate for two different photonic qubits. One uses a high-fidelity six-photon interferometer to realize controlled-NOT gates, and the other uses four-photon hyperentanglement to realize controlled-Phase gates. The results clearly demonstrate the working principles and the entangling capability of the gates. Our experiment represents an important step toward the realization of practical quantum computers and could lead to many further applications in linear optics quantum information processing. PMID:21098305

  18. A fault-tolerant one-way quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Raussendorf, R. . E-mail: rraussendorf@perimeterinstitute.ca; Harrington, J.; Goyal, K.

    2006-09-15

    We describe a fault-tolerant one-way quantum computer on cluster states in three dimensions. The presented scheme uses methods of topological error correction resulting from a link between cluster states and surface codes. The error threshold is 1.4% for local depolarizing error and 0.11% for each source in an error model with preparation-, gate-, storage-, and measurement errors.

  19. Universal fault-tolerant adiabatic quantum computing with quantum dots or donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew

    I will present a conceptual design for an adiabatic quantum computer that can achieve arbitrarily accurate universal fault-tolerant quantum computations with a constant energy gap and nearest-neighbor interactions. This machine can run any quantum algorithm known today or discovered in the future, in principle. The key theoretical idea is adiabatic deformation of degenerate ground spaces formed by topological quantum error-correcting codes. An open problem with the design is making the four-body interactions and measurements it uses more technologically accessible. I will present some partial solutions, including one in which interactions between quantum dots or donors in a two-dimensional array can emulate the desired interactions in second-order perturbation theory. I will conclude with some open problems, including the challenge of reformulating Kitaev's gadget perturbation theory technique so that it preserves fault tolerance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Fault-tolerant Holonomic Quantum Computation in Surface Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yicong; Brun, Todd; USC QIP Team Team

    2015-03-01

    We show that universal holonomic quantum computation (HQC) can be achieved by adiabatically deforming the gapped stabilizer Hamiltonian of the surface code, where quantum information is encoded in the degenerate ground space of the system Hamiltonian. We explicitly propose procedures to perform each logical operation, including logical state initialization, logical state measurement, logical CNOT, state injection and distillation,etc. In particular, adiabatic braiding of different types of holes on the surface leads to a topologically protected, non-Abelian geometric logical CNOT. Throughout the computation, quantum information is protected from both small perturbations and low weight thermal excitations by a constant energy gap, and is independent of the system size. Also the Hamiltonian terms have weight at most four during the whole process. The effect of thermal error propagation is considered during the adiabatic code deformation. With the help of active error correction, this scheme is fault-tolerant, in the sense that the computation time can be arbitrarily long for large enough lattice size. It is shown that the frequency of error correction and the physical resources needed can be greatly reduced by the constant energy gap.

  1. Gaussian quantum computation with oracle-decision problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Mark R. A.; Høyer, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.

    2013-04-01

    We study a simple-harmonic-oscillator quantum computer solving oracle decision problems. We show that such computers can perform better by using nonorthogonal Gaussian wave functions rather than orthogonal top-hat wave functions as input to the information encoding process. Using the Deutsch-Jozsa problem as an example, we demonstrate that Gaussian modulation with optimized width parameter results in a lower error rate than for the top-hat encoding. We conclude that Gaussian modulation can allow for an improved trade-off between encoding, processing and measurement of the information.

  2. Wigner Function Negativity and Contextuality in Quantum Computation on Rebits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfosse, Nicolas; Allard Guerin, Philippe; Bian, Jacob; Raussendorf, Robert

    2015-04-01

    We describe a universal scheme of quantum computation by state injection on rebits (states with real density matrices). For this scheme, we establish contextuality and Wigner function negativity as computational resources, extending results of M. Howard et al. [Nature (London) 510, 351 (2014), 10.1038/nature13460] to two-level systems. For this purpose, we define a Wigner function suited to systems of n rebits and prove a corresponding discrete Hudson's theorem. We introduce contextuality witnesses for rebit states and discuss the compatibility of our result with state-independent contextuality.

  3. Towards the fabrication of phosphorus qubits for a silicon quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, R. G.; Dzurak, A. S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, B. E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, M. E.; Brown, G. W.

    2001-10-01

    The quest to build a quantum computer has been inspired by the recognition of the formidable computational power such a device could offer. In particular silicon-based proposals, using the nuclear or electron spin of dopants as qubits, are attractive due to the long spin relaxation times involved, their scalability, and the ease of integration with existing silicon technology. Fabrication of such devices, however, requires atomic scale manipulation - an immense technological challenge. We demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate an atomically precise linear array of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface with the required dimensions for the fabrication of a silicon-based quantum computer. We also discuss strategies for the encapsulation of these phosphorus atoms by subsequent silicon crystal growth.

  4. Secure multiparty computation with a dishonest majority via quantum means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukopoulos, Klearchos; Browne, Daniel E.

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a scheme for secure multiparty computation utilizing the quantum correlations of entangled states. First we present a scheme for two-party computation, exploiting the correlations of a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state to provide, with the help of a third party, a near-private computation scheme. We then present a variation of this scheme which is passively secure with threshold t=2, in other words, remaining secure when pairs of players conspire together provided they faithfully follow the protocol. Furthermore, we show that the passively secure variant can be modified to be secure when cheating parties are allowed to deviate from the protocol. We show that this can be generalized to computations of n-party polynomials of degree 2 with a threshold of n-1. The threshold achieved is significantly higher than the best known classical threshold, which satisfies the bound tquantum secure multiparty computation.

  5. Low Disorder Si MOSFET Dots for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordberg, E. P.; Tracy, L. A.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Eng, K.; Stalford, H. L.; Childs, K. D.; Stevens, J.; Grubbs, R. K.; Lilly, M. P.; Eriksson, M. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2009-03-01

    Silicon quantum dot based qubits have emerged as an appealing approach to extending the success of GaAs spin based double quantum dot qubits. Research in this field is motivated by the promise of long spin coherence times, and within a MOS system the potential for variable carrier density, very small dot sizes, and CMOS compatibility. In this work, we will present results on the fabrication and transport properties of quantum dots in novel double gated Si MOS structures. Coulomb blockade is observed from single quantum dots with extracted charging energies up to an including 5meV. Observed dots were formed both from disorder within a quantum point contact, and through disorder free electrostatic confinement. Extracted capacitances, verified with 3D finite element simulations confirm the location of the disorder free dot to be within the designed lithographic structure. Distinctions will be made regarding the effects of feature sizes and sample processing. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Two dimensional electron systems for solid state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sumit

    Two dimensional electron systems based on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are extremely useful in various scientific investigations of recent times including the search for quantum computational schemes. Although significant strides have been made over the past few years to realize solid state qubits on GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs, there are numerous factors limiting the progress. We attempt to identify factors that have material and design-specific origin and develop ways to overcome them. The thesis is divided in two broad segments. In the first segment we describe the realization of a new field-effect induced two dimensional electron system on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the novel device-design is expected to suppress the level of charge noise present in the device. Modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are utilized extensively in the study of quantum transport in nanostructures, but charge fluctuations associated with remote ionized dopants often produce deleterious effects. Electric field-induced carrier systems offer an attractive alternative if certain challenges can be overcome. We demonstrate a field-effect transistor in which the active channel is locally devoid of modulation-doping, but silicon dopant atoms are retained in the ohmic contact region to facilitate low-resistance contacts. A high quality two-dimensional electron gas is induced by a field-effect that is tunable over a density range of 6.5x10 10cm-2 to 2.6x1011cm-2 . Device design, fabrication, and low temperature (T=0.3K) characterization results are discussed. The demonstrated device-design overcomes several existing limitations in the fabrication of field-induced 2DEGs and might find utility in hosting nanostructures required for making spin qubits. The second broad segment describes our effort to correlate transport parameters measured at T=0.3K to the strength of the fractional quantum Hall state observed at nu=5/2 in the second Landau level of high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional

  7. Effect of Multiphoton Processes on Geometric Quantum Computation in Superconducting Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Yong

    2012-11-01

    We study the influence of multi-photon processes on the geometric quantum computation in the systems of superconducting qubits based on the displacement-like and the general squeezed operator methods. As an example, we focus on the question about how to implement a two-qubit geometric phase gate using superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics with both single- and two-photon interaction between the qubits and the cavity modes. We find that the multiphoton processes are not only controllable but also improve the gating speed. The comparison with other physical systems and experimental feasibility are discussed in detail.

  8. Is the Penning Ion Trap Suitable for Quantum Computation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, J. J.; Kriesel, J. M.; Itano, W. M.; Mitchell, T. B.

    2001-10-01

    There is a great deal of interest in finding a physical system which can perform computations through quantum unitary operations and be scaled to large numbers of qubits. rf ion traps have been used in pioneering experiments on a few qubits. The Penning ion trap has some potential advantages compared to the rf trap. In rf traps, heating and decoherence rates of ion motional states have been observed to scale inversely with the size of the electrodes. Penning traps can have large electrodes while still retaining the large (5-10 MHz) motional frequencies required for quantum logic operations. This is because large static fields are more easily generated than large amplitude rf fields. Addressing of individual ions in the Penning trap is complicated by the plasma rotation, but should be possible with crystallized, planar plasmas controlled by a combination of rotating fields (a ``hard disk" geometry). We will discuss the pros and cons as well as some initial experiments to investigate the suitability of the Penning trap for quantum computation.

  9. Quantum Authentication Scheme Based on Entanglement Swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penghao, Niu; Yuan, Chen; Chong, Li

    2016-01-01

    Based on the entanglement swapping, a quantum authentication scheme with a trusted- party is proposed in this paper. With this scheme, two users can perform mutual identity authentication to confirm each other's validity. In addition, the scheme is proved to be secure under circumstances where a malicious attacker is capable of monitoring the classical and quantum channels and has the power to forge all information on the public channel.

  10. FPGA Based High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Dave; Mason, Jeff; Sundararajan, Prasanna; Dellinger, Erik; Putnam, Andrew; Storaasli, Olaf O

    2008-01-01

    Current high performance computing (HPC) applications are found in many consumer, industrial and research fields. From web searches to auto crash simulations to weather predictions, these applications require large amounts of power by the compute farms and supercomputers required to run them. The demand for more and faster computation continues to increase along with an even sharper increase in the cost of the power required to operate and cool these installations. The ability of standard processor based systems to address these needs has declined in both speed of computation and in power consumption over the past few years. This paper presents a new method of computation based upon programmable logic as represented by Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that addresses these needs in a manner requiring only minimal changes to the current software design environment.

  11. Majorana Fermion Surface Code for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Sagar; Hsieh, Tim; Fu, Liang

    We introduce an exactly solvable model of interacting Majorana fermions realizing Z2 topological order with a Z2 fermion parity grading and lattice symmetries permuting the three fundamental anyon types. We propose a concrete physical realization by utilizing quantum phase slips in an array of Josephson-coupled mesoscopic topological superconductors, which can be implemented in a wide range of solid state systems, including topological insulators, nanowires or two-dimensional electron gases, proximitized by s-wave superconductors. Our model finds a natural application as a Majorana fermion surface code for universal quantum computation, with a single-step stabilizer measurement requiring no physical ancilla qubits, increased error tolerance, and simpler logical gates than a surface code with bosonic physical qubits. We thoroughly discuss protocols for stabilizer measurements, encoding and manipulating logical qubits, and gate implementations.

  12. Majorana Fermion Surface Code for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Sagar; Hsieh, Timothy H.; Fu, Liang

    2015-10-01

    We introduce an exactly solvable model of interacting Majorana fermions realizing Z2 topological order with a Z2 fermion parity grading and lattice symmetries permuting the three fundamental anyon types. We propose a concrete physical realization by utilizing quantum phase slips in an array of Josephson-coupled mesoscopic topological superconductors, which can be implemented in a wide range of solid-state systems, including topological insulators, nanowires, or two-dimensional electron gases, proximitized by s -wave superconductors. Our model finds a natural application as a Majorana fermion surface code for universal quantum computation, with a single-step stabilizer measurement requiring no physical ancilla qubits, increased error tolerance, and simpler logical gates than a surface code with bosonic physical qubits. We thoroughly discuss protocols for stabilizer measurements, encoding and manipulating logical qubits, and gate implementations.

  13. Quantum computer networks with the orbital angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2012-09-01

    Inside computer networks, different information processing tasks are necessary to deliver the user data efficiently. This processing can also be done in the quantum domain. We present simple optical quantum networks where the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a single photon is used as an ancillary degree of freedom which controls decisions at the network level. Linear optical elements are enough to provide important network primitives such as multiplexing and routing. First we show how to build a simple multiplexer and demultiplexer which combine photonic qubits and separate them again at the receiver. We also give two different self-routing networks where the OAM of an input photon is enough to make it find its desired destination.

  14. Percolation, renormalization, and quantum computing with nondeterministic gates.

    PubMed

    Kieling, K; Rudolph, T; Eisert, J

    2007-09-28

    We apply a notion of static renormalization to the preparation of entangled states for quantum computing, exploiting ideas from percolation theory. Such a strategy yields a novel way to cope with the randomness of nondeterministic quantum gates. This is most relevant in the context of optical architectures, where probabilistic gates are common, and cold atoms in optical lattices, where hole defects occur. We demonstrate how to efficiently construct cluster states without the need for rerouting, thereby avoiding a massive amount of conditional dynamics; we furthermore show that except for a single layer of gates during the preparation, all subsequent operations can be shifted to the final adapted single-qubit measurements. Remarkably, cluster state preparation is achieved using essentially the same scaling in resources as if deterministic gates were available. PMID:17930565

  15. Fast and robust quantum computation with ionic Wigner crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrusch, J. D.; Negretti, A.; Taylor, J. M.; Calarco, T.

    2011-04-15

    We present a detailed analysis of the modulated-carrier quantum phase gate implemented with Wigner crystals of ions confined in Penning traps. We elaborate on a recent scheme, proposed by two of the authors, to engineer two-body interactions between ions in such crystals. We analyze the situation in which the cyclotron ({omega}{sub c}) and the crystal rotation ({omega}{sub r}) frequencies do not fulfill the condition {omega}{sub c}=2{omega}{sub r}. It is shown that even in the presence of the magnetic field in the rotating frame the many-body (classical) Hamiltonian describing small oscillations from the ion equilibrium positions can be recast in canonical form. As a consequence, we are able to demonstrate that fast and robust two-qubit gates are achievable within the current experimental limitations. Moreover, we describe a realization of the state-dependent sign-changing dipole forces needed to realize the investigated quantum computing scheme.

  16. A scalable quantum computer with ions in an array of microtraps

    PubMed

    Cirac; Zoller

    2000-04-01

    Quantum computers require the storage of quantum information in a set of two-level systems (called qubits), the processing of this information using quantum gates and a means of final readout. So far, only a few systems have been identified as potentially viable quantum computer models--accurate quantum control of the coherent evolution is required in order to realize gate operations, while at the same time decoherence must be avoided. Examples include quantum optical systems (such as those utilizing trapped ions or neutral atoms, cavity quantum electrodynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance) and solid state systems (using nuclear spins, quantum dots and Josephson junctions). The most advanced candidates are the quantum optical and nuclear magnetic resonance systems, and we expect that they will allow quantum computing with about ten qubits within the next few years. This is still far from the numbers required for useful applications: for example, the factorization of a 200-digit number requires about 3,500 qubits, rising to 100,000 if error correction is implemented. Scalability of proposed quantum computer architectures to many qubits is thus of central importance. Here we propose a model for an ion trap quantum computer that combines scalability (a feature usually associated with solid state proposals) with the advantages of quantum optical systems (in particular, quantum control and long decoherence times). PMID:10766235

  17. Cavity-based architecture to preserve quantum coherence and entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Lo Franco, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Quantum technology relies on the utilization of resources, like quantum coherence and entanglement, which allow quantum information and computation processing. This achievement is however jeopardized by the detrimental effects of the environment surrounding any quantum system, so that finding strategies to protect quantum resources is essential. Non-Markovian and structured environments are useful tools to this aim. Here we show how a simple environmental architecture made of two coupled lossy cavities enables a switch between Markovian and non-Markovian regimes for the dynamics of a qubit embedded in one of the cavity. Furthermore, qubit coherence can be indefinitely preserved if the cavity without qubit is perfect. We then focus on entanglement control of two independent qubits locally subject to such an engineered environment and discuss its feasibility in the framework of circuit quantum electrodynamics. With up-to-date experimental parameters, we show that our architecture allows entanglement lifetimes orders of magnitude longer than the spontaneous lifetime without local cavity couplings. This cavity-based architecture is straightforwardly extendable to many qubits for scalability. PMID:26351004

  18. Cavity-based architecture to preserve quantum coherence and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Lo Franco, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Quantum technology relies on the utilization of resources, like quantum coherence and entanglement, which allow quantum information and computation processing. This achievement is however jeopardized by the detrimental effects of the environment surrounding any quantum system, so that finding strategies to protect quantum resources is essential. Non-Markovian and structured environments are useful tools to this aim. Here we show how a simple environmental architecture made of two coupled lossy cavities enables a switch between Markovian and non-Markovian regimes for the dynamics of a qubit embedded in one of the cavity. Furthermore, qubit coherence can be indefinitely preserved if the cavity without qubit is perfect. We then focus on entanglement control of two independent qubits locally subject to such an engineered environment and discuss its feasibility in the framework of circuit quantum electrodynamics. With up-to-date experimental parameters, we show that our architecture allows entanglement lifetimes orders of magnitude longer than the spontaneous lifetime without local cavity couplings. This cavity-based architecture is straightforwardly extendable to many qubits for scalability. PMID:26351004

  19. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  20. The Computer-based Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Marcia M; Spickard, Anderson W; Wofford, James L

    2001-01-01

    Advancing computer technology, cost-containment pressures, and desire to make innovative improvements in medical education argue for moving learning resources to the computer. A reasonable target for such a strategy is the traditional clinical lecture. The purpose of the lecture, the advantages and disadvantages of “live” versus computer-based lectures, and the technical options in computerizing the lecture deserve attention in developing a cost-effective, complementary learning strategy that preserves the teacher-learner relationship. Based on a literature review of the traditional clinical lecture, we build on the strengths of the lecture format and discuss strategies for converting the lecture to a computer-based learning presentation. PMID:11520384

  1. A Novel Strategy for Quantum Image Steganography Based on Moiré Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Luo

    2015-03-01

    Image steganography technique is widely used to realize the secrecy transmission. Although its strategies on classical computers have been extensively researched, there are few studies on such strategies on quantum computers. Therefore, in this paper, a novel, secure and keyless steganography approach for images on quantum computers is proposed based on Moiré pattern. Algorithms based on the Moiré pattern are proposed for binary image embedding and extraction. Based on the novel enhanced quantum representation of digital images (NEQR), recursive and progressively layered quantum circuits for embedding and extraction operations are designed. In the end, experiments are done to verify the validity and robustness of proposed methods, which confirms that the approach in this paper is effective in quantum image steganography strategy.

  2. An inter-bank E-payment protocol based on quantum proxy blind signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Chen, Yongzhi; Fang, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    Security and anonymity are essential to E-payment systems. However, with the increasing computing power, existing E-payment systems will gradually become insecure. In this paper, we propose an inter-bank E-payment system which is based on quantum proxy blind signature. Adopting the techniques of quantum key distribution, one-time pad and quantum proxy blind signature, our quantum E-payment system could protect user's anonymity as the traditional E-payment systems do, and also have unconditional security which the classical E-payment systems cannot provide. Furthermore, compared with the existing quantum E-payment systems, the proposed system could support inter-bank transactions.

  3. Norm-based measurement of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchun; Guo Guangcan

    2011-06-15

    In this paper we derived a necessary and sufficient condition for classical correlated states and proposed a norm-based measurement Q of quantum correlation. Using the max norm of operators, we gave the expression of the quantum correlation measurement Q and investigated the dynamics of Q in Markovian and non-Markovian cases, respectively. Q decays exponentially and vanishes only asymptotically in the Markovian case and causes periodical death and rebirth in the non-Markovian case. In the pure state, the quantum correlation Q is always larger than the entanglement, which was different from other known measurements. In addition, we showed that locally broadcastable and broadcastable are equivalent and reproved the density of quantum correlated states.

  4. Schedule path optimization for adiabatic quantum computing and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lishan; Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2016-04-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing and optimization have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent hardware implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. As a part of this study we develop a convex optimization formulation of the search for optimal adiabatic schedules that makes this computation more tractable, and which may be of independent interest. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount.

  5. Two results in topology, motivated by quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagic, Gorjan

    2015-03-01

    The field of quantum computation is built on the foundation of physics, mathematics, and computer science. While it has taken much from these fields, there are also interesting examples where it has given back. I will discuss two new results of this kind. In both cases, we use very basic ideas from quantum computation to prove an interesting fact about low-dimensional topology. First, we use the Solovay-Kitaev universality theorem with exponential precision to give a simple proof of the #P-hardness of certain 3-manifold invariants. We then apply this result to show the existence of rather exotic 3-manifold diagrams. Second, we show a relationship between the distinguishing power of a link invariant, and the entangling power of the linear operator associated to braiding. More precisely, we show that link invariants derived from non-entangling solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation are trivial. The former is joint work with Catharine Lo (Caltech), and the latter is joint work with Stephen Jordan and Michael Jarett (UMD).

  6. Perspective on quantum computation from topos and sheaf theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, William D.

    1997-07-01

    The forcing process from mathematical logic offers a promising framework for studying the feasibility of quantum computation on a practical scale, since decoherence is a serious concern and, so far, questions of control, communication, and the implementation of operations that are important for a working computational system have received less attention than mathematical research on algorithms and basic physical investigations of creating simple gates and storing mixed states. Using forcing in this way is a new application of areas of model theory in which propositions and predicates take values in a lattice. Takeuti develops set theory for any universe built on a Boolean algebra generated by commutable projection operators on a Hilbert space, each such universe being a elementary topos of set- valued sheaves on the algebra, which thus is the lattice of truth values for the topos. Since it has a natural numbers object, it thus supports the general forcing method of Scedrov, but the idea of forcing is demonstrated by an example in the simpler context of partially ordered sets. Stout's lamination construction assembles toposes into objects with truth-value lattices that are orthomodular, like the lattice of all projection operators on Hilbert space, and clarifies some difficulties identified by Takeuti in the case where truth values are noncommutable operators. A substantial body of existing sheaf and topos theory thus is potentially relevant to quantum computation, and further work may provide guidance for system development.

  7. Silicon based quantum dot hybrid qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun

    2015-03-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of an electron constitute natural bases for constructing quantum two level systems, or qubits, in semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dot charge qubit offers a simple architecture and high-speed operation, but generally suffers from fast dephasing due to strong coupling of the environment to the electron's charge. On the other hand, quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, but their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications. This talk will present experimental progress of a `hybrid' qubit, formed by three electrons in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, which combines desirable characteristics (speed and coherence) in the past found separately in qubits based on either charge or spin degrees of freedom. Using resonant microwaves, we first discuss qubit operations near the `sweet spot' for charge qubit operation. Along with fast (>GHz) manipulation rates for any rotation axis on the Bloch sphere, we implement two independent tomographic characterization schemes in the charge qubit regime: traditional quantum process tomography (QPT) and gate set tomography (GST). We also present resonant qubit operations of the hybrid qubit performed on the same device, DC pulsed gate operations of which were recently demonstrated. We demonstrate three-axis control and the implementation of dynamic decoupling pulse sequences. Performing QPT on the hybrid qubit, we show that AC gating yields π rotation process fidelities higher than 93% for X-axis and 96% for Z-axis rotations, which demonstrates efficient quantum control of semiconductor qubits using resonant microwaves. We discuss a path forward for achieving fidelities better than the threshold for quantum error correction using surface codes. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028), and by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  8. Heralded linear optical quantum Fredkin gate based on one auxiliary qubit and one single photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chang-Hua; Cao, Xin; Quan, Dong-Xiao; Pei, Chang-Xing

    2014-08-01

    Linear optical quantum Fredkin gate can be applied to quantum computing and quantum multi-user communication networks. In the existing linear optical scheme, two single photon detectors (SPDs) are used to herald the success of the quantum Fredkin gate while they have no photon count. But analysis results show that for non-perfect SPD, the lower the detector efficiency, the higher the heralded success rate by this scheme is. We propose an improved linear optical quantum Fredkin gate by designing a new heralding scheme with an auxiliary qubit and only one SPD, in which the higher the detection efficiency of the heralding detector, the higher the success rate of the gate is. The new heralding scheme can also work efficiently under a non-ideal single photon source. Based on this quantum Fredkin gate, large-scale quantum switching networks can be built. As an example, a quantum Beneš network is shown in which only one SPD is used.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  10. A cascadic monotonic time-discretized algorithm for finite-level quantum control computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditz, P.; Borzi`, A.

    2008-03-01

    A computer package (CNMS) is presented aimed at the solution of finite-level quantum optimal control problems. This package is based on a recently developed computational strategy known as monotonic schemes. Quantum optimal control problems arise in particular in quantum optics where the optimization of a control representing laser pulses is required. The purpose of the external control field is to channel the system's wavefunction between given states in its most efficient way. Physically motivated constraints, such as limited laser resources, are accommodated through appropriately chosen cost functionals. Program summaryProgram title: CNMS Catalogue identifier: ADEB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADEB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 770 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7098 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB 6 Computer: AMD Athlon 64 × 2 Dual, 2:21 GHz, 1:5 GB RAM Operating system: Microsoft Windows XP Word size: 32 Classification: 4.9 Nature of problem: Quantum control Solution method: Iterative Running time: 60-600 sec

  11. Computational Investigation of Quantum Size Effects in Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Electron density perturbation from carbon monoxide adsorption on a multi-hundred atom gold nanoparticle. The perturbation causes significant quantum size effects in CO catalysis on gold particles. Science: Jeff Greeley and Nick Romero, Argonne National Laboratory; Jesper Kleis, Karsten Jacobsen, Jens Nørskov, Technical University of Denmark
 Visualization: Joseph Insley, Argonne National Laboratory This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. Paper-Based and Computer-Based Concept Mappings: The Effects on Computer Achievement, Computer Anxiety and Computer Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Yavuz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of paper-based and computer-based concept mappings on computer hardware achievement, computer anxiety and computer attitude of the eight grade secondary school students. The students were randomly allocated to three groups and were given instruction on computer hardware. The teaching methods used…

  13. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  14. Recent progress of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Sei

    2015-03-10

    We review the recent progress of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing was proposed as a method to solve generic optimization problems. Recently a Canadian company has drawn a great deal of attention, as it has commercialized a quantum computer based on quantum annealing. Although the performance of quantum annealing is not sufficiently understood, it is likely that quantum annealing will be a practical method both on a conventional computer and on a quantum computer.

  15. Comparison studies of infrared photodetectors with a quantum-dot and a quantum-wire base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tokhy, M. S.; Mahmoud, I. I.; Konber, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper mainly presents a theoretical analysis for the characteristics of quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) and quantum wire infrared photodetectors (QRIPs). The paper introduces a unique mathematical model of solving Poisson's equations with the usage of Lambert W functions for infrared detectors' structures based on quantum effects. Even though QRIPs and QDIPs have been the subject of extensive researches and development during the past decade, it is still essential to implement theoretical models allowing to estimate the ultimate performance of those detectors such as photocurrent and its figure-of-merit detectivity vs. various parameter conditions such as applied voltage, number of quantum wire layers, quantum dot layers, lateral characteristic size, doping density, operation temperature, and structural parameters of the quantum dots (QDs), and quantum wires (QRs). A comparison is made between the computed results of the implemented models and fine agreements are observed. It is concluded from the obtained results that the total detectivity of QDIPs can be significantly lower than that in the QRIPs and main features of the QRIPs such as large gap between the induced photocurrent and dark current of QRIP which allows for overcoming the problems in the QDIPs. This confirms what is evaluated before in the literature. It is evident that by increasing the QD/QR absorption volume in QDIPs/QRIPs as well as by separating the dark current and photocurrents, the specific detectivity can be improved and consequently the devices can operate at higher temperatures. It is an interesting result and it may be benefit to the development of QDIP and QRIP for infrared sensing applications.

  16. Robust quantum gates and a bus architecture for quantum computing with rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wesenberg, Janus; Moelmer, Klaus

    2003-07-01

    We present a composite pulse controlled phase gate which, together with a bus architecture, improves the feasibility of a recent quantum computing proposal based on rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. The proposed gate operation is tolerant to variations between ions of coupling strengths, pulse lengths, and frequency shifts. In the absence of decoherence effects, it achieves worst case fidelities above 0.999 with relative variations in coupling strength as high as 10% and frequency shifts up to several percent of the resonant Rabi frequency of the laser used to implement the gate. We outline an experiment to demonstrate the creation and detection of maximally entangled states in the system.

  17. Topological quantum computation of the Dold-Thom functor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2014-05-01

    A possible topological quantum computation of the Dold-Thom functor is presented. The method that will be used is the following: a) Certain 1+1-topological quantum field theories valued in symmetric bimonoidal categories are converted into stable homotopical data, using a machinery recently introduced by Elmendorf and Mandell; b) we exploit, in this framework, two recent results (independent of each other) on refinements of Khovanov homology: our refinement into a module over the connective k-theory spectrum and a stronger result by Lipshitz and Sarkar refining Khovanov homology into a stable homotopy type; c) starting from the Khovanov homotopy the Dold-Thom functor is constructed; d) the full construction is formulated as a topological quantum algorithm. It is conjectured that the Jones polynomial can be described as the analytical index of certain Dirac operator defined in the context of the Khovanov homotopy using the Dold-Thom functor. As a line for future research is interesting to study the corresponding supersymmetric model for which the Khovanov-Dirac operator plays the role of a supercharge.

  18. Ion traps, quantum computing, and the measurement problem^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a useful information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high- fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. NIST and other groups are addressing this scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly- parallel processing. As the number of qubits increases, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics becomes more glaring; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on this fundamental issue. Recent NIST work in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, J. Chiaverini, R. E. Drullinger, R. Epstein, D. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, J. Koelemeij, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, R. Reichle, T. Rosenband, P. O. Schmidt, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. Wesenberg, and supported by DTO, ONR, and NIST.

  19. Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Mathew

    2003-01-01

    A proposed integrated circuit based on quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) would function as a bit-serial adder. This circuit would serve as a prototype building block for demonstrating the feasibility of quantum-dots computing and for the further development of increasingly complex and increasingly capable quantum-dots computing circuits. QCA-based bit-serial adders would be especially useful in that they would enable the development of highly parallel and systolic processors for implementing fast Fourier, cosine, Hartley, and wavelet transforms. The proposed circuit would complement the QCA-based circuits described in "Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots" (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42 and "Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots" (NPO-20855), which appears elsewhere in this issue. Those articles described the limitations of very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) circuitry and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA. To recapitulate: In a VLSI circuit, signal paths that are required not to interact with each other must not cross in the same plane. In contrast, for reasons too complex to describe in the limited space available for this article, suitably designed and operated QCA-based signal paths that are required not to interact with each other can nevertheless be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. To enable a meaningful description of the proposed bit-serial adder, it is necessary to further recapitulate the description of a quantum-dot cellular automation from the first-mentioned prior article: A quantum-dot cellular automaton contains four quantum dots positioned at the corners of a square cell. The cell contains two extra mobile electrons that can tunnel (in the

  20. P/NP, and the Quantum Field Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    The central problem is computer science is the conjecture that two complexity classes, P (polynomial time) and NP (nondeterministic polynomial time-roughly those decision problems for which a proposed solution can be checked in polynomial time), are distinct in the standard Turing model of computation: P neq NP. As a generality, we propose that each physical theory supports computational models whose power is limited by the physical theory. It is well known that classical physics supports a multitude of implementation of the Turning machine. Non-Abelian topological quantum field theories exhibit the mathematical features necessary to support a model capable of solving all #P problems, a computationally intractable class, in polynomial time. Specifically, Witten [Witten, E. (1989) Commun. Math. Phys. 121, 351-391] has identified expectation values in a certain SU(2)-field theory with values of the Jones polynomial [Jones, V. (1985) Bull. Am. Math. Soc. 12, 103-111] that are #P-hard [Jaeger, F., Vertigen, D. & Welsh, D. (1990) Math. Proc. Comb. Philos. Soc. 108, 35-53]. This suggests that some physical system whose effective Lagrangian contains a non-Abelian topological term might be manipulated to serve as an analog computer capable of solving NP or even #P-hard problems in polynomial time. Defining such a system and addressing the accuracy issues inherent in preparation and measurement is a major unsolved problem.

  1. P/NP, and the quantum field computer

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    The central problem in computer science is the conjecture that two complexity classes, P (polynomial time) and NP (nondeterministic polynomial time—roughly those decision problems for which a proposed solution can be checked in polynomial time), are distinct in the standard Turing model of computation: P ≠ NP. As a generality, we propose that each physical theory supports computational models whose power is limited by the physical theory. It is well known that classical physics supports a multitude of implementation of the Turing machine. Non-Abelian topological quantum field theories exhibit the mathematical features necessary to support a model capable of solving all ⧣P problems, a computationally intractable class, in polynomial time. Specifically, Witten [Witten, E. (1989) Commun. Math. Phys. 121, 351–391] has identified expectation values in a certain SU(2)-field theory with values of the Jones polynomial [Jones, V. (1985) Bull. Am. Math. Soc. 12, 103–111] that are ⧣P-hard [Jaeger, F., Vertigen, D. & Welsh, D. (1990) Math. Proc. Comb. Philos. Soc. 108, 35–53]. This suggests that some physical system whose effective Lagrangian contains a non-Abelian topological term might be manipulated to serve as an analog computer capable of solving NP or even ⧣P-hard problems in polynomial time. Defining such a system and addressing the accuracy issues inherent in preparation and measurement is a major unsolved problem. PMID:9419335

  2. Quantum key distribution using card, base station and trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Peterson, Charles Glen; Rosenberg, Danna; McCabe, Kevin Peter; Tyagi, Kush T; Dallman, Nicholas

    2015-04-07

    Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution ("QKD") between a quantum communication ("QC") card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trusted authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.

  3. Approximating ground and excited state energies on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadfield, Stuart; Papageorgiou, Anargyros

    2015-04-01

    Approximating ground and a fixed number of excited state energies, or equivalently low-order Hamiltonian eigenvalues, is an important but computationally hard problem. Typically, the cost of classical deterministic algorithms grows exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom. Under general conditions, and using a perturbation approach, we provide a quantum algorithm that produces estimates of a constant number of different low-order eigenvalues. The algorithm relies on a set of trial eigenvectors, whose construction depends on the particular Hamiltonian properties. We illustrate our results by considering a special case of the time-independent Schrödinger equation with degrees of freedom. Our algorithm computes estimates of a constant number of different low-order eigenvalues with error and success probability at least , with cost polynomial in and . This extends our earlier results on algorithms for estimating the ground state energy. The technique we present is sufficiently general to apply to problems beyond the application studied in this paper.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace with transitionless quantum driving algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue-Ke; Zhang, Hao; Ai, Qing; Qiu, Jing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-01

    By using transitionless quantum driving algorithm (TQDA), we present an efficient scheme for the shortcuts to the holonomic quantum computation (HQC). It works in decoherence-free subspace (DFS) and the adiabatic process can be speeded up in the shortest possible time. More interestingly, we give a physical implementation for our shortcuts to HQC with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamonds dispersively coupled to a whispering-gallery mode microsphere cavity. It can be efficiently realized by controlling appropriately the frequencies of the external laser pulses. Also, our scheme has good scalability with more qubits. Different from previous works, we first use TQDA to realize a universal HQC in DFS, including not only two noncommuting accelerated single-qubit holonomic gates but also a accelerated two-qubit holonomic controlled-phase gate, which provides the necessary shortcuts for the complete set of gates required for universal quantum computation. Moreover, our experimentally realizable shortcuts require only two-body interactions, not four-body ones, and they work in the dispersive regime, which relax greatly the difficulty of their physical implementation in experiment. Our numerical calculations show that the present scheme is robust against decoherence with current experimental parameters.

  5. Quantum Mechanics Based Multiscale Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2013-03-01

    We present two quantum mechanics based multiscale approaches that can simulate extended defects in metals accurately and efficiently. The first approach (QCDFT) can treat multimillion atoms effectively via density functional theory (DFT). The method is an extension of the original quasicontinuum approach with DFT as its sole energetic formulation. The second method (QM/MM) has to do with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics coupling based on the constrained density functional theory, which provides an exact framework for a self-consistent quantum mechanical embedding. Several important materials problems will be addressed using the multiscale modeling approaches, including hydrogen-assisted cracking in Al, magnetism-controlled dislocation properties in Fe and Si pipe diffusion along Al dislocation core. We acknowledge the support from the Office of Navel Research and the Army Research Office.

  6. Quantum Error Correction and the Future of Solid State Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divincenzo, David

    Quantum error correction (QEC) theory has provided a very challenging but well defined goal for the further development of solid state qubit systems: achieve high enough fidelity so that fault-tolerant, error-corrected quantum computation in networks of these qubits becomes possible. I will begin by touching on some historical points: initial work on QEC is actually more than 20 years old, and the landmark work of Kitaev in 1996 which established 2D lattice structures as a suitable host for effective error correction, has its roots in theoretical work in many-body theory from Wegner in the 1970s. I will give some perspective on current developments in the implementation of small fragments of the surface code. The surface-code concept has driven a number of distinct requirements, beyond the reduction of error rates below the 1% range, that are actively considered as experiments are scaled beyond the 10-qubit level. Support of JARA FIT is acknolwedged.

  7. Practical position-based quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Leverrier, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    We study a general family of quantum protocols for position verification and present a class of attacks based on the Clifford hierarchy. These attacks outperform current strategies based on port-based teleportation for a large class of practical protocols. We then introduce the interleaved product protocol, a scheme for position verification involving only the preparation and measurement of single qubit states for which the best available attacks have a complexity exponential in the number of classical bits transmitted.

  8. Six-qubit two-photon hyperentangled cluster states: Characterization and application to quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Donati, Gaia; Ceccarelli, Raino; Mataloni, Paolo

    2010-05-15

    Six-qubit cluster states built on the simultaneous entanglement of two photons in three independent degrees of freedom, that is, polarization and a double longitudinal momentum, have been recently demonstrated. We present here the peculiar entanglement properties of the linear cluster state |L-tildeC{sub 6}> related to the three degrees of freedom. This state has been adopted to realize various kinds of controlled not (cnot) gates, obtaining high values of the fidelity of the expected output states for all considered cases. Our results demonstrate that these states may represent a promising approach toward scalable quantum computation in a medium-term time scale. The future perspectives of a hybrid approach to one-way quantum computing based on multiple degrees of freedom and multiphoton cluster states are also discussed in the conclusion of this article.

  9. Towards a scalable quantum computation platform with solid-state spins in low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wengang

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center can be treated as an ``ion'' trapped in the diamond lattice. An electron spin triplet ground state (S = 1) of NV center can be polarized, coherently manipulated and detected. Together with hyperfine-coupled proximal Carbon-13 and Nitrogen-14 (15) nuclear spins, NV center acts as a promising platform for large scale quantum computation platform at room temperature. By cooling down the diamond to liquid-helium temperature (4K), phonons can be largely suppressed, giving us much longer spin relaxation time (T1) and coherence time (T2) compared with room temperature, and a possibility to readout electron spin state in a single shot. Here we report our progress in building up a prototype for a scalable diamond based quantum computer.

  10. Results of Computer Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This report compares the projected savings of using computer based training to conduct training for newly hired pilots to the results of that application. New Hire training, one of a number of programs conducted continuously at the United Airline Flight Operations Training Center, is designed to assure that any newly hired pilot will be able to…

  11. Computer-Based Career Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mau, Wei-Cheng

    The possible utilities and limitations of computer-assisted career guidance systems (CACG) have been widely discussed although the effectiveness of CACG has not been systematically considered. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a theory-based CACG program, integrating Sequential Elimination and Expected Utility strategies. Three types of…

  12. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  13. Index to Computer Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoye, Robert E., Ed.; Wang, Anastasia C., Ed.

    The computer-based programs and projects described in this index are listed under 98 different subject matter fields. Descrptions of programs include information on: subject field, program name and number, author, source, the program's curriculum content, prerequisites, level of instruction, type of student for which it is intended, total hours of…

  14. Authenticated Quantum Dialogue Based on Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Ying; Yang, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes an authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD) based on Bell states, allowing two communicants to perform mutual authentication and secure bidirectional communications simultaneously via public classical channels. Compared with the other AQDs, the proposed protocol is free from information leakage and is secure under several well-known attacks.

  15. Topological and geometrical quantum computation in cohesive Khovanov homotopy type theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2015-05-01

    The recently proposed Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory is exploited as a formal foundation for central concepts in Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. Specifically the Cohesive Homotopy Type Theory provides a formal, logical approach to concepts like smoothness, cohomology and Khovanov homology; and such approach permits to clarify the quantum algorithms in the context of Topological and Geometrical Quantum Computation. In particular we consider the so-called "open-closed stringy topological quantum computer" which is a theoretical topological quantum computer that employs a system of open-closed strings whose worldsheets are open-closed cobordisms. The open-closed stringy topological computer is able to compute the Khovanov homology for tangles and for hence it is a universal quantum computer given than any quantum computation is reduced to an instance of computation of the Khovanov homology for tangles. The universal algebra in this case is the Frobenius Algebra and the possible open-closed stringy topological quantum computers are forming a symmetric monoidal category which is equivalent to the category of knowledgeable Frobenius algebras. Then the mathematical design of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer is involved with computations and theorem proving for generalized Frobenius algebras. Such computations and theorem proving can be performed automatically using the Automated Theorem Provers with the TPTP language and the SMT-solver Z3 with the SMT-LIB language. Some examples of application of ATPs and SMT-solvers in the mathematical setup of an open-closed stringy topological quantum computer will be provided.

  16. Opportunistic quantum network coding based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Du, Gang; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    It seems impossible to endow opportunistic characteristic to quantum network on the basis that quantum channel cannot be overheard without disturbance. In this paper, we propose an opportunistic quantum network coding scheme by taking full advantage of channel characteristic of quantum teleportation. Concretely, it utilizes quantum channel for secure transmission of quantum states and can detect eavesdroppers by means of quantum channel verification. What is more, it utilizes classical channel for both opportunistic listening to neighbor states and opportunistic coding by broadcasting measurement outcome. Analysis results show that our scheme can reduce the times of transmissions over classical channels for relay nodes and can effectively defend against classical passive attack and quantum active attack.

  17. From non-Abelian anyons to quantum computation to coin-flipping by telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochon, Carlos

    Following their divorce, Alice and Bob would like to split some of their possessions by flipping a coin. Unwilling to meet in person, and without a trusted third party, they must figure out a scheme to flip the coin over a telephone that guarantees that neither party can cheat. The preceding scenario is the traditional definition of two-party coin-flipping. In a classical setting, without limits on the available computational power, one player can always guarantee a coin-flipping victory by cheating. However, by employing quantum communication it is possible to guarantee, with only information-theoretic assumptions, that neither party can win by cheating, with a probability greater than two thirds. Along with the description of such a protocol, this thesis derives a tight lower bound on the bias for a large family of quantum weak coin-flipping protocols, proving such a protocol optimal within the family. The protocol described herein is an improvement and generalization of one examined by Spekkens and Rudolph. The key steps of the analysis involve Kitaev's description of quantum coin-flipping as a semidefinite program whose dual problem provides a certificate that upper bounds the amount of cheating for each party. In order for such quantum protocols to be viable, though, a number of practical obstacles involving the communication and processing of quantum information must be resolved. In the second half of this thesis, a scheme for processing quantum information is presented, which uses non-abelian anyons that are the magnetic and electric excitations of a discrete-group quantum gauge theory. In particular, the connections between group structure and computational power are examined, generalizing previous work by Kitaev, Ogburn and Preskill. Anyon based computation has the advantage of being topological, which exponentially suppresses the rate of decoherence and the errors associated with the elementary quantum gates. Though no physical systems with such

  18. Arbitrated quantum signature scheme based on cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Lei, He; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-03-01

    Cluster states can be exploited for some tasks such as topological one-way computation, quantum error correction, teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate and propose an arbitrated quantum signature scheme with cluster states. The cluster states are used for quantum key distribution and quantum signature. The proposed scheme can achieve an efficiency of 100 %. Finally, we also discuss its security against various attacks.

  19. Arbitrated quantum signature scheme based on cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Lei, He; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-06-01

    Cluster states can be exploited for some tasks such as topological one-way computation, quantum error correction, teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate and propose an arbitrated quantum signature scheme with cluster states. The cluster states are used for quantum key distribution and quantum signature. The proposed scheme can achieve an efficiency of 100 %. Finally, we also discuss its security against various attacks.

  20. Quantum computational capability of a 2D valence bond solid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Akimasa

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Our model is the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet. > Universal quantum computation is processed by measurements of quantum correlations. > An intrinsic complexity of strongly-correlated quantum systems could be a resource. - Abstract: Quantum phases of naturally-occurring systems exhibit distinctive collective phenomena as manifestation of their many-body correlations, in contrast to our persistent technological challenge to engineer at will such strong correlations artificially. Here we show theoretically that quantum correlations exhibited in the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet, modeled by Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki (AKLT) as a precursor of spin liquids and topological orders, are sufficiently complex yet structured enough to simulate universal quantum computation when every single spin can be measured individually. This unveils that an intrinsic complexity of naturally-occurring 2D quantum systems-which has been a long-standing challenge for traditional computers-could be tamed as a computationally valuable resource, even if we are limited not to create newly entanglement during computation. Our constructive protocol leverages a novel way to herald the correlations suitable for deterministic quantum computation through a random sampling, and may be extensible to other ground states of various 2D valence bond phases beyond the AKLT state.

  1. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  2. Quantum computing over long time scales in a singly charged quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo

    In this thesis, we will study the continuous wave optical spectroscopy of self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs), focusing on the use of these dots toward quantum computing and information processing applications. Probing the strong field interaction between an intense optical pump beam and a neutral quantum dot will reveal Autler-Townes splitting and Mollow absorption spectrum. The presence of these two phenomenon confirm the isolated nature of the exciton trapped in the quantum dot and the suppression of many-body physics due to exciton confinement. This curbs the decoherence caused by exciton-exciton interactions in higher dimensional heterostructures. After confirming the atom-like nature of the SAQD, we then charge the SAQD with a single electron and use the electron spin as our qubit. By applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample growth direction, we turn on the spin flip Raman transitions and create two lambda (Λ) systems that can be used to coherently manipulate the spin. A single laser resonant with one of the transitions can quickly initialize the spin state via optical pumping while two lasers, one on each leg of the lambda, can initialize the spin into an arbitrary superposition state through coherent population trapping. The developed dark state spectroscopy is then used to demonstrate interaction between the optically generated hole spin with the background nuclear spins. This hole assisted dynamic nuclear polarization creates a feedback mechanism which locks the nuclear field to the laser detunings and suppresses nuclear spin fluctuations. We use dark state spectroscopy to measure a two orders of magnitude increase of the electron spin coherence time, a result of the narrowing of the nuclear field distribution. Furthermore, we find that this nuclear spin narrowing can persist in the dark, without laser interaction, for well over 1s even in the presence of a fluctuating electron charge and electron spin polarization. We have opened the door

  3. Distillation of nonstabilizer states for universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos-Cianci, Guillaume; Svore, Krysta M.

    2013-10-01

    Magic-state distillation is a fundamental technique for realizing fault-tolerant universal quantum computing and produces high-fidelity Clifford eigenstates, called magic states, which can be used to implement the non-Clifford π/8 gate. We propose an efficient protocol for distilling other nonstabilizer states that requires only Clifford operations, measurement, and magic states. One critical application of our protocol is efficiently and fault-tolerantly implementing arbitrary, non-Clifford, single-qubit rotations in, on average, constant online circuit depth and polylogarithmic (in precision) offline resource cost, resulting in significant improvements over state-of-the-art decomposition techniques. Finally, we show that our protocol is robust to noise in the resource states.

  4. Universal holonomic quantum computing with cat-codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of ``colliding'' two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems which support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  5. High-fidelity linear optical quantum computing with polarization encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Spedalieri, Federico M.; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-15

    We show that the KLM scheme [Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn, Nature 409, 46 (2001)] can be implemented using polarization encoding, thus reducing the number of path modes required by half. One of the main advantages of this new implementation is that it naturally incorporates a loss detection mechanism that makes the probability of a gate introducing a non-detected error, when non-ideal detectors are considered, dependent only on the detector dark-count rate and independent of its efficiency. Since very low dark-count rate detectors are currently available, a high-fidelity gate (probability of error of order 10{sup -6} conditional on the gate being successful) can be implemented using polarization encoding. The detector efficiency determines the overall success probability of the gate but does not affect its fidelity. This can be applied to the efficient construction of optical cluster states with very high fidelity for quantum computing.

  6. What can quantum optics say about computational complexity theory?

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Lund, Austin P; Ralph, Timothy C

    2015-02-13

    Considering the problem of sampling from the output photon-counting probability distribution of a linear-optical network for input Gaussian states, we obtain results that are of interest from both quantum theory and the computational complexity theory point of view. We derive a general formula for calculating the output probabilities, and by considering input thermal states, we show that the output probabilities are proportional to permanents of positive-semidefinite Hermitian matrices. It is believed that approximating permanents of complex matrices in general is a #P-hard problem. However, we show that these permanents can be approximated with an algorithm in the BPP^{NP} complexity class, as there exists an efficient classical algorithm for sampling from the output probability distribution. We further consider input squeezed-vacuum states and discuss the complexity of sampling from the probability distribution at the output. PMID:25723196

  7. Spin-bus concept of spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mehring, Michael; Mende, Jens

    2006-05-15

    We present a spin-bus concept of quantum computing where an electron spin S=1/2 acts as a bus qubit connected to a finite number N of nuclear spins I=1/2 serving as client qubits. Spin-bus clusters are considered as local processing units and may be interconnected with other spin-bus clusters via electron-electron coupling in a scaled up version. Here we lay the ground for the basic functional unit with long qubit registers, provide the theory and experimental verification of correlated qubit states, and demonstrate the Deutsch algorithm. Experiments were performed on a qubyte plus one nuclear spin in a solid state system.

  8. Web-based hydrodynamics computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoide, Alan; Lin, Luping; Hong, Tracie-Lynne; Yoon, Ilmi; Aragon, Sergio R.

    2005-01-01

    Proteins are long chains of amino acids that have a definite 3-d conformation and the shape of each protein is vital to its function. Since proteins are normally in solution, hydrodynamics (describes the movement of solvent around a protein as a function of shape and size of the molecule) can be used to probe the size and shape of proteins compared to those derived from X-ray crystallography. The computation chain needed for these hydrodynamics calculations consists of several separate programs by different authors on various platforms and often requires 3D visualizations of intermediate results. Due to the complexity, tools developed by a particular research group are not readily available for use by other groups, nor even by the non-experts within the same research group. To alleviate this situation, and to foment the easy and wide distribution of computational tools worldwide, we developed a web based interactive computational environment (WICE) including interactive 3D visualization that can be used with any web browser. Java based technologies were used to provide a platform neutral, user-friendly solution. Java Server Pages (JSP), Java Servlets, Java Beans, JOGL (Java bindings for OpenGL), and Java Web Start were used to create a solution that simplifies the computing chain for the user allowing the user to focus on their scientific research. WICE hides complexity from the user and provides robust and sophisticated visualization through a web browser.

  9. Web-based hydrodynamics computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoide, Alan; Lin, Luping; Hong, Tracie-Lynne; Yoon, Ilmi; Aragon, Sergio R.

    2004-12-01

    Proteins are long chains of amino acids that have a definite 3-d conformation and the shape of each protein is vital to its function. Since proteins are normally in solution, hydrodynamics (describes the movement of solvent around a protein as a function of shape and size of the molecule) can be used to probe the size and shape of proteins compared to those derived from X-ray crystallography. The computation chain needed for these hydrodynamics calculations consists of several separate programs by different authors on various platforms and often requires 3D visualizations of intermediate results. Due to the complexity, tools developed by a particular research group are not readily available for use by other groups, nor even by the non-experts within the same research group. To alleviate this situation, and to foment the easy and wide distribution of computational tools worldwide, we developed a web based interactive computational environment (WICE) including interactive 3D visualization that can be used with any web browser. Java based technologies were used to provide a platform neutral, user-friendly solution. Java Server Pages (JSP), Java Servlets, Java Beans, JOGL (Java bindings for OpenGL), and Java Web Start were used to create a solution that simplifies the computing chain for the user allowing the user to focus on their scientific research. WICE hides complexity from the user and provides robust and sophisticated visualization through a web browser.

  10. Estimating Turaev-Viro three-manifold invariants is universal for quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Alagic, Gorjan; Reichardt, Ben W.; Jordan, Stephen P.; Koenig, Robert

    2010-10-15

    The Turaev-Viro invariants are scalar topological invariants of compact, orientable 3-manifolds. We give a quantum algorithm for additively approximating Turaev-Viro invariants of a manifold presented by a Heegaard splitting. The algorithm is motivated by the relationship between topological quantum computers and (2+1)-dimensional topological quantum field theories. Its accuracy is shown to be nontrivial, as the same algorithm, after efficient classical preprocessing, can solve any problem efficiently decidable by a quantum computer. Thus approximating certain Turaev-Viro invariants of manifolds presented by Heegaard splittings is a universal problem for quantum computation. This establishes a relation between the task of distinguishing nonhomeomorphic 3-manifolds and the power of a general quantum computer.

  11. Computational studies of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Grigory

    This thesis presents a computational study of quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells. First part deals with the non-equilibrium many-body theory or non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory. In this approach I study electron dynamics in the quantum-dot sensitized solar cell subjected to time-dependent fields. NEGF theory, because it does not impose any conditions on a perturbation, is the fundamental one to describe ultrafast processes in small, strongly correlated systems and/or in strong fields. In this research I do not only perform analytical derivation, but also design and implement spectral numerical solution for the resulting complex system of partial integrodifferential equations. This numerical solution yielded an order of magnitude speedup over the methods used previously in the field. The forth chapter of this thesis deals with calculation of optical properties and the ground state configuration of Zn2SnO4 (ZTO). ZTO is used by experimentalists in UW to grow nanorods which are then sensitized by QDs. ZTO is a challenging material for computational analysis because of its inverse spinel structure; thus it has an immense number of configurations matching the X-ray diffraction experiments. I've applied a cluster expansion method and have found the ground state configuration and phase diagram for ZTO. Calculations of optical properties of ground state bulk ZTO were done with a recently developed DFT functional. The optical band gap obtained in these calculations matched the experimental value. The last chapter describes development of the general simulator for interdigitated array electrodes. The application of this simulation together with the experiments may lead to understanding of reaction parameters and mechanisms important for development of electrochemical solar cells.

  12. ab initio based tight-binding investigation of quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Quansheng; Soluyanov, Alexey; Troyer, Matthias

    Quantum spin Hall state is a topologically non-trivial quantum state, which can be used for designing various quantum devices including those potentially useful for quantum computing. Type-II InAs/GaSb semiconductor quantum well was predicted to realize this state of matter. In this work, we systematically investigate topological properties of this system using symmetrized Wannier-based tight-binding models. The model parameters are derived from first-principles hybrid functional calculations, which capture the right band gap and effective masses of both InAs and GaSb. By varying the thickness of InAs and GaSb layers, three possible phases are obtained: normal insulator, quantum spin Hall insulator, and semimetal, allowing us to optimize the growth conditions for the quantum spin Hall phase realization. Most importantly, we identify optimal growth directions, showing that a significant increase of the topological gap can be obtained by growing the quantum well in the [111]-direction. Phase diagrams are obtained for different layer thicknesses and growth directions. Effects of strain and applied electric fields are also discussed.

  13. Introduction: From Efficient Quantum Computation to Nonextensive Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaz

    These few pages will attempt to make a short comprehensive overview of several contributions to this volume which concern rather diverse topics. I shall review the following works, essentially reversing the sequence indicated in my title: • First, by C. Tsallis on the relation of nonextensive statistics to the stability of quantum motion on the edge of quantum chaos. • Second, the contribution by P. Jizba on information theoretic foundations of generalized (nonextensive) statistics. • Third, the contribution by J. Rafelski on a possible generalization of Boltzmann kinetics, again, formulated in terms of nonextensive statistics. • Fourth, the contribution by D.L. Stein on the state-of-the-art open problems in spin glasses and on the notion of complexity there. • Fifth, the contribution by F.T. Arecchi on the quantum-like uncertainty relations and decoherence appearing in the description of perceptual tasks of the brain. • Sixth, the contribution by G. Casati on the measurement and information extraction in the simulation of complex dynamics by a quantum computer. Immediately, the following question arises: What do the topics of these talks have in common? Apart from the variety of questions they address, it is quite obvious that the common denominator of these contributions is an approach to describe and control "the complexity" by simple means. One of the very useful tools to handle such problems, also often used or at least referred to in several of the works presented here, is the concept of Tsallis entropy and nonextensive statistics.

  14. Prediction of nitroxide hyperfine coupling constants in solution from combined nanosecond scale simulations and quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houriez, Céline; Ferré, Nicolas; Masella, Michel; Siri, Didier

    2008-06-01

    We present a combined theoretical approach based on analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories (at the nanosecond scale) generated by use of classical polarizable force fields and on quantum calculations to compute averaged hyperfine coupling constants. That method is used to estimate the constant of a prototypical nitroxide: the dimethylnitroxide. The molecule is embedded during the simulations in a cubic box containing about 500 water molecules and the molecular dynamics is generated using periodic conditions. Once the trajectories are achieved, the nitroxide and its first hydration shell molecules are extracted, and the coupling constants are computed by considering the latter aggregates by means of quantum computations. However, all the water molecules of the bulk are also accounted for during those computations by means of the electrostatic potential fitted method. Our results exhibit that in order to predict accurate and reliable coupling constants, one needs to describe carefully the out-of-plane motion of the nitroxide nitrogen and to sample trajectories with a time interval of 400 fs at least to generate an uncorrelated large set of nitroxide structures. Compared to Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics techniques, our approach can be used readily to compute hyperfine coupling constants of large systems, such as nitroxides of great size interacting with macromolecules such as proteins or polymers.

  15. Prediction of nitroxide hyperfine coupling constants in solution from combined nanosecond scale simulations and quantum computations.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Ferré, Nicolas; Masella, Michel; Siri, Didier

    2008-06-28

    We present a combined theoretical approach based on analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories (at the nanosecond scale) generated by use of classical polarizable force fields and on quantum calculations to compute averaged hyperfine coupling constants. That method is used to estimate the constant of a prototypical nitroxide: the dimethylnitroxide. The molecule is embedded during the simulations in a cubic box containing about 500 water molecules and the molecular dynamics is generated using periodic conditions. Once the trajectories are achieved, the nitroxide and its first hydration shell molecules are extracted, and the coupling constants are computed by considering the latter aggregates by means of quantum computations. However, all the water molecules of the bulk are also accounted for during those computations by means of the electrostatic potential fitted method. Our results exhibit that in order to predict accurate and reliable coupling constants, one needs to describe carefully the out-of-plane motion of the nitroxide nitrogen and to sample trajectories with a time interval of 400 fs at least to generate an uncorrelated large set of nitroxide structures. Compared to Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics techniques, our approach can be used readily to compute hyperfine coupling constants of large systems, such as nitroxides of great size interacting with macromolecules such as proteins or polymers. PMID:18601346

  16. Demonstration of a controlled-phase gate for continuous-variable one-way quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Ryuji; Yokoyama, Shota; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; van Loock, Peter; Furusawa, Akira

    2011-12-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a controlled-phase gate for continuous variables using a cluster-state resource of four optical modes. The two independent input states of the gate are coupled with the cluster in a teleportation-based fashion. As a result, one of the entanglement links present in the initial cluster state appears in the two unmeasured output modes as the corresponding entangling gate acting on the input states. The genuine quantum character of this gate becomes manifest and is verified through the presence of entanglement at the output for a product two-mode coherent input state. By combining our gate with the recently reported module for single-mode Gaussian operations [R. Ukai et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 240504 (2011)], it is possible to implement any multimode Gaussian operation as a fully measurement-based one-way quantum computation. PMID:22243056

  17. Engineering of an all-heteronuclear 5-qubit NMR quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Marx, Raimund; Pomplun, Nikolas; Bermel, Wolfgang; Zeiger, Heinz; Engelke, Frank; Fahmy, Amr F; Glaser, Steffen J

    2015-06-01

    The realization of an all-heteronuclear 5-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer is reported, from the design and synthesis of a suitable molecule through the engineering of a prototype 6-channel probe head. Full control over the quantum computer is shown by a benchmark experiment. PMID:25854330

  18. Quantum key distribution protocol using random bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslouhi, A.; Amellal, H.; Hassouni, Y.; El Baz, M.; El Allati, A.

    2016-04-01

    In order to enhance the quantum key distribution (QKD) security, a new protocol, “QKDPRB” based on random bases is proposed. It consists of using standard encoding bases moving circularly with a variable rotational angle α which depends on angular velocity ω(t); thus, the traditional bases turn into relative ones. To prove the security and the efficiency of the protocol, we present a universal demonstration which proves a high level security of the proposed protocol, even in the presence of the intercept and resend attack. Finally, the QKDPRB may improve the security of QKD.

  19. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2014-12-30

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  20. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2015-01-27

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.