These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of "an Australian multi-university collaboration undertaking research on the fundamental physics and technology of building, at the atomic level, a solid state quantum computer in silicon together with other high potential implementations." Although attempts to develop a quantum computer have met with limited success, the centre has substantial resources invested in advancing toward practical uses of quantum computing technology. The site provides a very good introduction to the principles and implications of quantum computing, as well as details about various research projects underway at the Australian universities. Links to conference and journal papers produced by members of the centre, many from 2003, are also provided.

2

An Overview of Quantum Computing for Technology Managers  

E-print Network

Faster algorithms, novel cryptographic mechanisms, and alternative methods of communication become possible when the model underlying information and computation changes from a classical mechanical model to a quantum mechanical one. Quantum algorithms perform a select set of tasks vastly more efficiently than any classical algorithm, but for many tasks it has been proved that quantum algorithms provide no advantage. The breadth of quantum computing applications is still being explored. Major application areas include security and the many fields that would benefit from efficient quantum simulation. The quantum information processing viewpoint provides insight into classical algorithmic issues as well as a deeper understanding of entanglement and other non-classical aspects of quantum physics. This overview is aimed at technology managers who wish to gain a high level understanding of quantum information processing, particularly quantum computing.

Eleanor G. Rieffel

2008-09-26

3

Quantum computers.  

PubMed

Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future. PMID:20203602

Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

2010-03-01

4

Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The remarkable developments in theoretical and experimental quantum computation that have been inspired by Feynman's seminal papers on the subject are reviewed. Following an introduction to quantum computation, the implications for cryptography of quantum factoring are discussed. The requirements and challenges for practical quantum computational hardware are illustrated with an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los

Richard J. Hughes

2001-01-01

5

Quantum Computers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Moore's Law is a famous rule of thumb that says transistor density, and hence microprocessor performance, doubles approximately every eighteen months. While this trend has stood the test of time, many experts believe it will eventually grind to a halt when physical limitations prevent further miniaturization. Although this will likely not happen for twenty years or more, researchers are already looking at a potential solution.The concept of quantum computing has been around since the 1970's, but the science is still in its infancy. To learn about its profound implications, Liquid Logic (1) is a solid article with some remarkable insights into the technology. One of the most comprehensive sources on the Web is at the Centre for Quantum Computation (2) (last mentioned in the June 24, 1998 Scout Report). This has lots of introductory materials and tutorials that explain many of the basic concepts of quantum computing. The Centre's research efforts are also detailed on the site. Another good site for people new to the subject is the home page of Magiq Technologies (3). A very informative section about quantum information processing looks at some of the history of its development and its applications for the future. The company addresses some key issues in the frequently asked questions section, such as why research in this area could be so important. The Quantum Logic and Coherent Control Project Web site (4) presents extensive advanced theory about several experiments conducted with an rf (Paul) ion trap. The discussions are replete with equations and graphs, probably most suited for post graduate research. The Institute for Quantum Information (5) offers over 30 of its publications online, most of which are very recent. Because it is located at the California Institute of Technology, there are links to course home pages with lecture notes and solutions to problems. Users of the popular Mathematica software can add a powerful library of quantum computation functions with the free QuCalc package (6). The download site has documentation for the software and a few examples that include Mathematica code. Quantum Leap: Seize the Light (7) is an insightful article that discusses two recently published papers that address two promising methods of harnessing qubits (the fundamental unit of storage for quantum computation). This is necessary for the advancement of the technology, because the current methods are quite limited. EE Times hosts another article (8) about one of the newest breakthroughs in quantum information processing. Researchers at Harvard University have successfully transferred quantum information from a laser beam into and out of the spin state of rubidium atoms. The article considers the accomplishment and looks at what the group is planning next.

Leske, Cavin.

6

Quantum computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarise not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, the review begins with an introduction to

Andrew Steane

1998-01-01

7

Quantum Computation Quantum Information  

E-print Network

Quantum Computation and Quantum Information Samuel J. Lomonaco, Jr. and Howard E. Brandt editors Searches with a Quantum Robot .............................................. 12 pages Benioff, Paul Perturbation Theory and Numerical Modeling Quantum Logic Operations with a Large of Qubits

Lomonaco Jr., Samuel J.

8

Quantum Computing Computer Scientists  

E-print Network

.4 The Future of Quantum Hardware Appendix A) Historical Bibliography of Quantum Computing by Jill CirasellaQuantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky and Mirco A. Mannucci #12;© May 2007 Noson S. Yanofsky Mirco A. Mannucci #12;Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky

Yanofsky, Noson S.

9

Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

In the last few years, theoretical study of quantum systems serving as computational devices has achieved tremendous progress. We now have strong theoretical evidence that quantum computers, if built, might be used as a dramatically powerful computational tool. This review is about to tell the story of theoretical quantum computation. I left out the developing topic of experimental realizations of the model, and neglected other closely related topics which are quantum information and quantum communication. As a result of narrowing the scope of this paper, I hope it has gained the benefit of being an almost self contained introduction to the exciting field of quantum computation. The review begins with background on theoretical computer science, Turing machines and Boolean circuits. In light of these models, I define quantum computers, and discuss the issue of universal quantum gates. Quantum algorithms, including Shor's factorization algorithm and Grover's algorithm for searching databases, are explained. I will devote much attention to understanding what the origins of the quantum computational power are, and what the limits of this power are. Finally, I describe the recent theoretical results which show that quantum computers maintain their complexity power even in the presence of noise, inaccuracies and finite precision. I tried to put all results in their context, asking what the implications to other issues in computer science and physics are. In the end of this review I make these connections explicit, discussing the possible implications of quantum computation on fundamental physical questions, such as the transition from quantum to classical physics.

Dorit Aharonov

1998-12-15

10

Quantum computing with trapped ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

1998-01-01

11

Quantum Chaos & Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

The standard generic quantum computer model is studied analytically and numerically and the border for emergence of quantum chaos, induced by imperfections and residual inter-qubit couplings, is determined. This phenomenon appears in an isolated quantum computer without any external decoherence. The onset of quantum chaos leads to quantum computer hardware melting, strong quantum entropy growth and destruction of computer operability. The time scales for development of quantum chaos and ergodicity are determined. In spite the fact that this phenomenon is rather dangerous for quantum computing it is shown that the quantum chaos border for inter-qubit coupling is exponentially larger than the energy level spacing between quantum computer eigenstates and drops only linearly with the number of qubits n. As a result the ideal multi-qubit structure of the computer remains rather robust against imperfections. This opens a broad parameter region for a possible realization of quantum computer. The obtained results are related to the recent studies of quantum chaos in such many-body systems as nuclei, complex atoms and molecules, finite Fermi systems and quantum spin glass shards which are also reviewed in the paper.

D. L. Shepelyansky

2000-06-15

12

Computer Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will learn the history of computers as well as how computers work. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY (9-12) - 52.0417 Computer Technology is an introduction to computer application software that includes word processing, spreadsheet, database, and telecommunications. An awareness of career opportunities, business ethics, and trends is included. Everything is done with computers. Your job will most likely have a computer to save files, write ...

Mrs. Thackeray

2007-10-14

13

Quantum Information Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the research laboratories of Hewlett Packard, Quantum Information Technology provides an informative look at current work in quantum information processing and communication (QIPC). The report, published in November 2002, recognizes the potential applications of QIPC and how it could revolutionize conventional information technology. It cites cryptography, quantum computers, and quantum teleportation as motivational factors for development of this technology, offering a basic introduction to each discipline. The paper concludes with an analysis of the direction current research is taking and what the future may hold. Several links to further sources of information are also included.

Spiller, Timothy.

2002-01-01

14

Quantum Chaos and Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard generic quantum computer model is studied analytically and numerically and the border for emergence of quantum chaos, induced by imperfections and residual inter-qubit couplings, is determined. This phenomenon appears in an isolated quantum computer without any external decoherence. The onset of quantum chaos leads to quantum computer hardware melting, strong quantum entropy growth and destruction of computer operability.

D. L. Shepelyansky

2001-01-01

15

Quantum chaos and quantum computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard generic quantum computer model is studied analytically and numerically and the border for emergence of quantum chaos, induced by imperfections and residual inter-qubit couplings, is determined. This phenomenon appears in an isolated quantum computer without any external decoherence. The onset of quantum chaos leads to quantum computer hardware melting, strong quantum entropy growth and destruction of computer operability.

D. L. Shepelyansky

2001-01-01

16

Quantum Communication Technology  

E-print Network

Quantum communication is built on a set of disruptive concepts and technologies. It is driven by fascinating physics and by promising applications. It requires a new mix of competencies, from telecom engineering to theoretical physics, from theoretical computer science to mechanical and electronic engineering. First applications have already found their way to niche markets and university labs are working on futuristic quantum networks, but most of the surprises are still ahead of us. Quantum communication, and more generally quantum information science and technologies, are here to stay and will have a profound impact on the XXI century.

Nicolas Gisin; Rob Thew

2010-07-23

17

Quantum Communication Technology  

E-print Network

Quantum communication is built on a set of disruptive concepts and technologies. It is driven by fascinating physics and by promising applications. It requires a new mix of competencies, from telecom engineering to theoretical physics, from theoretical computer science to mechanical and electronic engineering. First applications have already found their way to niche markets and university labs are working on futuristic quantum networks, but most of the surprises are still ahead of us. Quantum communication, and more generally quantum information science and technologies, are here to stay and will have a profound impact on the XXI century.

Gisin, Nicolas

2010-01-01

18

Fault-tolerant quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery of quantum error correction has greatly improved the long-term prospects for quantum computing technology. Encoded quantum information can be protected from errors that arise due to uncontrolled interactions with the environment, or due to imperfect implementations of quantum logical operations. Recovery from errors can work effectively even if occasional mistakes occur during the recovery procedure. Furthermore, encoded quantum

John Preskill

1997-01-01

19

Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Quantum mechanics---the theory describing the fundamental workings of nature---is famously counterintuitive: it predicts that a particle can be in two places at the same time, and that two remote particles can be inextricably and instantaneously linked. These predictions have been the topic of intense metaphysical debate ever since the theory's inception early last century. However, supreme predictive power combined with direct experimental observation of some of these unusual phenomena leave little doubt as to its fundamental correctness. In fact, without quantum mechanics we could not explain the workings of a laser, nor indeed how a fridge magnet operates. Over the last several decades quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit these unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes. Many research groups around the world are working towards one of the most ambitious goals humankind has ever embarked upon: a quantum computer that promises to exponentially improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for this task---ranging from single particles of light to superconducting circuits---and it is not yet clear which, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain what the major challenges are for the future.

Thaddeus D. Ladd; Fedor Jelezko; Raymond Laflamme; Yasunobu Nakamura; Christopher Monroe; Jeremy L. O'Brien

2010-09-12

20

Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computation Network Security Course Project Report by Hidayath.2 Bases of the Hilbert space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 Quantum principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Quantum Cryptography 6 3.1 The BB84 protocol

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

21

Quantum walk computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are "universal for quantum computation" relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

Kendon, Viv

2014-12-01

22

Cryptography, Quantum Computation and Trapped Ions  

E-print Network

The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

Richard J. Hughes

1997-12-23

23

Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

R. J. Hughes; Richard J

1998-01-01

24

Quantum Computing's Classical Problem, Classical Computing's Quantum Problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tasked with the challenge to build better and better computers, quantum computing and classical computing face the same conundrum: the success of classical computing systems. Small quantum computing systems have been demonstrated, and intermediate-scale systems are on the horizon, capable of calculating numeric results or simulating physical systems far beyond what humans can do by hand. However, to be commercially viable, they must surpass what our wildly successful, highly advanced classical computers can already do. At the same time, those classical computers continue to advance, but those advances are now constrained by thermodynamics, and will soon be limited by the discrete nature of atomic matter and ultimately quantum effects. Technological advances benefit both quantum and classical machinery, altering the competitive landscape. Can we build quantum computing systems that out-compute classical systems capable of some logic gates per month? This article will discuss the interplay in these competing and cooperating technological trends.

Van Meter, Rodney

2014-08-01

25

Quantum Computational Complexity  

E-print Network

This article surveys quantum computational complexity, with a focus on three fundamental notions: polynomial-time quantum computations, the efficient verification of quantum proofs, and quantum interactive proof systems. Properties of quantum complexity classes based on these notions, such as BQP, QMA, and QIP, are presented. Other topics in quantum complexity, including quantum advice, space-bounded quantum computation, and bounded-depth quantum circuits, are also discussed.

John Watrous

2008-04-21

26

Quantum Computing Cambridge, MA  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing Peter Shor M.I.T. Cambridge, MA 1 #12;What is the difference between a computer computers can be built, this would imply this "folk thesis" is not true. 14 #12;Misconceptions about Quantum Computers False: Quantum computers would be able to speed up all com- putations. Quantum computers

Fominov, Yakov

27

Quantum Computational Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theory of quantum computational networks is the quantum generalization of the theory of logic circuits used in classical computing machines. Quantum gates are the generalization of classical logic gates. A single type of gate, the univeral quantum gate, together with quantum 'unit wires', is adequate for constructing networks with any possible quantum computational property.

D. Deutsch

1989-01-01

28

Quantum computation with linear optics  

E-print Network

We present a constructive method to translate small quantum circuits into their optical analogues, using linear components of present-day quantum optics technology only. These optical circuits perform precisely the computation that the quantum circuits are designed for, and can thus be used to test the performance of quantum algorithms. The method relies on the representation of several quantum bits by a single photon, and on the implementation of universal quantum gates using simple optical components (beam splitters, phase shifters, etc.). The optical implementation of Brassard et al.'s teleportation circuit, a non-trivial 3-bit quantum computation, is presented as an illustration.

C. Adami; N. J. Cerf

1998-06-14

29

Quantum Computation: Introduction  

E-print Network

Quantum Computation: Introduction Ronald de Wolf Quantum Computation: Introduction ­ p. 1/2 #12 "weird" effects: superposition, interference, entanglement Quantum Computation: Introduction ­ p. 2/2 #12;Quantum computers Current computers (in theory and practice) are based on classical physics Feynman

de Wolf, Ronald

30

Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical

Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

2010-01-01

31

Quantum Logic and Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use classes of Hilbert lattice equations for an alternative representation of Hilbert lattices and Hilbert spaces of arbitrary quantum systems that might enable a direct introduction of the states of the systems into quantum computers. More specifically, we look for a way to feed a quantum computer with algebraic equations of n-th order underlying an infinite dimensional Hilbert space

Mladen Pavicic; Norman D. Megill

2008-01-01

32

Hybrid quantum computing  

E-print Network

Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for the construction of a hybrid quantum computer that operates on both continuous and discrete quantum variables. Such hybrid computers are shown to be more efficient than conventional quantum computers for performing a variety of quantum algorithms, such as computing eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

Seth Lloyd

2000-08-11

33

Adiabatic Quantum Computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with scanning-tunneling microscopy. I will review our experimental and theoretical progress in this plenary talk.[4pt] This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Landahl, Andrew

2012-10-01

34

Quantum computation and Shor's factoring algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current technology is beginning to allow us to manipulate rather than just observe individual quantum phenomena. This opens up the possibility of exploiting quantum effects to perform computations beyond the scope of any classical computer. Recently Peter Shor discovered an efficient algorithm for factoring whole numbers, which uses characteristically quantum effects. The algorithm illustrates the potential power of quantum computation,

Artur Ekert; Richard Jozsa

1996-01-01

35

Quantum robots and quantum computers  

SciTech Connect

Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

Benioff, P.

1998-07-01

36

Topological Quantum Computing Jacob Colbert  

E-print Network

Topological Quantum Computing Jacob Colbert 3/5/2011 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Typical Quantum Computing 2 2.1 What is Quantum Computing? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Quantum Error Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 Topological Quantum Computing

Rosner, Jonathan L.

37

Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Quantum mechanics---the theory describing the fundamental workings of nature---is famously counterintuitive: it predicts that a particle can be in two places at the same time, and that two remote particles can be inextricably and instantaneously linked. These predictions have been the topic of intense metaphysical debate ever since the theory's inception early last century. However, supreme predictive power combined with direct experimental observation of some of these unusual phenomena leave little doubt as to its fundamental correctness. In fact, without quantum mechanics we could not explain the workings of a laser, nor indeed how a fridge magnet operates. Over the last several decades quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit these unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes. Many research groups around the world are working towards one ...

Ladd, Thaddeus D; Laflamme, Raymond; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Monroe, Christopher; O'Brien, Jeremy L; 10.1038/nature08812

2010-01-01

38

Quantum Computation as Geometry  

E-print Network

Quantum computers hold great promise, but it remains a challenge to find efficient quantum circuits that solve interesting computational problems. We show that finding optimal quantum circuits is essentially equivalent to finding the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry. By recasting the problem of finding quantum circuits as a geometric problem, we open up the possibility of using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry to suggest new quantum algorithms, or to prove limitations on the power of quantum computers.

Michael A. Nielsen; Mark R. Dowling; Mile Gu; Andrew C. Doherty

2006-03-21

39

Quantum Computing Abbas Edalat  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing Abbas Edalat 18 lectures + 9 tutorials Lecture Notes and Exercise Sheets London SW7 2BZ #12;Recommended Texts · Textbooks: ­ Jozef Gruska, Quantum Computing, (McGraw-Hill, 1999). ­ Michael A. Nielsen and Issac L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, (Cambridge University

Edalat, Abbas

40

Quantum Computing Abbas Edalat  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing Abbas Edalat 18 lectures + 9 tutorials Lecture Notes and Exercise Sheets London SW7 2BZ Recommended Texts . Textbooks: -- Jozef Gruska, Quantum Computing, (McGraw­Hill, 1999). -- Michael A. Nielsen and Issac L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, (Cambridge University

Edalat, Abbas

41

Fault-tolerant quantum computation  

E-print Network

The discovery of quantum error correction has greatly improved the long-term prospects for quantum computing technology. Encoded quantum information can be protected from errors that arise due to uncontrolled interactions with the environment, or due to imperfect implementations of quantum logical operations. Recovery from errors can work effectively even if occasional mistakes occur during the recovery procedure. Furthermore, encoded quantum information can be processed without serious propagation of errors. In principle, an arbitrarily long quantum computation can be performed reliably, provided that the average probability of error per gate is less than a certain critical value, the accuracy threshold. It may be possible to incorporate intrinsic fault tolerance into the design of quantum computing hardware, perhaps by invoking topological Aharonov-Bohm interactions to process quantum information.

John Preskill

1997-12-19

42

Integrable Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Integrable quantum computation is defined as quantum computing via the integrable condition, in which two-qubit gates are either nontrivial unitary solutions of the Yang--Baxter equation or the Swap gate (permutation). To make the definition clear, in this article, we explore the physics underlying the quantum circuit model, and then present a unified description on both quantum computing via the Bethe ansatz and quantum computing via the Yang--Baxter equation.

Yong Zhang

2011-11-16

43

Quantum computers T. D. Ladd1  

E-print Network

REVIEWS Quantum computers T. D. Ladd1 {, F. Jelezko2 , R. Laflamme3,4,5 , Y. Nakamura6,7 , C goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove

Monroe, Christopher

44

An introduction to quantum probability, quantum mechanics, and quantum computation  

E-print Network

An introduction to quantum probability, quantum mechanics, and quantum computation Greg Kuperberg". Recently quantum computation has entered as a new reason for both mathematicians and computer scientists deterministic algorithms for some computational problems, quantum algorithms can be moderately faster

Thomases, Becca

45

QUANTUM COMPUTATION AND INFORMATION  

E-print Network

- tum computation and information was accelerated in several fronts: hardware for quantum computationQUANTUM COMPUTATION AND INFORMATION Am´ilcar Sernadas,1 Paulo Mateus1 and Yasser Omar2 1CLC, Dep After a very brief survey of the key milestones and open problems in quantum computation and information

Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

46

Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum computation are unstable with respect to the physical realization of the quantum computer. We discuss the origin of these instabilities

Hans de Raedt; Kristel Michielsen; Anthony Hams; Seiji Miyashita; Keiji Saito

2001-01-01

47

Quantum computation with quantum dots  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose an implementation of a universal set of one- and two-quantum-bit gates for quantum computation using the spin states of coupled single-electron quantum dots. Desired operations are effected by the gating of the tunneling barrier between neighboring dots. Several measures of the gate quality are computed within a recently derived spin master equation incorporating decoherence caused by a prototypical

Daniel Loss; David P. Divincenzo

1998-01-01

48

Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 0.0043, which is comparable to that (0.0075) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 0.001 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Keisuke Fujii

2012-09-06

49

Cryptography, Quantum Computation and Trapped Ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed.\\u000aFollowing a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational\\u000ahardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos\\u000ais presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions\\u000aare analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology\\u000ais made.

Richard J. Hughes

1997-01-01

50

Instrumentation for quantum computers  

E-print Network

Quantum computation poses challenging engineering and basic physics issues for the control of nanoscale systems. In particular, experimental realizations of up to seven-qubit NMR quantum computers have acutely illustrated ...

Huang, Wei-Han, 1979-

2004-01-01

51

Optimal Blind Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation allows a client with limited quantum capabilities to interact with a remote quantum computer to perform an arbitrary quantum computation, while keeping the description of that computation hidden from the remote quantum computer. While a number of protocols have been proposed in recent years, little is currently understood about the resources necessary to accomplish the task. Here we present general techniques for upper and lower bounding the quantum communication necessary to perform blind quantum computation, and use these techniques to establish a concrete bounds for common choices of the client's quantum capabilities. Our results show that the UBQC protocol of Broadbent, Fitzsimons and Kashefi [1], comes within a factor of 8/3 of optimal when the client is restricted to preparing single qubits. However, we describe a generalization of this protocol which requires exponentially less quantum communication when the client has a more sophisticated device.

Atul Mantri; Carlos A. Perez-Delgado; Joseph F. Fitzsimons

2013-06-16

52

Quantum Computation and Spin Manipulation  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2 Quantum Computer Hardware 31 2.1 NMR1 Quantum Computation and Spin Manipulation 0Anthony Hams #12;Quantum Computation and Spin, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. Anthony Hams Quantum Computation and Spin Manipulation

53

Quantum Analogue Computing  

E-print Network

We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us, and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data is encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data is encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous variable quantum computers (CVQC) becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

Vivien M. Kendon; Kae Nemoto; William J. Munro

2010-01-13

54

Quantum analogue computing.  

PubMed

We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future. PMID:20603371

Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

2010-08-13

55

Introduction to the World of Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The world is changing very fast, and so are the ways of communication and computation. This article is about a new communication and information technology based on the principles of the quantum physics. At first we discuss about some fundamental paradigms of Quantum Computers World, and then introducing the basis of quantum computation: \\

Sina Jafarpour

2006-01-01

56

A Short Survey on Quantum Computers  

SciTech Connect

Quantum computing is an emerging technology. The clock frequency of current computer processor systems may reach about 40 GHz within the next 10 years. By then, one atom may represent one bit. Electrons under such conditions are no longer described by classical physics and a new model of the computer may be necessary by then. The quantum computer is one proposal that may have merit in dealing with the problems associated with the fact that certain important computationally intense problems present that current (classical) computers cannot solve because they require too much processing time. For example, Shor's algorithm performs factoring a large integer in polynomial time while classical factoring algorithms can do it in exponential time. In this paper we briefly survey the current status of quantum computers, quantum computer systems, and quantum simulators. Keywords Classical computers, quantum computers, quantum computer systems, quantum simulators, Shor's algorithm.

Kanamori, Yoshito [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Yoo, Seong-Moo [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Pan, W. D. [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL

2006-01-01

57

'Photosynthetic' Quantum Computers?  

E-print Network

Do quantum computers already exist in Nature? It is proposed that they do. Photosynthesis is one example in which a 'quantum computer' component may play a role in the 'classical' world of complex biological systems. A 'translation' of the standard metabolic description of the 'front-end' light harvesting complex in photosynthesis into the language of quantum computers is presented. Biological systems represent an untapped resource for thinking about the design and operation of hybrid quantum-classical computers and expanding our current conceptions of what defines a 'quantum computer' in Nature.

Scott M. Hitchcock

2001-08-20

58

Authorized quantum computation  

E-print Network

We present authorized quantum computation, where only a user with a non-cloneable quantum authorization key can perform a unitary operation created by an authenticated programmer. The security of our authorized quantum computation is based on the quantum computational complexity problem of forging the keys from an obfuscated quantum gate sequence. Under the assumption of the existence of a \\textit{sufficiently-random gate shuffling algorithm}, the problem is shown to be in the NQP (Non-deterministic Quantum Polynomial)-hard class by reducing it to a NQP-Complete problem, the exact non-identity check problem. Therefore, our authorized quantum computation can be computationally secure against attacks using quantum computers.

Yu Tanaka; Mio Murao

2009-03-12

59

Quantum Computation 6.1 Introduction of quantum computation  

E-print Network

behavior of quantum computer hardware [121]. The contents of this chapter are organized as following83 Chapter 6 Quantum Computation 6.1 Introduction of quantum computation Quantum computation of quantum physics. The basic ideas of quantum computation emerged when scientists were con- templating

60

Computational Methods for Simulating Quantum Computers H. De Raedt  

E-print Network

Computational Methods for Simulating Quantum Computers H. De Raedt and K. Michielsen Department to simulate quantum computers. It covers the basic concepts of quantum computation and quantum algorithms of quantum computers. Keywords: Quantum computation, computer simulation, time-integration algorithms

61

Quantum Knitting Computer  

E-print Network

We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e., joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

Fujii, Toshiyuki; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki

2009-01-01

62

Quantum Knitting Computer  

E-print Network

We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e., joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

Toshiyuki Fujii; Shigemasa Matsuo; Noriyuki Hatakenaka

2009-05-14

63

Simple quantum computer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose an implementation of a quantum computer to solve Deutsch's problem, which requires exponential time on a classical computer but only linear time with quantum parallelism. By using a dual-rail quantum-bit representation as a simple form of error correction, our machine can tolerate some amount of decoherence and still give the correct result with high probability. The design that

Isaac L. Chuang; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

1995-01-01

64

Towards a Quantum Computer?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In everyday life, practically all the information which is processed, exchanged or stored is coded in the form of discrete entities called bits, which take two values only, by convention 0 and 1. With the present technology for computers and optical fibers, bits are carried by electrical currents and electromagnetic waves corresponding to macroscopic fluxes of electrons and photons, and they are stored in memories of various kinds, for example, magnetic memories. Although quantum physics is the basic physics which underlies the operation of a transistor (Chapter 6) or of a laser (Chapter 4), each exchanged or processed bit corresponds to a large number of elementary quantum systems, and its behavior can be described classically due to the strong interaction with the environment (Chapter 9). For about thirty years, physicists have learned to manipulate with great accuracy individual quantum systems: photons, electrons, neutrons, atoms, and so forth, which opens the way to using two-state quantum systems, such as the polarization states of a photon (Chapter 2) or the two energy levels of an atom or an ion (Chapter 4) in order to process, exchange or store information. In 2.3.2, we used the two polarization states of a photon, vertical (V) and horizontal (H), to represent the values 0 and 1 of a bit and to exchange information. In what follows, it will be convenient to use Dirac's notation (see Appendix A.2.2 for more details), where a vertical polarization state is denoted by |V> or |0> and a horizontal one by |H> or |1>, while a state with arbitrary polarization will be denoted by |?>. The polarization states of a photon give one possible realization of a quantum bit, or for short a qubit. Thanks to the properties of quantum physics, quantum computers using qubits, if they ever exist, would outperform classical computers for some specific, but very important, problems. In Sections 8.1 and 8.2, we describe some typical quantum algorithms and, in order to do so, we shall not be able to avoid some technical developments. However, these two sections may be skipped in a first reading, as they are not necessary for understanding the more general considerations of Sections 8.3 and 8.4.

Bellac, Michel Le

2014-11-01

65

Continuous-variable blind quantum computation  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation is a secure delegated quantum computing protocol where Alice who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal delegates her computation to Bob who has a fully-fledged quantum computer in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. Protocols of blind quantum computation have been proposed for several qubit measurement-based computation models, such as the graph state model, the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model, and the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal topological model. Here, we consider blind quantum computation for the continuous-variable measurement-based model. We show that blind quantum computation is possible for the infinite squeezing case. We also show that the finite squeezing causes no additional problem in the blind setup apart from the one inherent to the continuous-variable measurement-based quantum computation.

Tomoyuki Morimae

2012-12-05

66

Quantum Imaging Technologies  

E-print Network

Over the past three decades, quantum mechanics has allowed the development of technologies that provide unconditionally secure communication. In parallel, the quantum nature of the transverse electromagnetic field has spawned the field of quantum imaging that encompasses technologies such as quantum ghost imaging and high-dimensional quantum key distribution (QKD). The emergence of such quantum technologies also highlights the need for the development of methods for characterizing the elusive quantum state itself. In this document, we describe new technologies that use the quantum properties of light for security. The first is a technique that extends the principles behind QKD to the field of imaging. By applying the polarization-based BB84 protocol to individual photons in an active imaging system, we obtained images that are secure against intercept-resend jamming attacks. The second technology presented in this article is based on an extension of quantum ghost imaging. We used a holographic filtering technique to build a quantum ghost image identification system that uses a few pairs of photons to identify an object from a set of known objects. The third technology addressed in this document is a high-dimensional QKD system that uses orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes of light for encoding. Moving to a high-dimensional state space in QKD allows one to impress more information on each photon, as well as introduce higher levels of security. We discuss the development of two OAM-QKD protocols based on the BB84 and Ekert QKD protocols. The fourth and final technology presented in this article is a relatively new technique called direct measurement that uses sequential weak and strong measurements to characterize a quantum state. We use this technique to characterize the quantum state of a photon with a dimensionality of d=27, and measure its rotation in the natural basis of OAM.

Mehul Malik; Robert W. Boyd

2014-06-06

67

Quantum information and computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Charles H. Bennett

1995-01-01

68

Quantum Computing since Democritus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Atoms and the void; 2. Sets; 3. Gdel, Turing, and friends; 4. Minds and machines; 5. Paleocomplexity; 6. P, NP, and friends; 7. Randomness; 8. Crypto; 9. Quantum; 10. Quantum computing; 11. Penrose; 12. Decoherence and hidden variables; 13. Proofs; 14. How big are quantum states?; 15. Skepticism of quantum computing; 16. Learning; 17. Interactive proofs and more; 18. Fun with the Anthropic Principle; 19. Free will; 20. Time travel; 21. Cosmology and complexity; 22. Ask me anything.

Aaronson, Scott

2013-03-01

69

Quantum Computers and Dissipation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyse dissipation in quantum computation and its destructive impact on\\u000aefficiency of quantum algorithms. Using a general model of decoherence, we\\u000astudy the time evolution of a quantum register of arbitrary length coupled with\\u000aan environment of arbitrary coherence length. We discuss relations between\\u000adecoherence and computational complexity and show that the quantum\\u000afactorization algorithm must be modified in

G. Massimo Palma; Kalle-Antti Suominen; Artur K. Ekert

1997-01-01

70

Chapter 52. Quantum Information and Quantum Computation Quantum Information and Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Chapter 52. Quantum Information and Quantum Computation 52-1 Quantum Information and Quantum Sullivan, Rita Tavilla Introduction Quantum computers and communication systems are devices that store for constructing quantum computers and quantum communication systems using atomic physics,quantum optics

71

Resilient Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practical realization of quantum computers will require overcoming decoherence and operational errors, which lead to problems that are more severe than in classical computation. It is shown that arbitrarily accurate quantum computation is possible provided that the error per operation is below a threshold value. 36 refs., 1 fig.

Emanuel Knill; Raymond Laflamme; Wojciech H. Zurek

1998-01-01

72

Quantum Computational Complexity John Watrous  

E-print Network

Quantum Computational Complexity John Watrous Institute for Quantum Computing and School of the subject and its importance II. Introduction III. The quantum circuit model IV. Polynomial-time quantum computations V. Quantum proofs VI. Quantum interactive proof systems VII. Other selected notions in quantum

Watrous, John

73

Ancilla-Driven Universal Blind Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation is a new quantum secure protocol, which enables Alice who does not have enough quantum technology to delegate her computation to Bob who has a fully-fledged quantum power without revealing her input, output and algorithm. So far, blind quantum computation has been considered only for the circuit model and the measurement-based model. Here we consider the possibility and the limitation of blind quantum computation in the ancilla-driven model, which is a hybrid of the circuit and the measurement-based models.

Takahiro Sueki; Takeshi Koshiba; Tomoyuki Morimae

2013-04-02

74

Scalable optical quantum computer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr3+, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y2SiO5) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications.

Manykin, E. A.; Mel'nichenko, E. V.

2014-12-01

75

Permutational Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

In topological quantum computation the geometric details of a particle trajectory are irrelevant; only the topology matters. Taking this one step further, we consider a model of computation that disregards even the topology of the particle trajectory, and computes by permuting particles. Whereas topological quantum computation requires anyons, permutational quantum computation can be performed with ordinary spin-1/2 particles, using a variant of the spin-network scheme of Marzuoli and Rasetti. We do not know whether permutational computation is universal. It may represent a new complexity class within BQP. Nevertheless, permutational quantum computers can in polynomial time approximate matrix elements of certain irreducible representations of the symmetric group and simulate certain processes in the Ponzano-Regge spin foam model of quantum gravity. No polynomial time classical algorithms for these problems are known.

Stephen P. Jordan

2009-06-14

76

Physical Models for Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the impact of the physical implementation of a quantum computer on its computational efficiency, using computer simulations of physical models of quantum computer hardware. We address the computational efficiency of practical procedures to extract the results of a quantum computation from the wave function respresenting the final state of the quantum computer.

H. De Raedt; K. Michielsen; S. Miyashita; K. Saito

2002-01-01

77

Universality in Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that in quantum computation almost every gate that operates on two or more bits is a universal gate. We discuss various physical considerations bearing on the proper definition of universality for computational components such as logic gates.

David Deutsch; Adriano Barenco; Artur Ekert

1995-01-01

78

COVER IMAGE Topological quantum computation  

E-print Network

COVER IMAGE Topological quantum computation schemes -- in which quantum information is stored non of one- dimensional semiconducting wires should bring topological quantum computers a step closer 376 Quantum metrology: Beauty and the noisy beast Lorenzo Maccone and Vittorio Giovannetti 377

Loss, Daniel

79

Quantum Analog Computing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

Zak, M.

1998-01-01

80

Quantum physics and computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent theoretical results confirm that quantum theory provides the possibility of new ways of performing efficient calculations. The most striking example is the factoring problem. It has recently been shown that computers that exploit quantum features could factor large composite integers. This task is believed to be out of reach of classical computers as soon as the number of digits

Adriano Barenco

1996-01-01

81

Secure Quantum Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past three decades, quantum mechanics has allowed the development of technologies that provide unconditionally secure communication. In parallel, the quantum nature of the transverse electromagnetic field has spawned the field of quantum imaging that encompasses technologies such as quantum lithography, quantum ghost imaging, and high-dimensional quantum key distribution (QKD). The emergence of such quantum technologies also highlights the need for the development of accurate and efficient methods of measuring and characterizing the elusive quantum state itself. In this thesis, I present new technologies that use the quantum properties of light for security. The first of these is a technique that extends the principles behind QKD to the field of imaging and optical ranging. By applying the polarization-based BB84 protocol to individual photons in an active imaging system, we obtained images that were secure against any intercept-resend jamming attacks. The second technology presented in this thesis is based on an extension of quantum ghost imaging, a technique that uses position-momentum entangled photons to create an image of an object without directly gaining any spatial information from it. We used a holographic filtering technique to build a quantum ghost image identification system that uses a few pairs of photons to identify an object from a set of known objects. The third technology addressed in this thesis is a high-dimensional QKD system that uses orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes of light for encoding. Moving to a high-dimensional state space in QKD allows one to impress more information on each photon, as well as introduce higher levels of security. I discuss the development of two OAM-QKD protocols based on the BB84 and Ekert protocols of QKD. In addition, I present a study characterizing the effects of turbulence on a communication system using OAM modes for encoding. The fourth and final technology presented in this thesis is a relatively new technique called direct measurement that uses sequential weak and strong measurements to characterize a quantum state. I use this technique to characterize the quantum state of a photon with a dimensionality of d = 27, and visualize its rotation in the natural basis of OAM.

Malik, Mehul

82

Photonic quantum technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of the approaches to quantum computing [1], photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation [2], and relevance to other quantum technologies [3], including communication, metrology [4] and measurement [5]. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6--10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised [11], demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates [12] and the iterative phase estimation algorithm [13]. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit [14], and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons [15]. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations [16], and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons [17], and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light [18]. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light [19]. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors [20] and diamond [21,22] and non-linear [23,24] single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment [25].[4pt] [1] TD Ladd, et al Nature 464, 45 (2010) [2] JL O'Brien, Science 318, 1567 (2007) [3] JL O'Brien, A Furusawa, J Vuckovic Nature Photon. 3, 687 (2009 [4] T Nagata, et al Science 316, 726 (2007) [5] R Okamoto, et al Science 323, 483 (2009) [6] A Politi, et al Science 320, 646 (2008). [7] A Laing, et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 211109 (2010) [8] JCF Matthews, et al Nature Photon. 3, 346 (2009) [9] A Politi, et al Science 325, 1221 (2009) [10] JCF Matthews, et al Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 163602 (2011) [11] X-Q Zhou, et al Nature Comm. 2 413 2011 [12] E Mart'in-Lpez, et al Nature Photon. 6, 773 (2012) [13] X-Q Zhou, et al arXiv:1110.4276 [14] PJ Shadbolt, et al Nature Photon. 6, 45 (2012). [15] D. Bonneau, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 108, 053601 (2012) [16] A Peruzzo, et al Nature Comm. 2, 224 (2011) [17] A Peruzzo, et al Science 329, 1500 (2010) [18] X Cai, et al Science 338, 363 (2012) [19] A Crespi, et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 233704 (2012) [20] CM Natarajan, et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 211101 (2010) [21] JP Hadden, et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 241901 (2010) [22] L Marseglia, et al Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 133107 (2011) [23] C. Xiong, et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 051101 (2011) [24] M. Lobino, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 081110 (2011) [25] E. Engin, et al. arXiv:1204.4922 [25] A. Peruzzo, et al Science 338, 634 (2012)

O'Brien, Jeremy

2013-03-01

83

Quantum computation Samuel L. Braunstein  

E-print Network

Quantum computation Samuel L. Braunstein Computer Science, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK and logic gates 3.1. FANOUT and ERASE 3.2. Computation without ERASE 4. Elementary quantum notation 5. Logic gates for quantum bits 6. Logic gates in the laboratory 7. Model quantum computer and quantum code 8

Braunstein, Samuel L.

84

Quantum computing: pro and con  

Microsoft Academic Search

I assess the potential of quantum computation. Broad and important applications must be found to justify construction of a quantum computer; I review some of the known quantum algorithms and consider the prospects for finding new ones. Quantum computers are notoriously susceptible to making errors; I discuss recently developed fault-tolerant procedures that enable a quantum computer with noisy gates to

John Preskill

1998-01-01

85

Quantum computing: pro and con  

Microsoft Academic Search

I assess the potential of quantum computation. Broad and important applications must be found to justify construction of a quantum computer; I review some of the known quantum algorithms and consider the prospects for nding new ones. Quantum computers are notoriously susceptible to making errors; I discuss recently developed fault-tolerant procedures that enable a quantum computer with noisy gates to

Charles C. Lauritsen

86

Quantum Computation and Quantum Error Prevention Wiki  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Quantum Computation and Quantum Error Prevention Wiki is a collaborative and live document to compliment courses on quantum computing. All edits must be made by registered users in order to maintain accuracy and integrity for the document. It is produced by Qunet, a network for quantum physicists, particularly those working in the fields of quantum information and quantum computation. It was developed as a part of a NSF funded project led by Prof. M. S. Byrd at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

Mark S. Byrd

2014-04-04

87

Universal blind quantum computation  

E-print Network

We present a protocol which allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for her such that the client's inputs, outputs and computation remain perfectly private, and where she does not require any quantum computational power or memory. The client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. Our protocol is interactive: after the initial preparation of quantum states, the client and server use two-way classical communication which enables the client to drive the computation, giving single-qubit measurement instructions to the server, depending on previous measurement outcomes. Our protocol works for inputs and outputs that are either classical or quantum. We give an authentication protocol that allows the client to detect an interfering server; our scheme can also be made fault-tolerant. We also generalize our result to the setting of a purely classical client who communicates classically with two non-communicating entangled servers, in order to perform a blind quantum computation. By incorporating the authentication protocol, we show that any problem in BQP has an entangled two-prover interactive proof with a purely classical verifier. Our protocol is the first universal scheme which detects a cheating server, as well as the first protocol which does not require any quantum computation whatsoever on the client's side. The novelty of our approach is in using the unique features of measurement-based quantum computing which allows us to clearly distinguish between the quantum and classical aspects of a quantum computation.

Anne Broadbent; Joseph Fitzsimons; Elham Kashefi

2009-12-12

88

Quantum Computing with Quantum Dots  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report recent results on the spin dynamics of coupled quantum dots and their potential as quantum computer devices. Using the Heitler-London approach, we obtain the exchange coupling J(B,a) between the excess electrons of coupled dots.(D.P. DiVincenzo and D. Loss, Quantum Computation is Physical), to appear in Superlattices and Microstructures. Special Issue on the occasion of Rolf Landauer's 70th Birthday, ed. S. Datta. See cond- mat/9710259. The dependence of J on the magnetic field B and the interdot distance 2a is of great importance for controlling the coherent time-evolution of the two-spin system as required for quantum computation.(D. Loss and D.P. DiVincenzo, Phys. Rev. A, in press. See cond- mat/9701055.) Our result, which is in good agreement with a more refined LCAO calculation, is accessible to experimental tests via magnetic response measurements.

Burkard, Guido; Loss, Daniel

1998-03-01

89

Review of quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

Digital computers are machines that can be programmed to perform logical and arithmetical operations. Contemporary digital computers are universal,'' in the sense that a program that runs on one computer can, if properly compiled, run on any other computer that has access to enough memory space and time. Any one universal computer can simulate the operation of any other; and the set of tasks that any such machine can perform is common to all universal machines. Since Bennett's discovery that computation can be carried out in a non-dissipative fashion, a number of Hamiltonian quantum-mechanical systems have been proposed whose time-evolutions over discrete intervals are equivalent to those of specific universal computers. The first quantum-mechanical treatment of computers was given by Benioff, who exhibited a Hamiltonian system with a basis whose members corresponded to the logical states of a Turing machine. In order to make the Hamiltonian local, in the sense that its structure depended only on the part of the computation being performed at that time, Benioff found it necessary to make the Hamiltonian time-dependent. Feynman discovered a way to make the computational Hamiltonian both local and time-independent by incorporating the direction of computation in the initial condition. In Feynman's quantum computer, the program is a carefully prepared wave packet that propagates through different computational states. Deutsch presented a quantum computer that exploits the possibility of existing in a superposition of computational states to perform tasks that a classical computer cannot, such as generating purely random numbers, and carrying out superpositions of computations as a method of parallel processing. In this paper, we show that such computers, by virtue of their common function, possess a common form for their quantum dynamics.

Lloyd, S.

1992-01-01

90

Review of quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

Digital computers are machines that can be programmed to perform logical and arithmetical operations. Contemporary digital computers are ``universal,`` in the sense that a program that runs on one computer can, if properly compiled, run on any other computer that has access to enough memory space and time. Any one universal computer can simulate the operation of any other; and the set of tasks that any such machine can perform is common to all universal machines. Since Bennett`s discovery that computation can be carried out in a non-dissipative fashion, a number of Hamiltonian quantum-mechanical systems have been proposed whose time-evolutions over discrete intervals are equivalent to those of specific universal computers. The first quantum-mechanical treatment of computers was given by Benioff, who exhibited a Hamiltonian system with a basis whose members corresponded to the logical states of a Turing machine. In order to make the Hamiltonian local, in the sense that its structure depended only on the part of the computation being performed at that time, Benioff found it necessary to make the Hamiltonian time-dependent. Feynman discovered a way to make the computational Hamiltonian both local and time-independent by incorporating the direction of computation in the initial condition. In Feynman`s quantum computer, the program is a carefully prepared wave packet that propagates through different computational states. Deutsch presented a quantum computer that exploits the possibility of existing in a superposition of computational states to perform tasks that a classical computer cannot, such as generating purely random numbers, and carrying out superpositions of computations as a method of parallel processing. In this paper, we show that such computers, by virtue of their common function, possess a common form for their quantum dynamics.

Lloyd, S.

1992-12-01

91

Simulation of Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steady process of computer miniaturisation will soon come to a scale where quantum eects on computation can no longer be ignored. Hardware development will nally reach a point where boolean logic will no longer be applicable and the classical concept of a universal deterministic computer with the Turing machine as mathematical model will have to be replaced by a

Karl Svozil

92

Computational Methods for Simulating Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

This review gives a survey of numerical algorithms and software to simulate quantum computers.It covers the basic concepts of quantum computation and quantum algorithms and includes a few examples that illustrate the use of simulation software for ideal and physical models of quantum computers.

H. De Raedt; K. Michielsen

2004-08-02

93

Quantum Computation: A Computer Science Perspective  

E-print Network

The theory of quantum computation is presented in a self contained way from a computer science perspective. The basics of classical computation and quantum mechanics is reviewed. The circuit model of quantum computation is presented in detail. Throughout there is an emphasis on the physical as well as the abstract aspects of computation and the interplay between them. This report is presented as a Master's thesis at the department of Computer Science and Engineering at G{\\"o}teborg University, G{\\"o}teborg, Sweden. The text is part of a larger work that is planned to include chapters on quantum algorithms, the quantum Turing machine model and abstract approaches to quantum computation.

Anders K. H. Bengtsson

2005-11-30

94

Nature as quantum computer  

E-print Network

Set theory reduces all processes to assembly and disassembly. A similar architecture is proposed for nature as quantum computer. It resolves the classical space-time underlying Feynman diagrams into a quantum network of creation and annihilation processes, reducing kinematics to quantum statistics, and regularizing the Lie algebra of the Einstein diffeomorphism group. The usually separate and singular Lie algebras of kinematics, statistics, and conserved currents merge into one regular statistics Lie algebra.

David Ritz Finkelstein

2012-01-08

95

Modelling of Miniature Ion Traps for Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion traps are one of the leading technologies for the implementation of quantum computers in hardware. They are a vacuum technology that captures small number of laser-cooled ions in a linear trap and uses their quantum states to construct quantum circuits. We present the simulation results for quantum computing in a miniature ion trap in order to investigate electrostatics, ion

Boris Brkic; Elias J. Griffith; Stephen Taylor; Jason F. Ralph

2004-01-01

96

Tripartite Blind Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

This paper proposes a model of tripartite blind quantum computation (TBQC), in which three independent participants hold different resources and accomplish a computational task through cooperation. The three participants are called C,S,T separately, where C needs to compute on his private data, and T has the required quantum algorithm, and S provides sufficient quantum computational resources. Then two concrete TBQC protocols are constructed. The first protocol is designed based on Broadbent-Fitzsimons-Kashefi protocol, and it cannot prevent from collusive attack of two participants. Then based on universal quantum circuit, we present the second protocol which can prevent from collusive attack. In the latter protocol, for each appearance of $R$-gate in the circuit, one call to a classical AND-BOX is required for privacy.

Min Liang

2013-11-25

97

An Introduction to Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

This is a short introduction to quantum computers, quantum algorithms and quantum error correcting codes. Familiarity with the principles of quantum theory is assumed. Emphasis is put on a concise presentation of the principles avoiding lengthy discussions.

Christof Zalka

1998-11-03

98

Duality and Recycling Computing in Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

Quantum computer possesses quantum parallelism and offers great computing power over classical computer \\cite{er1,er2}. As is well-know, a moving quantum object passing through a double-slit exhibits particle wave duality. A quantum computer is static and lacks this duality property. The recently proposed duality computer has exploited this particle wave duality property, and it may offer additional computing power \\cite{r1}. Simply put it, a duality computer is a moving quantum computer passing through a double-slit. A duality computer offers the capability to perform separate operations on the sub-waves coming out of the different slits, in the so-called duality parallelism. Here we show that an $n$-dubit duality computer can be modeled by an $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer. In a duality mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. A $n$-qubit quantum computer can be used as an $n$-bit reversible classical computer and is energy efficient. Our result further enables a $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer to run classical algorithms in a $O(2^n)$-bit classical computer. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. Here we also propose a recycling computing mode in which a quantum computer will continue to compute until the result is obtained. These two modes provide new tool for algorithm design. A search algorithm for the unsorted database search problem is designed.

Gui Lu Long; Yang Liu

2007-08-15

99

Optical Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

We review the field of Optical Quantum Computation, considering the various implementations that have been proposed and the experimental progress that has been made toward realizing them. We examine both linear and nonlinear approaches and both particle and field encodings. In particular we discuss the prospects for large scale optical quantum computing in terms of the most promising physical architectures and the technical requirements for realizing them.

T. C. Ralph; G. J. Pryde

2011-03-31

100

Quantum Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Quantum Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Computation 22-23 March 2012 Room 111, Jadwin Hall, focused meeting to explore the intersection between quantum statistical mechanics and quantum computation of statistical mechanical methods allows useful statements to be made about the average complexity of various

101

Using Quantum Computers for Quantum Simulation  

E-print Network

Numerical simulation of quantum systems is crucial to further our understanding of natural phenomena. Many systems of key interest and importance, in areas such as superconducting materials and quantum chemistry, are thought to be described by models which we cannot solve with sufficient accuracy, neither analytically nor numerically with classical computers. Using a quantum computer to simulate such quantum systems has been viewed as a key application of quantum computation from the very beginning of the field in the 1980s. Moreover, useful results beyond the reach of classical computation are expected to be accessible with fewer than a hundred qubits, making quantum simulation potentially one of the earliest practical applications of quantum computers. In this paper we survey the theoretical and experimental development of quantum simulation using quantum computers, from the first ideas to the intense research efforts currently underway.

Katherine L Brown; William J Munro; Vivien M Kendon

2010-11-16

102

Linear optical quantum computing with photonic qubits Pieter Kok*  

E-print Network

Linear optical quantum computing with photonic qubits Pieter Kok* Department of Materials, Oxford-ku, Tokyo 101-8430, Japan T. C. Ralph Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Queensland, St-4242, USA G. J. Milburn Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Queensland, St. Lucia

Dowling, Jonathan P.

103

QUANTUM COMPUTING: AN OVERVIEW MIKIO NAKAHARA  

E-print Network

QUANTUM COMPUTING: AN OVERVIEW MIKIO NAKAHARA Department of Physics and Research Center for Quantum of quantum computing and quantum infromation processing are introduced for mathe- matics students. Subjects. INTRODUCTION Quantum computing and quantum information processing are emerging disciplines in which

Li, Chi-Kwong

104

Quantum Computing and Digital Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic systems that contain a large number of solid-state devices must deal with the fact that there are likely to be differences between nominally identical components. Methods for manufacturing solid-state devices do not produce highly reproducible products, and solid-state devices change with age and use. Quantum computing systems propose to use the same binary digital language to represent information and

Robert W. Keyes

2010-01-01

105

Robustness of Adiabatic Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Adiabatic quantum computation for performing quantum computations such as Shor's algorithm is protected against thermal errors by an energy gap of size $O(1/n)$, where $n$ is the length of the computation to be performed.

Seth Lloyd

2008-05-18

106

From the Academy Quantum computing  

E-print Network

From the Academy Quantum computing Shu-Shen Li* , Gui-Lu Long§¶ , Feng-Shan Bai , Song-Lin Feng University, Beijing 100084, China Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence

Bai, Fengshan

107

Layered architecture for quantum computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a layered quantum computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a coherent device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose

N. Cody Jones; Rodney Van Meter; Austin G. Fowler; Peter L. McMahon; Jungsang Kim; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

2010-01-01

108

Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has recently been realized that use of the properties of quantum mechanics might speed up certain compu- tations dramatically. Interest in quantum computation has since been growing. One of the main difficulties in realizing quantum computation is that decoherence tends to destroy the information in a superposition of states in a quantum computer, making long compu- tations impossible. A

Peter W. Shor

1996-01-01

109

Mathematical Models of Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce two mathematical models of realistic quantum computation. First, we develop a theory of bulk quantum\\u000a computation such as NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) quantum computation. For this purpose, we define bulk quantum Turing\\u000a machine (BQTM for short) as a model of bulk quantum computation. Then, we define complexity classes EBQP, BBQP and ZBQP as\\u000a counterparts of

Tetsuro Nishino

2002-01-01

110

Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.310-3, which is comparable to that (7.510-3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10-3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

2012-09-01

111

Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation  

PubMed Central

Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the RaussendorfHarringtonGoyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.310?3, which is comparable to that (7.510?3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10?3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach. PMID:22948818

Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

2012-01-01

112

I, Quantum Robot: Quantum Mind control on a Quantum Computer  

E-print Network

The logic which describes quantum robots is not orthodox quantum logic, but a deductive calculus which reproduces the quantum tasks (computational processes, and actions) taking into account quantum superposition and quantum entanglement. A way toward the realization of intelligent quantum robots is to adopt a quantum metalanguage to control quantum robots. A physical implementation of a quantum metalanguage might be the use of coherent states in brain signals.

Paola Zizzi

2009-05-28

113

Optical Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

In 2001 all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single photon sources, linear optical elements, and single photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high efficiency single photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

Jeremy L. O'Brien

2008-03-11

114

UTS-AMSS Joint Annual Workshop on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Processing 2013  

E-print Network

Program -- 2013 UTS-AMSS Joint Annual Workshop on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information, CAS University of Technology Sydney (UTS) #12;UTS-AMSS Joint Annual Workshop on Quantum Computing Computing power of Turing machines based on quantum logic Afternoon 13:30--14:20 Yuan Feng Symbolic

Tian, Weidong

115

Lecture notes on Optical Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

A quantum computer is a machine that can perform certain calculations much faster than a classical computer by using the laws of quantum mechanics. Quantum computers do not exist yet, because it is extremely difficult to control quantum mechanical systems to the necessary degree. What is more, we do at this moment not know which physical system is the best suited for making a quantum computer (although we have some ideas). It is likely that a mature quantum information processing technology will use (among others) light, because photons are ideal carriers for quantum information. These notes are an expanded version of the five lectures I gave on the possibility of making a quantum computer using light, at the Summer School in Theoretical Physics in Durban, 14-24 January, 2007. There are quite a few proposals using light for quantum computing, and I can highlight only a few here. I will focus on photonic qubits, and leave out continuous variables completely. I assume that the reader is familiar with basic quantum mechanics and introductory quantum computing.

Pieter Kok

2007-05-29

116

Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems  

E-print Network

Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems Qualitative Questions Conjectural Answer to All Questions Locality in Quantum Computation, II Eric Rowell1 with Z. Wang2, C. Galindo3, S.-M. Hong4 1:Texas A Computation, II #12;Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems Qualitative Questions Conjectural Answer

Rowell, Eric C.

117

Coalgebraic Semantics for Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Coalgebraic Semantics for Quantum Computation Frank Roumen Master's thesis in Mathematics July 2012 systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2 Quantum computation 25 2.1 Hilbert spaces to perform computations on a quantum ver- sion of data, we obtain a type of computation that is fundamentally

Bosma, Wieb

118

Quantum++ - A C++11 quantum computing library  

E-print Network

Quantum++ is a general-purpose multi-threaded quantum computing library written in C++11 and composed solely of header files. The library is not restricted to qubit systems or specific quantum information processing tasks, being capable of simulating arbitrary quantum processes. The main design factors taken in consideration were ease of use, portability, and performance.

Vlad Gheorghiu

2014-12-15

119

Computational quantum chemistry website  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

none,

1997-08-22

120

Demonstration of blind quantum computing.  

PubMed

Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available. PMID:22267806

Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

2012-01-20

121

An Introduction to Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing is a new and exciting field at the intersection of mathematics, computer science and physics. It concerns a utilization of quantum mechanics to improve the efficiency of computation. Here we present a gentle introduction to some of the ideas in quantum computing. The paper begins by motivating the central ideas of quantum mechanics and quantum computation with simple toy models. From there we move on to a formal presentation of the small fraction of (finite dimensional) quantum mechanics that we will need for basic quantum computation. Central notions of quantum architecture (qubits and quantum gates) are described. The paper ends with a presentation of one of the simplest quantum algorithms: Deutsch's algorithm. Our presentation demands neither advanced mathematics nor advanced physics.

Noson S. Yanofsky

2007-08-02

122

technologies for computer  

E-print Network

information about how Microsoft Research tools and technologies can enhance your computer science research involved in innovative research in these areas? Microsoft Research Connections provides access to toolsTools and technologies for computer scientists who dream the future More information For more

Chaudhuri, Surajit

123

Adiabatic Quantum Computation is Equivalent to Standard Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adiabatic quantum computation has recently attracted attention in the physics and computer science communities, but its computational power has been unknown. We settle this question and describe an efficient adiabatic simulation of any given quantum algorit hm, which implies that the adiabatic com- putation model and the conventional quantum circuit model are polynomially equivalent. Our result can be extended to

Dorit Aharonov; Wim Van Dam; Julia Kempe; Zeph Landau; Seth Lloyd; Oded Regev

2004-01-01

124

Does not quantum compute  

Microsoft Academic Search

D-WAVE systems, a Canadian start-up, recently booted up a custom-built, multimillion-dollar, liquid-helium-cooled beast of a computer that it says runs on quantum mechanics. That's right. D-Wave, a 55-person company operating out of an office park in Burnaby, B.C., claims to have built that almost mythical machine, that holy grail of computing, the stuff of sci-fi novels and technothrillers - the

E. Guizzo

2010-01-01

125

Applications of quantum chaos to realistic quantum computations and sound treatment on quantum computers  

E-print Network

Applications of quantum chaos to realistic quantum computations and sound treatment on quantum dynamics on quantum computers in presence of imper- fections. The effects of random errors and static speech and sound of complex quantum wavefunctions. Keywords: Quantum computers, quantum chaos

Shepelyansky, Dima

126

Local Hamiltonians in quantum computation  

E-print Network

In this thesis, I investigate aspects of local Hamiltonians in quantum computing. First, I focus on the Adiabatic Quantum Computing model, based on evolution with a time- dependent Hamiltonian. I show that to succeed using ...

Nagaj, Daniel

2008-01-01

127

On Quantum Neural Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the notion of quantum neural computing in thecontext of several new directions in neural network research. In particular,we consider new neuron and network models that lead to rapidtraining; chaotic dynamics in neuron assemblies; models of attention andawareness; cytoskeletal microtubule information processing; and quantummodels. Recent discoveries in neuroscience that cannot be placed in the reductionistmodels of biological information

Subhash C. Kak

1995-01-01

128

Oracle Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building on the work of Deutsch and Jozsa, we construct oracles relative to which (1) there is a decision problem that can be solved with certainty in worst-case polynomial time on the quantum computer, yet it cannot be solved classically in probabilistic expected polynomial time if errors are not tolerated, nor even in nondeterministic polynomial time, and (2) there is

Andr Berthiaume; Gilles Brassard

1994-01-01

129

Reliable quantum certification for photonic quantum technologies  

E-print Network

A major roadblock for large-scale photonic quantum technologies is the lack of practical reliable certification tools. We introduce an experimentally friendly - yet mathematically rigorous - certification test for experimental preparations of arbitrary m-mode pure Gaussian states, pure non-Gaussian states generated by linear-optical circuits with n-boson Fock-basis states as inputs, and states of these two classes subsequently post-selected with local measurements on ancillary modes. The protocol is efficient in m and the inverse post-selection success probability for all Gaussian states and all mentioned non-Gaussian states with constant n. We follow the mindset of an untrusted prover, who prepares the state, and a skeptic certifier, with classical computing and single-mode homodyne-detection capabilities only. No assumptions are made on the type of noise or capabilities of the prover. Our technique exploits an extremality-based fidelity bound whose estimation relies on non-Gaussian state nullifiers, which we introduce on the way as a byproduct result. The certification of many-mode photonic networks, as those used for photonic quantum simulations, boson samplers, and quantum metrology, is now within reach.

L. Aolita; C. Gogolin; M. Kliesch; J. Eisert

2015-01-09

130

Genetic Algorithms and Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, researchers have applied genetic algorithms (GAs) to address some problems in quantum computation. Also, there has been some works in the designing of genetic algorithms based on quantum theoretical concepts and techniques. The so called Quantum Evolutionary Programming has two major sub-areas: Quantum Inspired Genetic Algorithms (QIGAs) and Quantum Genetic Algorithms (QGAs). The former adopts qubit chromosomes as representations

Gilson A. Giraldi; Renato Portugal; Ricardo N. Thess

2004-01-01

131

Abstract Emulation of Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computers realize parallel computing and solve NP problems efficiently since the possibilities of all the candidates for the answer are simultaneously calculated by utilizing quantum-mechanical processes. NP problems such as factorization are problems for which it is difficult to find the answers but candidates found are easily verified. In order to realize a quantum computer for solving practical problems,

Minoru Fujishima; Koichiro Hoh

132

Efficient quantum computation with probabilistic quantum gates  

E-print Network

With a combination of the quantum repeater and the cluster state approaches, we show that efficient quantum computation can be constructed even if all the entangling quantum gates only succeed with an arbitrarily small probability $p$. The required computational overhead scales efficiently both with $1/p$ and $n$, where $n$ is the number of qubits in the computation. This approach provides an efficient way to combat noise in a class of quantum computation implementation schemes, where the dominant noise leads to probabilistic signaled errors with an error probability $1-p$ far beyond any threshold requirement.

L. -M. Duan; R. Raussendorf

2005-02-18

133

Quantum computers: Definition and implementations  

SciTech Connect

The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria: Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.

Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15

134

Hybrid quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

We present a hybrid model of the unitary-evolution-based quantum computation model and the measurement-based quantum computation model. In the hybrid model, part of a quantum circuit is simulated by unitary evolution and the rest by measurements on star graph states, thereby combining the advantages of the two standard quantum computation models. In the hybrid model, a complicated unitary gate under simulation is decomposed in terms of a sequence of single-qubit operations, the controlled-z gates, and multiqubit rotations around the z axis. Every single-qubit and the controlled-z gate are realized by a respective unitary evolution, and every multiqubit rotation is executed by a single measurement on a required star graph state. The classical information processing in our model requires only an information flow vector and propagation matrices. We provide the implementation of multicontrol gates in the hybrid model. They are very useful for implementing Grover's search algorithm, which is studied as an illustrative example.

Sehrawat, Arun; Englert, Berthold-Georg [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Zemann, Daniel [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Technikerstrasse 21a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-02-15

135

Hybrid Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

We present a hybrid model of the unitary-evolution-based quantum computation model and the measurement-based quantum computation model. In the hybrid model part of a quantum circuit is simulated by unitary evolution and the rest by measurements on star graph states, thereby combining the advantages of the two standard quantum computation models. In the hybrid model, a complicated unitary gate under simulation is decomposed in terms of a sequence of single-qubit operations, the controlled-Z gates, and multi-qubit rotations around the z-axis. Every single-qubit- and the controlled-Z gate are realized by a respective unitary evolution, and every multi-qubit rotation is executed by a single measurement on a required star graph state. The classical information processing in our model only needs an information flow vector and propagation matrices. We provide the implementation of multi-control gates in the hybrid model. They are very useful for implementing Grover's search algorithm, which is studied as an illustrating example.

Arun Sehrawat; Daniel Zemann; Berthold-Georg Englert

2010-09-25

136

Layered Architecture for Quantum Computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a layered quantum-computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface-code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum-computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The time scales of physical-hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum-dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the time scale of days.

Jones, N. Cody; Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Kim, Jungsang; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

2012-07-01

137

Layered architecture for quantum computing  

E-print Network

We develop a layered quantum computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The timescales of physical hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the timescale of days.

N. Cody Jones; Rodney Van Meter; Austin G. Fowler; Peter L. McMahon; Jungsang Kim; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

2012-09-27

138

Quantum simulators A new tool to tackle computational quantum  

E-print Network

;Outline 1. Quantum computers. 2. Quantum simulators. 3. Realizations State-of-the-art. 4. Proposal for simulating spin models. 9 #12;Quantum computers 10 #12;The idea Digital quantum computer Bits "0" and "1 | = () | . Analog (continuous) quantum computer , = , , , 0 = - , 0 . Adiabatic quantum computer 0 ; 0

139

Quantum computing of semiclassical formulas  

E-print Network

We show that semiclassical formulas such as the Gutzwiller trace formula can be implemented on a quantum computer more efficiently than on a classical device. We give explicit quantum algorithms which yield quantum observables from classical trajectories, and which alternatively test the semiclassical approximation by computing classical actions from quantum evolution. The gain over classical computation is in general quadratic, and can be larger in some specific cases.

B. Georgeot; O. Giraud

2008-01-30

140

Topological quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theory of quantum computation can be constructed from the abstract study\\u000aof anyonic systems. In mathematical terms, these are unitary topological\\u000amodular functors. They underlie the Jones polynomial and arise in\\u000aWitten-Chern-Simons theory. The braiding and fusion of anyonic excitations in\\u000aquantum Hall electron liquids and 2D-magnets are modeled by modular functors,\\u000aopening a new possibility for the realization

Michael H. Freedman; Alexei Kitaev; Michael J. Larsen; Zhenghan Wang; L. D. Landau; Michael H. Freedman

2002-01-01

141

Quantum computing on encrypted data.  

PubMed

The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems. PMID:24445949

Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

2014-01-01

142

Quantum computing on encrypted data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

Fisher, K. A. G.; Broadbent, A.; Shalm, L. K.; Yan, Z.; Lavoie, J.; Prevedel, R.; Jennewein, T.; Resch, K. J.

2014-01-01

143

Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines  

E-print Network

Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines and quantum circuit families Christian by quantum circuit families . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3 Computational equivalence 19 3.1 Encoding with my master's study was to obtain a knowledge about the theoretical foundation of quantum computing

Møller, Jesper Michael

144

Motivation: Quantum Computation Sequences of Representations  

E-print Network

Motivation: Quantum Computation Sequences of Representations Outlook Localizing Unitary Braid Representations #12;Motivation: Quantum Computation Sequences of Representations Outlook Outline 1 Motivation: Quantum Computation Quantum Circuit and Topological Models 2 Sequences of Representations Matrix

Rowell, Eric C.

145

Quantum Computation Toward Quantum Gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to enlighten the emerging relevance of Quantum Information Theory in the field of Quantum Gravity. As it was suggested by J. A. Wheeler, information theory must play a relevant role in understanding the foundations of Quantum Mechanics (the "It from bit" proposal). Here we suggest that quantum information must play a relevant role in Quantum Gravity (the "It from qubit" proposal). The conjecture is that Quantum Gravity, the theory which will reconcile Quantum Mechanics with General Relativity, can be formulated in terms of quantum bits of information (qubits) stored in space at the Planck scale. This conjecture is based on the following arguments: a) The holographic principle, b) The loop quantum gravity approach and spin networks, c) Quantum geometry and black hole entropy. From the above arguments, as they stand in the literature, it follows that the edges of spin networks pierce the black hole horizon and excite curvature degrees of freedom on the surface. These excitations are micro-states of Chern-Simons theory and account of the black hole entropy which turns out to be a quarter of the area of the horizon, (in units of Planck area), in accordance with the holographic principle. Moreover, the states which dominate the counting correspond to punctures of spin j = 1/2 and one can in fact visualize each micro-state as a bit of information. The obvious generalization of this result is to consider open spin networks with edges labeled by the spin -1/ 2 representation of SU(2) in a superposed state of spin "on" and spin "down." The micro-state corresponding to such a puncture will be a pixel of area which is "on" and "off" at the same time, and it will encode a qubit of information. This picture, when applied to quantum cosmology, describes an early inflationary universe which is a discrete version of the de Sitter universe.

Zizzi, P. A.

2001-08-01

146

Self-correcting quantum computers  

E-print Network

Is the notion of a quantum computer (QC) resilient to thermal noise unphysical? We address this question from a constructive perspective and show that local quantum Hamiltonian models provide self-correcting QCs. To this ...

Chhajlany, R W

147

Liquid-State NMR Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Liquid-State NMR Quantum Computing Lieven M. K. Vandersypen TU Delft, Delft, the Netherlands Isaac, Dortmund, Germany 1 Introduction 1 2 Quantum Computation 1 3 NMR Quantum Computers 5 4 Summary of doing computation becomes possible, which is known as quantum computation (QC). Quantum computing

Suter, Dieter

148

Software Pauli Tracking for Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

The realisation of large-scale quantum computing is no longer simply a hardware question. The rapid development of quantum technology has resulted in dozens of control and programming problems that should be directed towards the classical computer science and engineering community. One such problem is known as Pauli tracking. Methods for implementing quantum algorithms that are compatible with crucial error correction technology utilise extensive quantum teleportation protocols. These protocols are intrinsically probabilistic and result in correction operators that occur as byproducts of teleportation. These byproduct operators do not need to be corrected in the quantum hardware itself. Instead, byproduct operators are tracked through the circuit and output results reinterpreted. This tracking is routinely ignored in quantum information as it is assumed that tracking algorithms will eventually be developed. In this work we help fill this gap and present an algorithm for tracking byproduct operators through a quantum computation. We formulate this work based on quantum gate sets that are compatible with all major forms of quantum error correction and demonstrate the completeness of the algorithm.

Alexandru Paler; Simon J. Devitt; Kae Nemoto; Ilia Polian

2014-01-23

149

Addition on a Quantum Computer  

E-print Network

A new method for computing sums on a quantum computer is introduced. This technique uses the quantum Fourier transform and reduces the number of qubits necessary for addition by removing the need for temporary carry bits. This approach also allows the addition of a classical number to a quantum superposition without encoding the classical number in the quantum register. This method also allows for massive parallelization in its execution.

Thomas G. Draper

2000-08-07

150

Interfacing External Quantum Devices to a Universal Quantum Computer  

PubMed Central

We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. PMID:22216276

Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, Max A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

2011-01-01

151

Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.  

PubMed

We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. PMID:22216276

Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

2011-01-01

152

Genetic Algorithms and Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, researchers have applied genetic algorithms (GAs) to address some\\u000aproblems in quantum computation. Also, there has been some works in the\\u000adesigning of genetic algorithms based on quantum theoretical concepts and\\u000atechniques. The so called Quantum Evolutionary Programming has two major\\u000asub-areas: Quantum Inspired Genetic Algorithms (QIGAs) and Quantum Genetic\\u000aAlgorithms (QGAs). The former adopts qubit chromosomes as representations

Gilson A. Giraldi; Renato Portugal; Ricardo N. Thess

2004-01-01

153

Cluster-state quantum computation  

E-print Network

This article is a short introduction to and review of the cluster-state model of quantum computation, in which coherent quantum information processing is accomplished via a sequence of single-qubit measurements applied to a fixed quantum state known as a cluster state. We also discuss a few novel properties of the model, including a proof that the cluster state cannot occur as the exact ground state of any naturally occurring physical system, and a proof that measurements on any quantum state which is linearly prepared in one dimension can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer, and thus are not candidates for use as a substrate for quantum computation.

Michael A. Nielsen

2005-07-01

154

Quantum computing for pattern classification  

E-print Network

It is well known that for certain tasks, quantum computing outperforms classical computing. A growing number of contributions try to use this advantage in order to improve or extend classical machine learning algorithms by methods of quantum information theory. This paper gives a brief introduction into quantum machine learning using the example of pattern classification. We introduce a quantum pattern classification algorithm that draws on Trugenberger's proposal for measuring the Hamming distance on a quantum computer (CA Trugenberger, Phys Rev Let 87, 2001) and discuss its advantages using handwritten digit recognition as from the MNIST database.

Maria Schuld; Ilya Sinayskiy; Francesco Petruccione

2014-12-11

155

Multi-party Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

We investigate definitions of and protocols for multi-party quantum computing in the scenario where the secret data are quantum systems. We work in the quantum information-theoretic model, where no assumptions are made on the computational power of the adversary. For the slightly weaker task of verifiable quantum secret sharing, we give a protocol which tolerates any t < n/4 cheating parties (out of n). This is shown to be optimal. We use this new tool to establish that any multi-party quantum computation can be securely performed as long as the number of dishonest players is less than n/6.

Adam Smith

2001-11-06

156

Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB - The Language

Cambridge, University of

157

Blind Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

We investigate the possibility of "having someone carry out the work of executing a function for you, but without letting him learn anything about your input". Say Alice wants Bob to compute some known function f upon her input x, but wants to prevent Bob from learning anything about x. The situation arises for instance if client Alice has limited computational resources in comparison with mistrusted server Bob, or if x is an inherently mobile piece of data. Could there be a protocol whereby Bob is forced to compute f(x) "blindly", i.e. without observing x? We provide such a blind computation protocol for the class of functions which admit an efficient procedure to generate random input-output pairs, e.g. factorization. The cheat-sensitive security achieved relies only upon quantum theory being true. The security analysis carried out assumes the eavesdropper performs individual attacks. Keywords: Secure Circuit Evaluation, Secure Two-party Computation, Information Hiding, Information gain vs disturbance.

Pablo Arrighi; Louis Salvail

2006-06-06

158

Quantum Computing: Pro and Con  

E-print Network

I assess the potential of quantum computation. Broad and important applications must be found to justify construction of a quantum computer; I review some of the known quantum algorithms and consider the prospects for finding new ones. Quantum computers are notoriously susceptible to making errors; I discuss recently developed fault-tolerant procedures that enable a quantum computer with noisy gates to perform reliably. Quantum computing hardware is still in its infancy; I comment on the specifications that should be met by future hardware. Over the past few years, work on quantum computation has erected a new classification of computational complexity, has generated profound insights into the nature of decoherence, and has stimulated the formulation of new techniques in high-precision experimental physics. A broad interdisciplinary effort will be needed if quantum computers are to fulfill their destiny as the world's fastest computing devices. (This paper is an expanded version of remarks that were prepared for a panel discussion at the ITP Conference on Quantum Coherence and Decoherence, 17 December 1996.)

John Preskill

1997-08-26

159

Quantum Computational Logics. A Survey  

E-print Network

Quantum computation has suggested new forms of quantum logic, called quantum computational logics. The basic semantic idea is the following: the meaning of a sentence is identified with a quregister, a system of qubits, representing a possible pure state of a compound quantum system. The generalization to mixed states, which might be useful to analyse entanglement-phenomena, is due to Gudder. Quantum computational logics represent non standard examples of unsharp quantum logic, where the non-contradiction principle is violated, while conjunctions and disjunctions are strongly non-idempotent. In this framework, any sentence of the language gives rise to a quantum tree: a kind of quantum circuit that transforms the quregister associated to the atomic subformulas of the sentence into the quregister associated to the sentence.

M. L. Dalla Chiara; R. Giuntini; R. Leporini

2003-05-06

160

Quantum technology and its applications  

SciTech Connect

Quantum states of matter can be exploited as high performance sensors for measuring time, gravity, rotation, and electromagnetic fields, and quantum states of light provide powerful new tools for imaging and communication. Much attention is being paid to the ultimate limits of this quantum technology. For example, it has already been shown that exotic quantum states can be used to measure or image with higher precision or higher resolution or lower radiated power than any conventional technologies, and proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating measurement precision below the standard quantum limit (shot noise) are just starting to appear. However, quantum technologies have another powerful advantage beyond pure sensing performance that may turn out to be more important in practical applications: the potential for building devices with lower size/weight/power (SWaP) and cost requirements than existing instruments. The organizers of Quantum Technology Applications Workshop (QTAW) have several goals: (1) Bring together sponsors, researchers, engineers and end users to help build a stronger quantum technology community; (2) Identify how quantum systems might improve the performance of practical devices in the near- to mid-term; and (3) Identify applications for which more long term investment is necessary to realize improved performance for realistic applications. To realize these goals, the QTAW II workshop included fifty scientists, engineers, managers and sponsors from academia, national laboratories, government and the private-sector. The agenda included twelve presentations, a panel discussion, several breaks for informal exchanges, and a written survey of participants. Topics included photon sources, optics and detectors, squeezed light, matter waves, atomic clocks and atom magnetometry. Corresponding applications included communication, imaging, optical interferometry, navigation, gravimetry, geodesy, biomagnetism, and explosives detection. Participants considered the physics and engineering of quantum and conventional technologies, and how quantum techniques could (or could not) overcome limitations of conventional systems. They identified several auxiliary technologies that needed to be further developed in order to make quantum technology more accessible. Much of the discussion also focused on specific applications of quantum technology and how to push the technology into broader communities, which would in turn identify new uses of the technology. Since our main interest is practical improvement of devices and techniques, we take a liberal definition of 'quantum technology': a system that utilizes preparation and measurement of a well-defined coherent quantum state. This nomenclature encompasses features broader than entanglement, squeezing or quantum correlations, which are often more difficult to utilize outside of a laboratory environment. Still, some applications discussed in the workshop do take advantage of these 'quantum-enhanced' features. They build on the more established quantum technologies that are amenable to manipulation at the quantum level, such as atom magnetometers and atomic clocks. Understanding and developing those technologies through traditional engineering will clarify where quantum-enhanced features can be used most effectively, in addition to providing end users with improved devices in the near-term.

Boshier, Malcolm [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berkeland, Dana [USG; Govindan, Tr [ARO; Abo - Shaeer, Jamil [DARPA

2010-12-10

161

Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk  

SciTech Connect

Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

2010-10-15

162

Quantum computing in a piece of glass  

E-print Network

Quantum gates and simple quantum algorithms can be designed utilizing the diffraction phenomena of a photon within a multiplexed holographic element. The quantum eigenstates we use are the photon's linear momentum (LM) as measured by the number of waves of tilt across the aperture. Two properties of quantum computing within the circuit model make this approach attractive. First, any conditional measurement can be commuted in time with any unitary quantum gate - the timeless nature of quantum computing. Second, photon entanglement can be encoded as a superposition state of a single photon in a higher-dimensional state space afforded by LM. Our theoretical and numerical results indicate that OptiGrate's photo-thermal refractive (PTR) glass is an enabling technology. We will review our previous design of a quantum projection operator and give credence to this approach on a representative quantum gate grounded on coupled-mode theory and numerical simulations, all with parameters consistent with PTR glass. We discuss the strengths (high efficiencies, robustness to environment) and limitations (scalability, crosstalk) of this technology. While not scalable, the utility and robustness of such optical elements for broader quantum information processing applications can be substantial.

Warner A. Miller; Grigoriy Kreymerman; Christopher Tison; Paul M. Alsing; Jonathan R. McDonald

2011-12-15

163

Algorithms on ensemble quantum computers.  

PubMed

In ensemble (or bulk) quantum computation, all computations are performed on an ensemble of computers rather than on a single computer. Measurements of qubits in an individual computer cannot be performed; instead, only expectation values (over the complete ensemble of computers) can be measured. As a result of this limitation on the model of computation, many algorithms cannot be processed directly on such computers, and must be modified, as the common strategy of delaying the measurements usually does not resolve this ensemble-measurement problem. Here we present several new strategies for resolving this problem. Based on these strategies we provide new versions of some of the most important quantum algorithms, versions that are suitable for implementing on ensemble quantum computers, e.g., on liquid NMR quantum computers. These algorithms are Shor's factorization algorithm, Grover's search algorithm (with several marked items), and an algorithm for quantum fault-tolerant computation. The first two algorithms are simply modified using a randomizing and a sorting strategies. For the last algorithm, we develop a classical-quantum hybrid strategy for removing measurements. We use it to present a novel quantum fault-tolerant scheme. More explicitly, we present schemes for fault-tolerant measurement-free implementation of Toffoli and ?(z)() as these operations cannot be implemented "bitwise", and their standard fault-tolerant implementations require measurement. PMID:21475662

Boykin, P Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh

2010-06-01

164

Quantum computation beyond the circuit model  

E-print Network

The quantum circuit model is the most widely used model of quantum computation. It provides both a framework for formulating quantum algorithms and an architecture for the physical construction of quantum computers. However, ...

Jordan, Stephen Paul

2008-01-01

165

Programming a Topological Quantum Computer  

E-print Network

Topological quantum computing has recently proven itself to be a powerful computational model when constructing viable architectures for large scale computation. The topological model is constructed from the foundation of a error correction code, required to correct for inevitable hardware faults that will exist for a large scale quantum device. It is also a measurement based model of quantum computation, meaning that the quantum hardware is responsible only for the construction of a large, computationally universal quantum state. This quantum state is then strategically consumed, allowing for the realisation of a fully error corrected quantum algorithm. The number of physical qubits needed by the quantum hardware and the amount of time required to implement an algorithm is dictated by the manner in which this universal quantum state is consumed. In this paper we examine the problem of algorithmic optimisation in the topological lattice and introduce the required elements that will be needed when designing a classical software package to compile and implement a large scale algorithm on a topological quantum computer.

Simon J. Devitt; Kae Nemoto

2012-09-07

166

Hybrid Quantum Computation in Quantum Optics  

E-print Network

We propose a hybrid quantum computing scheme where qubit degrees of freedom for computation are combined with quantum continuous variables for communication. In particular, universal two-qubit gates can be implemented deterministically through qubit-qubit communication, mediated by a continuous-variable bus mode ("qubus"), without direct interaction between the qubits and without any measurement of the qubus. The key ingredients are controlled rotations of the qubus and unconditional qubus displacements. The controlled rotations are realizable through typical atom-light interactions in quantum optics. For such interactions, our scheme is universal and works in any regime, including the limits of weak and strong nonlinearities.

P. van Loock; W. J. Munro; Kae Nemoto; T. P. Spiller; T. D. Ladd; Samuel L. Braunstein; G. J. Milburn

2007-01-11

167

Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.  

PubMed

The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors. PMID:21166541

Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Aln

2011-01-01

168

Molecular Magnets for Quantum Computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review recent progress in molecular magnets especially in the viewpoint of the application for quantum computing. After a brief introduction to single-molecule magnets (SMMs), a method for qubit manipulation by using non-equidistant spin sublevels of a SMM will be introduced. A weakly-coupled dimer of two SMMs is also a candidate for quantum computing, which shows no quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field. In the AF ring Cr7Ni system, the large tunnel splitting is a great advantage to reduce decoherence during manipulation, which can be a possible candidate to realize quantum computer devices in future.

Kuroda, Takayoshi

2009-06-01

169

7 Quantum Computing Applications of Genetic Programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computers are computational devices that use the dynamics of atomic-scale objects to store and manipulate information. Only a few, small-scale quantum computers have been built to date, but quantum computers can in principle outperform all possible classical computers in significant ways. Quantum computation is therefore a subject of considerable theoretical interest that may also have practical applications in the

Lee Spector; Howard Barnum; Herbert J. Bernstein; Nikhil Swamy

170

A potentially realizable quantum computer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arrays of weakly coupled quantum systems might compute if subjected to a sequence of electromagnetic pulses of well-defined frequency and length. Such pulsed arrays are true quantum computers: bits can be placed in superpositions of 0 and 1, logical operations take place coherently, and dissipation is required only for error correction. Operated with frequent error correction, such a system functions

Seth Lloyd

1993-01-01

171

quantph/9812037 QUANTUM COMPUTATION \\Lambda  

E-print Network

quant­ph/9812037 15 Dec 1998 QUANTUM COMPUTATION \\Lambda Dorit Aharonov Departments of Physics in their context, asking what the implications to other issues in computer science and physics are. In the end on fundamental physical questions, such as the transition from quantum to classical physics. 1 Overview Since

Crépeau, Claude

172

Quantum Computational Logics. A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computation has suggested new forms of quantum logic, called quantum\\u000acomputational logics. The basic semantic idea is the following: the meaning of\\u000aa sentence is identified with a quregister, a system of qubits, representing a\\u000apossible pure state of a compound quantum system. The generalization to mixed\\u000astates, which might be useful to analyse entanglement-phenomena, is due to\\u000aGudder.

MARIA LUISA DALLA CHIARA; ROBERTO GIUNTINI

2003-01-01

173

Semiconductor Spintronics for Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Encoding quantum information in spins embedded in semiconductors (electronic, ionic, or nuclear) offers several potential\\u000a approaches towards solid-state quantum computation. Electronic spin transport, persistence and manipulation in nonmagnetic\\u000a semiconductor materials, as well as the interaction of electronic spins with optics, are the fundamental properties reviewed\\u000a here. The presentation focuses on the material properties important for implementing quantum computation, and on

M. Flatt

174

Quantum computing with defects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized "deep-center" point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NCVSi-1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials.[4pt] [1] J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, J. B. Varley, A. Janotti, B. B. Buckley, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 107, 8513 (2010).

Varley, Joel

2011-03-01

175

Simulating quantum computing: Quantum eXpress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computing (QC) research has gained a lot of momentum recently due to several theoretical analyses that indicate that QC is significantly more efficient at solving certain classes of problems than classical computing. While experimental validation will ultimately be required, the primitive nature of current QC hardware leaves practical testing limited to trivial examples. Thus, a robust simulator is needed

Kareem S. Aggour; Renee Guhde; M. K. Sommins; Michael J. Simon

2003-01-01

176

Document: P1337 Category: Computing Technologies, Hardware License Status: Available to License Texas Industry Cluster: Information and Computer Technology  

E-print Network

Inventors Document: P1337 Category: Computing Technologies, Hardware License Status: Available to License Texas Industry Cluster: Information and Computer Technology Quantum dot applications for flash design using a protein-templated array of quantum dots reduces failure rates. When combined with a new

Lightsey, Glenn

177

Quantum technologies with hybrid systems.  

PubMed

An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mlmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jrg

2015-03-31

178

Database Manipulation on Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

Manipulating a database system on a quantum computer is an essential aim to benefit from the promising speed-up of quantum computers over classical computers in areas that take a vast amount of storage and processing time such as in databases. In this paper, the basic operations for manipulating the data in a quantum database will be defined, e.g. INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, SELECT, backing up and restoring a database file. This gives the ability to perform the data processing that usually takes a long processing time on a classical database system, in a simultaneous way on a quantum computer. Defining a quantum version of more advanced concepts used in database systems, e.g. the referential integrity and the relational algebra, is a normal extension to this work

Ahmed Younes

2007-05-29

179

Quantum Computing via The Bethe Ansatz  

E-print Network

We recognize quantum circuit model of computation as factorisable scattering model and propose that a quantum computer is associated with a quantum many-body system solved by the Bethe ansatz. As an typical example to support our perspectives on quantum computation, we study quantum computing in one-dimensional nonrelativistic system with delta-function interaction, where the two-body scattering matrix satisfies the factorisation equation (the quantum Yang--Baxter equation) and acts as a parametric two-body quantum gate. We conclude by comparing quantum computing via the factorisable scattering with topological quantum computing.

Yong Zhang

2011-06-20

180

Quantum computation with quantum dot excitons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potential application of elementary excitation in semiconductor quantum dot to quantum computation is discussed. We propose a scalable hardware and all optical implementation of a logic gate that exploits the discrete nature of electron-hole states and their well-concentrated oscillator strength for ultrafast gate operation. A multiple-bit gate function is based on the nearest neighbour dipole-dipole coupling. Rabi population oscillation and

H. Kamada; H. Gotoh

2004-01-01

181

Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

Kierk, I. K.

2002-01-01

182

Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

2001-01-01

183

Diagonal quantum circuits: their computational power and applications  

E-print Network

Diagonal quantum circuits are quantum circuits comprising only diagonal gates in the computational basis. In spite of a classical feature of diagonal quantum circuits in the sense of commutativity of all gates, their computational power is highly likely to outperform classical one and they are exploited for applications in quantum informational tasks. We review computational power of diagonal quantum circuits and their applications. We focus on the computational power of instantaneous quantum polynomial-time (IQP) circuits, which are a special type of diagonal quantum circuits. We then review an approximate generation of random states as an application of diagonal quantum circuits, where random states are an ensemble of pure states uniformly distributed in a Hilbert space. We also present a thermalizing algorithm of classical Hamiltonians by using diagonal quantum circuits. These applications are feasible to be experimentally implemented by current technology due to a simple and robust structure of diagonal gates.

Yoshifumi Nakata; Mio Murao

2014-08-04

184

Quantum technologies with hybrid systems  

E-print Network

An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for information processing, secure communication and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multi-tasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and the challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field.

G. Kurizki; P. Bertet; Y. Kubo; K. Mlmer; D. Petrosyan; P. Rabl; J. Schmiedmayer

2015-04-01

185

VolterraCIRM International School Quantum computer and quantum information  

E-print Network

Volterra­CIRM International School Quantum computer and quantum information Levico Terme, Italy Ricerca Matematica (CIRM), Istituto Trentino di Cultura The theory of quantum information and computing examples 3. general principles of quantum computation (q­bits, computational bases, gates, dis- crete

Petz, Dénes

186

Efficient distributed quantum computing  

E-print Network

We provide algorithms for efficiently moving and addressing quantum memory in parallel. These imply that the standard circuit model can be simulated with a low overhead by a more realistic model of a distributed quantum ...

Beals, Robert

187

Reliable quantum computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new field of quantum error correction has developed spectacularly since its origin less than two years ago. Encoded quantum information can be protected from errors that arise due to uncontrolled interactions with the environment. Recovery from errors can work effectively even if occasional mistakes occur during the recovery procedure. Furthermore, encoded quantum information can be processed without serious propagation

John Preskill

1998-01-01

188

Experimental one-way quantum computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard quantum computation is based on sequences of unitary quantum logic gates that process qubits. The one-way quantum computer proposed by Raussendorf and Briegel is entirely different. It has changed our understanding of the requirements for quantum computation and more generally how we think about quantum physics. This new model requires qubits to be initialized in a highly entangled cluster

P. Walther; K. J. Resch; T. Rudolph; E. Schenck; H. Weinfurter; V. Vedral; M. Aspelmeyer; A. Zeilinger

2005-01-01

189

Quantum computation and hidden variables  

E-print Network

Many physicists limit oneself to an instrumentalist description of quantum phenomena and ignore the problems of foundation and interpretation of quantum mechanics. This instrumentalist approach results to "specialization barbarism" and mass delusion concerning the problem, how a quantum computer can be made. The idea of quantum computation can be described within the limits of quantum formalism. But in order to understand how this idea can be put into practice one should realize the question: "What could the quantum formalism describe?", in spite of the absence of an universally recognized answer. Only a realization of this question and the undecided problem of quantum foundations allows to see in which quantum systems the superposition and EPR correlation could be expected. Because of the "specialization barbarism" many authors are sure that Bell proved full impossibility of any hidden-variables interpretation. Therefore it is important to emphasize that in reality Bell has restricted to validity limits of the no- hidden-variables proof and has shown that two-state quantum system can be described by hidden variables. The later means that no experimental result obtained on two-state quantum system can prove the existence of superposition and violation of the realism. One should not assume before unambiguous experimental evidence that any two-state quantum system is quantum bit. No experimental evidence of superposition of macroscopically distinct quantum states and of a quantum bit on base of superconductor structure was obtained for the present. Moreover same experimental results can not be described in the limits of the quantum formalism.

V. V. Aristov; A. V. Nikulov

2010-07-12

190

Distributed Quantum Computation Architecture Using Semiconductor Nanophotonics  

E-print Network

In a large-scale quantum computer, the cost of communications will dominate the performance and resource requirements, place many severe demands on the technology, and constrain the architecture. Unfortunately, fault-tolerant computers based entirely on photons with probabilistic gates, though equipped with "built-in" communication, have very large resource overheads; likewise, computers with reliable probabilistic gates between photons or quantum memories may lack sufficient communication resources in the presence of realistic optical losses. Here, we consider a compromise architecture, in which semiconductor spin qubits are coupled by bright laser pulses through nanophotonic waveguides and cavities using a combination of frequent probabilistic and sparse determinstic entanglement mechanisms. The large photonic resource requirements incurred by the use of probabilistic gates for quantum communication are mitigated in part by the potential high-speed operation of the semiconductor nanophotonic hardware. The s...

Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

2009-01-01

191

Complexity limitations on quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the powerful tools of counting complexity and generic oracles to help understand the lim- itations of the complexity of quantum computation. We show several results for the probabilistic quantum class BQP. BQP is low for PP, i.e., PPBQP = PP. There exists a relativized world where P = BQP and the polynomial-time hierarchy is innite. There exists a

Lance Fortnow; J. Rogers

1997-01-01

192

Quantum computation: Silicon comes back  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extraordinary long coherence times and high-fidelity manipulation of electron spins trapped in isotopically purified silicon could be an essential step towards the realization of a solid-state quantum computer.

Schreiber, Lars R.; Bluhm, Hendrik

2014-12-01

193

Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing  

SciTech Connect

We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

2008-07-01

194

Introduction to Quantum Computing Emma Strubell  

E-print Network

Introduction to Quantum Computing Part I Emma Strubell http://cs.umaine.edu/~ema/quantum_tutorial.pdf April 12, 2011 #12;Outline Overview What is quantum computing? Background Caveats Mathematical logic gates Computational complexity Emma Strubell (University of Maine) Intro to Quantum Computing

Siegelmann , Hava T

195

Computation and Dynamics: Classical and Quantum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss classical and quantum computations in terms of corresponding Hamiltonian dynamics. This allows us to introduce quantum computations which involve parallel processing of both: the data and programme instructions. Using mixed quantum-classical dynamics we look for a full cost of computations on quantum computers with classical terminals.

Kisil, Vladimir V.

2010-05-01

196

State complexity and quantum computation  

E-print Network

The complexity of a quantum state may be closely related to the usefulness of the state for quantum computation. We discuss this link using the tree size of a multiqubit state, a complexity measure that has two noticeable (and, so far, unique) features: it is in principle computable, and non-trivial lower bounds can be obtained, hence identifying truly complex states. In this paper, we first review the definition of tree size, together with known results on the most complex three and four qubits states. Moving to the multiqubit case, we revisit a mathematical theorem for proving a lower bound on tree size that scales superpolynomially in the number of qubits. Next, states with superpolynomial tree size, the Immanant states, the Deutsch-Jozsa states, the Shor's states and the subgroup states, are described. We showed that the universal resource state for measurement based quantum computation, the 2D-cluster state, has superpolynomial tree size. Moreover, we showed how the complexity of subgroup states and the 2D cluster state can be verified efficiently. The question of how tree size is related to the speed up achieved in quantum computation is also addressed. We show that superpolynomial tree size of the resource state is essential for measurement based quantum computation. The necessary role of large tree size in the circuit model of quantum computation is still a conjecture; and we prove a weaker version of the conjecture.

Yu Cai; Huy Nguyen Le; Valerio Scarani

2015-03-13

197

Mesoporous matrices for quantum computation with improved response through redundance  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a solid state implementation of quantum computation, which improves previously proposed optically driven schemes. Our proposal is based on vertical arrays of quantum dots embedded in a mesoporous material which can be fabricated with present technology. The redundant encoding typical of the chosen hardware protects the computation against gate errors and the effects of measurement induced noise. The

T. E. Hodgson; M. F. Bertino; N. Leventis; I. D'Amico

2007-01-01

198

Adiabatic Cluster State Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Models of quantum computation are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal quantum computation (QC). For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled "cluster" state followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. This opens the possibility to use the copious results from one-way QC to build more feasible adiabatic schemes.

Dave Bacon; Steven T. Flammia

2010-01-15

199

Computer Technology in Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides materials to help adult educators use computer technology in their teaching. Section 1, Computer Basics, contains activities and materials on these topics: increasing computer literacy, computer glossary, parts of a computer, keyboard, disk care, highlighting text, scrolling and wrap-around text, setting up text,

Slider, Patty; Hodges, Kathy; Carter, Cea; White, Barbara

200

Quantum Topology and Quantum Computing by Louis H. Kauffman  

E-print Network

Quantum Topology and Quantum Computing by Louis H. Kauffman Department of Mathematics, Statistics discussion of the relationships of quantum topology to quantum computing. This paper is intended and Computer Science 851 South Morgan Street University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, Illinois 60607

Kauffman, Louis H.

201

Quantum Chaos and Quantum Computers D. L. Shepelyansky*  

E-print Network

Quantum Chaos and Quantum Computers D. L. Shepelyansky* Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, UMR 5626: 03.67.Lx, 05.45.Mt, 24.10.Cn Abstract The standard generic quantum computer model is studied and residual inter-qubit couplings, is determined. This phenomenon appears in an isolated quantum computer

Shepelyansky, Dima

202

Adiabatic quantum computational properties of Hopf link  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Topological quantum computation has recently become an active field of research with a promise of tackling decoherence. Another track of research effort has presented adiabatic quantum computation as a candidate for implementing quantum computers with presently available technologies. We investigate the potential of combining the strengths of both regime. This report conducts adiabatic evolution on low dimensional topological constructs. We study the properties of a Hopf link related to adiabatic quantum computation. The graph and Seifert surface for the link are calculated. The Ising model representing the Hopf link is then derived from the surface. The Edwards-Anderson Hamiltonian is also solved for the Ising model. The associated eigenfunction and eigenvalues are then used to investigate computational problems which can be represented by the ground state of the adiabatic Hamiltonian. We also consider a type II Reidemeister move on the link. The graph and Seifert surface are calculated for the new link. Then the Edwards-Anderson Hamiltonian is solved for the associated Ising model. The constraints of adiabatic evolution are calculated for both cases. Finally, computational problems are investigated which can be represented by the ground state of the adiabatic Hamiltonian.

Shehab, Omar

2013-03-01

203

Distributed Quantum Computation Architecture Using Semiconductor Nanophotonics  

E-print Network

In a large-scale quantum computer, the cost of communications will dominate the performance and resource requirements, place many severe demands on the technology, and constrain the architecture. Unfortunately, fault-tolerant computers based entirely on photons with probabilistic gates, though equipped with "built-in" communication, have very large resource overheads; likewise, computers with reliable probabilistic gates between photons or quantum memories may lack sufficient communication resources in the presence of realistic optical losses. Here, we consider a compromise architecture, in which semiconductor spin qubits are coupled by bright laser pulses through nanophotonic waveguides and cavities using a combination of frequent probabilistic and sparse determinstic entanglement mechanisms. The large photonic resource requirements incurred by the use of probabilistic gates for quantum communication are mitigated in part by the potential high-speed operation of the semiconductor nanophotonic hardware. The system employs topological cluster-state quantum error correction for achieving fault-tolerance. Our results suggest that such an architecture/technology combination has the potential to scale to a system capable of attacking classically intractable computational problems.

Rodney Van Meter; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Austin G. Fowler; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

2009-09-17

204

A Grid Enabled Quantum Computer Simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation of quantum computers using classical computers is a computationally hard problem, requiring a huge amount of operations and storage. Grid systems are a good choice for simulating quantum algorithms, since they provide access to high-performance computer clusters. In this paper we present the design of a message passing parallel version of the quantum computer simulator, QCL, deployed as a

Simona Caraiman; Alexandru Archip; Vasile Manta

2009-01-01

205

Implementation of controlled SWAP gates for quantum fingerprinting and photonic quantum computation  

E-print Network

We propose a scheme to implement quantum controlled SWAP gates by directing single-photon pulses to a two-sided cavity with a single trapped atom. The resultant gates can be used to realize quantum fingerprinting and universal photonic quantum computation. The performance of the scheme is characterized under realistic experimental noise with the requirements well within the reach of the current technology.

B. Wang; L. -M. Duan

2006-10-08

206

Quantum Computers, Factoring and Decoherence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a quantum computer any superposition of inputs evolves unitarily into the correspond- ing superposition of outputs. It has been recently demonstrated that such computers can dramatically speed up the task of finding factors of large numbers - a problem of great practical significance because of its cryptographic applications. Instead of the nearly ex- ponential (? exp L1\\/3, for a

I. L. Chuang; R. Laflamme; P. Shor; W. H. Zurek

1995-01-01

207

Reversible logic and quantum computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is concerned with the construction of a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian describing a computer. This Hamiltonian generates a dynamical evolution which mimics a sequence of elementary logical steps. This can be achieved if each logical step is locally reversible (global reversibility is insufficient). Computational errors due to noise can be corrected by means of redundancy. In particular, reversible error-correcting codes

Asher Peres

1985-01-01

208

Rapid Solution of Problems by Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A class of problems is described which can be solved more efficiently by quantum computation than by any classical or stochastic method. The quantum computation solves the problem with certainty in exponentially less time than any classical deterministic computation.

David Deutsch; Richard Jozsa

1992-01-01

209

From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry  

E-print Network

Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

M. -H. Yung; J. Casanova; A. Mezzacapo; J. McClean; L. Lamata; A. Aspuru-Guzik; E. Solano

2013-07-16

210

A Quantum Jump in Computer Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classical and quantum information are very different. Together they can perform feats that neither could achieve alone. These include quantum computing, quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. This paper surveys some of the most striking new applications of quantum mechanics to computer science. Some of these applications are still theoretical but others have been implemented.

Gilles Brassard

1995-01-01

211

A Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Quantum Computer with Tellurium Donors in Silicon  

E-print Network

We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines the well-developed silicon technology with expected advances in MRFM.

G. P. Berman; G. D. Doolen; V. I. Tsifrinovich

2000-03-18

212

Prospective Algorithms for Quantum Evolutionary Computation  

E-print Network

This effort examines the intersection of the emerging field of quantum computing and the more established field of evolutionary computation. The goal is to understand what benefits quantum computing might offer to computational intelligence and how computational intelligence paradigms might be implemented as quantum programs to be run on a future quantum computer. We critically examine proposed algorithms and methods for implementing computational intelligence paradigms, primarily focused on heuristic optimization methods including and related to evolutionary computation, with particular regard for their potential for eventual implementation on quantum computing hardware.

Sofge, Donald A

2008-01-01

213

Realizing universal Majorana fermionic quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Majorana fermionic quantum computation (MFQC) was proposed by S. B. Bravyi and A. Yu. Kitaev [Ann. Phys. (NY) 298, 210 (2002), 10.1006/aphy.2002.6254], who indicated that a (nontopological) fault-tolerant quantum computer built from Majorana fermions may be more efficient than that built from distinguishable two-state systems. However, until now scientists have not known how to realize a MFQC in a physical system. In this paper we propose a possible realization of MFQC. We find that the end of a line defect of a p-wave superconductor or superfluid in a honeycomb lattice traps a Majorana zero mode, which becomes the starting point of MFQC. Then we show how to manipulate Majorana fermions to perform universal MFQC, which possesses possibilities for high-level local controllability through individually addressing the quantum states of individual constituent elements by using timely cold-atom technology.

Wu, Ya-Jie; He, Jing; Kou, Su-Peng

2014-08-01

214

Reliable quantum computers BY JOHN PRESKILL  

E-print Network

Reliable quantum computers BY JOHN PRESKILL Charles C. Lauritsen Laboratory of High Energy Physics long quantum computation can be performed reliably, provided that the average probability of error per quantum gate is less than a certain critical value, the accuracy threshold. A quantum computer storing

Preskill, John

215

Strengths and Weaknesses of Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently a great deal of attention has focused on quantum computation following a sequence of results suggesting that quantum computers are more powerful than classical probabilistic computers. Following Shor's result that factoring and the extraction of discrete logarithms are both solvable in quantum polynomial time, it is natural to ask whether all of NP can be efficiently solved in quantum

Charles H. Bennett; Ethan Bernstein; Gilles Brassard; Umesh V. Vazirani

1997-01-01

216

On the Problem of Programming Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical models of quantum computer hardware, we analyse the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical implementations of quantum computers. We discuss the origin of the instabilities of quantum algorithms and explore physical mechanisms to enlarge the region(s) of stable operation.

Hans De Raedt; Anthony Hams; Kristel Michielsen; Seiji Miyashita; Keiji Saito

2000-01-01

217

Universal Single-Server Blind Quantum Computation for Classical Client  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation allows a client without enough quantum technologies to delegate her quantum computation to quantum server, while keeping her input, output and algorithm secure. In this paper, we propose a universal single-server and classical-client blind quantum computation protocol based on entanglement swapping technology. In our protocol, the client interface with only one server and the only ability of the client requires is to get particles from trusted center and forward them to the server. Moreover, the protocol can be modified to make client completely classical by improving the ability of the trusted center. Numbers of blind quantum computation protocols have been presented in recent years, including single-, double- and triple-server protocols. In the single-server protocol, client needs to prepare single qubits. Though client can be classical in the double-server protocol, the two servers, who share Bell state from trusted center, are not allowed to communicate with each other. Recently, the triple-server protocol solves the noncommunication problem. Three servers, however, make the implementation of the computation sophisticated and unrealistic. Since it is impossible for blind quantum computation with only classical client and single server, blind quantum computation may work in the "Cloud + E-commerce" style in the future. Our protocol might become a key ingredient for real-life application in the first generation of quantum computations.

Hai-Ru Xu; Bang-Hai Wang

2014-11-12

218

[Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

2005-01-01

219

Some foundational aspects of quantum computers and quantum robots.  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses foundational issues related to quantum computing. The need for a universally valid theory such as quantum mechanics to describe to some extent its own validation is noted. This includes quantum mechanical descriptions of systems that do theoretical calculations (i.e. quantum computers) and systems that perform experiments. Quantum robots interacting with an environment are a small first step in this direction. Quantum robots are described here as mobile quantum systems with on-board quantum computers that interact with environments. Included are discussions on the carrying out of tasks and the division of tasks into computation and action phases. Specific models based on quantum Turing machines are described. Differences and similarities between quantum robots plus environments and quantum computers are discussed.

Benioff, P.; Physics

1998-01-01

220

Spin quantum computation in silicon nanostructures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proposed silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing Si technology infrastructure. Electronic and nuclear spins of shallow donors (e.g. phosphorus) in Si are ideal candidates for qubits in such proposals because of their long spin coherence times due to their limited interactions

S. Das Sarma; Rogerio de Sousa; Xuedong Hu; Belita Koiller

2005-01-01

221

Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states  

PubMed Central

Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems. PMID:22946034

Schulte-Herbrggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

2012-01-01

222

Maintaining coherence in quantum computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the inevitable coupling to external degrees of freedom of a\\u000aquantum computer are examined. It is found that for quantum calculations (in\\u000awhich the maintenance of coherence over a large number of states is important),\\u000anot only must the coupling be small but the time taken in the quantum\\u000acalculation must be less than the thermal time

W. G. Unruh

1995-01-01

223

Shaped pulses for quantum computing  

SciTech Connect

Quantum computers based on pulsed microwave operations are inherently sensitive to the pulse amplitude and detuning between the quantum bit and the microwave frequency. Designing techniques that can compensate both errors simultaneously have been challenging. Here we present a technique that achieves this goal by extending known numerical optimization schemes to obtain amplitude modulated microwave pulses robust against a large detuning range, and combining them with composite pulse techniques that are insensitive to amplitude errors.

Steffen, Matthias; Koch, Roger H. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

2007-06-15

224

Topological quantum computation via the quantum tunneling effect.  

PubMed

Quantum computers are predicted to utilize quantum states to process tasks far faster than those of conventional classical computers. In this Letter we show an alternative approach towards building topological quantum computers by tuning the quantum tunneling effect of degenerate quantum states in topological order, instead of braiding anyons. Using a designer Hamiltonian-the Wen-Plaquette model as an example, we study its quantum tunneling effect of the toric codes and show how to control the toric codes to realize topological quantum computation. In particular, we give a proposal to the measurement of the toric codes from Aharonov-Bohm interferences of quasiparticles. PMID:19392257

Kou, Su-Peng

2009-03-27

225

Quantum Computing in Plato's Cave  

E-print Network

We show that mere observation of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into a universal quantum computation. This effect, which occurs if the system is regularly observed at short time intervals, can be rephrased as a modern version of Plato's Cave allegory. More precisely, while in the original version of the myth, the reality perceived within the Cave is described by the projected shadows of some more fundamental dynamics which is intrinsically more complex, we found that in the quantum world the situation changes drastically as the "projected" reality perceived through sequences of measurements can be more complex than the one that originated it. After discussing examples we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics will become universal once "observed" as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be "purified" into a simpler one in larger dimensions.

Daniel Burgarth; Paolo Facchi; Vittorio Giovannetti; Hiromichi Nakazato; Saverio Pascazio; Kazuya Yuasa

2014-03-23

226

A Blueprint for a Topologically Fault-tolerant Quantum Computer  

E-print Network

The advancement of information processing into the realm of quantum mechanics promises a transcendence in computational power that will enable problems to be solved which are completely beyond the known abilities of any "classical" computer, including any potential non-quantum technologies the future may bring. However, the fragility of quantum states poses a challenging obstacle for realization of a fault-tolerant quantum computer. The topological approach to quantum computation proposes to surmount this obstacle by using special physical systems -- non-Abelian topologically ordered phases of matter -- that would provide intrinsic fault-tolerance at the hardware level. The so-called "Ising-type" non-Abelian topological order is likely to be physically realized in a number of systems, but it can only provide a universal gate set (a requisite for quantum computation) if one has the ability to perform certain dynamical topology-changing operations on the system. Until now, practical methods of implementing thes...

Bonderson, Parsa; Freedman, Michael; Nayak, Chetan

2010-01-01

227

Spin-based quantum computation in multielectron quantum dots  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a quantum computer the hardware and software are intrinsically connected because the quantum Hamiltonian (or more precisely its time development) is the code that runs the computer. We demonstrate this subtle and crucial relationship by considering the example of electron-spin-based solid-state quantum computer in semiconductor quantum dots. We show that multielectron quantum dots with one valence electron in the

Xuedong Hu; S. Das Sarma

2001-01-01

228

Tree Search and Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Traditional tree search algorithms supply a blueprint for modeling problem solving behaviour. A diverse spectrum of problems can be formulated in terms of tree search. Quantum computation, in particular Grover's algorithm, has aroused a great deal of interest since it allows for a quadratic speedup to be obtained in search procedures. In this work we consider the impact of incorporating classical search concepts alongside Grover's algorithm into a hybrid quantum search system. Some of the crucial points examined include: (1) the reverberations of contemplating the use of non-constant branching factors; (2) determining the consequences of incorporating an heuristic perspective into a quantum tree search model.

Lus Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

2015-02-06

229

Maintaining coherence in Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

The effect of the inevitable coupling to external degrees of freedom of a quantum computer are examined. It is found that for quantum calculations (in which the maintenance of coherence over a large number of states is important), not only must the coupling be small but the time taken in the quantum calculation must be less than the thermal time scale, $\\hbar/k_B T$. For longer times the condition on the strength of the coupling to the external world becomes much more stringent.

W. G. Unruh

1994-06-09

230

Theory of Quantum Computing and Communication  

E-print Network

Theory of Quantum Computing and Communication A report from the NSF sponsored workshop held January of Computer-Communications Research (C- CR) develop a new initiative in "Theory of Quantum Computing applications? We believe that C-CR should establish a new initiative in the "Theory of Quantum Computation

Fortnow, Lance

231

One Complexity Theorist's View of Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of quantum computation remains poorly understood. While physicists at- tempt to nd ways to create quantum computers, we still do not have much evidence one way or the other as to how useful these machines will be. The tools of computational complexity theory should come to bear on these important questions. Quantum computing often scares away many potential

Lance Fortnowy

232

Quantum Hypercomputation--Hype or Computation?  

E-print Network

- sibility of large-scale, fault-tolerant, and computationally superior quantum computers as purely to do and what it actually does. In quantum computing, where algorithms exist that can solve, claiming that quantum computers are neither digital nor analog. Rather, several error-correction codes were

Hagar, Amit

233

The Heisenberg Representation of Quantum Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Shor's discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers - the difficulty of describing them on classical computers - also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A

Daniel Gottesman

1998-01-01

234

Programming physical realizations of quantum computers  

E-print Network

We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical models of quantum computer hardware, we analyze the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical realizations of quantum computers. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation and Grover's database search algorithm are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum computation are unstable with respect to the physical realization of the quantum computer. We discuss the origin of these instabilities and discuss possibilities to overcome this, for practical purposes, fundamental limitation of quantum computers.

Hans De Raedt; Kristel Michielsen; Anthony Hams; Seiji Miyashita; Keiji Saito

2001-04-18

235

Computer Viruses. Technology Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and

Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

236

Ground state blind quantum computation on AKLT state  

E-print Network

The blind quantum computing protocols (BQC) enable a classical client with limited quantum technology to delegate a computation to the quantum server(s) in such a way that the privacy of the computation is preserved. Here we present a new scheme for BQC that uses the concept of the measurement based quantum computing with the novel resource state of Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) chains leading to more robust computation. AKLT states are physically motivated resource as they are gapped ground states of a physically natural Hamiltonian in condensed matter physics. Our BQC protocol can enjoy the advantages of AKLT resource states, such as the cooling preparation of the resource state, the energy-gap protection of the quantum computation, and the simple and efficient preparation of the resource state in linear optics with biphotons.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Vedran Dunjko; Elham Kashefi

2011-06-17

237

Impossibility of secure cloud quantum computing for classical client  

E-print Network

The first generation quantum computer will be implemented in the cloud style, since only few groups will be able to access such an expensive and high-maintenance machine. How the privacy of the client can be protected in such a cloud quantum computing? It was theoretically shown [A. Broadbent, J. F. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundation of Computer Science, 517 (2009)], and experimentally demonstrated [S. Barz, E. Kashefi, A. Broadbent, J. F. Fitzsimons, A. Zeilinger, and P. Walther, Science {\\bf335}, 303 (2012)] that a client who can generate randomly-rotated single qubit states can delegate her quantum computing to a remote quantum server without leaking any privacy. The generation of a single qubit state is not too much burden for the client, and therefore we can say that "almost classical client" can enjoy the secure cloud quantum computing. However, isn't is possible to realize a secure cloud quantum computing for a client who is completely free from any quantum technology? Here we show that perfectly-secure cloud quantum computing is impossible for a completely classical client unless classical computing can simulate quantum computing, or a breakthrough is brought in classical cryptography.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Takeshi Koshiba

2014-07-07

238

Topological cluster state quantum computing  

E-print Network

The quantum computing scheme described in Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 190504 (2007), when viewed as a cluster state computation, features a 3-D cluster state, novel adjustable strength error correction capable of correcting general errors through the correction of Z errors only, a threshold error rate approaching 1% and low overhead arbitrarily long-range logical gates. In this work, we review the scheme in detail framing discussion solely in terms of the required 3-D cluster state and its stabilizers.

Austin G. Fowler; Kovid Goyal

2009-02-25

239

Universal Quantum Gates for Single Cooper Pair Box Based Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation. Quantum gate operations are achieved by applying sequences of voltages and magnetic fluxes to single qubits or pairs of qubits. Neither the temporal duration, nor the starting time, of a gate operation is used as a control parameter. As a result, the quantum gates have a constant and known duration, and depend upon standard control parameter sequences regardless of when the gate operation begins. This simplifies the integration of quantum gates into parallel, synchronous, quantum circuits. In addition, we demonstrate the ability to fabricate such gates, and large-scale quantum circuits, using current e-beam lithography technology. These features make the SCB-based scheme a credible contender for practical quantum computer hardware.

P. Echternach; C. P. Williams; S. C. Dultz; P. Delsing; S. L. Braunstein; J. P. Dowling

2001-12-08

240

my account e-alert subscribe register Can quantum computers be  

E-print Network

-based arrays using conventional microfabrication technology. So far, the researchers have only made in tune Ultra-powerful quantum computers could use nanoscale resonators for passing information between the quantum data devices or qubits. PHILIP BALL The quantum computer will transform information technology

Geller, Michael R.

241

Quantum computing and hidden variables  

SciTech Connect

This paper initiates the study of hidden variables from a quantum computing perspective. For us, a hidden-variable theory is simply a way to convert a unitary matrix that maps one quantum state to another into a stochastic matrix that maps the initial probability distribution to the final one in some fixed basis. We list five axioms that we might want such a theory to satisfy and then investigate which of the axioms can be satisfied simultaneously. Toward this end, we propose a new hidden-variable theory based on network flows. In a second part of the paper, we show that if we could examine the entire history of a hidden variable, then we could efficiently solve problems that are believed to be intractable even for quantum computers. In particular, under any hidden-variable theory satisfying a reasonable axiom, we could solve the graph isomorphism problem in polynomial time, and could search an N-item database using O(N{sup 1/3}) queries, as opposed to O(N{sup 1/2}) queries with Grover's search algorithm. On the other hand, the N{sup 1/3} bound is optimal, meaning that we could probably not solve NP-complete problems in polynomial time. We thus obtain the first good example of a model of computation that appears slightly more powerful than the quantum computing model.

Aaronson, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2005-03-01

242

Quantum computation and decision trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many interesting computational problems can be reformulated in terms of decision trees. A natural classical algorithm is to then run a random walk on the tree, starting at the root, to see if the tree contains a node n level from the root. We devise a quantum-mechanical algorithm that evolves a state, initially localized at the root, through the tree.

Edward Farhi; Sam Gutmann

1998-01-01

243

High-fidelity quantum memory using nitrogen-vacancy center ensemble for hybrid quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

We study a hybrid quantum computing system using a nitrogen-vacancy center ensemble (NVE) as quantum memory, a current-biased Josephson junction (CBJJ) superconducting qubit fabricated in a transmission line resonator (TLR) as the quantum computing processor, and the microwave photons in TLR as the quantum data bus. The storage process is seriously treated by considering all kinds of decoherence mechanisms. Such a hybrid quantum device can also be used to create multiqubit W states of NVEs through a common CBJJ. The experimental feasibility is achieved using currently available technology.

Yang, W. L.; Feng, M. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yin, Z. Q. [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026 (China); Hu, Y. [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, J. F. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physics Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China)

2011-07-15

244

Experimental Demonstration of Blind Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to provide the possibility of preserving the privacy of a computation. Here we show the first such experimental demonstration of blind quantum computation where the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. We demonstrate various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover algorithms. Remarkably, the client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for future unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

Stefanie Barz; Elham Kashefi; Anne Broadbent; Joseph F. Fitzsimons; Anton Zeilinger; Philip Walther

2011-10-06

245

Ensemble quantum computing by NMR?spectroscopy  

PubMed Central

A quantum computer (QC) can operate in parallel on all its possible inputs at once, but the amount of information that can be extracted from the result is limited by the phenomenon of wave function collapse. We present a new computational model, which differs from a QC only in that the result of a measurement is the expectation value of the observable, rather than a random eigenvalue thereof. Such an expectation value QC can solve nondeterministic polynomial-time complete problems in polynomial time. This observation is significant precisely because the computational model can be realized, to a certain extent, by NMR spectroscopy on macroscopic ensembles of quantum spins, namely molecules in a test tube. This is made possible by identifying a manifold of statistical spin states, called pseudo-pure states, the mathematical description of which is isomorphic to that of an isolated spin system. The result is a novel NMR computer that can be programmed much like a QC, but in other respects more closely resembles a DNA computer. Most notably, when applied to intractable combinatorial problems, an NMR computer can use an amount of sample, rather than time, which grows exponentially with the size of the problem. Although NMR computers will be limited by current technology to exhaustive searches over only 15 to 20 bits, searches over as much as 50 bits are in principle possible, and more advanced algorithms could greatly extend the range of applicability of such machines. PMID:9050830

Cory, David G.; Fahmy, Amr F.; Havel, Timothy F.

1997-01-01

246

Ensemble quantum computing by NMR spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A quantum computer (QC) can operate in parallel on all its possible inputs at once, but the amount of information that can be extracted from the result is limited by the phenomenon of wave function collapse. We present a new computational model, which differs from a QC only in that the result of a measurement is the expectation value of the observable, rather than a random eigenvalue thereof. Such an expectation value QC can solve nondeterministic polynomial-time complete problems in polynomial time. This observation is significant precisely because the computational model can be realized, to a certain extent, by NMR spectroscopy on macroscopic ensembles of quantum spins, namely molecules in a test tube. This is made possible by identifying a manifold of statistical spin states, called pseudo-pure states, the mathematical description of which is isomorphic to that of an isolated spin system. The result is a novel NMR computer that can be programmed much like a QC, but in other respects more closely resembles a DNA computer. Most notably, when applied to intractable combinatorial problems, an NMR computer can use an amount of sample, rather than time, which grows exponentially with the size of the problem. Although NMR computers will be limited by current technology to exhaustive searches over only 15 to 20 bits, searches over as much as 50 bits are in principle possible, and more advanced algorithms could greatly extend the range of applicability of such machines. PMID:9050830

Cory, D G; Fahmy, A F; Havel, T F

1997-03-01

247

January 18, 2007 Topological Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

1 Date January 18, 2007 Title Topological Quantum Computing Speaker Chetan Nayak (Station Q) Abstract The computational power of a quantum-mechanical Hilbert space is potentially far greater than and Quantum Computation (CSQC) University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-6105 Phone: 805

Bigelow, Stephen

248

Thoughts on Noise and Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Thoughts on Noise and Quantum Computation Gil Kalai Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Yale models of quantum computation on n qubits subject to noise operators that are obtained as products of this pa- per is that these properties of noise are sufficient to reduce quantum computation

Kalai, Gil

249

Programming physical realizations of quantum computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical models of quantum computer hardware, we analyze the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical realizations of quantum computers. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation and Grover's database search algorithm are used to demonstrate that the results of a

Hans De Raedt; Kristel Michielsen; Anthony Hams; Seiji Miyashita; Keiji Saito

2001-01-01

250

Emerging Models and Technologies for Computation (EMT) Program Solicitation  

E-print Network

such as biological systems, quantum phenomena, nanoscale science and engineering, and other novel computing concepts. To bring fundamental changes to software, hardware and architectural design aspects of future computingEmerging Models and Technologies for Computation (EMT) Program Solicitation NSF 07-523 Replaces

Mazumder, Pinaki

251

Quantum Darwinism and Computability Theory  

E-print Network

This paper examines whether unitary evolution alone is sufficient to explain emergence of the classical world from the perspective of computability theory. Specifically, it looks at the problem of how the choice related to the measurement is made by the observer viewed as a quantum system. In interpretations where the system together with the observers is completely described by unitary transformations, the observer cannot make any choices and so measurement is impossible. From the perspective of computability theory, a quantum machine cannot halt and so it cannot observe the computed state, indicating that unitarity alone does not explain all matter processes. Further it is argued that the consideration of information and observation requires an overarching system of knowledge and expectations about outcomes.

Subhash Kak

2014-10-23

252

Gate count estimates for performing quantum chemistry on small quantum computers  

E-print Network

As quantum computing technology improves and quantum computers with a small but non-trivial number of N > 100 qubits appear feasible in the near future the question of possible applications of small quantum computers gains importance. One frequently mentioned application is Feynman's original proposal of simulating quantum systems, and in particular the electronic structure of molecules and materials. In this paper, we analyze the computational requirements for one of the standard algorithms to perform quantum chemistry on a quantum computer. We focus on the quantum resources required to find the ground state of a molecule twice as large as what current classical computers can solve exactly. We find that while such a problem requires about a ten-fold increase in the number of qubits over current technology, the required increase in the number of gates that can be coherently executed is many orders of magnitude larger. This suggests that for quantum computation to become useful for quantum chemistry problems, drastic algorithmic improvements will be needed.

Dave Wecker; Bela Bauer; Bryan K. Clark; Matthew B. Hastings; Matthias Troyer

2014-07-11

253

KLM quantum computation as a measurement based computation  

E-print Network

We show that the Knill Laflamme Milburn method of quantum computation with linear optics gates can be interpreted as a one-way, measurement based quantum computation of the type introduced by Briegel and Rausendorf. We also show that the permanent state of n n-dimensional systems is a universal state for quantum computation.

Sandu Popescu

2006-10-04

254

A Quantum Logic Array Microarchitecture: Scalable Quantum Data Movement and Computation  

E-print Network

Recent experimental advances have demonstrated technologies capable of supporting scalable quantum computation. A critical next step is how to put those technologies together into a scalable, fault-tolerant system that is also feasible. We propose a Quantum Logic Array (QLA) microarchitecture that forms the foundation of such a system. The QLA focuses on the communication resources necessary to efficiently support fault-tolerant computations. We leverage the extensive groundwork in quantum error correction theory and provide analysis that shows that our system is both asymptotically and empirically fault tolerant. Specifically, we use the QLA to implement a hierarchical, array-based design and a logarithmic expense quantum-teleportation communication protocol. Our goal is to overcome the primary scalability challenges of reliability, communication, and quantum resource distribution that plague current proposals for large-scale quantum computing.

Metodi, T S; Cross, A W; Chong, F T; Chuang, I L; Metodi, Tzvetan S.; Thaker, Darshan D.; Cross, Andrew W.; Chong, Frederic T.; Chuang, Isaac L.

2005-01-01

255

A Quantum Logic Array Microarchitecture: Scalable Quantum Data Movement and Computation  

E-print Network

Recent experimental advances have demonstrated technologies capable of supporting scalable quantum computation. A critical next step is how to put those technologies together into a scalable, fault-tolerant system that is also feasible. We propose a Quantum Logic Array (QLA) microarchitecture that forms the foundation of such a system. The QLA focuses on the communication resources necessary to efficiently support fault-tolerant computations. We leverage the extensive groundwork in quantum error correction theory and provide analysis that shows that our system is both asymptotically and empirically fault tolerant. Specifically, we use the QLA to implement a hierarchical, array-based design and a logarithmic expense quantum-teleportation communication protocol. Our goal is to overcome the primary scalability challenges of reliability, communication, and quantum resource distribution that plague current proposals for large-scale quantum computing.

Tzvetan S. Metodi; Darshan D. Thaker; Andrew W. Cross; Frederic T. Chong; Isaac L. Chuang

2005-09-07

256

Computable measure of quantum correlation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general state of an system is a classical-quantum state if and only if its associated -correlation matrix (a matrix constructed from the coherence vector of the party , the correlation matrix of the state, and a function of the local coherence vector of the subsystem ), has rank no larger than . Using the general Schatten -norms, we quantify quantum correlation by measuring any violation of this condition. The required minimization can be carried out for the general -norms and any function of the local coherence vector of the unmeasured subsystem, leading to a class of computable quantities which can be used to capture the quantumness of correlations due to the subsystem . We introduce two special members of these quantifiers: The first one coincides with the tight lower bound on the geometric measure of discord, so that such lower bound fully captures the quantum correlation of a bipartite system. Accordingly, a vanishing tight lower bound on the geometric discord is a necessary and sufficient condition for a state to be zero-discord. The second quantifier has the property that it is invariant under a local and reversible operation performed on the unmeasured subsystem, so that it can be regarded as a computable well-defined measure of the quantum correlations. The approach presented in this paper provides a way to circumvent the problem with the geometric discord. We provide some examples to exemplify this measure.

Akhtarshenas, S. Javad; Mohammadi, Hamidreza; Karimi, Saman; Azmi, Zahra

2015-01-01

257

COMPUTERS: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY PARADOX?  

Microsoft Academic Search

As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have invoked responses to many

Wan Narita Mustapha

258

Models of quantum computation and quantum programming languages  

E-print Network

The goal of the presented paper is to provide an introduction to the basic computational models used in quantum information theory. We review various models of quantum Turing machine, quantum circuits and quantum random access machine (QRAM) along with their classical counterparts. We also provide an introduction to quantum programming languages, which are developed using the QRAM model. We review the syntax of several existing quantum programming languages and discuss their features and limitations.

J. A. Miszczak

2011-12-03

259

RISQ - reduced instruction set quantum computers  

E-print Network

Candidates for quantum computing which offer only restricted control, e.g., due to lack of access to individual qubits, are not useful for general purpose quantum computing. We present concrete proposals for the use of systems with such limitations as RISQ - reduced instruction set quantum computers and devices - for simulation of quantum dynamics, for multi-particle entanglement and squeezing of collective spin variables. These tasks are useful in their own right, and they also provide experimental probes for the functioning of quantum gates in pre-mature proto-types of quantum computers.

Klaus Molmer; Anders Sorensen

2000-04-04

260

How to teach basic quantum mechanics to computer scientists and electrical engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the rapid development of quantum computation and of quantum technologies in general, computer scientists and electrical engineers will have to learn quantum mechanics (QM) in the near future. Although the teaching methods of QM are well established in both undergraduate and graduate physics courses, an effective method for teaching QM to computer scientists and electrical engineers is still

Bernardo Cuenca Grau

2004-01-01

261

Quantum Ballistic Evolution in Quantum Mechanics: Application to Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

Quantum computers are important examples of processes whose evolution can be described in terms of iterations of single step operators or their adjoints. Based on this, Hamiltonian evolution of processes with associated step operators $T$ is investigated here. The main limitation of this paper is to processes which evolve quantum ballistically, i.e. motion restricted to a collection of nonintersecting or distinct paths on an arbitrary basis. The main goal of this paper is proof of a theorem which gives necessary and sufficient conditions that T must satisfy so that there exists a Hamiltonian description of quantum ballistic evolution for the process, namely, that T is a partial isometry and is orthogonality preserving and stable on some basis. Simple examples of quantum ballistic evolution for quantum Turing machines with one and with more than one type of elementary step are discussed. It is seen that for nondeterministic machines the basis set can be quite complex with much entanglement present. It is also proved that, given a step operator T for an arbitrary deterministic quantum Turing machine, it is decidable if T is stable and orthogonality preserving, and if quantum ballistic evolution is possible. The proof fails if T is a step operator for a nondeterministic machine. It is an open question if such a decision procedure exists for nondeterministic machines. This problem does not occur in classical mechanics.

Paul Benioff

1996-05-15

262

Computer Technology for Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A special National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) service is contributing to national productivity by providing industry with reusable, low-cost, government-developed computer programs. Located at the University of Georgia, NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) has developed programs for equipment

Aviation/Space, 1982

1982-01-01

263

Decoding Technology: Computer Shortcuts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the typical early childhood administrator, there will never be enough hours in a day to finish the work that needs to be done. This includes numerous hours spent on a computer tracking enrollment, managing the budget, researching curriculum ideas online, and many other administrative tasks. Improving an administrator's computer efficiency can

Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

2008-01-01

264

Quantum Computing Using Crossed Atomic Beams  

E-print Network

A quantum computer is a hypothetical device in which the laws of quantum mechanics are used to introduce a degree of parallelism into computations and which could therefore significantly improve on the computational speed of a classical computer at certain tasks. Cluster state quantum computing (recently proposed by Raussendorf and Briegel) is a new paradigm in quantum information processing and is a departure from the conventional model of quantum computation. The cluster state quantum computer begins by creating a highly entangled multi-particle state (the cluster state) which it uses as a quantum resource during the computation. Information is processed in the computer via selected measurements on individual qubits that form the cluster state. We describe in detail how a scalable quantum computer can be constructed using microwave cavity QED and, in a departure from the traditional understanding of a computer as a fixed array of computational elements, we show that cluster state quantum computing is well suited to atomic beam experiments. We show that all of the necessary elements have been individually realised, and that the construction of a truly scalable atomic beam quantum computer may be an experimental reality in the near future.

P. Blythe; B. Varcoe

2006-05-23

265

Quantum computing and the entanglement frontier  

E-print Network

Quantum information science explores the frontier of highly complex quantum states, the "entanglement frontier." This study is motivated by the observation (widely believed but unproven) that classical systems cannot simulate highly entangled quantum systems efficiently, and we hope to hasten the day when well controlled quantum systems can perform tasks surpassing what can be done in the classical world. One way to achieve such "quantum supremacy" would be to run an algorithm on a quantum computer which solves a problem with a super-polynomial speedup relative to classical computers, but there may be other ways that can be achieved sooner, such as simulating exotic quantum states of strongly correlated matter. To operate a large scale quantum computer reliably we will need to overcome the debilitating effects of decoherence, which might be done using "standard" quantum hardware protected by quantum error-correcting codes, or by exploiting the nonabelian quantum statistics of anyons realized in solid state sy...

Preskill, John

2012-01-01

266

Information Technology: Computer Systems Engineer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Watch how a community college education took one person from being a computer know-nothing to having a career as a successful information technologist, in this video adapted from Pathways to Technology.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2012-05-18

267

A concise introduction to quantum probability, quantum mechanics, and quantum computation  

E-print Network

A concise introduction to quantum probability, quantum mechanics, and quantum computation Greg called "non-commutative probability". Recently quantum computation has entered as a new reason for both mathematicians and computer scientists to learn the precepts of quantum mechan- ics. Just as randomized

Thomases, Becca

268

Geometry of Quantum Computation with Qutrits  

PubMed Central

Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3n). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail. PMID:24005379

Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

2013-01-01

269

What quantum computers may tell us about quantum mechanics  

E-print Network

17 What quantum computers may tell us about quantum mechanics Christopher R. Monroe University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Quantum mechanics occupies a unique position in the history of science. It has sur successes of quantum mechanics, its foundations are often questioned, owing to the glaring difficulties

Monroe, Christopher

270

Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Computer Science Department  

E-print Network

Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Eli Biham Computer Science Department, Switzerland Tal Mor Department of Physics Technion Haifa 32000, Israel (September 24, 1996) Abstract Quantum transmission of information. We present a quantum cryptographic system, in which users store particles

Biham, Eli

271

Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present numerical and analytical studies of a quantum computer proposed by the Yamamoto group in Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 017901 (2002). The stable and quantum chaos regimes in the quantum computer hardware are identified as a function of magnetic field gradient and dipole-dipole couplings between qubits on a square lattice. It is shown that a strong magnetic field gradient

J. Lages; D. L. Shepelyansky

2006-01-01

272

Technical Report No. 2005-496 QUANTUM COMPUTATION AND QUANTUM  

E-print Network

. This will leave quantum computation and quantum information as abstract mathematical curiosities, without computation and quantum infor- mation with a talk Richard Feynman gave at MIT in 1981 see 80 for the journal This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. 1 #12;modeled

Graham, Nick

273

QCE: A Simulator for Quantum Computer Hardware  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Quantum Computer Emulator (QCE) described in this paper consists of a simulator of a generic, general purpose quantum computer and a graphical user interface. The latter is used to control the simulator, to define the hardware of the quantum computer and to debug and execute quantum algorithms. QCE runs in a Windows 98\\/NT\\/2000\\/ME\\/XP environment. It can be used to

Kristel Michielsen; Hans de Raedt

2003-01-01

274

A simulator for quantum computer hardware  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Quantum Computer Emulator (QCE) described in this paper consists of a simulator of a generic, general purpose quantum computer and a graphical user interface. The latter is used to control the sim- ulator, to dene the hardware of the quantum computer and to debug and execute quantum algorithms. QCE runs in a Windows 98\\/NT\\/2000\\/ME\\/XP environment. It can be used

Koen De Raedt; Hans De Raedt; Kristel Michielsen

2002-01-01

275

Classical Control of Large-Scale Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

The accelerated development of quantum technology has reached a pivotal point. Early in 2014, several results were published demonstrating that several experimental technologies are now accurate enough to satisfy the requirements of fault-tolerant, error corrected quantum computation. While there are many technological and experimental issues that still need to be solved, the ability of experimental systems to now have error rates low enough to satisfy the fault-tolerant threshold for several error correction models is a tremendous milestone. Consequently, it is now a good time for the computer science and classical engineering community to examine the {\\em classical} problems associated with compiling quantum algorithms and implementing them on future quantum hardware. In this paper, we will review the basic operational rules of a topological quantum computing architecture and outline one of the most important classical problems that need to be solved; the decoding of error correction data for a large-scale quantum computer. We will endeavour to present these problems independently from the underlying physics as much of this work can be effectively solved by non-experts in quantum information or quantum mechanics.

Simon J. Devitt

2014-05-20

276

A lambda calculus for quantum computation with classical control  

E-print Network

A lambda calculus for quantum computation with classical control is to develop a functional programming language for quantum computers. We develop a lambda calculus a functional programming language for* * quan- tum computers. Quantum computing is a theory of computation

Selinger, Peter

277

The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and

Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

2008-01-01

278

Computer Technology and Social Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computing involves social issues and political choices. Issues such as privacy, computer crime, gender inequity, disemployment, and electronic democracy versus "Big Brother" are addressed in the context of efforts to develop a national public policy for information technology. A broad range of research and case studies are examined in an attempt

Garson, G. David

279

Quantum-dot cellular automata: computing by filed polarization  

Microsoft Academic Search

As CMOS technology continue its monotonic shrink, computing with quantum dots remains a goal in nanotechnology research. Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a paradigm for low-power, high-speed, highly dense computing that could be realized in a variety of materials systems. Discussed here are the basic paradigm of QCA, materials systems in which QCA might be constructed, a series of experiments

Gary H. Bernstein

2003-01-01

280

Quantum-dot cellular automata: computing by field polarization  

Microsoft Academic Search

As CMOS technology continues its monotonic shrink, computing with quantum dots remains a goal in nanotechnology research. Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a paradigm for low-power, high-speed, highly dense computing that could be realized in a variety of materials systems. Discussed here are the basic paradigm of QCA, materials systems in which QCA might be constructed, a series of experiments

Gary H. Bernstein

2003-01-01

281

Strain effects on silicon donor exchange: Quantum computer architecture considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proposed silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing infrastructure of the powerful Si technology. Quantitative understanding of and precise physical control over donor (e.g., phosphorus) exchange are crucial elements in the physics underlying the proposed Si-based quantum-computer hardware. An important potential problem

Belita Koiller; Xuedong Hu

2002-01-01

282

Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.  

PubMed

It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations. PMID:22652702

Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

2012-07-14

283

Mesoporous matrices for quantum computation with improved response through redundance  

E-print Network

We present a solid state implementation of quantum computation, which improves previously proposed optically driven schemes. Our proposal is based on vertical arrays of quantum dots embedded in a mesoporous material which can be fabricated with present technology. The redundant encoding typical of the chosen hardware protects the computation against gate errors and the effects of measurement induced noise. The system parameters required for quantum computation applications are calculated for II-VI and III-V materials and found to be within the experimental range. The proposed hardware may help minimize errors due to polydispersity of dot sizes, which is at present one of the main problems in relation to quantum dot-based quantum computation.

T. Hodgson; M. Bertino; N. Leventis; I. D'Amico

2007-05-22

284

Mesoporous matrices for quantum computation with improved response through redundance  

E-print Network

We present a solid state implementation of quantum computation, which improves previously proposed optically driven schemes. Our proposal is based on vertical arrays of quantum dots embedded in a mesoporous material which can be fabricated with present technology. The redundant encoding typical of the chosen hardware protects the computation against gate errors and the effects of measurement induced noise. The system parameters required for quantum computation applications are calculated for II-VI and III-V materials and found to be within the experimental range. The proposed hardware may help minimize errors due to polydispersity of dot sizes, which is at present one of the main problems in relation to quantum dot-based quantum computation.

Hodgson, T; Leventis, N; D'Amico, I; 10.1063/1.2745438

2009-01-01

285

Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

286

Dynamical imperfections in quantum computers  

SciTech Connect

We study the effects of dynamical imperfections in quantum computers. By considering an explicit example, we identify different regimes ranging from the low-frequency case, where the imperfections can be considered as static but with renormalized parameters, to the high-frequency fluctuations, where the effects of imperfections are completely wiped out. We generalize our results by proving a theorem on the dynamical evolution of a system in the presence of dynamical perturbations.

Facchi, Paolo; Pascazio, Saverio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy and INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Montangero, Simone; Fazio, Rosario [NEST-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2005-06-15

287

Exploiting locality in quantum computation for quantum chemistry  

E-print Network

Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route towards highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost, however this solution still carries a large overhead. In this perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provide numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

Jarrod R. McClean; Ryan Babbush; Peter J. Love; Aln Aspuru-Guzik

2014-07-29

288

Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies  

E-print Network

We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.

Mehdi Ahmadi; David Edward Bruschi; Carlos Sabn; Gerardo Adesso; Ivette Fuentes

2014-04-29

289

Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies  

PubMed Central

We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects. PMID:24851858

Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabn, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

2014-01-01

290

Review: Towards Spintronic Quantum Technologies with Dopants in Silicon  

E-print Network

Dopants in crystalline silicon such as phosphorus (Si:P) have electronic and nuclear spins with exceptionally long coherence times making them promising platforms for quantum computing and quantum sensing. The demonstration of single-spin single-shot readout brings these ideas closer to implementation. Progress in fabricating atomic-scale Si:P structures with scanning tunnelling microscopes offers a powerful route to scale up this work, taking advantage of techniques developed by the computing industry. The experimental and theoretical sides of this emerging quantum technology are reviewed with a focus on the period from 2009 to mid-2014.

Gavin W. Morley

2014-08-06

291

Information Technology: Computer Systems Engineer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video adapted from Pathways to Technology, learn what drove Choice Jennings??someone who had never owned a computer of his own??to become interested in computer graphics, attend community college, earn an associate's degree in computer systems engineering (CSE), and start his own information technology (IT) business. Also see the many roles a CSE professional can play, from systems administrator to IT director.The video runs 2:45 and is accompanied by a background essay, standards alignment, and discussion questions. Users who sign up for a free account can save the resource and download the video as well.

292

Computer Technology for Industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shell Oil Company used a COSMIC program, called VISCEL to insure the accuracy of the company's new computer code for analyzing polymers, and chemical compounds. Shell reported that there were no other programs available that could provide the necessary calculations. Shell produces chemicals for plastic products used in the manufacture of automobiles, housewares, appliances, film, textiles, electronic equipment and furniture.

1982-01-01

293

Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware  

E-print Network

We present numerical and analytical studies of a quantum computer proposed by the Yamamoto group in Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 017901 (2002). The stable and quantum chaos regimes in the quantum computer hardware are identified as a function of magnetic field gradient and dipole-dipole couplings between qubits on a square lattice. It is shown that a strong magnetic field gradient leads to suppression of quantum chaos.

J. Lages; D. L. Shepelyansky

2005-10-14

294

Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.  

SciTech Connect

We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

2011-01-01

295

Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic instantiation of quantum computation. Third, there is no psychological evidence that such mental

Abninder Litt; Chris Eliasmith; Frederick W. Kroon

296

Geometry, optimal control and quantum computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computation promises solution to problems that are hard to solve by classical computers. The efficient construction of quantum circuits that can solve interesting tasks is a fundamental challenge in the field. Such efficient construction also reduces decoherence losses in physical implementations of quantum algorithms by reducing interaction time with the environment. Therefore, finding time-optimal ways to synthesize unitary transformations

Haidong Yuan

2006-01-01

297

Quantum Computation Beyond the Circuit Model  

E-print Network

The quantum circuit model is the most widely used model of quantum computation. It provides both a framework for formulating quantum algorithms and an architecture for the physical construction of quantum computers. However, several other models of quantum computation exist which provide useful alternative frameworks for both discovering new quantum algorithms and devising new physical implementations of quantum computers. In this thesis, I first present necessary background material for a general physics audience and discuss existing models of quantum computation. Then, I present three results relating to various models of quantum computation: a scheme for improving the intrinsic fault tolerance of adiabatic quantum computers using quantum error detecting codes, a proof that a certain problem of estimating Jones polynomials is complete for the one clean qubit complexity class, and a generalization of perturbative gadgets which allows k-body interactions to be directly simulated using 2-body interactions. Lastly, I discuss general principles regarding quantum computation that I learned in the course of my research, and using these principles I propose directions for future research.

Stephen P. Jordan

2008-09-13

298

A One-Way Quantum Computer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a scheme of quantum computation that consists entirely of one-qubit measurements on a particular class of entangled states, the cluster states. The measurements are used to imprint a quantum logic circuit on the state, thereby destroying its entanglement at the same time. Cluster states are thus one-way quantum computers and the measurements form the program.

Robert Raussendorf; Hans J. Briegel

2001-01-01

299

Stabilisation of Quantum Computations by Symmetrisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a method for the stabilisation of quantum computations (including quantum state storage). The method is based on the operation of projection into $\\\\cal SYM$, the symmetric subspace of the full state space of $R$ redundant copies of the computer. We describe an efficient algorithm and quantum network effecting $\\\\cal SYM$--projection and discuss the stabilising effect of the proposed

Adriano Barenco; David Deutsch; Artur Ekert; Richard Jozsa; Chiara Macchiavello

1996-01-01

300

Quantum computing: beyond the limits of conventional computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantum model of computation not only offers entirely new ways to manipulate information, but also allows information processing tasks to be formulated in unconventional, genuine quantum mechanical terms. We show that the task of distinguishing among entangled quantum states combines entanglement and non-determinism in a way that makes the quantum solution impossible to simulate on any classical machine (even

Marius Nagy; Selim G. Akl

2007-01-01

301

Universal quantum computation using the discrete-time quantum walk  

SciTech Connect

A proof that continuous-time quantum walks are universal for quantum computation, using unweighted graphs of low degree, has recently been presented by A. M. Childs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 180501 (2009)]. We present a version based instead on the discrete-time quantum walk. We show that the discrete-time quantum walk is able to implement the same universal gate set and thus both discrete and continuous-time quantum walks are computational primitives. Additionally, we give a set of components on which the discrete-time quantum walk provides perfect state transfer.

Lovett, Neil B.; Cooper, Sally; Everitt, Matthew; Trevers, Matthew; Kendon, Viv [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2010-04-15

302

Universal quantum computation using the discrete time quantum walk  

E-print Network

A proof that continuous time quantum walks are universal for quantum computation, using unweighted graphs of low degree, has recently been presented by Childs [PRL 102 180501 (2009)]. We present a version based instead on the discrete time quantum walk. We show the discrete time quantum walk is able to implement the same universal gate set and thus both discrete and continuous time quantum walks are computational primitives. Additionally we give a set of components on which the discrete time quantum walk provides perfect state transfer.

Neil B. Lovett; Sally Cooper; Matthew Everitt; Matthew Trevers; Viv Kendon

2010-03-02

303

Helsinki University of Technology: Computational Information Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Computational Information Technology is a research group of the Laboratory of Computational Engineering at the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland. This section of the website introduces visitors to the group's work on modelling and analyzing complex physical, technical and economic processes and systems. Researchers "carry out method development and application oriented research on advanced probabilistic and information theoretic methods." Some applications include statistical modelling of financial markets, pattern recognition in neural networks, machine vision for microscope image processing, data mining, and intelligent human-machine interfaces. The Research Projects section describes the group's work in these areas and highlights the mathematical and statistical methods used, such as Bayesian methods, vision geometry, Turing's reaction-diffusion systems, and time-frequency analysis. Each research area has its own website, where the overall project and theoretical framework is described along with images and diagrams. Publications, such as theses and journal articles are listed and some conference proceedings and articles are available to download.

304

Computations in Quantum Tensor Networks  

E-print Network

The computation of the ground state (i.e. the eigenvector related to the smallest eigenvalue) is an important task in the simulation of quantum many-body systems. As the dimension of the underlying vector space grows exponentially in the number of particles, one has to consider appropriate subsets promising both convenient approximation properties and efficient computations. The variational ansatz for this numerical approach leads to the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient. The Alternating Least Squares technique is then applied to break down the eigenvector computation to problems of appropriate size, which can be solved by classical methods. Efficient computations require fast computation of the matrix-vector product and of the inner product of two decomposed vectors. To this end, both appropriate representations of vectors and efficient contraction schemes are needed. Here approaches from many-body quantum physics for one-dimensional and two-dimensional systems (Matrix Product States and Projected Entangled Pair States) are treated mathematically in terms of tensors. We give the definition of these concepts, bring some results concerning uniqueness and numerical stability and show how computations can be executed efficiently within these concepts. Based on this overview we present some modifications and generalizations of these concepts and show that they still allow efficient computations such as applicable contraction schemes. In this context we consider the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient in terms of the {\\sc parafac} (CP) formalism, where we also allow different tensor partitions. This approach makes use of efficient contraction schemes for the calculation of inner products in a way that can easily be extended to the mps format but also to higher dimensional problems.

T. Huckle; K. Waldherr; T. Schulte-Herbrueggen

2012-12-21

305

The universal quantum driving force to speed up a quantum computation -- The unitary quantum dynamics  

E-print Network

It is shown in the paper that the unitary quantum dynamics in quantum mechanics is the universal quantum driving force to speed up a quantum computation. This assertion supports strongly in theory that the unitary quantum dynamics is the fundamental and universal principle in nature. On the other hand, the symmetric structure of Hilbert space of a composite quantum system is the quantum-computing resource that is not owned by classical computation. A new quantum-computing speedup theory is set up on the basis of the unitary quantum dynamics. Both the unitary quantum dynamics and the symmetric structure and property of the Hilbert space of the quantum system are mainly responsible for an exponential quantum-computing speedup for a general efficient quantum algorithm. The inherent importance for the unitary quantum dynamics to speed up a quantum computation lies in the unique ability of the unitary quantum dynamics to build the effective interaction between the symmetric structure of the Hilbert space of the quantum system and the mathematical symmetric structure of a problem to be solved on the quantum system. This unique ability could result in an essential difference of computational power between quantum and classical computations by combining the symmetric structure and property of the Hilbert space. The new quantum-computing speedup theory also provides reasonable mechanisms for exponential quantum-computing speedup for the existing efficient quantum algorithms based on the quantum parallel principle. These existing quantum algorithms including the hidden-subgroup-problem quantum algorithms and conventional quantum search algorithms have the common character that the symmetric structure of the Hilbert space does not have any effective effect on these quantum algorithms. This could be the main reason why these quantum algorithms are quite special and considered to be semiclassical.

Xijia Miao

2011-11-22

306

Quantum Computation Beyond the "Standard Circuit Model"  

E-print Network

Construction of explicit quantum circuits follows the notion of the "standard circuit model" introduced in the solid and profound analysis of elementary gates providing quantum computation. Nevertheless the model is not always optimal (e.g. concerning the number of computational steps) and it neglects physical systems which cannot follow the "standard circuit model" analysis. We propose a computational scheme which overcomes the notion of the transposition from classical circuits providing a computation scheme with the least possible number of Hamiltonians in order to minimize the physical resources needed to perform quantum computation and to succeed a minimization of the computational procedure (minimizing the number of computational steps needed to perform an arbitrary unitary transformation). It is a general scheme of construction, independent of the specific system used for the implementation of the quantum computer. The open problem of controllability in Lie groups is directly related and rises to prominence in an effort to perform universal quantum computation.

K. Ch. Chatzisavvas; C. Daskaloyannis; C. P. Panos

2006-08-16

307

Quantum spin dynamics as a model for quantum computer operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

: We study effects of the physical realization of quantum computers on their logical operation. Through simulation of physical\\u000a models of quantum computer hardware, we analyze the difficulties that are encountered in programming physical realizations\\u000a of quantum computers. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation and Grover's database\\u000a search algorithm are used to demonstrate that the results of

H. De Raedt; K. Michielsen; A. Hams; S. Miyashita; K. Saito

2002-01-01

308

987DNA, QUANTUM, AND MOLECULAR COMPUTING 988 DNA, QUANTUM, AND MOLECULAR COMPUTING  

E-print Network

and Quantum Computers Russell Deaton Computer Science and Engineering Dept. The University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701 rdeaton@uark.edu 501-575-5590 Abstract Both DNA and quantum computers have the potential must be over- come. Through coherent superposition of states, quantum computers are more pow- erful

Fernandez, Thomas

309

Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.  

PubMed

Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer. PMID:22094695

Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

2011-11-17

310

Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

2004-01-01

311

Physics and computer science: quantum computation and other approaches  

E-print Network

This is a position paper written as an introduction to the special volume on quantum algorithms I edited for the journal Mathematical Structures in Computer Science (Volume 20 - Special Issue 06 (Quantum Algorithms), 2010).

Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E

2011-01-01

312

The Quantum Computing (QC), Quantum Information (QI), and Quantum Encryption (QE) Curriculum. (Why? Now? Never?)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The curriculum needs for quantum computing (QC), quantum information (QI), and quantum encryption (QE) are discussed. QC is an application of Quantum Mechanics (Messiah 1958) to the problem of defining a computer using quantum phenomena. QI is an expansion of quan- tum mechanics analogous to classical information theory, and QE is an application of QI. Now that the first venture

Ronald I. Frank

313

Universal quantum computation in integrable systems  

E-print Network

Quantized integrable systems can be made to perform universal quantum computation by the application of a global time-varying control. The action-angle variables of the integrable system function as qubits or qudits, which can be coupled selectively by the global control to induce universal quantum logic gates. By contrast, chaotic quantum systems, even if controllable, do not generically allow quantum computation under global control.

Seth Lloyd; Simone Montangero

2014-08-03

314

Multivalued logic gates for quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a multivalued logic for quantum computing for use in multi-level quantum systems, and discuss the practical advantages of this approach for scaling up a quantum computer. Generalizing the methods of binary quantum logic, we establish that arbitrary unitary operations on any number of d-level systems (d>2) can be decomposed into logic gates that operate on only two systems

Ashok Muthukrishnan; C. R. Stroud Jr.; Jr

2000-01-01

315

The Halting Problem for Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

We argue that the halting problem for quantum computers which was first raised by Myers, is by no means solved, as has been claimed recently. We explicitly demonstrate the difficulties that arise in a quantum computer when different branches of the computation halt at different, unknown, times.

Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu

1998-06-29

316

Resilient Quantum Computation: Error Models and Thresholds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research has demonstrated that quantum comput- ers can solve certain types of problems substantially faster than the known classical algorithms. These problems include factoring integers and certain physics simulations. Practical quantum computation requires overcoming the problems of environmental noise and operational errors, problems which appear to be much more severe than in classical computation due to the inherent fragility

Emanuel Knill; Raymond Laflamme; Wojciech H. Zurek

317

Quantum Computing in Non Euclidean Geometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent debate on hyper-computation has raised new questions both on the computational abilities of quantum systems and the Church-Turing Thesis role in Physics. We propose here the idea of geometry of effective physical process as the essentially physical notion of computation. In Quantum mechanics we cannot use the traditional Euclidean geometry but we introduce more sophisticate non Euclidean geometry

Germano Resconi; Ignazio Licata

2009-01-01

318

Contextuality supplies the `magic' for quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via `magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple `hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

2014-06-01

319

Contextuality supplies the 'magic' for quantum computation.  

PubMed

Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via 'magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple 'hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms. PMID:24919152

Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

2014-06-19

320

Quantum computing with steady state spin currents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many approaches to quantum computing use spatially confined qubits in the presence of dynamic fields to perform computation. These approaches are contrasted with proposals using mobile qubits in the presence of static fields. In this thesis, steady state quantum computing using mobile electrons is explored using numerical modeling. Firstly, a foundational introduction to the case of spatially confined qubits embodied via quantum dots is provided. A collection of universal gates implemented with dynamic fields is described using simulations. These gates are combined to implement a five-qubit Grover search to provide further insight on the time-dependent field approach. Secondly, the quantum dot description is contrasted with quantum computing using steady state spin currents. Leveraging the Non-Equilibrium Greens Function formalism to perform numerical simulations, the quantum aspects of steady state spin currents are explored by revisiting the Stern-Gerlach experiment using spin-polarized contacts on a one-dimensional channel. After demonstrating the quantum nature of mobile electrons at steady state, arbitrary single qubit operations using static fields are explored. The model is further extended to incorporate two-qubit interactions to realize the square root of SWAP gate. The two-qubit CNOT gate is used to prepare a Bell state, which is read via quantum state tomography. Finally, Grover's search is revisited to explore the performance benefits of steady state quantum computing. The described multi-particle model is applicable to mobile qubit quantum computing proposals leveraging synchronized electron transport in static fields to perform quantum computing.

Sutton, Brian M.

321

Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion  

E-print Network

Single photons provide excellent quantum information carriers, but current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed single photons, while linear-optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here, we introduce a deterministic scheme for photonic quantum information. Our single, versatile process---coherent photon conversion---provides a full suite of photonic quantum processing tools, from creating high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free of higher-order imperfections to implementing deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates and high-efficiency detection. It fulfils all requirements for a scalable photonic quantum computing architecture. Using photonic crystal fibres, we experimentally demonstrate a four-colour nonlinear process usable for coherent photon conversion and show that current technology provides a feasible path towards deterministic operation. Our scheme, based on interacting bosonic fields, is not restricted to optical systems, but could also be implemented in optomechanical, electromechanical and superconducting systems which exhibit extremely strong intrinsic nonlinearities.

N. K. Langford; S. Ramelow; R. Prevedel; W. J. Munro; G. J. Milburn; A. Zeilinger

2011-06-10

322

Spin quantum computation in silicon nanostructures  

E-print Network

Proposed silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing Si technology infrastructure. Electronic and nuclear spins of shallow donors (e.g. phosphorus) in Si are ideal candidates for qubits in such proposals because of their long spin coherence times due to their limited interactions with their environments. For these spin qubits, shallow donor exchange gates are frequently invoked to perform two-qubit operations. We discuss in this review a particularly important spin decoherence channel, and bandstructure effects on the exchange gate control. Specifically, we review our work on donor electron spin spectral diffusion due to background nuclear spin flip-flops, and how isotopic purification of silicon can significantly enhance the electron spin dephasing time. We then review our calculation of donor electron exchange coupling in the presence of degenerate silicon conduction band valleys. We show that valley interference leads to orders of magnitude variations in electron exchange coupling when donor configurations are changed on an atomic scale. These studies illustrate the substantial potential that donor electron/nuclear spins in silicon have as candidates for qubits and simultaneously the considerable challenges they pose. In particular, our work on spin decoherence through spectral diffusion points to the possible importance of isotopic purification in the fabrication of scalable solid state quantum computer architectures. We also provide a critical comparison between the two main proposed spin-based solid state quantum computer architectures, namely, shallow donor bound states in Si and localized quantum dot states in GaAs.

S. Das Sarma; Rogerio de Sousa; Xuedong Hu; Belita Koiller

2004-11-30

323

Spin quantum computation in silicon nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proposed silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing Si technology infrastructure. Electronic and nuclear spins of shallow donors (e.g. phosphorus) in Si are ideal candidates for qubits in such proposals because of their long spin coherence times due to their limited interactions with their environments. For these spin qubits, shallow donor exchange gates are frequently invoked to perform two-qubit operations. We discuss in this review a particularly important spin decoherence channel, and bandstructure effects on the exchange gate control. Specifically, we review our work on donor electron spin spectral diffusion due to background nuclear spin flip-flops, and how isotopic purification of silicon can significantly enhance the electron spin dephasing time. We then review our calculation of donor electron exchange coupling in the presence of degenerate silicon conduction band valleys. We show that valley interference leads to orders of magnitude variations in electron exchange coupling when donor configurations are changed on an atomic scale. These studies illustrate the substantial potential that donor electron/nuclear spins in silicon have as candidates for qubits and simultaneously the considerable challenges they pose. In particular, our work on spin decoherence through spectral diffusion points to the possible importance of isotopic purification in the fabrication of scalable solid state quantum computer architectures. We also provide a critical comparison between the two main proposed spin-based solid state quantum computer architectures, namely, shallow donor bound states in Si and localized quantum dot states in GaAs.

Sarma, S. Das; Sousa, Rogerio de; Hu, Xuedong; Koiller, Belita

2005-03-01

324

Mini-maximizing two qubit quantum computations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two qubit quantum computations are viewed as two player, strictly competitive games and a game-theoretic measure of optimality of these computations is developed. To this end, the geometry of Hilbert space of quantum computations is used to establish the equivalence of game-theoretic solution concepts of Nash equilibrium and mini-max outcomes in games of this type, and quantum mechanisms are designed for realizing these mini-max outcomes.

Khan, Faisal Shah; Phoenix, Simon J. D.

2013-12-01

325

An introduction to reliable quantum computation  

E-print Network

This is an introduction to software methods of quantum fault tolerance. Broadly speaking, these methods describe strategies for using the noisy hardware components of a quantum computer to perform computations while continually monitoring and actively correcting the hardware faults. We discuss parallels and differences with similar methods for ordinary digital computation, we discuss some of the noise models used in designing and analyzing noisy quantum circuits, and we sketch the logic of some of the central results in this area of research.

Panos Aliferis

2013-12-05

326

Ultrafast Pulse Shaping Approaches to Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computing exploits the quantum-mechanical nature of matter to exist in multiple possible states simultaneously. This new approach promises to revolutionize the present form of computing. As an approach to quantum computing, we discuss ultrafast laser pulse shaping, in particular, the acousto-optic modulator based Fourier-Transform pulse-shaper, which has the ability to modulate tunable high power ultrafast laser pulses. We show

Debabrata Goswami

2003-01-01

327

An introduction to reliable quantum computation  

E-print Network

This is an introduction to software methods of quantum fault tolerance. Broadly speaking, these methods describe strategies for using the noisy hardware components of a quantum computer to perform computations while continually monitoring and actively correcting the hardware faults. We discuss parallels and differences with similar methods for ordinary digital computation, we discuss some of the noise models used in designing and analyzing noisy quantum circuits, and we sketch the logic of some of the central results in this area of research.

Aliferis, Panos

2011-01-01

328

Gate-teleportation-based blind quantum computation  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation (BQC) is a model in which a computation is performed on a server by a client such that the server is kept blind about the input, the algorithm, and the output of the computation. Here we layout a general framework for BQC which, unlike the previous BQC models, does not constructed on specific computational model. A main ingredient of our construction is gate teleportation. We demonstrate that our framework can be straightforwardly implemented on circuit-based models as well as measurement-based models of quantum computation. We illustrate our construction by showing that universal BQC is possible on correlation-space measurement-based quantum computation models.

Mear M. R. Koochakie

2014-12-25

329

Quantum Computation: Towards the Construction of a `Between Quantum and Classical Computer'  

E-print Network

Quantum Computation: Towards the Construction of a `Between Quantum and Classical Computer-Mails: diraerts@vub.ac.be, bdhooghe@vub.ac.be Abstract Using the `between quantum and classical' models that have been constructed explicitly within the hidden measurement approach of quantum mechanics we investigate

Aerts, Diederik

330

Technical Report No. 2005496 QUANTUM COMPUTATION AND QUANTUM  

E-print Network

. This will leave quantum computation and quantum information as abstract mathematical curiosities, without] for the journal version). In his talk he pointed out the difficulty of simulating quantum systems using classical This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. 1 #12; modeled

Graham, Nick

331

Mathematical modeling of quantum noise and the quality of hardware components of quantum computers  

E-print Network

In the present paper methods and algorithms of modeling quantum operations for quantum computer integrated circuits design are developed. We examine different ways of quantum operation descriptions, including operator-sums, unitary representations, Choi-Jamiolkowski state representations and the corresponding chi-matrices, as well as quantum system evolution operators. The results of modeling of practically important quantum gates: SQiSW (square root of i-SWAP gate), controlled-NOT (CNOT), and controlled Z-transform (CZ) subject to different decoherence mechanisms are presented. These mechanisms include analysis of depolarizing quantum noise and processes of amplitude and phase relaxation. Finally, we consider error correction of phase flip, and the tasks of creating and maintaining the entanglement, as well as its breaking for two- and multi-qubit realizations of quantum operations. Importance of the present analysis for the quality and efficiency of quantum information technologies in practical applications is discussed.

Yu. I. Bogdanov; A. Yu. Chernyavskiy; A. S. Holevo; V. F. Luckichev; S. A. Nuyanzin; A. A. Orlikovsky

2012-07-13

332

How Quantum Computers Fail: Quantum Codes, Correlations in Physical Systems, and Noise Accumulation  

E-print Network

How Quantum Computers Fail: Quantum Codes, Correlations in Physical Systems, and Noise Accumulation for quantum evolutions when noise accumulates. 1 Introduction Quantum computers were offered by Feynman [6: The postulate of quantum computation: Computational devices based on quantum mechanics will be computationally

Kalai, Gil

333

Accounting Principles are Simulated on Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

The paper is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. After that we simulated the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that all arbitrary accounting actions are exhausted by the described basic actions. The main problem of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation we use our constructed quantum Gau\\ss-Jordan Elimination to solve the problem and the time of quantum computing is some square root order faster than the time in classical computing.

Do Ngoc Diep; Do Hoang Giang

2007-07-04

334

Captology: Computers as Persuasive Technologies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab creates insight into how computing products -- from websites to mobile phone software -- can be designed to change what people believe and what they do." This unusual field of study is called captology, and the subject is explored in detail on the lab's homepage. The Key Concepts section provides a brief overview of captology and links to another page with nine topic papers published by researchers at the lab. In a series of examples demonstrating how computers can be used to influence a person, the site's creators separate instances into macrosuasion and microsuasion. Specific websites and computer programs are highlighted to reveal these interesting marketing or motivational tactics.

335

Contextuality supplies the magic for quantum computation  

E-print Network

Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the answer to the most basic question "What is the source of the power in quantum computing?" has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via magic state distillation. This is a conceptually satisfying link because contextuality provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena and, moreover, magic state distillation is the leading model for experimentally realizing fault-tolerant quantum computation. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the nonlocality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality and nonlocality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation and bounding the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

Mark Howard; Joel J. Wallman; Victor Veitch; Joseph Emerson

2014-10-15

336

Photon echo quantum RAM integration in quantum computer  

E-print Network

We have analyzed an efficient integration of the multi-qubit echo quantum memory into the quantum computer scheme on the atomic resonant ensembles in quantum electrodynamics cavity. Here, one atomic ensemble with controllable inhomogeneous broadening is used for the quantum memory node and other atomic ensembles characterized by the homogeneous broadening of the resonant line are used as processing nodes. We have found optimal conditions for efficient integration of multi-qubit quantum memory modified for this analyzed physical scheme and we have determined a specified shape of the self temporal modes providing a perfect reversible transfer of the photon qubits between the quantum memory node and arbitrary processing nodes. The obtained results open the way for realization of full-scale solid state quantum computing based on using the efficient multi-qubit quantum memory.

Sergey A. Moiseev; Sergey N. Andrianov

2012-01-21

337

Computing quantum discord is NP-complete  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the computational complexity of quantum discord (a measure of quantum correlation beyond entanglement), and prove that computing quantum discord is NP-complete. Therefore, quantum discord is computationally intractable: the running time of any algorithm for computing quantum discord is believed to grow exponentially with the dimension of the Hilbert space so that computing quantum discord in a quantum system of moderate size is not possible in practice. As by-products, some entanglement measures (namely entanglement cost, entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, squashed entanglement, classical squashed entanglement, conditional entanglement of mutual information, and broadcast regularization of mutual information) and constrained Holevo capacity are NP-hard/NP-complete to compute. These complexity-theoretic results are directly applicable in common randomness distillation, quantum state merging, entanglement distillation, superdense coding, and quantum teleportation; they may offer significant insights into quantum information processing. Moreover, we prove the NP-completeness of two typical problems: linear optimization over classical states and detecting classical states in a convex set, providing evidence that working with classical states is generically computationally intractable.

Huang, Yichen

2014-03-01

338

Children and Computers: New Technology--  

E-print Network

media tech- nology brought with it great promise for social and educational benefits, and great concern- nology benefits children by opening up new worlds to them, while opponents argue that new media might Computer technology has ushered in a new era of mass media, bringing with it great promise and great

Cassell, Justine

339

Chapter 51. Algorithms and Architectures for Quantum Computers Algorithms and Architectures for Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

Chapter 51. Algorithms and Architectures for Quantum Computers 51-1 Algorithms and Architectures for Quantum Computers RLE Group Quanta Research Group Academic and Research Staff Professor Isaac Chuang physics. Two fundamental questions motivate our work: (1) How can a large-scale, reliable quantum computer

340

Optical Computers and Space Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rapidly increasing demand for greater speed and efficiency on the information superhighway requires significant improvements over conventional electronic logic circuits. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strong candidates to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by the conventional electronic logic circuits. The new optical technology has increased the demand for high quality optical materials. NASA's recent involvement in processing optical materials in space has demonstrated that a new and unique class of high quality optical materials are processible in a microgravity environment. Microgravity processing can induce improved orders in these materials and could have a significant impact on the development of optical computers. We will discuss NASA's role in processing these materials and report on some of the associated nonlinear optical properties which are quite useful for optical computers technology.

Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis; Hicks, Rosilen; Shields, Angela

1995-01-01

341

The one-way quantum computer - a non-network model of quantum computation  

E-print Network

A one-way quantum computer works by only performing a sequence of one-qubit measurements on a particular entangled multi-qubit state, the cluster state. No non-local operations are required in the process of computation. Any quantum logic network can be simulated on the one-way quantum computer. On the other hand, the network model of quantum computation cannot explain all ways of processing quantum information possible with the one-way quantum computer. In this paper, two examples of the non-network character of the one-way quantum computer are given. First, circuits in the Clifford group can be performed in a single time step. Second, the realisation of a particular circuit --the bit-reversal gate-- on the one-way quantum computer has no network interpretation. (Submitted to J. Mod. Opt, Gdansk ESF QIT conference issue.)

Robert Raussendorf; Daniel E. Browne; Hans J. Briegel

2001-08-27

342

Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and

Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

2012-01-01

343

Quantum Computations with Cold Trapped Ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantum computer can be implemented with cold ions confined in a linear trap and interacting with laser beams. Quantum gates involving any pair, triplet, or subset of ions can be realized by coupling the ions through the collective quantized motion. In this system decoherence is negligible, and the measurement (readout of the quantum register) can be carried out with

J. I. Cirac; P. Zoller

1995-01-01

344

Treatment of sound on quantum computers  

E-print Network

We study numerically how a sound signal stored in a quantum computer can be recognized and restored with a minimal number of measurements in presence of random quantum gate errors. A method developed uses elements of MP3 sound compression and allows to recover human speech and sound of complex quantum wavefunctions.

Jae Weon Lee; Alexei Chepelianskii; Dima Shepelyansky

2003-09-01

345

Efficient Quantum Computing of Complex Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a quantum algorithm which uses the number of qubits in an optimal way and efficiently simulates a physical model with rich and complex dynamics described by the quantum sawtooth map. The numerical study of the effect of static imperfections in the quantum computer hardware shows that the main elements of the phase space structures are accurately reproduced up

Giuliano Benenti; Giulio Casati; Simone Montangero; Dima L. Shepelyansky

2001-01-01

346

Communication Links for Distributed Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Distributed quantum computation requires quantum operations that act over a distance on error-correction encoded states of logical qubits, such as the transfer of qubits via teleportation. We evaluate the performance of several quantum error correction codes, and find that teleportation failure rates of one percent or more are tolerable when two levels of the [[23,1,7

Rodney Van Meter; Kae Nemoto; W. J. Munro

2007-01-09

347

How to test the ``quantumness'' of a quantum computer?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent devices, using hundreds of superconducting quantum bits, claim to perform quantum computing. However, it is not an easy task to determine and quantify the degree of quantum coherence and control used by these devices. Namely, it is a difficult task to know with certainty whether or not a given device (e.g., the D-Wave One or D-Wave Two) is a quantum computer. Such a verification of quantum computing would be more accessible if we already had some kind of working quantum computer, to be able to compare the outputs of these various computing devices. Moreover, the verification process itself could strongly depend on whether the tested device is a standard (gate-based) or, e.g., an adiabatic quantum computer. Here we do not propose a technical solution to this quantum-computing verification problem, but rather outline the problem in a way which would help both specialists and non-experts to see the scale of this difficult task, and indicate some possible paths towards its solution.

Zagoskin, Alexandre; Il'ichev, Evgeni; Grajcar, Miroslav; Betouras, Joseph; Nori, Franco

2014-05-01

348

Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealingthough inconclusiveresults.

Crowley, P. J. D.; ?uri?, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

2014-10-01

349

Computer Education in Dental Laboratory Technology Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1990 survey of 37 dental technology programs investigated 3 areas of computer use: current and anticipated general computer education courses; incorporation of computer applications into technology and management courses; and faculty use of the computer. Most programs are beginning to expand use of technology. (MSE)

Rogers, William A.; Hawkins, Robert Ross

1991-01-01

350

The Third Life of Quantum Logic: Quantum Logic Inspired by Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

We begin by discussing the history of quantum logic, dividing it into three eras or lives. The first life has to do with Birkhoff and von Neumann's algebraic approach in the 1930's. The second life has to do with attempt to understand quantum logic as logic that began in the late 1950's and blossomed in the 1970's. And the third life has to do with recent developments in quantum logic coming from its connections to quantum computation. We discuss our own work connecting quantum logic to quantum computation (viewing quantum logic as the logic of quantum registers storing qubits), and make some speculations about mathematics based on quantum principles.

J. Michael Dunn; Lawrence S. Moss; Zhenghan Wang

2013-02-14

351

Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections.  

PubMed

The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once 'observed' as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be 'purified' into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

2014-01-01

352

Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections  

PubMed Central

The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once observed as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be purified into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

2014-01-01

353

Enhancement Single Electron Transistor for Quantum Computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a novel scheme to build single spin quantum dots as the building block for quantum computing. In contrast to the depletion mode single electron transistors (SETs) commonly used for creating quantum dot qubits, our approach is based on an enhancement mode SET using InAs/GaSb composite quantum wells through bandgap engineering. The enhancement mode SETs host no electrons at zero applied voltage, compared to thousands of electrons in depletion dots to start with. When a voltage is applied to a single top metal gate, two symmetric tunneling barriers are created between GaSb and InAs quantum wells. These tunneling barriers define an InAs quantum dot and a single electron can tunnel there. This novel approach has a number of advantages for scalable quantum computing. In this talk, we will discuss the structure design, quantum dot simulation, and device fabrication. We will also present experimental results that provide proof-of-principle demonstrations.

Hu, B.; Yang, M. J.; Lyanda-Geller, Y. B.

2005-03-01

354

The Essence of Quantum Theory for Computers  

E-print Network

Quantum computers take advantage of interfering quantum alternatives in order to handle problems that might be too time consuming with algorithms based on classical logic. Developing quantum computers requires new ways of thinking beyond those in the familiar classical world. To help in this thinking, we give a description of the foundational ideas that hold in all of our successful physical models, including quantum theory. Our emphasis will be on the proper interpretation of our theories, and not just their statements. Our tact will be to build on the concept of information, which lies central to the operation of not just computers, but the Universe. For application to quantum computing, the essence of quantum theory is given, together with special precautions and limitations.

W. C. Parke

2014-09-07

355

Center for Advanced Computational Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

Noor, Ahmed K.

2000-01-01

356

Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.  

PubMed

The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question. PMID:25061205

Rnnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

2014-07-25

357

Secure Entanglement Distillation for Double-Server Blind Quantum Computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client, who does not have enough quantum technologies at her disposal, can delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that the server cannot learn anything about the clients input, output, and program. If the client interacts with only a single server, the client has to have some minimum quantum power, such as the ability of emitting randomly rotated single-qubit states or the ability of measuring states. If the client interacts with two servers who share Bell pairs but cannot communicate with each other, the client can be completely classical. For such a double-server scheme, two servers have to share clean Bell pairs, and therefore the entanglement distillation is necessary in a realistic noisy environment. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to perform entanglement distillation in the double-server scheme without degrading the security of blind quantum computing.

Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

2013-07-01

358

Blind quantum computation protocol in which Alice only makes measurements  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol which enables Alice who does not have sufficient quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to Bob who has a fully-fledged quantum computer in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. In previous protocols, Alice needs to have a device which generates quantum states, such as single-photon states. Here we propose another type of blind computing protocol where Alice does only measurements, such as the polarization measurements with a threshold detector. In several experimental setups, such as optical systems, the measurement of a state is much easier than the generation of a single-qubit state. Therefore our protocols ease Alice's burden. Furthermore, the security of our protocol is based on the no-signaling principle, which is more fundamental than quantum physics. Finally, our protocols are device independent in the sense that Alice does not need to trust her measurement device in order to guarantee the security.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Keisuke Fujii

2013-05-14

359

On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam  

E-print Network

On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam #12;#12;On Quantum Computation Theory #12;ILLC woensdag 9 oktober 2002, te 14.00 uur door Willem Klaas van Dam geboren te Breda. #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. P Dam, 2002 ISBN: 90­5776­091­6 #12;" . . . Many errors have been made in the world which today

ten Cate, Balder

360

Wavelets and Wavelet Packets on Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

We show how periodized wavelet packet transforms and periodized wavelet transforms can be implemented on a quantum computer. Surprisingly, we find that the implementation of wavelet packet transforms is less costly than the implementation of wavelet transforms on a quantum computer.

Andreas Klappenecker

1999-09-03

361

Fault-tolerant quantum computation by anyons  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-dimensional quantum system with anyonic excitations can be considered as a quantum computer. Unitary transformations can be performed by moving the excitations around each other. Measurements can be performed by joining excitations in pairs and observing the result of fusion. Such computation is fault-tolerant by its physical nature.

A. Yu. Kitaev; L. D. Landau

2003-01-01

362

Fault-tolerant holonomic quantum computation  

E-print Network

We explain how to combine holonomic quantum computation (HQC) with fault tolerant quantum error correction. This establishes the scalability of HQC, putting it on equal footing with other models of computation, while retaining the inherent robustness the method derives from its geometric nature.

Ognyan Oreshkov; Todd A. Brun; Daniel A. Lidar

2009-02-20

363

Decoherence-Free Subspaces for Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decoherence in quantum computers is formulated within the semigroup approach. The error genera- tors are identified with the generators of a Lie algebra. This allows for a comprehensive description which includes as a special case the frequently assumed spin-boson model. A generic condition is presented for errorless quantum computation: decoherence-free subspaces are spanned by those states which are annihilated by

D. A. Lidar; I. L. Chuang; K. B. Whaley

1998-01-01

364

Quantum Mechanics - Fundamentals and Applications to Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explore the relationship between quantum mechanics and information-age applications This volume takes an altogether unique approach to quantum mechanics. Providing an in-depth exposition of quantum mechanics fundamentals, it shows how these concepts are applied to most of today's information technologies, whether they are electronic devices or materials. No other text makes this critical, essential leap from theory to real-world applications.

Jasprit Singh

1996-01-01

365

Quantum cryptographic network based on quantum memories Computer Science Department, Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel  

E-print Network

Quantum cryptographic network based on quantum memories Eli Biham Computer Science Department that these complexity assumptions may not hold for a quantum computer for example, a quantum computer should enable fast , may be broken by quantum computers. These developments enhanced the interest in quantum cryptography

Mor, Tal

366

Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics Hans De Raedt, Kristel Michielsen, and Anthony Hams  

E-print Network

quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. ExamplesQuantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics Hans De Raedt, Kristel Michielsen, and Anthony Hams@yuragi.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, saitoh@spin.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realiz- able

367

Geometry of Quantum Computation with Qudits  

PubMed Central

The circuit complexity of quantum qubit system evolution as a primitive problem in quantum computation has been discussed widely. We investigate this problem in terms of qudit system. Using the Riemannian geometry the optimal quantum circuits are equivalent to the geodetic evolutions in specially curved parametrization of SU(dn). And the quantum circuit complexity is explicitly dependent of controllable approximation error bound. PMID:24509710

Luo, Ming-Xing; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

2014-01-01

368

Effects of Static Imperfections for Quantum Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We model the quantum computer hardware as a two-dimensional lattice of qubits with static imperfections, i.e. fluctuations in individual qubit energies and residual short-range inter-qubit couplings. We show that these imperfections can lead to the emergence of quantum chaos and dynamical thermalization also in a quantum computer ideally decoupled from the environment. We discuss their effect on the stability of

Giuliano Benenti; Giulio Casati

2003-01-01

369

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY  

E-print Network

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY Abstract.Quantum Computing is a new and exciting field at the intersecti* *on of mathematics, computer science and physics. It concerns a utilization* * of quantum mechanics to improve

Yanofsky, Noson S.

370

Transitions in the quantum computational power  

E-print Network

We construct two spin models on lattices (both two and three-dimensional) to study the capability of quantum computational power as a function of temperature and the system parameter. There exists a finite region in the phase diagram such that the thermal equilibrium states are capable of providing a universal fault-tolerant resource for measurement-based quantum computation. Moreover, in such a region the thermal resource states on the 3D lattices can enable topological protection for quantum computation. The two models behave similarly in terms of quantum computational power. However, they have different properties in terms of the usual phase transitions. The first model has a first-order phase transition only at zero temperature whereas there is no transition at all in the second model. Interestingly, the transition in the quantum computational power does not coincide with the phase transition in the first model.

Tzu-Chieh Wei; Ying Li; Leong Chuan Kwek

2014-05-16

371

Acausal measurement-based quantum computing  

E-print Network

In the measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of byproduct operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, byproduct operators cannot be avoided. In this paper, we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [O. Oreshkov, F. Costa, and C. Brukner, Nature Communications {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing.

Tomoyuki Morimae

2014-07-14

372

Experimental demonstration of deterministic one-way quantum computation on a NMR quantum computer  

SciTech Connect

One-way quantum computing is an important and novel approach to quantum computation. By exploiting the existing particle-particle interactions, we report an experimental realization of the complete process of deterministic one-way quantum Deutsch-Josza algorithm in NMR, including graph state preparation, single-qubit measurements, and feed-forward corrections. The findings in our experiment may shed light on the future scalable one-way quantum computation.

Ju, Chenyong; Zhu Jing; Peng Xinhua; Chong Bo; Zhou Xianyi; Du Jiangfeng [Heifei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China)

2010-01-15

373

Quantum dot-based quantum buses for quantum computer hardware architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a quantum bus based on semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots. This allows for transmission of qubits between the different quantum registers, and could be integrated in most of the present proposal for semiconductor quantum dot-based quantum computation.

Irene DAmico

2006-01-01

374

Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.  

PubMed

Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers. PMID:20431256

Tsai, Jaw-Shen

2010-01-01

375

Entanglement purification for quantum computation.  

PubMed

We show that thresholds for fault-tolerant quantum computation are solely determined by the quality of single-system operations if one allows for d-dimensional systems with 8 < or = d < or = 32. Each system serves to store one logical qubit and additional auxiliary dimensions are used to create and purify entanglement between systems. Physical, possibly probabilistic two-system operations with error rates up to 2/3 are still tolerable to realize deterministic high-quality two-qubit gates on the logical qubits. The achievable error rate is of the same order of magnitude as of the single-system operations. We investigate possible implementations of our scheme for several physical setups. PMID:12633329

Dr, W; Briegel, H-J

2003-02-14

376

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY  

E-print Network

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY Abstract. Quantum Computing is a new of quantum mechanics to improve the efficiency of computation. Here we present a gentle introduction to some of the ideas in quantum computing. The paper begins by motivating the central ideas of quantum mechanics

Yanofsky, Noson S.

377

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY  

E-print Network

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM COMPUTING NOSON S. YANOFSKY Abstract. Quantum Computing is a new of quantum mechanics to improve the e#ciency of computation. Here we present a gentle introduction to some of the ideas in quantum computing. The paper begins by motivating the central ideas of quantum mechanics

Yanofsky, Noson S.

378

Secure Multi-party Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Secure multi-party computing, also called "secure function evaluation", has been extensively studied in classical cryptography. We consider the extension of this task to computation with quantum inputs and circuits. Our protocols are information-theoretically secure, i.e. no assumptions are made on the computational power of the adversary. For the weaker task of verifiable quantum secret sharing, we give a protocol which tolerates any t < n/4 cheating parties (out of n). This is shown to be optimal. We use this new tool to show how to perform any multi-party quantum computation as long as the number of dishonest players is less than n/6.

Claude Crepeau; Daniel Gottesman; Adam Smith

2002-06-20

379

Recent Results in Photonic Quantum Computations, Simulations and Quantum Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applications of photonic entanglement manifold and reach from quantum communication [1] to quantum metrology [2] and optical quantum computing [3]. The advantage of the photon's mobility makes optical quantum computing unprecedented in speed, including feed-forward operations with high fidelity [4]. During the last few years the degree of control over photonic multi-particle entanglement has improved substantially and allows for not only overcoming the random nature of spontaneous emission sources [5], but also for the quantum simulation of other quantum systems. Here, I will also present the simulation of four spin-1/2 particles interacting via any Heisenberg-type Hamiltonian [6]. Moreover, recent experimental and theoretical progress, using the concepts of measurement-based quantum computation, indicates that photons are best suited for quantum networks. I will also present present results for the realization for such a client-server environment, where quantum information is communicated and computed using the same physical system [7]. References: [1] PRL 103, 020503 (2009); [2] Nature 429, 158 (2004); [3] Nature 434, 169 (2005); [4] Nature 445, 65 (2007); [5] Nature Photon 4, 553 (2010); [6] Nature Physics 7, 399 (2011); [7] in press.

Walther, Philip

2012-02-01

380

The case for biological quantum computer elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An extension to vonNeumann's analysis of quantum theory suggests self-measurement is a fundamental process of Nature. By mapping the quantum computer to the brain architecture we will argue that the cognitive experience results from a measurement of a quantum memory maintained by biological entities. The insight provided by this mapping suggests quantum effects are not restricted to small atomic and nuclear phenomena but are an integral part of our own cognitive experience and further that the architecture of a quantum computer system parallels that of a conscious brain. We will then review the suggestions for biological quantum elements in basic neural structures and address the de-coherence objection by arguing for a self- measurement event model of Nature. We will argue that to first order approximation the universe is composed of isolated self-measurement events which guaranties coherence. Controlled de-coherence is treated as the input/output interactions between quantum elements of a quantum computer and the quantum memory maintained by biological entities cognizant of the quantum calculation results. Lastly we will present stem-cell based neuron experiments conducted by one of us with the aim of demonstrating the occurrence of quantum effects in living neural networks and discuss future research projects intended to reach this objective.

Baer, Wolfgang; Pizzi, Rita

2009-05-01

381

Quantum computing and the entanglement frontier  

E-print Network

Quantum information science explores the frontier of highly complex quantum states, the "entanglement frontier." This study is motivated by the observation (widely believed but unproven) that classical systems cannot simulate highly entangled quantum systems efficiently, and we hope to hasten the day when well controlled quantum systems can perform tasks surpassing what can be done in the classical world. One way to achieve such "quantum supremacy" would be to run an algorithm on a quantum computer which solves a problem with a super-polynomial speedup relative to classical computers, but there may be other ways that can be achieved sooner, such as simulating exotic quantum states of strongly correlated matter. To operate a large scale quantum computer reliably we will need to overcome the debilitating effects of decoherence, which might be done using "standard" quantum hardware protected by quantum error-correcting codes, or by exploiting the nonabelian quantum statistics of anyons realized in solid state systems, or by combining both methods. Only by challenging the entanglement frontier will we learn whether Nature provides extravagant resources far beyond what the classical world would allow.

John Preskill

2012-11-10

382

Quantum computing and the entanglement frontier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum information science explores the frontier of highly complex quantum states, the ``entanglement frontier.'' This study is motivated by the observation (widely believed but unproven) that classical systems cannot simulate highly entangled quantum systems efficiently, and we hope to hasten the day when well controlled quantum systems can perform tasks surpassing what can be done in the classical world. One way to achieve such ``quantum supremacy'' would be to run an algorithm on a quantum computer which solves a problem with a super-polynomial speedup relative to classical computers, but there may be other ways that can be achieved sooner, such as simulating exotic quantum states of strongly correlated matter. To operate a large scale quantum computer reliably we will need to overcome the debilitating effects of decoherence, which might be done using ``standard'' quantum hardware protected by quantum error-correcting codes, or by exploiting the nonabelian quantum statistics of anyons realized in solid state systems, or by combining both methods. Only by challenging the entanglement frontier will we learn whether Nature provides extravagant resources far beyond what the classical world would allow.

Preskill, John

2013-04-01

383

KLM quantum computation with bosonic atoms  

E-print Network

A Knill-Laflamme-Milburn (KLM) type quantum computation with bosonic neutral atoms or bosonic ions is suggested. Crucially, as opposite to other quantum computation schemes involving atoms (ions), no controlled interactions between atoms (ions) involving their internal levels are required. Versus photonic KLM computation this scheme has the advantage that single atom (ion) sources are more natural than single photon sources, and single atom (ion) detectors are far more efficient than single photon ones.

Sandu Popescu

2006-10-06

384

Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G ?G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap ? (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ?1. Calculating ? (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

2014-02-01

385

Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will evolve. By using CST in the design and operation of future structures systems, engineers will have a better understanding of how a system responds and lasts, more cost-effective methods of designing and testing models, and improved productivity. For informational and educational purposes, a videotape is being produced using both static and dynamic images from research institutions, software and hardware companies, private individuals, and historical photographs and drawings. The extensive number of CST resources indicates its widespread use. Applications run the gamut from simpler university-simulated problems to those requiring solutions on supercomputers. In some cases, an image or an animation will be mapped onto the actual structure to show the relevance of the computer model to the structure. computer image using traditional composition theories or video production requirements, often the image loses some of its original digital quality and impact when transferred to videotape. Although many CST images are currently available, those that are edited into the final project must meet two important criteria: they must complement the narration, and they must be broadcast quality when recorded on videotape.

Beam, Sherilee F.

1994-12-01

386

Quantum computation and simulation with trapped ions using dissipation  

E-print Network

Quantum computation and simulation with trapped ions using dissipation Dissertation zur Erlangung and computer science. A quantum computer promises to solve certain problems more efficient than classical computers. But building such a quantum computer is a cumbersome task as the quantum system needs

Blatt, Rainer

387

Scaling Ion Trap Quantum Computation through Fast Quantum Gates  

E-print Network

We propose a method to achieve scalable quantum computation based on fast quantum gates on an array of trapped ions, without the requirement of ion shuttling. Conditional quantum gates are obtained for any neighboring ions through spin-dependent acceleration of the ions from periodic photon kicks. The gates are shown to be robust to influence of all the other ions in the array and insensitive to the ions' temperature.

L. -M. Duan

2004-01-29

388

LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.  

SciTech Connect

For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. (.; )); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

2006-01-01

389

Fault-tolerant, Universal Adiabatic Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Quantum computation has revolutionary potential for speeding computational tasks such as factoring and simulating quantum systems, but the task of constructing a quantum computer is daunting. Adiabatic quantum computation and other ``hands-off" approaches relieve the need for rapid, precise pulsing to control the system, inspiring at least one high-profile effort to realize a hands-off quantum computing device. But is hands-off incompatible with fault-tolerant? Concerted effort and many innovative ideas have not resolved this question but have instead deepened it, linking it to fundamental problems in quantum complexity theory. Here we present a hands-off approach that is provably (a) capable of scalable universal quantum computation in a non-degenerate ground state and (b) fault-tolerant against an analogue of the usual local stochastic fault model. A satisfying physical and numerical argument indicates that (c) it is also fault-tolerant against thermal excitation below a threshold temperature independent of the computation size.

Ari Mizel

2014-03-30

390

Application of superconducting quantum interferometer in quantum computer development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various variants of use high-sensitivity superconducting quantum interferometers (SQUID) in problems closely connected with development of a quantum computer are considered. 1.Hardware realization of a method of definition of midget concentration of the paramagnetic centers, based on measurement of their magnetization SQUID in a mode of modulation microwave saturation of magnetic sublevels is offered. The method will allow make testing

A. I. Golovashkin; A. L. Karuzskiy; A. A. Orlikovskiy; V. V. Privezentsev; A. M. Tshovrebov

2008-01-01

391

Quantum Computation with Generalized Binomial States in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics  

E-print Network

We study universal quantum computation in the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) framework exploiting two orthonormal two-photon generalized binomial states as qubit and dispersive interactions of Rydberg atoms with high-$Q$ cavities. We show that an arbitrary qubit state may be generated and that controlled-NOT and 1-qubit rotation gates can be realized via standard atom-cavity interactions.

Rosario Lo Franco; Giuseppe Compagno; Antonino Messina; Anna Napoli

2008-05-15

392

Video Encryption and Decryption on Quantum Computers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method for video encryption and decryption on quantum computers is proposed based on color information transformations on each frame encoding the content of the encoding the content of the video. The proposed method provides a flexible operation to encrypt quantum video by means of the quantum measurement in order to enhance the security of the video. To validate the proposed approach, a tetris tile-matching puzzle game video is utilized in the experimental simulations. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method enhances the security and speed of quantum video encryption and decryption, both properties required for secure transmission and sharing of video content in quantum communication.

Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Yang, Huamin

2015-02-01

393

Quantum Multiplexing for Quantum Computer Networks  

E-print Network

In communication networks many different channels must share a limited amount of resources. In order to allow for multiple simultaneous communications, multiple access techniques are routinely employed. With quantum communication, it is possible to share a new kind of resource. All of the system channels can be accommodated into a single channel in a larger Hilbert space. In the scheme, a single line combines the information of all the users, and, at the receiver, the original quantum channels are recovered. The given multiplexer/demultiplexer circuit can perform this n qubits to qudit transformation. Connections with superdense coding and classical multiple access schemes are discussed.

Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

2007-01-22

394

Ultrafast Pulse Shaping Approaches to Quantum Computing  

E-print Network

Quantum computing exploits the quantum-mechanical nature of matter to exist in multiple possible states simultaneously. This new approach promises to revolutionize the present form of computing. As an approach to quantum computing, we discuss ultrafast laser pulse shaping, in particular, the acousto-optic modulator based Fourier-Transform pulse-shaper, which has the ability to modulate tunable high power ultrafast laser pulses. We show that optical pulse shaping is an attractive route to quantum computing since shaped pulses can be transmitted over optical hardware and the same infrastructure can be used for computation and optical information transfer. We also address the problem of extending coherence-times for optically induced processes.

Goswami, D

2003-01-01

395

Quantum computations: algorithms and error correction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contents 0. Introduction 1. Abelian problem on the stabilizer 2. Classical models of computations2.1. Boolean schemes and sequences of operations2.2. Reversible computations 3. Quantum formalism3.1. Basic notions and notation3.2. Transformations of mixed states3.3. Accuracy 4. Quantum models of computations4.1. Definitions and basic properties4.2. Construction of various operators from the elements of a basis4.3. Generalized quantum control and universal schemes 5.

A Yu Kitaev

1997-01-01

396

Parallel quantum computer simulation on the GPU  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation of quantum computers using classical computers is a hard problem with high memory and computa- tional requirements. Parallelization can alleviate this problem, allowing the simulation of more qubits at the same time or the same number of qubits to be simulated in less time. A promising approach is to exploit the high performance computing capa- bilities provided by the

Andrei Amariutei; Simona Caraiman

2011-01-01

397

Computer technologies and institutional memory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

1989-01-01

398

Quantum Computation and Shor's Factoring Algorithm Ronald de Wolf  

E-print Network

that are based on quantum mechanical principles. We give a brief introduction to the model of quantum the computational power and other proper ties of computers based on quantummechanical principles. Its main with an abstract explanation of quantum mechanics in Section 2. Section 3 explains what quantum bits and quantum

de Wolf, Ronald

399

Military engine computational structures technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

Thomson, Daniel E.

1992-01-01

400

One-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

In this Brief Report, we propose a potential scheme to implement one-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Large cluster states of charge qubits can be generated in just one step with a superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR) playing the role of a dispersive coupler. A single-qubit measurement in the arbitrary basis can be implemented using a single electron transistor with the help of one-qubit gates. By examining the main decoherence sources, we show that circuit QED is a promising architecture for one-way quantum computation.

Wu Chunwang; Han Yang; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhong Xiaojun [China Satellite Maritime Tracking and Control Department, Jiangyin 214400 (China)

2010-03-15

401

The Physical Implementation of Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

After a brief introduction to the principles and promise of quantum\\u000ainformation processing, the requirements for the physical implementation of\\u000aquantum computation are discussed. These five requirements, plus two relating\\u000ato the communication of quantum information, are extensively explored and\\u000arelated to the many schemes in atomic physics, quantum optics, nuclear and\\u000aelectron magnetic resonance spectroscopy, superconducting electronics, and\\u000aquantum-dot

David P. DiVincenzo

2000-01-01

402

Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots  

E-print Network

It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF.

Bao-Cang Ren; Fu-Guo Deng

2014-05-01

403

Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots.  

PubMed

It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF. PMID:24721781

Ren, Bao-Cang; Deng, Fu-Guo

2014-01-01

404

Hyper-parallel photonic quantum computation with coupled quantum dots  

PubMed Central

It is well known that a parallel quantum computer is more powerful than a classical one. So far, there are some important works about the construction of universal quantum logic gates, the key elements in quantum computation. However, they are focused on operating on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable hyper-parallel quantum computation based on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating on both the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of a two-photon system simultaneously, by exploiting the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This hyper-CNOT gate is implemented by manipulating the four qubits in the two DOFs of a two-photon system without auxiliary spatial modes or polarization modes. It reduces the operation time and the resources consumed in quantum information processing, and it is more robust against the photonic dissipation noise, compared with the integration of several cascaded CNOT gates in one DOF. PMID:24721781

Ren, Bao-Cang; Deng, Fu-Guo

2014-01-01

405

Quantum Computers What is the difference between a computer and a physics  

E-print Network

Quantum Computers Peter Shor MIT #12;What is the difference between a computer and a physics. 1970). If quantum computers can be built, this would imply this "folk thesis" is probably not true. #12;Misconceptions about Quantum Computers False: Quantum computers would be able to speed up all computations

Shor, Peter W.

406

Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic

Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

2006-01-01

407

Analog analogue of a digital quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We solve a problem, which while not fitting into the usual paradigm, can be viewed as a quantum computation. Suppose we are given a quantum system with a Hamiltonian of the form E\\\\|w> is an unknown (normalized) state. The problem is to produce \\\\|w> by adding a Hamiltonian (independent of \\\\|w>) and evolving the system. If \\\\|w> is chosen uniformly

Edward Farhi; Sam Gutmann

1998-01-01

408

Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers  

E-print Network

Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers P. Oscar Boykin*, Tal Mor§ , Vwani cooling (via polarization heat bath)--a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression

Mor, Tal

409

Progress in silicon-based quantum computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review progress at the Australian Centre for Quantum Computer Technology towards the fabrication and demonstration of spin qubits and charge qubits based on phosphorus donor atoms embedded in intrinsic silicon. Fabrication is being pursued via two complementary pathways: a 'top-down' approach for near-term production of few-qubit demonstration devices and a 'bottom-up' approach for large-scale qubit arrays with sub-nanometre precision. The 'top-down' approach employs a low-energy (keV) ion beam to implant the phosphorus atoms. Single-atom control during implantation is achieved by monitoring on-chip detector electrodes, integrated within the device structure. In contrast, the 'bottom-up' approach uses scanning tunnelling microscope lithography and epitaxial silicon overgrowth to construct devices at an atomic scale. In both cases, surface electrodes control the qubit using voltage pulses, and dual single-electron transistors operating near the quantum limit provide fast read-out with spurious-signal rejection.

Clark, R. G.; Brenner, R.; Buehler, T. M.; et al.

2003-07-01

410

Image segmentation on a quantum computer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we address the field of quantum information processing and analyze the prospects of applying quantum computation concepts to image processing tasks. Specifically, we discuss the development of a quantum version for the image segmentation operation. This is an important technique that comes up in many image processing applications. We consider the threshold-based segmentation and show that a quantum circuit to achieve this operation can be built using a quantum oracle that implements the thresholding function. We discuss the circuit implementation of the oracle operator and provide examples of segmenting synthetic and real images. The main advantage of the quantum version for image segmentation over the classical approach is its speedup and is provided by the special properties of quantum information processing: superposition of states and inherent parallelism.

Caraiman, Simona; Manta, Vasile I.

2015-01-01

411

Quantum computational logic with mixed states  

E-print Network

Using an algebraic framework we solve a problem posed in [5] and [7] about the axiomatizability of a quantum computational type logic related to fuzzy logic. A Hilbert-style calculus is developed obtaining an algebraic strong completeness theorem.

Hector Freytes; Graciela Domenech

2010-02-26

412

Second order error correction in quantum computing  

E-print Network

Error correction codes are necessary for the development of reliable quantum computers. Such codes can prevent the lost of information from decoherence caused by external perturbations. This thesis evaluates a five qubit ...

Sheldon, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

2008-01-01

413

Classical signal-flow in cluster-state quantum computation  

E-print Network

We study concretely how classical signals should be processed in quantum cluster-state computation. Deforming corresponding quantum teleportation circuit, we find a simple rule of a classical signal-flow to obtain correct quantum computation results.

Kazuto Oshima

2009-06-13

414

A Very Simple Example of Parallel Quantum Computation Frank Rioux  

E-print Network

important roles in quantum computation and quantum information processing [4]. For instance, the nuclear in NMR quantum computers [6]. There have been many rigorous results on the optimal control of spin

Rioux, Frank

415

Faculty Computer Expertise and Use of Instructional Technology. Technology Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report shows the findings of a 1997 technology survey used to assess degrees of faculty computer expertise and the use of instructional technology. Part 1 reviews general findings of the fall 1997 technology survey: (1) the level of computer expertise among faculty, staff and administrators appears to be increasing; (2) in comparison with the

Gabriner, Robert; Mery, Pamela

416

Quantum computer of wire circuit architecture  

E-print Network

First solid state quantum computer was built using transmons (cooper pair boxes). The operation of the computer is limited because of using a number of the rigit cooper boxes working with fixed frequency at temperatures of superconducting material. Here, we propose a novel architecture of quantum computer based on a flexible wire circuit of many coupled quantum nodes containing controlled atomic (molecular) ensembles. We demonstrate wide opportunities of the proposed computer. Firstly, we reveal a perfect storage of external photon qubits to multi-mode quantum memory node and demonstrate a reversible exchange of the qubits between any arbitrary nodes. We found optimal parameters of atoms in the circuit and self quantum modes for quantum processing. The predicted perfect storage has been observed experimentally for microwave radiation on the lithium phthalocyaninate molecule ensemble. Then also, for the first time we show a realization of the efficient basic two-qubit gate with direct coupling of two arbitrary nodes by using appropriate atomic frequency shifts in the circuit nodes. Proposed two-qubit gate runs with a speed drastically accelerated proportionally to the number of atoms in the node. The direct coupling and accelerated two-qubit gate can be realized for large number of the circuit nodes. Finally, we describe two and three-dimensional scalable architectures that pave the road to construction of universal multi-qubit quantum computer operating at room temperatures.

S. A. Moiseev; F. F. Gubaidullin; S. N. Andrianov

2010-01-07

417

Measurement-based quantum computation on cluster states  

Microsoft Academic Search

We give a detailed account of the one-way quantum computer, a scheme of quantum computation that consists entirely of one-qubit measurements on a particular class of entangled states, the cluster states. We prove its universality, describe why its underlying computational model is different from the network model of quantum computation, and relate quantum algorithms to mathematical graphs. Further we investigate

Robert Raussendorf; Daniel E. Browne; Hans J. Briegel

2003-01-01

418

Quantum Computers: Noise Propagation and Adversarial Noise Models  

E-print Network

Quantum Computers: Noise Propagation and Adversarial Noise Models Gil Kalai Hebrew University that will fail quantum error correction and fault-tolerant quantum computation. We describe known results;1 Introduction The feasibility of computationally superior quantum computers is one of the most fascinating

Kalai, Gil

419

quantph/9809016 An Introduction to Quantum Computing for  

E-print Network

quant­ph/9809016 8 Sep 1998 An Introduction to Quantum Computing for Non­Physicists Eleanor Rieffel more efficiently if it made use of these quantum effects. But building quantum computers, computational], that the field of quantum computing came into its own. This discovery prompted a flurry of activity, both among

Crépeau, Claude

420

Quantum computing: pro and con BY JOHN PRESKILL  

E-print Network

-tolerant procedures that enable a quantum computer with noisy gates to perform reliably. Quantum computing hardware will the quantum computers of the future use? Can this hardware be constructed via incremental improvementsQuantum computing: pro and con BY JOHN PRESKILL Charles C. Lauritsen Laboratory of High Energy

Preskill, John

421

Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks  

E-print Network

In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communications. We propose a non-classical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes we can route the information after part of it has left the network node.

Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

2005-12-02

422

Stabilization of Quantum Computations by Symmetrization  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a method for the stabilization of quantum computations (including quan- tum state storage). The method is based on the operation of projection intoSYM, the symmetric subspace of the full state space of R redundant copies of the computer. We describe an ecient algorithm and quantum network eectingSYM{projection and discuss the stabilizing eect of the proposed method in the

Adriano Barenco; Andre? Berthiaume; David Deutsch; Artur Ekert; Richard Jozsa; Chiara Macchiavello

1997-01-01

423

Strain effects on silicon donor exchange: Quantum computer architecture considerations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proposed silicon-based quantum-computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing infrastructure of the powerful Si technology. Quantitative understanding of and precise physical control over donor (e.g., phosphorus) exchange are crucial elements in the physics underlying the proposed Si-based quantum-computer hardware. An important potential problem in this context is that intervalley interference originating from the degeneracy in the Si conduction-band edge causes fast oscillations in donor exchange coupling, which imposes significant constraints on the Si quantum-computer architecture. In this paper we consider the effect of external strain on Si donor exchange in the context of quantum-computer hardware. We study donor-electron exchange in uniaxially strained Si, since strain partially lifts the valley degeneracy in the bulk. In particular, we focus on the effects of donor displacements among lattice sites on the exchange coupling, investigating whether intervalley interference poses less of a problem to exchange coupling of donors in strained Si. We show, using the Kohn-Luttinger envelope-function approach, that fast oscillations in exchange coupling indeed disappear for donor pairs that satisfy certain conditions for their relative positions, while in other situations the donor exchange coupling remains oscillatory, with periods close to interatomic spacing. We also comment on the possible role of controlled external strain in the design and fabrication of Si quantum-computer architecture.

Koiller, Belita; Hu, Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

2002-09-01

424

Strain effects on silicon donor exchange: Quantum computer architecture considerations  

E-print Network

Proposed Silicon-based quantum computer architectures have attracted attention because of their promise for scalability and their potential for synergetically utilizing the available resources associated with the existing infrastructure of the powerful Si technology. Quantitative understanding of and precise physical control over donor (e.g. Phosphorus) exchange are crucial elements in the physics underlying the proposed Si-based quantum computer hardware. An important potential problem in this context is that inter-valley interference originating from the degeneracy in the Si conduction band edge causes fast oscillations in donor exchange coupling, which imposes significant constraints on the Si quantum computer architecture. In this paper we consider the effect of external strain on Si donor exchange in the context of quantum computer hardware. We study donor electron exchange in uniaxially strained Si, since strain partially lifts the valley degeneracy in the bulk. In particular, we focus on the effects of donor displacements among lattice sites on the exchange coupling, investigating whether inter-valley interference poses less of a problem to exchange coupling of donors in strained Si. We show, using the Kohn-Luttinger envelope function approach, that fast oscillations in exchange coupling indeed disappear for donor pairs that satisfy certain conditions for their relative positions, while in other situations the donor exchange coupling remains oscillatory, with periods close to interatomic spacing. We also comment on the possible role of controlled external strain in the design and fabrication of Si quantum computer architecture.

Belita Koiller; Xuedong Hu; S. Das Sarma

2001-12-05

425

Simulation and verification II: simulating quantum computing: quantum express  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum Computing (QC) research has gained a lot of momentum recently due to several theoretical analyses that indicate that QC is significantly more efficient at solving certain classes of problems than classical computing. While experimental validation will ultimately be required, the primitive nature of current QC hardware leaves practical testing limited to trivial examples. Thus, a robust simulator is needed

Kareem S. Aggour; Renee Guhde; Melvin K. Simmons; Michael J. Simon

2003-01-01

426

EDITORIAL: Quantum Computing and the Feynman Festival  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Feynman Festival is a new interdisciplinary conference developed for studying Richard Feynman and his physics. The first meeting of this new conference series was held at the University of Maryland on 23--28 August 2002 (http://www.physics.umd.edu/robot/feynman.html) and the second meeting is scheduled for August 2004 at the same venue. According to Feynman, the different aspects of nature are different aspects of the same thing. Therefore, the ultimate purpose of the conference is to find Feynman's same thing from all different theories. For this reason, the first meeting of the Festival did not begin with a fixed formula, but composed its scientific programme based on responses from the entire physics community. The conference drew the most enthusiastic response from the community of quantum computing, the field initiated by Feynman. Encouraged by the response, we decided to edit a special issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on quantum computing in connection with the first Feynman Festival. The authorship is not restricted to the participants of the Feynman Festival, and all interested parties were encouraged to submit their papers on this subject. Needless to say, all the papers were peer reviewed according to the well-established standards of the journal. The subject of quantum computing is not restricted to building and operating computers. It requires a deeper understanding of how quantum mechanics works in materials as well as in our minds. Indeed, it covers the basic foundations of quantum mechanics, measurement theory, information theory, quantum optics, atomic physics and condensed matter physics. It may be necessary to develop new mathematical tools to accommodate the language that nature speaks. It is gratifying to note that this special issue contains papers covering all these aspects of quantum computing. As Feynman noted, we could be discussing these diversified issues to study one problem. In our case, this `one problem' is to build quantum computers.

Brandt, Howard E.; Kim, Young S.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

2003-12-01

427

Device-Independent Verifiable Blind Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

As progress on experimental quantum processors continues to advance, the problem of verifying the correct operation of such devices is becoming a pressing concern. Although recent progress has resulted in several protocols which can verify the output of a quantum computation performed by entangled but non-communicating processors, the overhead for such schemes is prohibitive, scaling at least as the 22nd power of the number of gates. We present a new approach based on a combination of verified blind quantum computation and Bell state self-testing. This approach has significantly reduced overhead, with resources scaling as a quartic polynomial in the number of gates.

Michal Hajduek; Carlos A. Prez-Delgado; Joseph F. Fitzsimons

2015-02-09

428

Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

Johnson, Roger L.

1991-01-01

429

Computer Technologies 1.An Alien Autopsy  

E-print Network

Computer Technologies 1.An Alien Autopsy 2. Hardware and Software 3. The WIMP interface #12 · Motherboard · Memory · Processor · Chips #12;Implementation Technology · Relays · Vacuum Tubes · Transistors;Implementation Technology · Common Links? · A controllable switch · Computers are wires and switches #12;Chips

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

430

Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities  

PubMed Central

Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

2014-01-01

431

Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities  

E-print Network

Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

Hai-Rui Wei; Fu-Guo Deng

2014-12-12

432

Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.  

PubMed

Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low. PMID:25518899

Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

2014-01-01

433

Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

We give a quantum algorithm for solving instances of the satisfiability problem, based on adiabatic evolution. The evolution of the quantum state is governed by a time-dependent Hamiltonian that interpolates between an initial Hamiltonian, whose ground state is easy to construct, and a final Hamiltonian, whose ground state encodes the satisfying assignment. To ensure that the system evolves to the

Edward Farhi; Jeffrey Goldstone; Sam Gutmann; Michael Sipser

2000-01-01

434

Computing as Interaction: Agent and Agreement Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the emergence of new paradigms for computing, such as peer-to-peer technologies, grid computing, autonomic computing and other approaches, it is becoming increasingly natural to view large systems in terms of the services they offer, and consequently in terms of the entities or agents providing or consuming services. For example, web services technologies provide a standard means of interoperating be-

Michael Luck; Peter McBurney

435

Prospects for quantum computing: Extremely doubtful  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quantum computer is supposed to process information by applying unitary transformations to 2N complex amplitudes defining the state of N qubits. A useful machine needing N 103 or more, the number of continuous parameters describing the state of a quantum computer at any given moment is at least 21000 10300 which is much greater than the number of protons in the Universe. However, the theorists believe that the feasibility of large-scale quantum computing has been proved via the threshold theorem. Like for any theorem, the proof is based on a number of assumptions considered as axioms. However, in the physical world none of these assumptions can be fulfilled exactly. Any assumption can be only approached with some limited precision. So, the rather meaningless error per qubit per gate threshold must be supplemented by a list of the precisions with which all assumptions behind the threshold theorem should hold. Such a list still does not exist. The theory also seems to ignore the undesired free evolution of the quantum computer caused by the energy differences of quantum states entering any given superposition. Another important point is that the hypothetical quantum computer will be a system of 103 -106 qubits PLUS an extremely complex and monstrously sophisticated classical apparatus. This huge and strongly nonlinear system will generally exhibit instabilities and chaotic behavior.

Dyakonov, M. I.

2014-09-01

436

Syllabus MCS 590, Spring 2014 Introduction to Quantum Computation and Quantum Information  

E-print Network

Syllabus MCS 590, Spring 2014 Introduction to Quantum Computation and Quantum Information LCD-0-7503-0983-7. Supplementary TEXT: [2] Michael A. Nielsen and Isaac L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Infor- mation) or its equiva- lent. 1 Introduction Quantum computing (QC) and information (QI) are rapidly developing

Friedland, Shmuel

437

Computational complexity of the quantum separability problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ever since entanglement was identified as a computational and cryptographic resource, researchers have sought efficient ways to tell whether a givendensity matrix represents an unentangled, or separable, state. This paper gives the first systematic and com- prehensive treatment of this (bipartite) quantum separability problem, focusing on its deterministic (as opposed to randomized) computational complexity. First, I review the one-sided tests

Lawrence M. Ioannou

2006-01-01

438

Qubus ancilla-driven quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to quantum computation. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We demonstrate how using a continuous variable qubus as the ancilla provides savings in the total number of operations required when computing with many qubits.

Brown, Katherine Louise; De, Suvabrata; Kendon, Viv; Munro, Bill

2014-12-01

439

Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation  

E-print Network

Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any measurement-based quantum computation on a graph state with \\emph{gflow} can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call \\emph{adiabatic graph-state quantum computation} (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of $\\dot{H}$ as well as the degree of $H$, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

Bobby Antonio; Damian Markham; Janet Anders

2014-12-19

440

Ensemble Quantum Computing by NMR Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantum computer (QC) can operate in parallel on all its possible inputs at once, but the amount of information that can be extracted from the result is limited by the phenomenon of wave function collapse. We present a new computational model, which differs from a QC only in that the result of a measurement is the expectation value of

David G. Cory; Amr F. Fahmy; Timothy F. Havel

1997-01-01

441

Multilinear Formulas and Skepticism of Quantum Computing #  

E-print Network

Multilinear Formulas and Skepticism of Quantum Computing # Scott Aaronson + ABSTRACT Several computers will never be built in practice. (C) Even if (A) and (B) fail, the speedup o#ered by quan­ tum practical value. 1 The objections can be classified along two axes: Theoretical Practical Physical (A) (B

Aaronson, Scott

442

Extending matchgates into universal quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

Matchgates are a family of two-qubit gates associated with noninteracting fermions. They are classically simulatable if acting only on nearest neighbors but become universal for quantum computation if we relax this restriction or use swap gates [Jozsa and Miyake, Proc. R. Soc. A 464, 3089 (2008)]. We generalize this result by proving that any nonmatchgate parity-preserving unitary is capable of extending the computational power of matchgates into universal quantum computation. We identify the single local invariant of parity-preserving unitaries responsible for this, and discuss related results in the context of fermionic systems.

Brod, Daniel J.; Galvao, Ernesto F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil)

2011-08-15

443

Accelerating Quantum Computer Simulation via Parallel Eigenvector Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum-dot cellular automata (QDCA) hold great potential to produce the next generation of computer hardware, but their development is hindered by computationally intensive simulations. Our research therefore focuses on rewriting one such simulation to run parallel calculations on a graphics processing unit (GPU). We have decreased execution time from 33 hours 11 minutes to 1 hour 39 minutes, but current

Karl Stathakis

2011-01-01

444

Quantum state transition diagram: a bridge from classical computing to quantum computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Very few papers have been written on the topic of a quantum version of the finite state machine, (or finite state automata). Furthermore, these papers only serve to define what a quantum finite state machine might be in the mathematical sense using the early languages of Turing machines. This paper seeks to further develop the notion of a quantum finite state machine (FSM) using constructs developed for the classical FSM and utilized for classical FSM design. In particular the quantum state transition diagram (QSTD) is constructed to further the understanding and realization of quantum finite state machines and quantum computers.

Hook, Loyd R., IV; Lee, Samuel C.

2010-04-01

445

Universal quantum computation with little entanglement.  

PubMed

We show that universal quantum computation can be achieved in the standard pure-state circuit model while the entanglement entropy of every bipartition is small in each step of the computation. The entanglement entropy required for large-scale quantum computation even tends to zero. Moreover we show that the same conclusion applies to many entanglement measures commonly used in the literature. This includes e.g., the geometric measure, localizable entanglement, multipartite concurrence, squashed entanglement, witness-based measures, and more generally any entanglement measure which is continuous in a certain natural sense. These results demonstrate that many entanglement measures are unsuitable tools to assess the power of quantum computers. PMID:23432229

Van den Nest, Maarten

2013-02-01

446

Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit ?/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10-3 to 10-4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

2010-11-01

447

Universal quantum computation on a semiconductor quantum wire network  

E-print Network

Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a 2D topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include \\emph{any} two-qubit gate and also the single-qubit $\\pi/8$ phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, \\emph{etc.}), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an $s$-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of $0.14$ as compared to $10^{-3}$ to $10^{-4}$ in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

Jay D. Sau; Sumanta Tewari; S. Das Sarma

2010-11-24

448

Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots  

E-print Network

The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a quantum metalanguage, the operation of an artificial quantum computer.

Eliano Pessa; Paola zizzi

2009-09-08

449

Computer Technology: State of the Art.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the nature of modern general-purpose computer systems, including hardware, semiconductor electronics, microprocessors, computer architecture, input output technology, and system control programs. Seven suggested readings are cited. (FM)

Withington, Frederic G.

1981-01-01

450

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-print Network

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01

451

Building blocks for a scalable quantum computer Paola Cappellaro  

E-print Network

Building blocks for a scalable quantum computer Paola Cappellaro Nuclear Science and Engineering would be quantum computation. Although small quantum systems can be manipulated with high precision toward a scalable quantum computer. Wires Diamond substrate Control circuitControl circuit 20nm Bath

Aalberts, Daniel P.

452

Quantum computing based on vibrational eigenstates: Pulse area theorem analysis  

E-print Network

Quantum computing based on vibrational eigenstates: Pulse area theorem analysis Taiwang Cheng the accuracy of quantum gates in a quantum computer based on molecular vibrational eigenstates. The effects.1063/1.2164457 I. INTRODUCTION The field of quantum computing1­3 has emerged as an intriguing and exciting new

Brown, Alex

453

A scheme for efficient quantum computation with linear optics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum computers promise to increase greatly the efficiency of solving problems such as factoring large integers, combinatorial optimization and quantum physics simulation. One of the greatest challenges now is to implement the basic quantum-computational elements in a physical system and to demonstrate that they can be reliably and scalably controlled. One of the earliest proposals for quantum computation is based

E. Knill; R. Laflamme; G. J. Milburn

2001-01-01

454

Information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality and quantum computation  

SciTech Connect

An information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality is formulated to contrast classical and quantum computations. Any classical algorithm satisfies the inequality, while quantum ones can violate it. Therefore, the violation of the inequality is an immediate consequence of the quantumness in the computation. Furthermore, this approach suggests a notion of temporal nonlocality in quantum computation.

Morikoshi, Fumiaki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan) and PRESTO, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2006-05-15

455

Quantum Computing in Non Euclidean Geometry  

E-print Network

The recent debate on hyper-computation has raised new questions both on the computational abilities of quantum systems and the Church-Turing Thesis role in Physics. We propose here the idea of geometry of effective physical process as the essentially physical notion of computation. In Quantum mechanics we cannot use the traditional Euclidean geometry but we introduce more sophisticate non Euclidean geometry which include a new kind of information diffuse in the entire universe and that we can represent as Fisher information or active information. We remark that from the Fisher information we can obtain the Bohm and Hiley quantum potential and the classical Schrodinger equation. We can see the quantum phenomena do not affect a limited region of the space but is reflected in a change of the geometry of all the universe. In conclusion any local physical change or physical process is reflected in all the universe by the change of its geometry, This is the deepest meaning of the entanglement in Quantum mechanics and quantum computing. We stress the connection between metric and information as measure of change. Because computation is not restricted to calculus but is the environment changing via physical processes, super-Turing potentialities derive from an incomputable information source embedded into the geometry of the universe in accordance with Bell's constraints. In the general relativity we define the geometry of the space time. In our approach quantum phenomena define the geometry of the parameters of the probability distribution that include also the space time parameters. To study this new approach to the computation we use the new theory of Morphogenic systems.

Germano Resconi; Ignazio Licata

2009-11-04

456

Research of cloud computing data security technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

With cloud computing applications and research at home and abroad continue to advance cloud computing platform for users and data exchange between the greater the amount of user data transmission and storage a security threat, a cloud computing security is an important issue to be resolved. In this paper, all with state of encryption technology, presents a cloud computing data

Yubo Tan; Xinlei Wang

2012-01-01

457

Biologically inspired path to quantum computer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an approach to quantum computer inspired by the information processing at the molecular level in living cells. It is based on the separation of a small ensemble of qubits inside the living system (e.g., a bacterial cell), such that coherent quantum states of this ensemble remain practically unchanged for a long time. We use the notion of a quantum kernel to describe such an ensemble. Quantum kernel is not strictly connected with certain particles; it permanently exchanges atoms and molecules with the environment, which makes quantum kernel a virtual notion. There are many reasons to expect that the state of quantum kernel of a living system can be treated as the stationary state of some Hamiltonian. While the quantum kernel is responsible for the stability of dynamics at the time scale of cellular life, at the longer inter-generation time scale it can change, varying smoothly in the course of biological evolution. To the first level of approximation, quantum kernel can be described in the framework of qubit modification of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the relaxation corresponds to the exchange of matter between quantum kernel and the rest of the cell and is represented as Lindblad super-operators.

Ogryzko, Vasily; Ozhigov, Yuri

2014-12-01

458

Space-Efficient Simulation of Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

Traditional algorithms for simulating quantum computers on classical ones require an exponentially large amount of memory, and so typically cannot simulate general quantum circuits with more than about 30 or so qubits on a typical PC-scale platform with only a few gigabytes of main memory. However, more memory-efficient simulations are possible, requiring only polynomial or even linear space in the size of the quantum circuit being simulated. In this paper, we describe one such technique, which was recently implemented at FSU in the form of a C++ program called SEQCSim, which we releasing publicly. We also discuss the potential benefits of this simulation in quantum computing research and education, and outline some possible directions for further progress.

Michael P. Frank; Uwe H. Meyer-Baese; Irinel Chiorescu; Liviu Oniciuc; Robert A. van Engelen

2009-10-08

459

Theory of fault-tolerant quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to use quantum error-correcting codes to improve the performance of a quantum computer, it is necessary to be able to perform operations fault-tolerantly on encoded states. I present a theory of fault-tolerant operations on stabilizer codes based on symmetries of the code stabilizer. This allows a straightforward determination of which operations can be performed fault-tolerantly on a given

Daniel Gottesman

1998-01-01

460

Can Quantum Communication Speed Up Distributed Computation?  

E-print Network

The focus of this paper is on {\\em quantum distributed} computation, where we investigate whether quantum communication can help in {\\em speeding up} distributed network algorithms. Our main result is that for certain fundamental network problems such as minimum spanning tree, minimum cut, and shortest paths, quantum communication {\\em does not} help in substantially speeding up distributed algorithms for these problems compared to the classical setting. In order to obtain this result, we extend the technique of Das Sarma et al. [SICOMP 2012] to obtain a uniform approach to prove non-trivial lower bounds for quantum distributed algorithms for several graph optimization (both exact and approximate versions) as well as verification problems, some of which are new even in the classical setting, e.g. tight randomized lower bounds for Hamiltonian cycle and spanning tree verification, answering an open problem of Das Sarma et al., and a lower bound in terms of the weight aspect ratio, matching the upper bounds of Elkin [STOC 2004]. Our approach introduces the {\\em Server model} and {\\em Quantum Simulation Theorem} which together provide a connection between distributed algorithms and communication complexity. The Server model is the standard two-party communication complexity model augmented with additional power; yet, most of the hardness in the two-party model is carried over to this new model. The Quantum Simulation Theorem carries this hardness further to quantum distributed computing. Our techniques, except the proof of the hardness in the Server model, require very little knowledge in quantum computing, and this can help overcoming a usual impediment in proving bounds on quantum distributed algorithms.

Michael Elkin; Hartmut Klauck; Danupon Nanongkai; Gopal Pandurangan

2014-05-09

461

Simulating a perceptron on a quantum computer  

E-print Network

Perceptrons are the basic computational unit of artificial neural networks, as they model the activation mechanism of an output neuron due to incoming signals from its neighbours. As linear classifiers, they play an important role in the foundations of machine learning. In the context of the emerging field of quantum machine learning, several attempts have been made to develop a corresponding unit using quantum information theory. Based on the quantum phase estimation algorithm, this paper introduces a quantum perceptron model imitating the step-activation function of a classical perceptron. This scheme requires resources in $\\mathcal{O}(n)$ (where $n$ is the size of the input) and promises efficient applications for more complex structures such as trainable quantum neural networks.

Maria Schuld; Ilya Sinayskiy; Francesco Petruccione

2014-12-11

462

many possible routes to quantum comput-ing have been suggested, but the most  

E-print Network

many possible routes to quantum comput- ing have been suggested, but the most promising are solid-intuitive rules of quantum mechanics imply that, unlike classical com- puters, quantum computers should per- form

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

463

Interconnection Networks for Scalable Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

We show that the problem of communication in a quantum computer reduces to constructing reliable quantum channels by distributing high-fidelity EPR pairs. We develop analytical models of the latency, bandwidth, error rate and resource utilization of such channels, and show that 100s of qubits must be distributed to accommodate a single data communication. Next, we show that a grid of teleportation nodes forms a good substrate on which to distribute EPR pairs. We also explore the control requirements for such a network. Finally, we propose a specific routing architecture and simulate the communication patterns of the Quantum Fourier Transform to demonstrate the impact of resource contention.

Nemanja Isailovic; Yatish Patel; Mark Whitney; John Kubiatowicz

2006-04-07

464

Efficient quantum computing of complex dynamics.  

PubMed

We propose a quantum algorithm which uses the number of qubits in an optimal way and efficiently simulates a physical model with rich and complex dynamics described by the quantum sawtooth map. The numerical study of the effect of static imperfections in the quantum computer hardware shows that the main elements of the phase space structures are accurately reproduced up to a time scale which is polynomial in the number of qubits. The errors generated by these imperfections are more significant than the errors of random noise in gate operations. PMID:11736427

Benenti, G; Casati, G; Montangero, S; Shepelyansky, D L

2001-11-26

465

Error correcting codes for adiabatic quantum computation  

E-print Network

Recently, there has been growing interest in using adiabatic quantum computation as an architecture for experimentally realizable quantum computers. One of the reasons for this is the idea that the energy gap should provide some inherent resistance to noise. It is now known that universal quantum computation can be achieved adiabatically using 2-local Hamiltonians. The energy gap in these Hamiltonians scales as an inverse polynomial in the problem size. Here we present stabilizer codes which can be used to produce a constant energy gap against 1-local and 2-local noise. The corresponding fault-tolerant universal Hamiltonians are 4-local and 6-local respectively, which is the optimal result achievable within this framework.

Stephen P. Jordan; Edward Farhi; Peter W. Shor

2006-10-10

466

Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.  

PubMed

A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology. PMID:25501117

Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

2015-01-28

467

Composable security of delegated quantum computation  

E-print Network

Delegating difficult computations to remote large computation facilities, with appropriate security guarantees, is a possible solution for the ever-growing needs of personal computing power. For delegated computation protocols to be usable in a larger context---or simply to securely run two protocols in parallel---the security definitions need to be composable. Here, we define composable security for delegated quantum computation. We distinguish between protocols which provide only blindness---the computation is hidden from the server---and those that are also verifiable---the client can check that it has received the correct result. We show that the composable security definition capturing both these notions can be reduced to a combination of several distinct "trace-distance-type" criteria---which are, individually, non-composable security definitions. Additionally, we study the security of some known delegated quantum computation protocols, including Broadbent, Fitzsimons and Kashefi's Universal Blind Quantum Computation protocol. Even though these protocols were originally proposed with insufficient security criteria, they turn out to still be secure given the stronger composable definitions.

Vedran Dunjko; Joseph F. Fitzsimons; Christopher Portmann; Renato Renner

2014-09-13

468

Technical Report No. 2005500 Quantum computing: Beyond the limits of  

E-print Network

Technical Report No. 2005­500 Quantum computing: Beyond the limits of conventional computation Canada E­mail: fmarius,aklg@cs.queensu.ca July 22, 2005 Abstract The quantum model of computation measurement capabilities as the quantum computational device). A new class of information processing tasks

Graham, Nick

469

Discrete Cosine Transforms on Quantum Computers Andreas Klappenecker  

E-print Network

Discrete Cosine Transforms on Quantum Computers Andreas Klappenecker Texas A&M University Institut f?ur Algorithmen und Kognitive Systeme Quantum Computing Group, Prof. Thomas Beth Am Fasanengarten on a quantum computer, whereas the known fast algorithms on a classical computer need O(N log N) operations. 1

Klappenecker, Andreas

470

Discrete Cosine Transforms on Quantum Computers Andreas Klappenecker  

E-print Network

Discrete Cosine Transforms on Quantum Computers Andreas Klappenecker Texas A&M University Institut f¨ur Algorithmen und Kognitive Systeme Quantum Computing Group, Prof. Thomas Beth Am Fasanengarten on a quantum computer, whereas the known fast algorithms on a classical computer need ¤¦¥ §© operations. 1

Klappenecker, Andreas

471

Verification for measurement-only blind quantum computing  

E-print Network

Blind quantum computing is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client who does not have any sophisticated quantum technlogy can delegate her quantum computing to a server without leaking any privacy. It is known that a client who has only a measurement device can perform blind quantum computing [T. Morimae and K. Fujii, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf87}, 050301(R) (2013)]. It has been an open problem whether the protocol can enjoy the verification, i.e., the ability of client to check the correctness of the computing. In this paper, we propose a protocol of verification for the measurement-only blind quantum computing.

Tomoyuki Morimae

2014-06-19

472

Accuracy Threshold for Quantum Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have previously [11] shown that for quantum memories andquantum communication, a state can be transmitted over arbitrarydistances with error ffl provided each gate has error at most cffl. Wediscuss a similar concatenation technique which can be used with faulttolerant networks to achieve any desired accuracy when computingwith classical initial states, provided a minimum gate accuracy can beachieved. The technique

Emanuel Knill; Raymond Laflamme; Wojciech Zurek

1996-01-01

473

Marketing the Monster: Advertising Computer Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpreting the rich and striking blend of technical, intellectual, economic, social, and cultural information in advertisements of computer technology reveals how popular understanding and perceptions of the meaning of computers changed between 1950 and 1980. The study's findings contribute to the historical understanding of the social diffusion of the technology in society; its methodology illustrates the historiographic strengths and weaknesses

William Aspray; Donald de B. Beaver

1986-01-01

474

Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and

Ben-Ari, Mordechai

2001-01-01

475

Solid state quantum computers: a nanoscopic solution to the Moore's law problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The computer industry has followed Moore's Law closely and faithfully over the past few decades. However, transistors cannot continue to shrink at their current rate forever, and new methods of computation must be explored. Quantum computation is one such method that has received much attention over the past few years and will heavily rely on technological advances in the smart electronics and nanotechnology arena. In this review, we will present some of the problems facing classical computers and why quantum computers may be a viable alternative. We will briefly describe some of the "killer" quantum applications, such as Deutsch's, Shor's and Grover's algorithms that demonstrate the computational powers of quantum computation. Kane's solid state quantum computer in silicon promises to demonstrate some of these applications. However there remain many significant technological difficulties which will need to be overcome if we are to see a useful quantum computer. The main technological challenges, for Kane's solid-state computer, of interest to the smart materials and structures community, will be highlighted.

Ng, Joseph; Abbott, Derek

2001-03-01

476

"The application of quantum technologies to encryption algorithms threatens to dramatically  

E-print Network

"The application of quantum technologies to encryption algorithms threatens to dramatically impact the US government's ability to both protect its communications and eavesdrop on the communications into application and new industries ­ from quantum computation to secure communication", as announced by Chancellor

477

Resource-efficient linear optical quantum computation  

E-print Network

We introduce a scheme for linear optics quantum computation, that makes no use of teleported gates, and requires stable interferometry over only the coherence length of the photons. We achieve a much greater degree of efficiency and a simpler implementation than previous proposals. We follow the "cluster state" measurement based quantum computational approach, and show how cluster states may be efficiently generated from pairs of maximally polarization entangled photons using linear optical elements. We demonstrate the universality and usefulness of generic parity measurements, as well as introducing the use of redundant encoding of qubits to enable utilization of destructive measurements - both features of use in a more general context.

Daniel E. Browne; Terry Rudolph

2005-02-09

478

Towards universal quantum computation through relativistic motion  

E-print Network

We show how to use relativistic motion and local phase shifts to generate continuous variable Gaussian cluster states within cavity modes. Our results can be demonstrated experimentally using superconducting circuits where tuneable boundary conditions correspond to mirrors moving with velocities close to the speed of light. In particular, we propose the generation of a quadripartite square cluster state as a first example that can be readily implemented in the laboratory. Since cluster states are universal resources for universal one-way quantum computation, our results pave the way for relativistic quantum computation schemes.

David Edward Bruschi; Carlos Sabn; Pieter Kok; Gran Johansson; Per Delsing; Ivette Fuentes

2014-07-03

479

Information Security Technology Based on DNA Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA computing is a new method of simulating biomolecular structure of DNA and computing by means of molecular biology technological computation. It introduces a fire-new data structure and calculating method, providing a new way for solving the NP-complete problem. It is a new computational method by harnessing the enormous parallel computing ability and high memory density of bio-molecules, which brings

Guangzhao Cui; Limin Qin; Yanfeng Wang; Xuncai Zhang

2007-01-01

480

Technologies for Visualization in Computational Aerosciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

State-of-the-art research in computational aerosciences produces' complex, time-dependent datasets. Simulations can also be multidisciplinary in nature, coupling two or more physical disciplines such as fluid dynamics, structural dynamics, thermodynamics, and acoustics. Many diverse technologies are necessary for visualizing computational aerosciences simulations. This paper describes these technologies and how they contribute to building effective tools for use by domain scientists. These technologies include data management, distributed environments, advanced user interfaces, rapid prototyping environments, parallel computation, and methods to visualize the scalar and vector fields associated with computational aerosciences datasets.

Miceli, Kristina D.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

1993-01-01

481

Quantum Computing and Lie Theory Feynman's suggestion that the only effective way to model quantum phe-  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing and Lie Theory Feynman's suggestion that the only effective way to model quantum that a quantum computer could, in theory, factor large integers or do discrete logarithms in polynomial time the basic quantum mechanics necessary to understand the theory, describe quantum algorithms and explain

D'Agnolo, Andrea

482

ITAMP/HQOC Quantum Sciences Colloquium The Quantum Way of Doing Computations  

E-print Network

ITAMP/HQOC Quantum Sciences Colloquium The Quantum Way of Doing Computations.iqoqi.at In this talk, the basic toolbox of the Innsbruck quantum computer based on a string.quantumoptics.at Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences

483

Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

2014-11-01

484

Random Numbers and Quantum Computers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since

McCartney, Mark; Glass, David