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Sample records for quantum dot confinement

  1. Comparison of quantum confinement effects between quantum wires and dots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-03-30

    Dimensionality is an important factor to govern the electronic structures of semiconductor nanocrystals. The quantum confinement energies in one-dimensional quantum wires and zero-dimensional quantum dots are quite different. Using large-scale first-principles calculations, we systematically study the electronic structures of semiconductor (including group IV, III-V, and II-VI) surface-passivated quantum wires and dots. The band-gap energies of quantum wires and dots have the same scaling with diameter for a given material. The ratio of band-gap-increases between quantum wires and dots is material-dependent, and slightly deviates from 0.586 predicted by effective-mass approximation. Highly linear polarization of photoluminescence in quantum wires is found. The degree of polarization decreases with the increasing temperature and size.

  2. Correlation studies in weakly confining quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter; Jones, Preston; Winkler, Peter

    We investigate the electron correlation in few-electron closed-shell atomic systems and similarly in few-electron quantum dots under weak confinement. As usual we start with restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations and add electron correlation in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) second-order Green function (GF); (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA); and (iii) an extended version thereof which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. Our studies exhibit similarities and differences between weakly confined quantum dots and standard atomic systems. The calculations support the application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional quantum dot systems. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots, such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and thus - compared to atomic systems - modified shell-filling sequences.

  3. Enhanced confinement in compositionally heterogeneous alloy quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Zubaer

    While there is a growing need to increase solar cell efficiencies and reduce the cost per watt, reported efficiencies are still well below the thermodynamic limit of photovoltaic energy conversion. The major factor that affects the efficiency (by more than 40%) is the lack of absorption or thermalization of electrons. To improve absorption, existing approaches, till date, are focused on combining multiple materials in the form of heterostructures. This talk will show the application of a physics-based mechanistic approach to engineer absorption by using alloy quantum dots and exploiting its heterogeneous compositional and deformation fields. Using a multiscale computational framework that combines density functional theory, k.p method and the finite element calculations, the work shows that heterogeneous distribution of composition and strain fields can lead to substantial confinement in alloy quantum dots. Subsequently alloy quantum dots that are much larger (on the order of 50 nm) in size - compared to their single crystalline counterparts (which are on the order of 5 nm) - can still provide significant confinement. The findings uncover new fundamental insights for engineering confinement that are unattainable under conventional homogenization approximations.

  4. Confinement of Dirac electrons in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolie, Wouter; Craes, Fabian; Petrović, Marin; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Caciuc, Vasile; Blügel, Stefan; Kralj, Marko; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2014-04-01

    We observe spatial confinement of Dirac states on epitaxial graphene quantum dots with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy after using oxygen as an intercalant to suppress the surface state of Ir(111) and to effectively decouple graphene from its metal substrate. We analyze the confined electronic states with a relativistic particle-in-a-box model and find a linear dispersion relation. The oxygen-intercalated graphene is p doped [ED=0.64±0.07 eV] and has a Fermi velocity close to the one of free-standing graphene [vF=0.96±0.07×106 m/s].

  5. Si quantum dots in silicon nitride: Quantum confinement and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharova, L. V. Karner, V. L.; D'Ortenzio, R.; Chaudhary, S.; Mokry, C. R.; Simpson, P. J.; Nguyen, P. H.

    2015-12-14

    Luminescence of amorphous Si quantum dots (Si QDs) in a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}:H) matrix was examined over a broad range of stoichiometries from Si{sub 3}N{sub 2.08} to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4.14}, to optimize light emission. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit hydrogenated SiN{sub x} films with excess Si on Si (001) substrates, with stoichiometry controlled by variation of the gas flow rates of SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} gases. The compositional and optical properties were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-laser-excited PL spectra show multiple emission bands from 400 nm (3.1 eV) to 850 nm (1.45 eV) for different Si{sub 3}N{sub x} compositions. There is a red-shift of the measured peaks from ∼2.3 eV to ∼1.45 eV as Si content increases, which provides evidence for quantum confinement. Higher N content samples show additional peaks in their PL spectra at higher energies, which we attribute to defects. We observed three different ranges of composition where Tauc band gaps, PL, and PL lifetimes change systematically. There is an interesting interplay of defect luminescence and, possibly, small Si QD luminescence observed in the intermediate range of compositions (∼Si{sub 3}N{sub 3.15}) in which the maximum of light emission is observed.

  6. Si quantum dots in silicon nitride: Quantum confinement and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, L. V.; Nguyen, P. H.; Karner, V. L.; D'Ortenzio, R.; Chaudhary, S.; Mokry, C. R.; Simpson, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Luminescence of amorphous Si quantum dots (Si QDs) in a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNx:H) matrix was examined over a broad range of stoichiometries from Si3N2.08 to Si3N4.14, to optimize light emission. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit hydrogenated SiNx films with excess Si on Si (001) substrates, with stoichiometry controlled by variation of the gas flow rates of SiH4 and NH3 gases. The compositional and optical properties were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-laser-excited PL spectra show multiple emission bands from 400 nm (3.1 eV) to 850 nm (1.45 eV) for different Si3Nx compositions. There is a red-shift of the measured peaks from ˜2.3 eV to ˜1.45 eV as Si content increases, which provides evidence for quantum confinement. Higher N content samples show additional peaks in their PL spectra at higher energies, which we attribute to defects. We observed three different ranges of composition where Tauc band gaps, PL, and PL lifetimes change systematically. There is an interesting interplay of defect luminescence and, possibly, small Si QD luminescence observed in the intermediate range of compositions (˜Si3N3.15) in which the maximum of light emission is observed.

  7. Impurity binding energies in quantum dots with parabolic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Arnold

    2015-03-01

    We present an effective numerical procedure to calculate the binding energies and wave functions of the hydrogen-like impurity states in a quantum dot (QD) with parabolic confinement. The unknown wave function was expressed as an expansion over one-dimensional harmonic oscillator states, which describes the electron's movement along the defined z-axis. Green's function technique used to obtain the solution of Schredinger equation for electronic states in a transverse plane. Binding energy of impurity states is defined as poles of the wave function. The dependences of the binding energy on the position of an impurity, the size of the QD and the magnetic field strength are presented and discussed.

  8. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a confined donor in inhomogeneous quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, K.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2011-03-01

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility χdia are estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in GaAs-GaAlAs inhomogeneous quantum dots. The calculation was performed within the effective mass approximation and using the variational method. The results show that the binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility χdia depend strongly on the core radius and the shell radius. We have demonstrated that there is a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius which may be important for nanofabrication techniques. The binding energy Eb shows a minimum for a critical value of this ratio depending on the value of the outer radius and shows a maximum when the donor is placed at the center of the spherical layer. The diamagnetic susceptibility is more sensitive to variations of the radius for a large spherical layer. The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position.

  9. Investigation of quantum confinement behavior of zinc sulphide quantum dots synthesized via various chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Meera Sakthivel, T. Chandran, Hrisheekesh T. Nivea, R. Gunasekaran, V.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, undoped and Ag-doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized using various chemical methods. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our results revealed that the size of the as-prepared samples range from 1–6 nm in diameter and have a cubic zinc-blende structure. Also, we observed the emission of different wavelength of light from different sized quantum dots of the same material due to quantum confinement effect. The results will be presented in detail and ZnS can be a potential candidate for optical device development and applications.

  10. Graphene/Si-quantum-dot heterojunction diodes showing high photosensitivity compatible with quantum confinement effect.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jong Min; Jang, Chan Wook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Lee, Kyeong Won; Kim, Jungkil; Oh, Si Duck; Lee, Dae Hun; Kang, Soo Seok; Kim, Chang Oh; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2015-04-24

    Graphene/Si quantum dot (QD) heterojunction diodes are reported for the first time. The photoresponse, very sensitive to variations in the size of the QDs as well as in the doping concentration of graphene and consistent with the quantum-confinement effect, is remarkably enhanced in the near-ultraviolet range compared to commercially available bulk-Si photodetectors. The photoresponse proves to be dominated by the carriertunneling mechanism. PMID:25776865

  11. The Interplay of Quantum Confinement and Hydrogenation in Amorphous Silicon Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Askari, Sadegh; Svrcek, Vladmir; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-12-22

    Hydrogenation in amorphous silicon quantum dots (QDs) has a dramatic impact on the corresponding optical properties and band energy structure, leading to a quantum-confined composite material with unique characteristics. The synthesis of a-Si:H QDs is demonstrated with an atmospheric-pressure plasma process, which allows for accurate control of a highly chemically reactive non-equilibrium environment with temperatures well below the crystallization temperature of Si QDs. PMID:26523743

  12. Quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes in MoS{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z. X.; Liu, L. Z.; Wu, H. Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Shan, Y.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-06-08

    The low quantum yield (∼10{sup −5}) has restricted practical use of photoluminescence (PL) from MoS{sub 2} composed of a few layers, but the quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes are believed to be able to boost the PL intensity. In this work, PL from 2 to 9 nm MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) is excluded from the solvent and the absorption and PL spectra are shown to be consistent with the size distribution. PL from MoS{sub 2} QDs is also found to be sensitive to aggregation due to the size effect.

  13. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level

  14. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots - more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms - are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement - or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) - in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level transitions are seen

  15. Experimental Observation of Quantum Confinement in the Conduction Band of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Meulenberg, Robert W.; Klepeis, John E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Buuren, Tony van; Hanif, Khalid M.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2007-04-06

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to characterize the evolution in the conduction band (CB) density of states of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a function of particle size. We have unambiguously witnessed the CdSe QD CB minimum (CBM) shift to higher energy with decreasing particle size, consistent with quantum confinement effects, and have directly compared our results with recent theoretical calculations. At the smallest particle size, evidence for a pinning of the CBM is presented. Our observations can be explained by considering a size-dependent change in the angular-momentum-resolved states at the CBM.

  16. Experimental Observation of Quantum Confinement in the Conduction Band of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J I; Meulenberg, R W; Hanif, K M; Mattoussi, H; Klepeis, J E; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T

    2006-12-15

    Recent theoretical descriptions as to the magnitude of effect that quantum confinement has on he conduction band (CB) of CdSe quantum dots (QD) have been conflicting. In this manuscript, we experimentally identify quantum confinement effects in the CB of CdSe QDs for the first time. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have unambiguously witnessed the CB minimum shift to higher energy with decreasing particle size and have been able to compare these results to recent theories. Our experiments have been able to identify which theories correctly describe the CB states in CdSe QDs. In particular, our experiments suggest that multiple theories describe the shifts in the CB of CdSe QDs and are not mutually exclusive.

  17. Engineering the hole confinement for CdTe-based quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłopotowski, Ł.; Wojnar, P.; Kret, S.; Parlińska-Wojtan, M.; Fronc, K.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to engineer the quantum confinement in a system of two quantum dots grown in a vertical stack. We achieve this by using materials with a different lattice constant for the growth of the outer and inner barriers. We monitor the resulting dot morphology with transmission electron microscopy studies and correlate the results with ensemble quantum dot photoluminescence. Furthermore, we embed the double quantum dots into diode structures and study photoluminescence as a function of bias voltage. We show that in properly engineered structures, it is possible to achieve a resonance of the hole states by tuning the energy levels with electric field. At the resonance, we observe signatures of a formation of a molecular state, hybridized over the two dots.

  18. Engineering the hole confinement for CdTe-based quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kłopotowski, Ł. Wojnar, P.; Kret, S.; Fronc, K.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2015-06-14

    We demonstrate an efficient method to engineer the quantum confinement in a system of two quantum dots grown in a vertical stack. We achieve this by using materials with a different lattice constant for the growth of the outer and inner barriers. We monitor the resulting dot morphology with transmission electron microscopy studies and correlate the results with ensemble quantum dot photoluminescence. Furthermore, we embed the double quantum dots into diode structures and study photoluminescence as a function of bias voltage. We show that in properly engineered structures, it is possible to achieve a resonance of the hole states by tuning the energy levels with electric field. At the resonance, we observe signatures of a formation of a molecular state, hybridized over the two dots.

  19. Confinement and inhomogeneous broadening effects in the quantum oscillatory magnetization of quantum dot ensembles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, F; Heedt, S; Goerke, S; Ibrahim, A; Rupprecht, B; Heyn, Ch; Hardtdegen, H; Schäpers, Th; Wilde, M A; Grundler, D

    2016-02-01

    We report on the magnetization of ensembles of etched quantum dots with a lateral diameter of 460 nm, which we prepared from InGaAs/InP heterostructures. The quantum dots exhibit 1/B-periodic de-Haas-van-Alphen-type oscillations in the magnetization M(B) for external magnetic fields B  >  2 T, measured by torque magnetometry at 0.3 K. We compare the experimental data to model calculations assuming different confinement potentials and including ensemble broadening effects. The comparison shows that a hard wall potential with an edge depletion width of 100 nm explains the magnetic behavior. Beating patterns induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) as measured in unpatterned and nanopatterned InGaAs/InP heterostructures are not observed for the quantum dots. From our model we predict that signatures of SOI in the magnetization could be observed in larger dots in tilted magnetic fields. PMID:26740509

  20. Anomalous Light Emission and Wide Photoluminescence Spectra in Graphene Quantum Dot: Quantum Confinement from Edge Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Shi, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-He; Zhong, Hong-Xia; Ding, Yi-Min; Cao, Xiong; Wu, Meng; Lu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The physical origin of the observed anomalous photoluminescence (PL) behavior, that is, the large-size graphene quantum dots (GQDs) exhibiting higher PL energy than the small ones and the broadening PL spectra from deep ultraviolet to near-infrared, has been debated for many years. Obviously, it is in conflict with the well-accepted quantum confinement. Here we shed new light on these two notable debates by state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. We find that quantum confinement is significant in GQDs with remarkable size-dependent exciton absorption/emission. The edge environment from alkaline to acidic conditions causes a blue shift of the PL peak. Furthermore, carbon vacancies are inclined to assemble at the GQD edge and form the tiny edge microstructures. The bound excitons, localized inside these edge microstructures, determine the anomalous PL behavior (blue and UV emission) of large-size GQDs. The bound excitons confined in the whole GQD lead to the low-energy transition. PMID:27409980

  1. Electronic structure and electron correlation in weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter Borgia Ndungu

    The electronic structure and electron correlations in weakly confining spherical quantum dots potentials are investigated. Following a common practice, the investigation starts with the restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. Then electron correlation is added in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) Second-order Green function (GF) (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and (iii) an extended version thereof (XTDA) which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. The study includes as well Hartree-Fock V (N-1) potential approximation in which framework the Hartree-Fock virtual orbitals are calculated in the field of the N-1 electrons as opposed to the regular but unphysical N-electron field Hartree-Fock calculation of virtual orbitals. For contrast and comparison, the same approximation techniques are applied to few-electron closed-shell atoms and few-electron negative ions for which pertinent data is readily available. The results for the weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials and the standard atomic systems exhibit fundamental similarities as well as significant differences. For the most part the results of these calculations are in favor of application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional weakly confining quantum dot potentials. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and the modified shell filling sequences.

  2. XANES: observation of quantum confinement in the conduction band of colloidal PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, I. N.; Chernyshova, M.; He, X.; Minikayev, R.; Syryanyy, Y.; Derkachova, A.; Derkachov, G.; Stolte, W. C.; Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Reszka, A.; Liang, H.

    2013-04-01

    The presented investigations aimed at development of inexpensive method for synthesized materials suitable for utilization of solar energy. This important issue was addressed by focusing, mainly, on electronic local structure studies with supporting x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of colloidal galena nano-particles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) synthesized using wet chemistry under microwave irradiation. Performed x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed an evidence of quantum confinement for the sample with QDs, where the bottom of the conduction band was shifted to higher energy. The QDs were found to be passivated with oxides at the surface. Existence of sulfate/sulfite and thiosulfate species in pure PbS and QDs, respectively, was identified.

  3. Demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to an InAs quantum dot and a photon.

    PubMed

    Schaibley, J R; Burgers, A P; McCracken, G A; Duan, L-M; Berman, P R; Steel, D G; Bracker, A S; Gammon, D; Sham, L J

    2013-04-19

    The electron spin state of a singly charged semiconductor quantum dot has been shown to form a suitable single qubit for quantum computing architectures with fast gate times. A key challenge in realizing a useful quantum dot quantum computing architecture lies in demonstrating the ability to scale the system to many qubits. In this Letter, we report an all optical experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to a single charged semiconductor quantum dot and the polarization state of a photon spontaneously emitted from the quantum dot's excited state. We obtain a lower bound on the fidelity of entanglement of 0.59±0.04, which is 84% of the maximum achievable given the timing resolution of available single photon detectors. In future applications, such as measurement-based spin-spin entanglement which does not require sub-nanosecond timing resolution, we estimate that this system would enable near ideal performance. The inferred (usable) entanglement generation rate is 3×10(3) s(-1). This spin-photon entanglement is the first step to a scalable quantum dot quantum computing architecture relying on photon (flying) qubits to mediate entanglement between distant nodes of a quantum dot network. PMID:23679636

  4. Elucidating Quantum Confinement in Graphene Oxide Dots Based On Excitation-Wavelength-Independent Photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Te-Fu; Huang, Wei-Lun; Chung, Chung-Jen; Chiang, I-Ting; Chen, Liang-Che; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Su, Wu-Chou; Cheng, Ching; Chen, Shean-Jen; Teng, Hsisheng

    2016-06-01

    Investigating quantum confinement in graphene under ambient conditions remains a challenge. In this study, we present graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) that show excitation-wavelength-independent photoluminescence. The luminescence color varies from orange-red to blue as the GOQD size is reduced from 8 to 1 nm. The photoluminescence of each GOQD specimen is associated with electron transitions from the antibonding π (π*) to oxygen nonbonding (n-state) orbitals. The observed quantum confinement is ascribed to a size change in the sp(2) domains, which leads to a change in the π*-π gap; the n-state levels remain unaffected by the size change. The electronic properties and mechanisms involved in quantum-confined photoluminescence can serve as the foundation for the application of oxygenated graphene in electronics, photonics, and biology. PMID:27192445

  5. Optimal quantum control via numerical pulse shape optimization for two exciton qubits confined to semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Shi Yang, Hong Yi; Hall, Kimberley

    2015-03-01

    Optimal quantum control (OQC), which iteratively optimizes the control Hamiltonian to achieve a target quantum state, is a versatile approach for manipulating quantum systems. For optically-active transitions, OQC can be implemented using femtosecond pulse shaping which provides control over the amplitude and/or phase of the electric field. Optical pulse shaping has been employed to optimize physical processes such as nonlinear optical signals, photosynthesis, and has recently been applied to optimizing single-qubit gates in multiple semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, we examine the use of numerical pulse shape optimization for optimal quantum control of multiple qubits confined to quantum dots as a function of their electronic structure parameters. The numerically optimized pulse shapes were found to produce high fidelity quantum gates for a range of transition frequencies, dipole moments, and arbitrary initial and final states. This work enhances the potential for scalability by reducing the laser resources required to control multiple qubits.

  6. Excitons in artificial quantum dots in the weak spatial confinement regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, S. V. Welsch, M. K.; Forchel, A.; Bacher, G.

    2007-12-15

    The exciton states in individual quantum dots prepared by the selective interdiffusion method in CdTe/CdMgTe quantum wells are studied by the methods of steady-state optical spectroscopy. The annealing-induced diffusion of Mg atoms inward to the bulk of the quantum well, which is significantly enhanced under the SiO{sub 2} mask, leads to a modulation of the bandgap width in the plane of the well, with the minima of the potential being located in the mask aperture areas. A lateral potential that arises, whose height is in the range 30-270 meV and characteristic scale is about 100 nm, efficiently localizes carriers, which form quasi-zero-dimensional excitons in the weak spatial confinement regime. Detailed magnetooptical studies show that Coulomb correlations play a significant role in the formation of exciton states under such a regime, which, in particular, manifests itself in the localization of the wavefunction of carriers on scales that are considerably smaller than the scale of the lateral potential. The particular features of the interlevel splitting, of the biexciton binding energy, and of the diamagnetic shift are discussed. A strong dependence of the interlevel relaxation on the interlevel splitting (the phonon neck) indicates that alternative relaxation mechanisms in the quantum dots studied are weak. The excited states are populated according to the Pauli principle, which indicates that it is possible to apply the shell model of many-exciton states to quantum dots under the weak spatial confinement conditions.

  7. Role of confinements on the melting of Wigner molecules in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dyuti; Filinov, Alexei V.; Ghosal, Amit; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We explore the stability of a Wigner molecule (WM) formed in confinements with different geometries emulating the role of disorder and analyze the melting (or crossover) of such a system. Building on a recent calculation [D. Bhattacharya, A. Ghosal, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 499 (2013)] that discussed the effects of irregularities on the thermal crossover in classical systems, we expand our studies in the untested territory by including both the effects of quantum fluctuations and of disorder. Our results, using classical and quantum (path integral) Monte Carlo techniques, unfold complementary mechanisms that drive the quantum and thermal crossovers in a WM and show that the symmetry of the confinement plays no significant role in determining the quantum crossover scale n X . This is because the zero-point motion screens the boundary effects within short distances. The phase diagram as a function of thermal and quantum fluctuations determined from independent criteria is unique, and shows "melting" from the WM to both the classical and quantum "liquids". An intriguing signature of weakening liquidity with increasing temperature, T, is found in the extreme quantum regime. The crossover is associated with production of defects. However, these defects appear to play distinct roles in driving the quantum and thermal "melting". Our analyses carry serious implications for a variety of experiments on many-particle systems - semiconductor heterostructure quantum dots, trapped ions, nanoclusters, colloids and complex plasma.

  8. Strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots in polymeric microdisk resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Flatae, Assegid Grossmann, Tobias; Beck, Torsten; Wiegele, Sarah; Kalt, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    We report on a simple route to the efficient coupling of optical emission from strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots (QDs) to the eigenmodes of a micro-resonator. The quantum emitters are embedded into QD/polymer sandwich microdisk cavities. This prevents photo-oxidation and yields the high dot concentration necessary to overcome Auger enhanced surface trapping of carriers. In combination with the very high cavity Q-factors, interaction of the QDs with the cavity modes in the weak coupling regime is readily observed. Under nanosecond pulsed excitation the CdTe QDs in the microdisks show lasing with a threshold energy as low as 0.33 μJ.

  9. Self-Induced Oscillation for Electron-Hole Pair Confined in Quantum Dot

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Tomoki; Tsubaki, Atsushi; Ishizuki, Masamu; Takeda, Kyozaburo

    2011-12-23

    We study the time-dependent (TD) phenomena of the electron-hole or electron-electron pair confined in the square quantum dot (SQD) system by computationally solving TD Schroedinger equation under the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) approach. A typical vacillation is found both in the electron and hole when the charged pair is strongly confined in the SQD while the charged particles have initially the same orbital symmetry. The FFT analysis elucidates that the transition matrix element due to the coulomb interaction involves the eigen frequency {omega} being equal to the excitation energy when the resonative vacillation appears. Thus, Coulomb potential has a potential to cause the self-induced ''Rabi'' oscillation when the charged-particle pair is confined only in the QD.

  10. Energies and densities of electrons confined in elliptical and ellipsoidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2016-10-01

    We consider a droplet of electrons confined within an external harmonic potential well of elliptical or ellipsoidal shape, a geometry commonly encountered in work with semiconductor quantum dots and other nanoscale or mesoscale structures. For droplet sizes exceeding the effective Bohr radius, the dominant contribution to average system parameters in the Thomas-Fermi approximation comes from the potential energy terms, which allows us to derive expressions describing the electron droplet's shape and dimensions, its density, total and capacitive energy, and chemical potential. The analytical results are in very good agreement with experimental data and numerical calculations, and make it possible to follow the dependence of the properties of the system on its parameters (the total number of electrons, the axial ratios and curvatures of the confinement potential, and the dielectric constant of the material). An interesting feature is that the eccentricity of the electron droplet is not the same as that of its confining potential well. PMID:27502044

  11. The surface termination effect on the quantum confinement and electron affinities of 3C-SiC quantum dots: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out theoretical investigations on SiC quantum dots, with surfaces uniformly terminated by C-H or Si-H bonds, to explore the role of surface terminations on these two aspects. Surprisingly, it was found that the quantum confinement effect is present (or absent) in the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital of the SiC quantum dots regardless of their surface terminations. Thus, the quantum confinement effect related to the energy gap observed experimentally (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 94, 026102) is contributed to by the size-dependence of the highest occupied states; the absence of quantum confinement in the lowest unoccupied states is in contrary to the usual belief based on hydrogen-passivated C quantum dots. However, the cause of the absence of the quantum confinement in C nanodots is not transferable to SiC. We propose a model that provides a clear explanation for all findings on the basis of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions between the valence atomic p-orbital in the frontier occupied/unoccupied states. We also found that the electron affinities of the SiC quantum dots, which closely depend on the surface environments, are negative for the C-H termination and positive for the Si-H termination. The prediction of negative electron affinities in SiC quantum dots by simple C-H termination indicates a promising application for these materials in electron-emitter devices. Our model predicts that GeC quantum dots with hydrogen passivation exhibit similar features to SiC quantum dots and our study confirms the crucial role that the surface environment plays in these nanoscale systems.In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out

  12. Spin blockade and exchange in Coulomb-confined silicon double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bent; Tan, Y H Matthias; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Watson, Thomas F; Ryu, Hoon; Rahman, Rajib; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-06-01

    Electron spins confined to phosphorus donors in silicon are promising candidates as qubits because of their long coherence times, exceeding seconds in isotopically purified bulk silicon. With the recent demonstrations of initialization, readout and coherent manipulation of individual donor electron spins, the next challenge towards the realization of a Si:P donor-based quantum computer is the demonstration of exchange coupling in two tunnel-coupled phosphorus donors. Spin-to-charge conversion via Pauli spin blockade, an essential ingredient for reading out individual spin states, is challenging in donor-based systems due to the inherently large donor charging energies (∼45 meV), requiring large electric fields (>1 MV m(-1)) to transfer both electron spins onto the same donor. Here, in a carefully characterized double donor-dot device, we directly observe spin blockade of the first few electrons and measure the effective exchange interaction between electron spins in coupled Coulomb-confined systems. PMID:24727686

  13. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  14. Ligand-Mediated Control of the Confinement Potential in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Victor

    This thesis describes the mechanisms by which organic surfactants, particularly thiophenols and phenyldithiocarbamates, reduce the confinement potential experienced by the exciton of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The reduction of the confinement potential is enabled by the creation of interfacial electronic states near the band edge of the QD upon ligand adsorption. In the case of thiophenols, we find that this ligand adsorbs in two distinct binding modes, (i) a tightly bound mode capable of exciton delocalization, and (ii) a more weakly bound mode that has no discernable effect on exciton confinement. Both the adsorption constant and reduction in confinement potential are tunable by para substitution and are generally anticorrelated. For tightly bound thiophenols and other moderately delocalizing ligands, the degree of delocalization induced in the QD is approximately linearly proportional to the fractional surface area occupied by the ligand for all sizes of QDs. In the case of phenyldithiocarbamates, the reduction in the confinement potential is much greater, and ligand adjacency must be accounted for to model exciton delocalization. We find that at high surface coverages, exciton delocalization by phenyldithiocarbamates and other highly delocalizing ligands is dominated by ligand packing effects. Finally, we construct a database of electronic structure calculations on organic molecules and propose an algorithm that combines experimental and computational screening to find novel delocalizing ligands.

  15. First-principle study of quantum confinement effect on small sized silicon quantum dots using density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Othman, A. P.; Gopir, G.

    2014-09-03

    Density functional theory (DFT), as a first-principle approach has successfully been implemented to study nanoscale material. Here, DFT by numerical basis-set was used to study the quantum confinement effect as well as electronic properties of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) in ground state condition. Selection of quantum dot models were studied intensively before choosing the right structure for simulation. Next, the computational result were used to examine and deduce the electronic properties and its density of state (DOS) for 14 spherical Si-QDs ranging in size up to ∼ 2 nm in diameter. The energy gap was also deduced from the HOMO-LUMO results. The atomistic model of each silicon QDs was constructed by repeating its crystal unit cell of face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, and reconstructed until the spherical shape obtained. The core structure shows tetrahedral (T{sub d}) symmetry structure. It was found that the model need to be passivated, and hence it was noticed that the confinement effect was more pronounced. The model was optimized using Quasi-Newton method for each size of Si-QDs to get relaxed structure before it was simulated. In this model the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub xc}) of the electrons was treated by Local Density Approximation (LDA) functional and Perdew-Zunger (PZ) functional.

  16. Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction Approach for Multielectron System Confined in Two-Dimensional Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, Takuma; Clark, Richard; Takeda, Kyozaburo; Kusakabe, Koichi; Tomita, Norikazu

    2013-02-01

    We extend the static multireference description (resonant unrestricted Hartree-Fock) to a dynamical system in order to include the correlation effect dynamically. The resulting time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation is simplified into the time-developed rate equation (TD-CI), where the TD external field \\hatH‧(t) is taken into account directly in the Hamiltonian without any approximations. This TD-CI approach also has an advantage in that it takes into account the electron correlation by narrowing down the number of employed Slater determinants. We apply our TD-CI approach to the case of two electrons confined in the square quantum dot (QD) having the spin singlet multiplicity, and study theoretically the spatial and temporal fluctuation of the two-electron ground state under photon injection and pulse field application.

  17. Decoupling the effects of confinement and passivation on semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Roya; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter J; Reece, Peter J; Charrault, Eric; Evans, Drew

    2016-07-20

    Semiconductor (SC) quantum dots (QDs) have recently been fabricated by both chemical and plasma techniques for specific absorption and emission of light. Their optical properties are governed by the size of the QD and the chemistry of any passivation at their surface. Here, we decouple the effects of confinement and passivation by utilising DC magnetron sputtering to fabricate SC QDs in a perfluorinated polyether oil. Very high band gaps are observed for fluorinated QDs with increasing levels of quantum confinement (from 4.2 to 4.6 eV for Si, and 2.5 to 3 eV for Ge), with a shift down to 3.4 eV for Si when oxygen is introduced to the passivation layer. In contrast, the fluorinated Si QDs display a constant UV photoluminescence (3.8 eV) irrespective of size. This ability to tune the size and passivation independently opens a new opportunity to extending the use of simple semiconductor QDs. PMID:27385513

  18. Quantum-confined bandgap narrowing of TiO2 nanoparticles by graphene quantum dots for visible-light-driven applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Cole, Ivan S; Li, Qin

    2016-07-28

    We for the first time report a quantum-confined bandgap narrowing mechanism through which the absorption of two UV absorbers, namely the graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and TiO2 nanoparticles, can be easily extended into the visible light range in a controllable manner. Such a mechanism may be of great importance for light harvesting, photocatalysis and optoelectronics. PMID:27297746

  19. The role of the interface in germanium quantum dots: when not only size matters for quantum confinement effects.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, S; Mio, A M; Barbagiovanni, E G; Raciti, R; Bahariqushchi, R; Miritello, M; Nicotra, G; Aydinli, A; Spinella, C; Terrasi, A; Mirabella, S

    2015-07-14

    Quantum confinement (QC) typically assumes a sharp interface between a nanostructure and its environment, leading to an abrupt change in the potential for confined electrons and holes. When the interface is not ideally sharp and clean, significant deviations from the QC rule appear and other parameters beyond the nanostructure size play a considerable role. In this work we elucidate the role of the interface on QC in Ge quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by rf-magnetron sputtering or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Through a detailed electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis we investigated the structural and chemical properties of QD interfaces. PECVD QDs exhibit a sharper interface compared to sputter ones, which also evidences a larger contribution of mixed Ge-oxide states. Such a difference strongly modifies the QC strength, as experimentally verified by light absorption spectroscopy. A large size-tuning of the optical bandgap and an increase in the oscillator strength occur when the interface is sharp. A spatially dependent effective mass (SPDEM) model is employed to account for the interface difference between Ge QDs, pointing out a larger reduction in the exciton effective mass in the sharper interface case. These results add new insights into the role of interfaces on confined systems, and open the route for reliable exploitation of QC effects. PMID:26077313

  20. Dispersive measurement of electron spin states in Coulomb-confined silicon double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Matthew; Kobayashi, Takashi; Weber, Bent; Hile, Sam; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    We use radio frequency reflectometry with a resonant circuit to investigate a double quantum dot device patterned by the placement of phosphorus donors in silicon with scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. The circuit responds to electron tunnelling to and from the quantum dots, the complex admittance of which provides information about the tunnel coupling between the dots and the leads. With four electrons on two dots, the Pauli Exclusion Principle makes tunnelling of one electron between the two dots spin dependent, which we exploit to measure the electronic spin state. We map the ground state transition between singlet and triplet states as a function of electric and magnetic fields, which shows that the exchange energy can be tuned over an order of magnitude (about 10 to 100 μeV) or more in this device. We apply high frequency pulses to induce an excited spin state and observe that the dispersive measurement can detect the excited spin state in addition to the ground state.

  1. Entanglement and Quantum Optics with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgers, A. P.; Schaibley, J. R.; Steel, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) exhibit many characteristics of simpler two-level (or few level) systems, under optical excitation. This makes atomic coherent optical spectroscopy theory and techniques well suited for understanding the behavior of quantum dots. Furthermore, the combination of the solid state nature of quantum dots and their close approximation to atomic systems makes them an attractive platform for quantum information based technologies. In this chapter, we will discuss recent studies using direct detection of light emitted from a quantum dot to investigate coherence properties and confirm entanglement between the emitted photon and an electron spin qubit confined to the QD.

  2. Theory of confined states of positronium in spherical and circular quantum dots with Kane’s dispersion law

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Confined states of a positronium (Ps) in the spherical and circular quantum dots (QDs) are theoretically investigated in two size quantization regimes: strong and weak. Two-band approximation of Kane’s dispersion law and parabolic dispersion law of charge carriers are considered. It is shown that electron-positron pair instability is a consequence of dimensionality reduction, not of the size quantization. The binding energies for the Ps in circular and spherical QDs are calculated. The Ps formation dependence on the QD radius is studied. PMID:23826867

  3. Quantum confinement effect in Bi anti-dot thin films with tailored pore wall widths and thicknesses

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Nakao, S.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-13

    We investigated quantum confinement effects in Bi anti-dot thin films grown on anodized aluminium oxide templates. The pore wall widths (w{sub Bi}) and thickness (t) of the films were tailored to have values longer or shorter than Fermi wavelength of Bi (λ{sub F} = ∼40 nm). Magnetoresistance measurements revealed a well-defined weak antilocalization effect below 10 K. Coherence lengths (L{sub ϕ}) as functions of temperature were derived from the magnetoresistance vs field curves by assuming the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model. The anti-dot thin film with w{sub Bi} and t smaller than λ{sub F} showed low dimensional electronic behavior at low temperatures where L{sub ϕ}(T) exceed w{sub Bi} or t.

  4. Impurity with two electrons in the spherical quantum dot with Unite confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. A.; Ghaltaghchyan, H. Ts; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Two-electron states in a spherical QD with the hydrogenic impurity located in the center and with a finite height confinement potential barrier are investigated. The effective mass mismatch have been taken into account. The dependence of ground state energy and Coulomb electron-electron interaction energy correction on the QD size is studied. The problem of the state exchange time control in QD is discussed, taking into account the spins of the electrons in the Russell-Saunders approximation. The effect of quantum emission has been shown.

  5. Fluorescent carbon nano dots from lignite: unveiling the impeccable evidence for quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Kumar Thiyagarajan, Senthil; Raghupathy, Suresh; Palanivel, Dharmalingam; Raji, Kaviyarasan; Ramamurthy, Perumal

    2016-04-28

    Synthesizing nano carbon from its bulk precursors is of recent research interest. In this report, luminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with tunable particle size and surface functionality are fabricated from lignite using ethylenediamine as the reactive solvent and surface passivating agent via different experimental methods. From the steady-state and time-resolved photophysical studies of these differently sized CNPs, it is unveiled that the energy of the excitons generated after photoexcitation is quantum confined, and it influences the observed photophysical behaviour significantly only when the particle size is less than 10 nm. A larger size of the CNPs and less surface functionalization lead to aggregation, and quenching of the fluorescence. But by dispersing smaller size CNPs in sodium sulfate matrix exhibits fluorescence in the solid state with an absolute fluorescence quantum yield of ∼34%. The prospective application of this hybrid material in sensing and removal of moisture in the atmosphere is illustrated. PMID:27067247

  6. Density matrix for an electron confined in quantum dots under uniform magnetic field and static electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Qian-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Using unitary transformations, this paper obtains the eigenvalues and the common eigenvector of Hamiltonian and a new-defined generalized angular momentum (Lz) for an electron confined in quantum dots under a uniform magnetic field (UMF) and a static electric field (SEF). It finds that the eigenvalue of Lz just stands for the expectation value of a usual angular momentum lz in the eigen-state. It first obtains the matrix density for this system via directly calculating a transfer matrix element of operator exp(-βH) in some representations with the technique of integral within an ordered products (IWOP) of operators, rather than via solving a Bloch equation. Because the quadratic homogeneity of potential energy is broken due to the existence of SEF, the virial theorem in statistical physics is not satisfactory for this system, which is confirmed through the calculation of thermal averages of physical quantities.

  7. Electrochromic nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shim, M; Guyot-Sionnest, P

    2001-03-23

    Incorporating nanocrystals into future electronic or optoelectronic devices will require a means of controlling charge-injection processes and an understanding of how the injected charges affect the properties of nanocrystals. We show that the optical properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots can be tuned by an electrochemical potential. The injection of electrons into the quantum-confined states of the nanocrystal leads to an electrochromic response, including a strong, size-tunable, midinfrared absorption corresponding to an intraband transition, a bleach of the visible interband exciton transitions, and a quench of the narrow band-edge photoluminescence. PMID:11264530

  8. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s−1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25996307

  9. Transport through graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttinger, J.; Molitor, F.; Stampfer, C.; Schnez, S.; Jacobsen, A.; Dröscher, S.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review transport experiments on graphene quantum dots and narrow graphene constrictions. In a quantum dot, electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. The recently isolated two-dimensional carbon allotrope graphene is an interesting host to study quantum phenomena, due to its novel electronic properties and the expected weak interaction of the electron spin with the material. Graphene quantum dots are fabricated by etching mono-layer flakes into small islands (diameter 60-350 nm) with narrow connections to contacts (width 20-75 nm), serving as tunneling barriers for transport spectroscopy. Electron confinement in graphene quantum dots is observed by measuring Coulomb blockade and transport through excited states, a manifestation of quantum confinement. Measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane allowed to identify the regime with only a few charge carriers in the dot (electron-hole transition), and the crossover to the formation of the graphene specific zero-energy Landau level at high fields. After rotation of the sample into parallel magnetic field orientation, Zeeman spin splitting with a g-factor of g ≈ 2 is measured. The filling sequence of subsequent spin states is similar to what was found in GaAs and related to the non-negligible influence of exchange interactions among the electrons.

  10. Wavelength-tunable visible to near-infrared photoluminescence of carbon dots: the role of quantum confinement and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamsari, Morteza Sasani; Bidzard, Ashkan Momeni; Han, Wooje; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) with different size distributions and surface characteristics can exhibit good emission properties in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions, which can be applicable in optoelectronic devices as well as biomedical applications. Optical properties of colloidal C-QDs in distilled water at different concentrations produced using a method of alkali-assisted surfactant-free oxidation of cellulose acetate is presented. The structural and optical properties of colloidal C-QDs at different concentrations were investigated, with the aim of clarifying the main mechanisms of photoluminescence emissions. We observed a wide range of tunable visible to NIR emissions with good stability from the C-QD colloids at different applied excitation wavelengths. The colloids show dual emissions with maxima at ˜420 and 775 nm (blue and NIR emissions) when excited at the wavelength range near the energy gaps of the C-QDs. Moreover, by increasing the excitation wavelength, tunable visible emissions at the spectral range of 475 to 550 nm are observed. A detailed analysis of the results shows that the blue and NIR luminescence of colloidal C-QDs originate from the oxide-related surface effects whereas quantum confinement is the responsible mechanism for tunable visible emissions of the C-QD colloid.

  11. Quantum-confinement effect in individual Ge1-xSnx quantum dots on Si(111) substrates covered with ultrathin SiO2 films using scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Masada, Akiko; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2007-07-01

    The authors observed a quantum-confinement effect in individual Ge1-xSnx quantum dots (QDs) on Si (111) substrates covered with ultrathin SiO2 films using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at room temperature. The quantum-confinement effect was featured by an increase in the energy band gap of ˜1.5eV with a decrease in QD diameter from 35to4nm. The peaks for quantum levels of QDs became broader with a decrease in the height-diameter aspect ratio of QDs, demonstrating the gradual emergence of two dimensionality in density of states of quasi zero-dimensional QDs with the QD flattening.

  12. Lateral Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Matthew Gregory

    The possibility of building a computer that takes advantage of the most subtle nature of quantum physics has been driving a lot of research in atomic and solid state physics for some time. It is still not clear what physical system or systems can be used for this purpose. One possibility that has been attracting significant attention from researchers is to use the spin state of an electron confined in a semiconductor quantum dot. The electron spin is magnetic in nature, so it naturally is well isolated from electrical fluctuations that can a loss of quantum coherence. It can also be manipulated electrically, by taking advantage of the exchange interaction. In this work we describe several experiments we have done to study the electron spin properties of lateral quantum dots. We have developed lateral quantum dot devices based on the silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor, and studied the physics of electrons confined in these quantum dots. We measured the electron spin excited state lifetime, which was found to be as long as 30 ms at the lowest magnetic fields that we could measure. We fabricated and characterized a silicon double quantum dot. Using this double quantum dot design, we fabricated devices which combined a silicon double quantum dot with a superconducting microwave resonator. The microwave resonator was found to be sensitive to two-dimensional electrons in the transistor channel, which we measured and characterized. We developed a new method for extracting information from random telegraph signals, which are produced when we observe thermal fluctuations of electrons in quantum dots. The new statistical method, based on the hidden Markov model, allows us to detect spin-dependent effects in such fluctuations even though we are not able to directly observe the electron spin. We use this analysis technique on data from two experiments involving gallium arsenide quantum dots and use it to measure spin-dependent tunneling rates. Our results advance the

  13. Modeling of the quantum dot filling and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ameen, Tarek A.; El-Batawy, Yasser M.; Abouelsaood, A. A.

    2014-02-14

    A generalized drift-diffusion model for the calculation of both the quantum dot filling profile and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors is proposed. The confined electrons inside the quantum dots produce a space-charge potential barrier between the two contacts, which controls the quantum dot filling and limits the dark current in the device. The results of the model reasonably agree with a published experimental work. It is found that increasing either the doping level or the temperature results in an exponential increase of the dark current. The quantum dot filling turns out to be nonuniform, with a dot near the contacts containing more electrons than one in the middle of the device where the dot occupation approximately equals the number of doping atoms per dot, which means that quantum dots away from contacts will be nearly unoccupied if the active region is undoped.

  14. Effect of the 2DEG confinement potential on the magnetotransport properties of an open quantum dot under a tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, C.; Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Bayot, V.; de Poortere, E.; Shayegan, M.

    2002-03-01

    We report on the low temperature magnetoresistance of various quantum billiards, each with a different shape of the 2DEG (two-dimensional electron gas) confinement potential. The structures are patterned by electron beam lithography on three different high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs samples, namely a single heterojunction and two quantum wells with widths of 150 and 450Årespectively. By means of electrostatic gates, both the electron density and the shape of the billiard can be controlled, as well as the finite thickness of the 2DEG in the case of the wide quantum well. We discuss the results of low temperature magnetotransport measurements with the open dots subject to an phin-situ tilted magnetic field. More specifically we investigate the influence of the symmetry-asymmetry of the 2DEG confinement potential on the statistics of the universal conductance fluctuations (UCF).

  15. Analyzing total optical absorption coefficient of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise with special emphasis on electric field, magnetic field and confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Arkajit; Sarkar, Sucharita; Ghosh, Arghya Pratim; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-12-01

    We make an extensive investigation of total optical absorption coefficient (TOAC) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. The TOAC profiles have been monitored against incident photon energy with special emphasis on the roles played by the electric field, magnetic field, and the dot confinement potential. Presence of impurity also influences the TOAC profile. In general, presence of noise causes enhancement of TOAC over that of noise-free condition. However, the interplay between the noise and the quantities like electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential and impurity potential bring about rich subtleties in the TOAC profiles. The said subtleties are often manifested by the alterations in TOAC peak intensity, extent of TOAC peak bleaching, and value of saturation intensity. The findings reveal some technologically relevant aspects of TOAC for the doped QD systems, specially in presence of noise.

  16. Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, T.; Baumann, V.; Iff, O.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission in the visible red spectral range from site-controlled InP/GaInP quantum dots by resonant coupling to Tamm-plasmon modes confined beneath gold disks in a hybrid metal/semiconductor structure. The enhancement of the emission intensity is confirmed by spatially resolved micro-photoluminescence area scans and temperature dependent measurements. Single photon emission from our coupled system is verified via second order autocorrelation measurements. We observe bright single quantum dot emission of up to ∼173 000 detected photons per second at a repetition rate of the excitation source of 82 MHz, and calculate an extraction efficiency of our device as high as 7%.

  17. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kosemura, Daisuke Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-01-15

    100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  18. Quantum Dots: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  19. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-10-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  20. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-01-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  1. Confined acoustic phonon-mediated spin relaxation in a twodimensional quantum dot in the presence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, K. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Stepanyan, A. G.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The spin-relaxation time due to the electron-acoustic phonon scattering in GaAs quantum dots is studied after the exact diagonalization of the electron Hamiltonian with the spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that in comparison with flexural phonons, the electron coupling with the dilatational phonons causes 3 orders faster spin relaxation. We have found that the relaxation rate of the spin-flip is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the spin- conserving.

  2. Electron Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Marie, X.; Belhadj, T.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P.

    2011-07-15

    An electron spin confined to a semiconductor quantum dot is not subject to the classical spin relaxation mechanisms known for free carriers but it strongly interacts with the nuclear spin system via the hyperfine interaction. We show in time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments on ensembles of self assembled InAs quantum dots in GaAs that this interaction leads to strong electron spin dephasing.

  3. Designing quantum dots for solotronics

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, J.; Smoleński, T.; Goryca, M.; Papaj, M.; Gietka, K.; Bogucki, A.; Koperski, M.; Rousset, J.-G.; Suffczyński, J.; Janik, E.; Nawrocki, M.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Pacuski, W.

    2014-01-01

    Solotronics, optoelectronics based on solitary dopants, is an emerging field of research and technology reaching the ultimate limit of miniaturization. It aims at exploiting quantum properties of individual ions or defects embedded in a semiconductor matrix. It has already been shown that optical control of a magnetic ion spin is feasible using the carriers confined in a quantum dot. However, a serious obstacle was the quenching of the exciton luminescence by magnetic impurities. Here we show, by photoluminescence studies on thus-far-unexplored individual CdTe dots with a single cobalt ion and CdSe dots with a single manganese ion, that even if energetically allowed, nonradiative exciton recombination through single-magnetic-ion intra-ionic transitions is negligible in such zero-dimensional structures. This opens solotronics for a wide range of as yet unconsidered systems. On the basis of results of our single-spin relaxation experiments and on the material trends, we identify optimal magnetic-ion quantum dot systems for implementation of a single-ion-based spin memory. PMID:24463946

  4. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  5. Effect of Rashba spin-orbit interaction on the ground state energy of a D0 centre in a GaAs quantum dot with Gaussian confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Boda, Aalu; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    The ground state energy of a neutral hydrogenic donor impurity (D0) trapped in a three-dimensional GaAs quantum dot with Gaussian confinement is calculated in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The effect of the spin-orbit interaction is incorporated by performing a unitary transformation and retaining terms up to quadratic in the spin-orbit interaction coefficient. For the resulting Hamiltonian, the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method is employed with a simple wave function within the framework of effective-mass envelope function theory to determine the ground state energy and the binding energy of the donor complex. The results show that the Rashba spin-orbit interaction reduces the total GS energy of the donor impurity.

  6. Effect of elemental composition and size on electron confinement in self-assembled SiC quantum dots: A combinatorial approach

    SciTech Connect

    Das Arulsamy, A.; Rider, A. E.; Cheng, Q. J.; Ostrikov, K.; Xu, S.

    2009-05-01

    A high level of control over quantum dot (QD) properties such as size and composition during fabrication is required to precisely tune the eventual electronic properties of the QD. Nanoscale synthesis efforts and theoretical studies of electronic properties are traditionally treated quite separately. In this paper, a combinatorial approach has been taken to relate the process synthesis parameters and the electron confinement properties of the QDs. First, hybrid numerical calculations with different influx parameters for Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} QDs were carried out to simulate the changes in carbon content x and size. Second, the ionization energy theory was applied to understand the electronic properties of Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} QDs. Third, stoichiometric (x=0.5) silicon carbide QDs were grown by means of inductively coupled plasma-assisted rf magnetron sputtering. Finally, the effect of QD size and elemental composition were then incorporated in the ionization energy theory to explain the evolution of the Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} photoluminescence spectra. These results are important for the development of deterministic synthesis approaches of self-assembled nanoscale quantum confinement structures.

  7. Quantum dot device tunable from single to triple dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, M. C.; Haug, R. J.; Pierz, K.

    2013-12-04

    We present a lateral quantum dot device which has a tunable number of quantum dots. Depending on easily tunable gate voltages, one, two or three quantum dots are found. They are investigated in transport and charge detection.

  8. Optical phonons in nanostructured thin films composed by zincblende zinc selenide quantum dots in strong size-quantization regime: Competition between phonon confinement and strain-related effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pejova, Biljana

    2014-05-01

    Raman scattering in combination with optical spectroscopy and structural studies by X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the phonon confinement and strain-induced effects in 3D assemblies of variable-size zincblende ZnSe quantum dots close packed in thin film form. Nanostructured thin films were synthesized by colloidal chemical approach, while tuning of the nanocrystal size was enabled by post-deposition thermal annealing treatment. In-depth insights into the factors governing the observed trends of the position and half-width of the 1LO band as a function of the average QD size were gained. The overall shifts in the position of 1LO band were found to result from an intricate compromise between the influence of phonon confinement and lattice strain-induced effects. Both contributions were quantitatively and exactly modeled. Accurate assignments of the bands due to surface optical (SO) modes as well as of the theoretically forbidden transverse optical (TO) modes were provided, on the basis of reliable physical models (such as the dielectric continuum model of Ruppin and Englman). The size-dependence of the ratio of intensities of the TO and LO modes was studied and discussed as well. Relaxation time characterizing the phonon decay processes in as-deposited samples was found to be approximately 0.38 ps, while upon post-deposition annealing already at 200 °C it increases to about 0.50 ps. Both of these values are, however, significantly smaller than those characteristic for a macrocrystalline ZnSe sample. - Graphical abstract: Optical phonons in nanostructured thin films composed by zincblende zinc selenide quantum dots in strong size-quantization regime: competition between phonon confinement and strain-related effects. - Highlights: • Phonon confinement vs. strain-induced effects in ZnSe 3D QD assemblies were studied. • Shifts of the 1LO band result from an intricate compromise between the two effects. • SO and theoretically forbidden TO modes were

  9. Bound states in continuum: Quantum dots in a quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodanović, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Ikonić, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan; Harrison, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We report on the existence of a bound state in the continuum (BIC) of quantum rods (QR). QRs are novel elongated InGaAs quantum dot nanostructures embedded in the shallower InGaAs quantum well. BIC appears as an excited confined dot state and energetically above the bottom of a well subband continuum. We prove that high height-to-diameter QR aspect ratio and the presence of a quantum well are indispensable conditions for accommodating the BIC. QRs are unique semiconductor nanostructures, exhibiting this mathematical curiosity predicted 83 years ago by Wigner and von Neumann.

  10. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  11. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  12. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at Quantum Dot 2010 (QD2010). The conference was held in Nottingham, UK, on 26-30 April 2010. The conference addressed topics in research on: 1. Epitaxial quantum dots (including self-assembled and interface structures, dots defined by electrostatic gates etc): optical properties and electron transport quantum coherence effects spin phenomena optics of dots in cavities interaction with surface plasmons in metal/semiconductor structures opto-electronics applications 2. Novel QD structures: fabrication and physics of graphene dots, dots in nano-wires etc 3. Colloidal quantum dots: growth (shape control and hybrid nanocrystals such as metal/semiconductor, magnetic/semiconductor) assembly and surface functionalisation optical properties and spin dynamics electrical and magnetic properties applications (light emitting devices and solar cells, biological and medical applications, data storage, assemblers) The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Maurice Skolnick (Chair) Alexander Tartakovskii (Programme Chair) Pavlos Lagoudakis (Programme Chair) Max Migliorato (Conference Secretary) Paola Borri (Publicity) Robert Taylor (Proceedings) Manus Hayne (Treasurer) Ray Murray (Sponsorship) Mohamed Henini (Local Organiser) International Advisory Committee: Yasuhiko Arakawa (Tokyo University, Japan) Manfred Bayer (Dortmund University, Germany) Sergey Gaponenko (Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk, Belarus) Pawel Hawrylak (NRC, Ottawa, Canada) Fritz Henneberger (Institute for Physics, Berlin, Germany) Atac Imamoglu (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) Paul Koenraad (TU Eindhoven, Nethehrlands) Guglielmo Lanzani (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Jungil Lee (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea) Henri Mariette (CNRS-CEA, Grenoble, France) Lu Jeu Sham (San Diego, USA) Andrew Shields (Toshiba Research Europe, Cambridge, UK) Yoshihisa Yamamoto (Stanford University, USA) Artur

  13. The impact of quantum dot filling on dual-band optical transitions via intermediate quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiang; Passmore, Brandon; Manasreh, M. O.

    2015-08-28

    InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors with different doping levels were investigated to understand the effect of quantum dot filling on both intraband and interband optical transitions. The electron filling of self-assembled InAs quantum dots was varied by direct doping of quantum dots with different concentrations. Photoresponse in the near infrared and middle wavelength infrared spectral region was observed from samples with low quantum dot filling. Although undoped quantum dots were favored for interband transitions with the absence of a second optical excitation in the near infrared region, doped quantum dots were preferred to improve intraband transitions in the middle wavelength infrared region. As a result, partial filling of quantum dot was required, to the extent of maintaining a low dark current, to enhance the dual-band photoresponse through the confined electron states.

  14. Gallium arsenide-based long-wavelength quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyoungwon

    2001-09-01

    GaAs-based long-wavelength quantum dot lasers have long been studied for applications to optical interconnects. The zero-dimensional confinement potential of quantum dots opens possibility of novel devices. Also, the quantum dot itself shows very interesting characteristics. This dissertation describes the development of GaAs-based 1.3 μm quantum dot lasers and the research on the unique characteristics of quantum dot ensemble. InGaAs quantum dots grown using molecular beam epitaxy in submonolayer deposition have extended wavelength around 1.3 μm and well resolved energy levels that can be described by three-dimensional harmonic oscillator model assuming parabolic confining potential. Lasing transitions from various InGaAs quantum dot energy levels are obtained from edge-emitting lasers. With optimized quantum dot active region and device structure, continuous-wave, room-temperature lasing operation around 1.3 μm is achieved with very low threshold current. Lateral confinement of carriers and photons in the cavity with AlxO y using wet-oxidation technique results in low waveguide loss, which lowers the threshold further. InGaAs quantum dot lasers have almost temperature- insensitive lasing threshold below ~200 K with very low threshold current density close to transparency current density. The rapid increase of threshold current along with temperature above ~200 K is due to thermal excitation of carriers into the higher energy levels and increase of non-radiative recombination. Quasi- equilibrium model for carrier dynamics shows that the optical gain of quantum dot ensemble is strongly temperature dependent, and that the separation between quantum dot energy levels plays an important role in the temperature dependence of the device characteristics. Several predictions of the model are compared with the experimental results. Lasing operation with less temperature-sensitivity is achieved from InAs quantum dot lasers with increased level separation.

  15. Silicon quantum dots: fine-tuning to maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dots in semiconductor heterostructures provide one of the most flexible platforms for the study of quantum phenomena at the nanoscale. The surging interest in using quantum dots for quantum computation is forcing researchers to rethink fabrication and operation methods, to obtain highly tunable dots in spin-free host materials, such as silicon. Borselli and colleagues report in Nanotechnology the fabrication of a novel Si/SiGe double quantum dot device, which combines an ultra-low disorder Si/SiGe accumulation-mode heterostructure with a stack of overlapping control gates, ensuring tight confining potentials and exquisite tunability. This work signals the technological maturity of silicon quantum dots, and their readiness to be applied to challenging projects in quantum information science.

  16. Spontaneous emission control of quantum dots embedded in photonic crystals: Effects of external fields and dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Hashemi, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper simultaneous effects of external electric and magnetic fields and quantum confinement on the radiation properties of spherical quantum dot embedded in a photonic crystal are investigated. Under the influence of photonic band-gap, effects of external static fields and dot dimension on the amplitude and spectrum of different radiation fields emitted by the quantum dot are studied. Our results show the considerable effects of external fields and quantum confinement on the spontaneous emission of the system.

  17. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  18. Quantum confinement-tunable ultrafast charge transfer at the PbS quantum dot and phenyl-C₆₁-butyric acid methyl ester interface.

    PubMed

    El-Ballouli, Ala'a O; Alarousu, Erkki; Bernardi, Marco; Aly, Shawkat M; Lagrow, Alec P; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2014-05-14

    Quantum dot (QD) solar cells have emerged as promising low-cost alternatives to existing photovoltaic technologies. Here, we investigate charge transfer and separation at PbS QDs and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) interfaces using a combination of femtosecond broadband transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy and steady-state photoluminescence quenching measurements. We analyzed ultrafast electron injection and charge separation at PbS QD/PCBM interfaces for four different QD sizes and as a function of PCBM concentration. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum size effect, is the key element for efficient electron injection and charge separation processes. More specifically, the steady-state and time-resolved data demonstrate that only small-sized PbS QDs with a bandgap larger than 1 eV can transfer electrons to PCBM upon light absorption. We show that these trends result from the formation of a type-II interface band alignment, as a consequence of the size distribution of the QDs. Transient absorption data indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to PCBM occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs for QDs with bandgaps that achieve type-II alignment, while virtually all signals observed in smaller bandgap QD samples result from large bandgap outliers in the size distribution. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that charge transfer rates at QD interfaces can be tuned by several orders of magnitude by engineering the QD size distribution. The work presented here will advance both the design and the understanding of QD interfaces for solar energy conversion. PMID:24521255

  19. Reducing Blinking in Small Core-Multishell Quantum Dots by Carefully Balancing Confinement Potential and Induced Lattice Strain: The "Goldilocks" Effect.

    PubMed

    Omogo, Benard; Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Kaneko, Mizuho; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-04-26

    Currently, the most common way to reduce blinking in quantum dots (QDs) is accomplished by using very thick and/or perfectly crystalline CdS shells on CdSe cores. Ideally, a nontoxic material such as ZnS is preferred to be the outer material in order to reduce environmental and cytotoxic effects. Blinking suppression with multishell configurations of CdS and ZnS has been reported only for "giant" QDs of 15 nm or more. One of the main reasons for the limited progress is that the role that interfacial trap states play in blinking in these systems is not very well understood. Here, we show a "Goldilocks" effect to reduce blinking in small (∼7 nm) QDs by carefully controlling the thicknesses of the shells in multishell QDs. Furthermore, by correlating the fluorescence lifetime components with the fraction of time that a QD spends in the on-state, both with and without applying a threshold, we found evidence for two types of blinking that separately affect the average fluorescence lifetime of a single QD. A thorough characterization of the time-resolved fluorescence at the ensemble and single-particle level allowed us to propose a detailed physical model involving both short-lived interfacial trap states and long-lived surface trap states that are coupled. This model highlights a strategy of reducing QD blinking in small QDs by balancing the magnitude of the induced lattice strain, which results in the formation of interfacial trap states between the inner shell and the outer shell, and the confinement potential that determines how accessible the interfacial trap states are. The combination of reducing blinking while maintaining a small overall QD size and using a Cd-free outer shell of ZnS will be useful in a wide array of applications, particularly for advanced bioimaging. PMID:27058120

  20. Electron charging in epitaxial germanium quantum dots on silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketharanathan, Sutharsan

    The electron charging behavior of self assembled epitaxial Ge quantum dots on Si(100) grown using molecular beam epitaxy has been studied. Ge quantum dots encapsulated in n-type Si matrix were incorporated into Schottky diodes to investigate their charging behavior using capacitance-voltage measurements. These experimental results were interpreted in the context of theoretical models to assess the degree of charge localization to the dot. Experiments involving Ge quantum dot growth, growth of Sb-doped Si and morphological evolution during encapsulation of the Ge dots during Si overgrowth were performed in order to optimize the conditions for obtaining distinct Ge quantum dot morphologies. This investigation included finding a suitable method to minimize Sb segregation while maintaining good dot epitaxy and overall crystal quality. Holes are confined to the Ge dots for which the valence band offsets are large (˜650 meV). Electrons are confined to the strained Si regions adjacent to the Ge quantum dots which have relatively smaller confinement potentials (˜100--150 meV). Experimentally, it was found that but and pyramid clusters in the range from 20--40 nm in diameter confine ˜1electron per dot while dome clusters in the range from 60--80 nm diameter confine ˜6--8 electrons per dot. Theoretical simulations predict that similar pyramid structures confine ˜0.4 electrons per dot and dome structures confine ˜2.2--3 electrons per dot. Even though the theory and the experimental results disagree due to various uncertainties and approximations, the ratio between theory and experiment agree remarkably well for both island types. We also investigated constructive three-dimensional nanolithography. Nanoscale Au rich dots and pure Ge dots were deposited on SiO2 and Si3N4 substrates by decomposing adsorbed precursors using a focused electron beam in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Dimethyl acetylacetonate gold was used for Au and digermane was used to

  1. Numerical simulation of optical feedback on a quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khursan, Amin H.; Ghalib, Basim Abdullattif; Al-Obaidi, Sabri J.

    2012-02-15

    We use multi-population rate equations model to study feedback oscillations in the quantum dot laser. This model takes into account all peculiar characteristics in the quantum dots such as inhomogeneous broadening of the gain spectrum, the presence of the excited states on the quantum dot and the non-confined states due to the presence of wetting layer and the barrier. The contribution of quantum dot groups, which cannot follow by other models, is simulated. The results obtained from this model show the feedback oscillations, the periodic oscillations which evolves to chaos at higher injection current of higher feedback levels. The frequency fluctuation is attributed mainly to wetting layer with a considerable contribution from excited states. The simulation shows that is must be not using simple rate equation models to express quantum dots working at excited state transition.

  2. Microanalysis of quantum dots with type II band alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarney, Wendy; Little, John; Svensson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We will discuss the structural characterization of a system consisting of undoped self-assembled InSb quantum dots having a type II band alignment with the surrounding In0.53Ga0.47As matrix. This differs from systems using conventional type-I quantum dots that must be doped and that rely on intersubband transitions for infrared photoresponse. Type II dots grown in a superlattice structure combine the advantages of quantum dots (3-dimensional confinement) with the tunability and photovoltaic operation of the type II superlattice. We grew a high surface density of InSb quantum dots with a narrow distribution of sizes and shapes and free of dislocations within the body of the dots. The dots are relaxed due to an array of misfit dislocations confined at the basal dot/matrix interface. This makes burying the dots with InGaAs not feasible without generating dislocations due to the large dot/matrix lattice mismatch. We are experimenting with strain-compensating or graded strain overlayers to lower the lattice mismatch.

  3. Influence of the Nuclear Electric Quadrupolar Interaction on the Coherence Time of Hole and Electron Spins Confined in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, J.; Glasenapp, Ph.; Greilich, A.; Bayer, M.; Anders, F. B.

    2015-11-01

    The real-time spin dynamics and the spin noise spectra are calculated for p and n -charged quantum dots within an anisotropic central spin model extended by additional nuclear electric quadrupolar interactions and augmented by experimental data. Using realistic estimates for the distribution of coupling constants including an anisotropy parameter, we show that the characteristic long time scale is of the same order for electron and hole spins strongly determined by the quadrupolar interactions even though the analytical form of the spin decay differs significantly consistent with our measurements. The low frequency part of the electron spin noise spectrum is approximately 1 /3 smaller than those for hole spins as a consequence of the spectral sum rule and the different spectral shapes. This is confirmed by our experimental spectra measured on both types of quantum dot ensembles in the low power limit of the probe laser.

  4. Energy levels in self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2005-02-01

    A model to determine the electronic structure of self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots is applied. This model is based principally on constant effective mass and constant potentials of the barrier and quantum dot material. An analysis of the different parameters of this model is done and compared with those which take into account the variation of confining potentials, bands, and effective masses due to strain. The results are compared with several spectra reported in literature. By considering the symmetry, the computational cost is reduced with respect to other methods in literature. In addition, this model is not limited by the geometry of the quantum dot. PMID:15740390

  5. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  6. A Nanowire-Based Plasmonic Quantum Dot Laser.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jinfa; Tatebayashi, Jun; Sergent, Sylvain; Fong, Chee Fai; Ota, Yasutomo; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-13

    Quantum dots enable strong carrier confinement and exhibit a delta-function like density of states, offering significant improvements to laser performance and high-temperature stability when used as a gain medium. However, quantum dot lasers have been limited to photonic cavities that are diffraction-limited and further miniaturization to meet the demands of nanophotonic-electronic integration applications is challenging based on existing designs. Here we introduce the first quantum dot-based plasmonic laser to reduce the cross-sectional area of nanowire quantum dot lasers below the cutoff limit of photonic modes while maintaining the length in the order of the lasing wavelength. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition grown GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires containing InGaAs quantum dot stacks are placed directly on a silver film, and lasing was observed from single nanowires originating from the InGaAs quantum dot emission into the low-loss higher order plasmonic mode. Lasing threshold pump fluences as low as ∼120 μJ/cm(2) was observed at 7 K, and lasing was observed up to 125 K. Temperature stability from the quantum dot gain, leading to a high characteristic temperature was demonstrated. These results indicate that high-performance, miniaturized quantum dot lasers can be realized with plasmonics. PMID:27030886

  7. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-03

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  8. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  9. Quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate an InAs quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector operating at room temperature with a peak detection wavelength of 4.3 μm. The detector shows sensitive photoresponse for normal-incidence light, which is attributed to an intraband transition of the quantum dots and the following transfer of excited electrons on a cascade of quantum levels. The InAs quantum dots for the infrared absorption were formed by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and two-step strain-compensation design based on InAs/GaAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure, while the following extraction quantum stairs formed by LO-phonon energy are based on a strain-compensated InGaAs/InAlAs chirped superlattice. Johnson noise limited detectivities of 3.64 × 1011 and 4.83 × 106 Jones at zero bias were obtained at 80 K and room temperature, respectively. Due to the low dark current and distinct photoresponse up to room temperature, this device can form high temperature imaging.

  10. Quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Jun-Qi E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Liu, Feng-Qi E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate an InAs quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector operating at room temperature with a peak detection wavelength of 4.3 μm. The detector shows sensitive photoresponse for normal-incidence light, which is attributed to an intraband transition of the quantum dots and the following transfer of excited electrons on a cascade of quantum levels. The InAs quantum dots for the infrared absorption were formed by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode and two-step strain-compensation design based on InAs/GaAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure, while the following extraction quantum stairs formed by LO-phonon energy are based on a strain-compensated InGaAs/InAlAs chirped superlattice. Johnson noise limited detectivities of 3.64 × 10{sup 11} and 4.83 × 10{sup 6} Jones at zero bias were obtained at 80 K and room temperature, respectively. Due to the low dark current and distinct photoresponse up to room temperature, this device can form high temperature imaging.

  11. A prototype silicon double quantum dot with dispersive microwave readout

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. R. Henry, E.; Namaan, O.; Siddiqi, I.; Lo, C. C.; Wang, Y.-T.; Bokor, J.; Yablonovitch, E.; Li, H.; Greenman, L.; Whaley, K. B.; Schenkel, T.

    2014-07-28

    We present a unique design and fabrication process for a lateral, gate-confined double quantum dot in an accumulation mode metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure coupled to an integrated microwave resonator. All electrostatic gates for the double quantum dot are contained in a single metal layer, and use of the MOS structure allows for control of the location of the two-dimensional electron gas via the location of the accumulation gates. Numerical simulations of the electrostatic confinement potential are performed along with an estimate of the coupling of the double quantum dot to the microwave resonator. Prototype devices are fabricated and characterized by transport measurements of electron confinement and reflectometry measurements of the microwave resonator.

  12. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; Qu, Zhi-Bei; Kim, Kyoungwon; Jiang, Shuang; Baumeister, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaewook; Yeom, Bongjun; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Lee, Jaebeom; Violi, Angela; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-02-23

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the "crowded" edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210-220 and 250-265 nm that changed their signs for different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210-220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250-265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to L/D-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than L-GQDs. Emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials. PMID:26743467

  13. The transfer matrix approach to circular graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, Nhung T. T.; Nguyen, V. Lien

    2016-07-01

    We adapt the transfer matrix (T-matrix) method originally designed for one-dimensional quantum mechanical problems to solve the circularly symmetric two-dimensional problem of graphene quantum dots. Similar to one-dimensional problems, we show that the generalized T-matrix contains rich information about the physical properties of these quantum dots. In particular, it is shown that the spectral equations for bound states as well as quasi-bound states of a circular graphene quantum dot and related quantities such as the local density of states and the scattering coefficients are all expressed exactly in terms of the T-matrix for the radial confinement potential. As an example, we use the developed formalism to analyse physical aspects of a graphene quantum dot induced by a trapezoidal radial potential. Among the obtained results, it is in particular suggested that the thermal fluctuations and electrostatic disorders may appear as an obstacle to controlling the valley polarization of Dirac electrons.

  14. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam. PMID:26978011

  15. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  16. The emission wavelength dependent photoluminescence lifetime of the N-doped graphene quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingxia; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Shen, Hao; Zhou, Wei; Lu, Jian; Wang, Zhongyang

    2015-12-14

    Aromatic nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The PL lifetime was found to be dependent on the emission wavelength and coincident with the PL spectrum, which is different from most semiconductor quantum dots and fluorescent dyes. This result shows the synergy and competition between the quantum confinement effect and edge functional groups, which may have the potential to guide the synthesis and expand the applications of graphene quantum dots.

  17. NREL Certifies First All-Quantum-Dot Photovoltaic Cell; Demonstrates Stability, Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have certified the first all-quantum-dot photovoltaic cell, which was based on lead sulfide and demonstrated reasonable quantum dot solar cell performance for an initial efficiency measurement along with good stability. The certified open-circuit voltage of the quantum dot cell is greater than that possible from bulk lead sulfide because of quantum confinement.

  18. Signatures of single quantum dots in graphene nanoribbons within the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Tóvári, Endre; Makk, Péter; Rickhaus, Peter; Schönenberger, Christian; Csonka, Szabolcs

    2016-06-01

    We report on the observation of periodic conductance oscillations near quantum Hall plateaus in suspended graphene nanoribbons. They are attributed to single quantum dots that are formed in the narrowest part of the ribbon, in the valleys and hills of a disorder potential. In a wide flake with two gates, a double-dot system's signature has been observed. Electrostatic confinement is enabled in single-layer graphene due to the gaps that are formed between the Landau levels, suggesting a way to create gate-defined quantum dots that can be accessed with quantum Hall edge states. PMID:27198562

  19. Self-assembly drives quantum dot photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Plain, J; Sonnefraud, Y; Viste, P; Lérondel, G; Huant, S; Royer, P

    2009-03-01

    Engineering the spectral properties of quantum dots can be achieved by a control of the quantum dots organization on a substrate. Indeed, many applications of quantum dots as LEDs are based on the realization of a 3D architecture of quantum dots. In this contribution, we present a systematic study of the quantum dot organization obtained on different chemically modified substrates. By varying the chemical affinity between the quantum dots and the substrate, the quantum dot organization is strongly modified from the 2D monolayer to the 3D aggregates. Then the photoluminescence of the different obtained samples has been systematically studied and correlated with the quantum dot film organization. We clearly show that the interaction between the substrate and the quantum dot must be stronger than the quantum dot-quantum dot interaction to avoid 3D aggregation and that these organization strongly modified the photoluminescence of the film rather than intrinsic changes of the quantum dot induced by pure surface chemistry. PMID:18792763

  20. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Corfdir, P. Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T.; Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  1. Luminescent graphene quantum dots fabricated by pulsed laser synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Habiba, Khaled; Makarov, Vladimir I.; Avalos, Javier; Guinel, Maxime J.F.; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been the subject of intense research in recent years due to its unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Furthermore, it is expected that quantum dots of graphene would make their way into devices due to their structure and composition which unify graphene and quantum dots properties. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are planar nano flakes with a few atomic layers thick and with a higher surface-to-volume ratio than spherical carbon dots (CDs) of the same size. We have developed a pulsed laser synthesis (PLS) method for the synthesis of GQDs that are soluble in water, measure 2–6 nm across, and are about 1–3 layers thick. They show strong intrinsic fluorescence in the visible region. The source of fluorescence can be attributed to various factors, such as: quantum confinement, zigzag edge structure, and surface defects. Confocal microscopy images of bacteria exposed to GQDs show their suitability as biomarkers and nano-probes in high contrast bioimaging.

  2. The linear optical properties of a multi-shell spherical quantum dot of a parabolic confinement for cases with and without a hydrogenic impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Mehmet; Köksal, Koray

    2012-12-01

    Throughout this work, we aim to explore the linear optical properties of a semiconductor multi-shell spherical quantum dot with and without a hydrogenic donor impurity. The core and well layers are defined by the parabolic electronic potentials in the radial direction. The energy levels and corresponding wavefunctions of the structure are calculated by using the shooting technique in the framework of the effective-mass approximation. We investigate the intersublevel absorption coefficients of a single electron and the hydrogenic donor impurity comparatively as a function of the photon energy. In addition, we carry out the effect of a donor impurity and the layer thickness on the oscillator strengths and magnitude and position of absorption coefficient peaks. We illustrate the electron probability distribution and variation of the energy levels in cases with and without the impurity for different thicknesses of layers. This kind of structure gives an opportunity to tune and control the absorption coefficient of the system by changing three different thickness parameters. Also it provides a possibility to separate 0s and 1p electrons in different regions of the quantum dot.

  3. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Pedro; Martins, Manuel António; Trindade, Tito; Santos, José Luís; Farahi, Faramarz

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilized in optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms.

  4. Semiconductor double quantum dot micromaser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Eichler, C; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2015-01-16

    The coherent generation of light, from masers to lasers, relies upon the specific structure of the individual emitters that lead to gain. Devices operating as lasers in the few-emitter limit provide opportunities for understanding quantum coherent phenomena, from terahertz sources to quantum communication. Here we demonstrate a maser that is driven by single-electron tunneling events. Semiconductor double quantum dots (DQDs) serve as a gain medium and are placed inside a high-quality factor microwave cavity. We verify maser action by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. PMID:25593187

  5. Gate-defined Quantum Confinement in Suspended Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Quantum confined devices in carbon-based materials offer unique possibilities for applications ranging from quantum computation to sensing. In particular, nanostructured carbon is a promising candidate for spin-based quantum computation due to the ability to suppress hyperfine coupling to nuclear spins, a dominant source of spin decoherence. Yet graphene lacks an intrinsic bandgap, which poses a serious challenge for the creation of such devices. We present a novel approach to quantum confinement utilizing tunnel barriers defined by local electric fields that break sublattice symmetry in suspended bilayer graphene. This technique electrostatically confines charges via band structure control, thereby eliminating the edge and substrate disorder that hinders on-chip etched nanostructures to date. We report clean single electron tunneling through gate-defined quantum dots in two regimes: at zero magnetic field using the energy gap induced by a perpendicular electric field and at finite magnetic fields using Landau level confinement. The observed Coulomb blockade periodicity agrees with electrostatic simulations based on local top-gate geometry, a direct demonstration of local control over the band structure of graphene. This technology integrates quantum confinement with pristine device quality and access to vibrational modes, enabling wide applications from electromechanical sensors to quantum bits. More broadly, the ability to externally tailor the graphene bandgap over nanometer scales opens a new unexplored avenue for creating quantum devices.

  6. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  7. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices. PMID:26437175

  8. Density functional calculation of the structural and electronic properties of germanium quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Gopir, G.

    2015-04-24

    We apply first principles density functional computational methods to study the structures, densities of states (DOS), and higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) – lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps of selected free-standing Ge semiconductor quantum dots up to 1.8nm. Our calculations are performed using numerical atomic orbital approach where linear combination of atomic orbital was applied. The surfaces of the quantum dots was passivized by hydrogen atoms. We find that surface passivation does affect the electronic properties associated with the changes of surface state, electron localization, and the energy gaps of germanium nanocrystals as well as the confinement of electrons inside the quantum dots (QDs). Our study shows that the energy gaps of germanium quantum dots decreases with the increasing dot diameter. The size-dependent variations of the computed HOMO-LUMO gaps in our quantum dots model were found to be consistent with the effects of quantum confinement reported in others theoretical and experimental calculation.

  9. Charge transfer magnetoexciton formation at vertically coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Willian; Marin, Jairo H; Mikhailov, Ilia D

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the properties of charge transfer excitons at vertically coupled semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of electric and magnetic fields directed along the growth axis. Such excitons should have two interesting characteristics: an extremely long lifetime and a permanent dipole moment. We show that wave functions and the low-lying energies of charge transfer exciton can be found exactly for a special morphology of quantum dots that provides a parabolic confinement inside the layers. To take into account a difference between confinement potentials of an actual structure and of our exactly solvable model, we use the Galerkin method. The density of energy states is calculated for different InAs/GaAs quantum dots' dimensions, the separation between layers, and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields. A possibility of a formation of a giant dipolar momentum under external electric field is predicted. PMID:23092373

  10. Telegraph noise in coupled quantum dot circuits induced by a quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Taubert, D; Pioro-Ladrière, M; Schröer, D; Harbusch, D; Sachrajda, A S; Ludwig, S

    2008-05-01

    Charge detection utilizing a highly biased quantum point contact has become the most effective probe for studying few electron quantum dot circuits. Measurements on double and triple quantum dot circuits is performed to clarify a back action role of charge sensing on the confined electrons. The quantum point contact triggers inelastic transitions, which occur quite generally. Under specific device and measurement conditions these transitions manifest themselves as bounded regimes of telegraph noise within a stability diagram. A nonequilibrium transition from artificial atomic to molecular behavior is identified. Consequences for quantum information applications are discussed. PMID:18518321

  11. Single-Photon Superradiance from a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël S.; Lehmann, Tau B.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Lodahl, Peter; Stobbe, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and the hole comprising the exciton gives rise to an anharmonic spectrum, which we exploit to prepare the superradiant quantum state deterministically with a laser pulse. We observe a fivefold enhancement of the oscillator strength compared to conventional quantum dots. The enhancement is limited by the base temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies.

  12. Single-Photon Superradiance from a Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël S; Lehmann, Tau B; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Lodahl, Peter; Stobbe, Søren

    2016-04-22

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and the hole comprising the exciton gives rise to an anharmonic spectrum, which we exploit to prepare the superradiant quantum state deterministically with a laser pulse. We observe a fivefold enhancement of the oscillator strength compared to conventional quantum dots. The enhancement is limited by the base temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies. PMID:27152804

  13. Signatures of single quantum dots in graphene nanoribbons within the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóvári, Endre; Makk, Péter; Rickhaus, Peter; Schönenberger, Christian; Csonka, Szabolcs

    2016-06-01

    We report on the observation of periodic conductance oscillations near quantum Hall plateaus in suspended graphene nanoribbons. They are attributed to single quantum dots that are formed in the narrowest part of the ribbon, in the valleys and hills of a disorder potential. In a wide flake with two gates, a double-dot system's signature has been observed. Electrostatic confinement is enabled in single-layer graphene due to the gaps that are formed between the Landau levels, suggesting a way to create gate-defined quantum dots that can be accessed with quantum Hall edge states.We report on the observation of periodic conductance oscillations near quantum Hall plateaus in suspended graphene nanoribbons. They are attributed to single quantum dots that are formed in the narrowest part of the ribbon, in the valleys and hills of a disorder potential. In a wide flake with two gates, a double-dot system's signature has been observed. Electrostatic confinement is enabled in single-layer graphene due to the gaps that are formed between the Landau levels, suggesting a way to create gate-defined quantum dots that can be accessed with quantum Hall edge states. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR00187D

  14. Quantum Dots Based Rad-Hard Computing and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Klimeck, G.; Leon, R.; Qiu, Y.; Toomarian, N.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are solid-state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well-conducting region. Thus, they can be viewed as artificial atoms. They therefore represent the ultimate limit of the semiconductor device scaling. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Low Disorder Si MOSFET Dots for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordberg, E. P.; Tracy, L. A.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Eng, K.; Stalford, H. L.; Childs, K. D.; Stevens, J.; Grubbs, R. K.; Lilly, M. P.; Eriksson, M. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2009-03-01

    Silicon quantum dot based qubits have emerged as an appealing approach to extending the success of GaAs spin based double quantum dot qubits. Research in this field is motivated by the promise of long spin coherence times, and within a MOS system the potential for variable carrier density, very small dot sizes, and CMOS compatibility. In this work, we will present results on the fabrication and transport properties of quantum dots in novel double gated Si MOS structures. Coulomb blockade is observed from single quantum dots with extracted charging energies up to an including 5meV. Observed dots were formed both from disorder within a quantum point contact, and through disorder free electrostatic confinement. Extracted capacitances, verified with 3D finite element simulations confirm the location of the disorder free dot to be within the designed lithographic structure. Distinctions will be made regarding the effects of feature sizes and sample processing. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Thermoelectric energy harvesting with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sothmann, Björn; Sánchez, Rafael; Jordan, Andrew N

    2015-01-21

    We review recent theoretical work on thermoelectric energy harvesting in multi-terminal quantum-dot setups. We first discuss several examples of nanoscale heat engines based on Coulomb-coupled conductors. In particular, we focus on quantum dots in the Coulomb-blockade regime, chaotic cavities and resonant tunneling through quantum dots and wells. We then turn toward quantum-dot heat engines that are driven by bosonic degrees of freedom such as phonons, magnons and microwave photons. These systems provide interesting connections to spin caloritronics and circuit quantum electrodynamics. PMID:25549281

  17. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future. PMID:24191178

  18. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  19. Luminescence upconversion in colloidal double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Zvicka; Neeman, Lior; Oron, Dan

    2013-09-01

    Luminescence upconversion nanocrystals capable of converting two low-energy photons into a single photon at a higher energy are sought-after for a variety of applications, including bioimaging and photovoltaic light harvesting. Currently available systems, based on rare-earth-doped dielectrics, are limited in both tunability and absorption cross-section. Here we present colloidal double quantum dots as an alternative nanocrystalline upconversion system, combining the stability of an inorganic crystalline structure with the spectral tunability afforded by quantum confinement. By tailoring its composition and morphology, we form a semiconducting nanostructure in which excited electrons are delocalized over the entire structure, but a double potential well is formed for holes. Upconversion occurs by excitation of an electron in the lower energy transition, followed by intraband absorption of the hole, allowing it to cross the barrier to a higher energy state. An overall conversion efficiency of 0.1% per double excitation event is achieved. PMID:23912060

  20. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  1. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Kahen

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m2, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  2. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kahen, Keith

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m{sup 2}, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  3. Quantitative multiplexed quantum dot immunohistochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, E.; Ward, T.H.; Gray, N.; Womack, C.; Jayson, G.; Hughes, A.; Dive, C.; Byers, R.

    2008-09-19

    Quantum dots are photostable fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals possessing wide excitation and bright narrow, symmetrical, emission spectra. These characteristics have engendered considerable interest in their application in multiplex immunohistochemistry for biomarker quantification and co-localisation in clinical samples. Robust quantitation allows biomarker validation, and there is growing need for multiplex staining due to limited quantity of clinical samples. Most reported multiplexed quantum dot staining used sequential methods that are laborious and impractical in a high-throughput setting. Problems associated with sequential multiplex staining have been investigated and a method developed using QDs conjugated to biotinylated primary antibodies, enabling simultaneous multiplex staining with three antibodies. CD34, Cytokeratin 18 and cleaved Caspase 3 were triplexed in tonsillar tissue using an 8 h protocol, each localised to separate cellular compartments. This demonstrates utility of the method for biomarker measurement enabling rapid measurement of multiple co-localised biomarkers on single paraffin tissue sections, of importance for clinical trial studies.

  4. Nano-laser on silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Qin, Chao-Jian; Lü, Quan; Xu, Li

    2011-04-01

    A new conception of nano-laser is proposed in which depending on the size of nano-clusters (silicon quantum dots (QD)), the pumping level of laser can be tuned by the quantum confinement (QC) effect, and the population inversion can be formed between the valence band and the localized states in gap produced from the surface bonds of nano-clusters. Here we report the experimental demonstration of nano-laser on silicon quantum dots fabricated by nanosecond pulse laser. The peaks of stimulated emission are observed at 605 nm and 693 nm. Through the micro-cavity of nano-laser, a full width at half maximum of the peak at 693 nm can reach to 0.5 nm. The theoretical model and the experimental results indicate that it is a necessary condition for setting up nano-laser that the smaller size of QD (d < 3 nm) can make the localized states into band gap. The emission energy of nano-laser will be limited in the range of 1.7-2.3 eV generally due to the position of the localized states in gap, which is in good agreement between the experiments and the theory.

  5. Tunneling through a quantum dot in a quantum waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsen'ev, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    The problem is considered of scattering in a system consisting of a quantum waveguide and a quantum dot weakly coupled to the waveguide. It is assumed that the quantum waveguide is described by the Pauli equations, and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction is taken into account. The possibility of tunneling through the quantum dot is proved.

  6. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given.

  7. Optically active quantum dots in monolayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ajit; Sidler, Meinrad; Allain, Adrien V; Lembke, Dominik S; Kis, Andras; Imamoğlu, A

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have emerged as promising candidates for the implementation of quantum information processing, because they allow for a quantum interface between stationary spin qubits and propagating single photons. In the meantime, transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers have moved to the forefront of solid-state research due to their unique band structure featuring a large bandgap with degenerate valleys and non-zero Berry curvature. Here, we report the observation of zero-dimensional anharmonic quantum emitters, which we refer to as quantum dots, in monolayer tungsten diselenide, with an energy that is 20-100 meV lower than that of two-dimensional excitons. Photon antibunching in second-order photon correlations unequivocally demonstrates the zero-dimensional anharmonic nature of these quantum emitters. The strong anisotropic magnetic response of the spatially localized emission peaks strongly indicates that radiative recombination stems from localized excitons that inherit their electronic properties from the host transition-metal dichalcogenide. The large ∼1 meV zero-field splitting shows that the quantum dots have singlet ground states and an anisotropic confinement that is most probably induced by impurities or defects. The possibility of achieving electrical control in van der Waals heterostructures and to exploit the spin-valley degree of freedom renders transition-metal-dichalcogenide quantum dots interesting for quantum information processing. PMID:25938570

  8. Synthetic Developments of Nontoxic Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Das, Adita; Snee, Preston T

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots (QDs), are candidates for biological sensing, photovoltaics, and catalysis due to their unique photophysical properties. The most studied QDs are composed of heavy metals like cadmium and lead. However, this engenders concerns over heavy metal toxicity. To address this issue, numerous studies have explored the development of nontoxic (or more accurately less toxic) quantum dots. In this Review, we select three major classes of nontoxic quantum dots composed of carbon, silicon and Group I-III-VI elements and discuss the myriad of synthetic strategies and surface modification methods to synthesize quantum dots composed of these material systems. PMID:26548450

  9. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  10. Electronic Structure of Helium Atom in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanta, K. Saha; Bhattacharyya, S.; T. K., Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Bound and resonance states of helium atom have been investigated inside a quantum dot by using explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set within the framework of stabilization method. To be specific, precise energy eigenvalues of bound 1sns (1Se) (n = 1-6) states and the resonance parameters i.e. positions and widths of 1Se states due to 2sns (n = 2-5) and 2pnp (n = 2-5) configurations of confined helium below N = 2 ionization threshold of He+ have been estimated. The two-parameter (Depth and Width) finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confining potential due to the quantum dot. It has been explicitly demonstrated that the electronic structural properties become sensitive functions of the dot size. It is observed from the calculations of ionization potential that the stability of an impurity ion within a quantum dot may be manipulated by varying the confinement parameters. A possibility of controlling the autoionization lifetime of doubly excited states of two-electron ions by tuning the width of the quantum cavity is also discussed here. TKM Gratefully Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. 37(3)/14/27/2014-BRNS from the Department of Atomic Energy, BRNS, Government of India. SB Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. PSW-160/14-15(ERO) from University Grants Commission, Government of India

  11. Einstein's Photoemission from Quantum Confined Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 83th Birthday of Late Professor B. R. Nag, D.Sc., formerly Head of the Departments of Radio Physics and Electronics and Electronic Science of the University of Calcutta, a firm believer of the concept of theoretical minimum of Landau and an internationally well known semiconductor physicist, to whom the second author remains ever grateful as a student and research worker from 1974-2004. In this paper, an attempt is made to study, the Einstein's photoemission (EP) from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum well heavily doped superlattices (QWHDSLs) with graded interfaces in the presence of quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion relations within the frame work of k · p formalism. The EP from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum wells of heavily doped effective mass superlattices respectively has been presented under magnetic quantization. Besides the said emissions, from the quantum dots of the aforementioned heavily doped SLs have further investigated for the purpose of comparison and complete investigation in the context of EP from quantum confined superlattices. Using appropriate SLs, it appears that the EP increases with increasing surface electron concentration and decreasing film thickness in spiky manners, which are the characteristic features of such quantized hetero structures. Under magnetic quantization, the EP oscillates with inverse quantizing magnetic field due to Shuvnikov-de Haas effect. The EP increases with increasing photo energy in a step-like manner and the numerical values of EP with all the physical variables are totally band structure dependent for all the cases. The most striking features are that the presence of poles in the dispersion relation of the materials in the absence of band tails create the complex energy spectra in the corresponding HD constituent materials of such quantum confined superlattices and effective electron

  12. Two blinking mechanisms in highly confined AgInS2 and AgInS2/ZnS quantum dots evaluated by single particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichy, B.; Rich, R.; Olejniczak, A.; Gryczynski, Z.; Strek, W.

    2016-02-01

    Ternary AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been found as promising cadmium-free, red-shifted, and tunable luminescent bio-probes with efficient Stokes and anti-Stokes excitations and luminescence lifetimes (ca. 100 ns) convenient for time resolved techniques like fluorescence life-time imaging. Although the spectral properties of the AgInS2 QDs are encouraging, the complex recombination kinetics in the QDs being still far from understood, limits their full utility. In this paper we report on a model describing the recombination pathways responsible for large deviations from the first-order decay law observed commonly in the ternary chalcogenides. The presented results were evaluated by means of individual AgInS2 QD spectroscopy aided by first principles calculations including the electronic structure and structural reconstruction of the QDs. Special attention was devoted to study the impact of the surface charge state on the excited state relaxation and effect of its passivation by Zn2+ ion alloying. Two different blinking mechanisms related to defect-assisted charge imbalance in the QD responsible for fast non-radiative relaxation of the excited states as well as surface recharging of the QD were found as the major causes of deviations from the first-order decay law. Careful optimization of the AgInS2 QDs would help to fabricate new red-shifted and tunable fluorescent bio-probes characterized by low-toxicity, high quantum yield, long luminescence lifetime, and time stability, leading to many novel in vitro and in vivo applications based on fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and time-gated detection.Ternary AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been found as promising cadmium-free, red-shifted, and tunable luminescent bio-probes with efficient Stokes and anti-Stokes excitations and luminescence lifetimes (ca. 100 ns) convenient for time resolved techniques like fluorescence life-time imaging. Although the spectral properties of the AgInS2 QDs are encouraging, the complex

  13. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g‑1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g‑1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g‑1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g‑1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance.

  14. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 100 mA g(-1), superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1)). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance. PMID:27181691

  15. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g−1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g−1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g−1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance. PMID:27181691

  16. Temperature independent infrared responsivity of a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Shu-Man; Ren, Fei; Ning, Zhen-Dong; Ye, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jun-Qi; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a quantum dot quantum cascade photodetector with a hybrid active region of InAs quantum dots and an InGaAs quantum well, which exhibited a temperature independent response at 4.5 μm. The normal incident responsivity reached 10.3 mA/W at 120 K and maintained a value of 9 mA/W up to 260 K. It exhibited a specific detectivity above 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 77 K, which remained at 108 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 260 K. We ascribe the device's good thermal stability of infrared response to the three-dimensional quantum confinement of the InAs quantum dots incorporated in the active region.

  17. Computation of hyperfine energies of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, Bekir; Özmen, Ayhan; Yakar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    The hyperfine energies and hyperfine constants of the ground and excited states of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots(QDs) are calculated. Quantum genetic algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) methods are employed to calculate the unperturbed wave functions and energy eigenvalues. The results show that in the medium and strong confinement regions the hyperfine energy and hyperfine constant are strongly affected by dot radius, impurity charge, electron spin orientation, impurity spin and impurity magnetic moment. Besides, in all dot radii, the hyperfine splitting and hyperfine constant of the confined hydrogen and tritium atoms are approximately equivalent to each other and they are greater than the confined deuterium atom.

  18. Photoluminescence of a quantum-dot molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchinin, Stanislav Yu.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Leonov, Mikhail Yu.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-01-07

    The coherent coupling of quantum dots is a sensitive indicator of the energy and phase relaxation processes taking place in the nanostructure components. We formulate a theory of low-temperature, stationary photoluminescence from a quantum-dot molecule composed of two spherical quantum dots whose electronic subsystems are resonantly coupled via the Coulomb interaction. We show that the coupling leads to the hybridization of the first excited states of the quantum dots, manifesting itself as a pair of photoluminescence peaks with intensities and spectral positions strongly dependent on the geometric, material, and relaxation parameters of the quantum-dot molecule. These parameters are explicitly contained in the analytical expression for the photoluminescence differential cross section derived in the paper. The developed theory and expression obtained are essential in interpreting and analyzing spectroscopic data on the secondary emission of coherently coupled quantum systems.

  19. Anomalous polarization in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. H.; Jiang, H.; Sun, X.; Lin, H. Q.

    2000-04-01

    The coupled quantum dots can be designed to possess negative polarizability in low-lying excited states. In an electric field, the coupled dots are polarized, and the dipole moment of the coupled dots is reversed by absorbing one photon. This photoswitch effect is a new photoinduced phenomenon.

  20. Charge transfer magnetoexciton formation at vertically coupled quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the properties of charge transfer excitons at vertically coupled semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of electric and magnetic fields directed along the growth axis. Such excitons should have two interesting characteristics: an extremely long lifetime and a permanent dipole moment. We show that wave functions and the low-lying energies of charge transfer exciton can be found exactly for a special morphology of quantum dots that provides a parabolic confinement inside the layers. To take into account a difference between confinement potentials of an actual structure and of our exactly solvable model, we use the Galerkin method. The density of energy states is calculated for different InAs/GaAs quantum dots’ dimensions, the separation between layers, and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields. A possibility of a formation of a giant dipolar momentum under external electric field is predicted. PMID:23092373

  1. Valley-orbit hybrid states in Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2013-03-01

    The conduction band for electrons in layered Si nanostructures oriented along (001) has two low-lying valleys. Most theoretical treatments assume that these valleys are decoupled from the long-wavelength physics of electron confinement. In this work, we show that even a minimal amount of disorder (a single atomic step at the quantum well interface) is sufficient to mix valley states and electron orbitals, causing a significant distortion of the long-wavelength electron envelope. For physically realistic electric fields and dot sizes, this valley-orbit coupling impacts all electronic states in Si quantum dots, implying that one must always consider valley-orbit hybrid states, rather than distinct valley and orbital degrees of freedom. We discuss the ramifications of our results on silicon quantum dot qubits. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-08-1-0482) and NSF (DMR-0805045).

  2. Charge state hysteresis in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A.; Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which accounts for the observed hysteretic behaviour by extending the established description for transport in double dots coupled to two reservoirs. We demonstrate that this type of device operates like a single-electron memory latch.

  3. Charge state hysteresis in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A. Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A. S.

    2014-11-03

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which accounts for the observed hysteretic behaviour by extending the established description for transport in double dots coupled to two reservoirs. We demonstrate that this type of device operates like a single-electron memory latch.

  4. A quantum dot in topological insulator nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Herath, Thakshila M; Hewageegana, Prabath; Apalkov, Vadym

    2014-03-19

    We introduce a quantum dot in topological insulator nanofilm as a bump at the surface of the nanofilm. Such a quantum dot can localize an electron if the size of the dot is large enough, ≳5 nm. The quantum dot in topological insulator nanofilm has states of two types, which belong to two ('conduction' and 'valence') bands of the topological insulator nanofilm. We study the energy spectra of such defined quantum dots. We also consider intraband and interband optical transitions within the dot. The optical transitions of the two types have the same selection rules. While the interband absorption spectra have multi-peak structure, each of the intraband spectra has one strong peak and a few weak high frequency satellites. PMID:24590177

  5. STED nanoscopy with fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanne, Janina; Falk, Henning J.; Görlitz, Frederik; Hoyer, Patrick; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-05-01

    The widely popular class of quantum-dot molecular labels could so far not be utilized as standard fluorescent probes in STED (stimulated emission depletion) nanoscopy. This is because broad quantum-dot excitation spectra extend deeply into the spectral bands used for STED, thus compromising the transient fluorescence silencing required for attaining super-resolution. Here we report the discovery that STED nanoscopy of several red-emitting commercially available quantum dots is in fact successfully realized by the increasingly popular 775 nm STED laser light. A resolution of presently ~50 nm is demonstrated for single quantum dots, and sub-diffraction resolution is further shown for imaging of quantum-dot-labelled vimentin filaments in fibroblasts. The high quantum-dot photostability enables repeated STED recordings with >1,000 frames. In addition, we have evidence that the tendency of quantum-dot labels to blink is largely suppressed by combined action of excitation and STED beams. Quantum-dot STED significantly expands the realm of application of STED nanoscopy, and, given the high stability of these probes, holds promise for extended time-lapse imaging.

  6. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  7. STED nanoscopy with fluorescent quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Hanne, Janina; Falk, Henning J.; Görlitz, Frederik; Hoyer, Patrick; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-01-01

    The widely popular class of quantum-dot molecular labels could so far not be utilized as standard fluorescent probes in STED (stimulated emission depletion) nanoscopy. This is because broad quantum-dot excitation spectra extend deeply into the spectral bands used for STED, thus compromising the transient fluorescence silencing required for attaining super-resolution. Here we report the discovery that STED nanoscopy of several red-emitting commercially available quantum dots is in fact successfully realized by the increasingly popular 775 nm STED laser light. A resolution of presently ∼50 nm is demonstrated for single quantum dots, and sub-diffraction resolution is further shown for imaging of quantum-dot-labelled vimentin filaments in fibroblasts. The high quantum-dot photostability enables repeated STED recordings with >1,000 frames. In addition, we have evidence that the tendency of quantum-dot labels to blink is largely suppressed by combined action of excitation and STED beams. Quantum-dot STED significantly expands the realm of application of STED nanoscopy, and, given the high stability of these probes, holds promise for extended time-lapse imaging. PMID:25980788

  8. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sandra J.; Chang, Jerry C.; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R.; Tomlinson, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, sizetunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots. PMID:21276935

  9. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Sandra; Chang, Jerry; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James; Tomlinson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, size-tunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots.

  10. Changes in luminescence emission induced by proton irradiation: InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and quantum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G. M.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W. A.; Tang, Y. S.; Wang, K. L.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2000-01-01

    The photoluminescence emission from InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well and quantum-dot (QD) structures are compared after controlled irradiation with 1.5 MeV proton fluxes. Results presented here show a significant enhancement in radiation tolerance with three-dimensional quantum confinement.

  11. Robust effective Zeeman energy in monolayer MoS2 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Dias, A C; Fu, Jiyong; Villegas-Lelovsky, L; Qu, Fanyao

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation on the energy spectrum and the effective Zeeman energy (EZE) in monolayer MoS2 circular quantum dots, subjected to an out-of-plane magnetic field. Interestingly, we observe the emergence of energy-locked modes, depending on the competition between the dot confinement and the applied magnetic field, for either the highest K-valley valence band or the lowest [Formula: see text]-valley conduction band. Moreover, an unusual dot-size-independent EZE behavior of the highest valence and the lowest conduction bands is found. Although the EZEs are insensitive to the variation of quantum confinement, both of them grow linearly with the magnetic field, similar to that in the monolayer MoS2 material. The EZEs along with their 'robustness' against dot confinements open opportunities of a universal magnetic control over the valley degree of freedom, for quantum dots of all sizes. PMID:27421077

  12. Robust effective Zeeman energy in monolayer MoS2 quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, A. C.; Fu, Jiyong; Villegas-Lelovsky, L.; Qu, Fanyao

    2016-09-01

    We report a theoretical investigation on the energy spectrum and the effective Zeeman energy (EZE) in monolayer MoS2 circular quantum dots, subjected to an out-of-plane magnetic field. Interestingly, we observe the emergence of energy-locked modes, depending on the competition between the dot confinement and the applied magnetic field, for either the highest K-valley valence band or the lowest {{K}\\prime} -valley conduction band. Moreover, an unusual dot-size-independent EZE behavior of the highest valence and the lowest conduction bands is found. Although the EZEs are insensitive to the variation of quantum confinement, both of them grow linearly with the magnetic field, similar to that in the monolayer MoS2 material. The EZEs along with their ‘robustness’ against dot confinements open opportunities of a universal magnetic control over the valley degree of freedom, for quantum dots of all sizes.

  13. Optophononics with coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Mark L; Govorov, Alexander O; Czarnocki, Cyprian; Lu, Davis; Gad, Youstina N; Bracker, Allan S; Gammon, Daniel; Scheibner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Modern technology is founded on the intimate understanding of how to utilize and control electrons. Next to electrons, nature uses phonons, quantized vibrations of an elastic structure, to carry energy, momentum and even information through solids. Phonons permeate the crystalline components of modern technology, yet in terms of technological utilization phonons are far from being on par with electrons. Here we demonstrate how phonons can be employed to render a single quantum dot pair optically transparent. This phonon-induced transparency is realized via the formation of a molecular polaron, the result of a Fano-type quantum interference, which proves that we have accomplished making typically incoherent and dissipative phonons behave in a coherent and non-dissipative manner. We find the transparency to be widely tunable by electronic and optical means. Thereby we show amplification of weakest coupling channels. We further outline the molecular polaron's potential as a control element in phononic circuitry architecture. PMID:24534815

  14. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27-61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72-93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying. PMID:27250067

  15. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-01-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27–61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72–93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying. PMID:27250067

  16. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27–61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72–93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying.

  17. Parallel magnetic-field-induced conductance fluctuations in one- and two-subband ballistic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, C.; Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Melinte, S.; Shayegan, M.; Bayot, V.

    2003-12-01

    We report on conductance fluctuations of ballistic quantum dots in a strictly parallel magnetic field B. The quantum dots are patterned in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG’s), confined to 15- and 45-nm-thick GaAs quantum wells (QW) with one and two occupied subbands at B=0, respectively. For both dots we observe universal conductance fluctuations (UCF’s) and, in the case of the wide QW dot, a reduction in their amplitude at large B. Our data suggest that the finite thickness of the 2DEG and the orbital effect are responsible for the parallel B-induced UCF’s.

  18. Decoherence dynamics of two charge qubits in vertically coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Chouikha, W.; Bennaceur, R.; Jaziri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The decoherence dynamics of two charge qubits in a double quantum dot is investigated theoretically. We consider the quantum dynamics of two interacting electrons in a vertically coupled quantum dot driven by an external electric field. We derive the equations of motion for the density matrix, in which the presence of an electron confined in the double dot represents one qubit. A Markovian approach to the dynamical evolution of the reduced density matrix is adopted. We evaluate the concurrence of two qubits in order to study the effect of acoustic phonons on the entanglement. We also show that the disentanglement effect depends on the double dot parameters and increases with the temperature.

  19. Tailoring 10 nm scale suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tayari, Vahid; McRae, Andrew C; Yiğen, Serap; Island, Joshua O; Porter, James M; Champagne, Alexandre R

    2015-01-14

    The possibility to make 10 nm scale, and low-disorder, suspended graphene devices would open up many possibilities to study and make use of strongly coupled quantum electronics, quantum mechanics, and optics. We present a versatile method, based on the electromigration of gold-on-graphene bow-tie bridges, to fabricate low-disorder suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots with lengths ranging from 6 nm up to 55 nm. We control the length of the junctions, and shape of their gold contacts by adjusting the power at which the electromigration process is allowed to avalanche. Using carefully engineered gold contacts and a nonuniform downward electrostatic force, we can controllably tear the width of suspended graphene channels from over 100 nm down to 27 nm. We demonstrate that this lateral confinement creates high-quality suspended quantum dots. This fabrication method could be extended to other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25490053

  20. Magnetic field dependence of a charge-frustrated state in a triangular triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, M.; Chung, Y.

    2013-11-01

    We studied the magnetic field dependence of a charge-frustrated state formed in a triangular triple quantum dot. Stability diagrams at various magnetic fields were measured by using two-terminal and three-terminal conductance measurement schemes. We found that the frustrated state broke down at an external magnetic field of around 0.1 T. This result is due to the confinement energy shifts in quantum dots under external magnetic fields. A similar breakdown of the frustrated state was observed when the confinement energy of a quantum dot was intentionally shifted by the plunger gate of the dot, which confirm the reason for the breakdown of the frustrated state under on applied magnetic field. Our measured stability diagrams differed depending on the measurement schemes, which could not be explained by the capacitive interaction model based on an independent particle picture. We believe that the discrepancy is related to the closed electron and hole trajectories inside a triple quantum dot.

  1. Single Electron in Systems of Two and Three Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    We consider the single electron confinement states in the system of two and three quantum dots (QDs). The InAs/GaAs QDs are modeled as laterally distributed dots, using single sub-band effective mass approach with effective potential simulating the strain effect. Electron localization in double quantum dots (DQDs) and in triple quantum dots (TQDs) is studied over the entire electron energy spectrum by varying the geometry parameters of these QDs arrays. It is shown that a small violation of the DQD shape symmetry drastically affects tunneling. This effect also appears as a numerical instability in calculations of spectral distribution of localized/delocalized electron states for small variations of the input parameters of numerical procedure. The effect of adding a third dot to a DQD is investigated. We show that the presence of a third dot increases the tunneling in the initial DQD. The spectral distribution of localized/delocalized states appears sensitive to the violation of the mirror symmetry of TQDs. This work was supported by the NSF (HRD-1345219).

  2. Surface Induced Magnetism in Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; Lee, J I

    2009-08-20

    The study of nanometer sized semiconductor crystallites, also known as quantum dots (QDs), has seen rapid advancements in recent years in scientific disciplines ranging from chemistry, physics, biology, materials science, and engineering. QD materials of CdSe, ZnSe, InP, as well as many others, can be prepared in the size range of 1-10 nm producing uniform, nearly monodisperse materials that are typically coated with organic molecules [1-3]. The strength of charge carrier confinement, which dictates the size-dependent properties, in these QDs depends on the nature of the material and can be correlated to the Bohr radius for the system of interest. For instance, the Bohr radius for CdSe is {approx} 5 nm, while in the more covalent structure of InP, the Bohr radius approaches {approx} 10 nm. The study of CdSe QDs has been particularly extensive during the last decade because they exhibit unique and tunable optical properties and are readily synthesized with high-crystallinity and narrow size dispersions. Although the core electronic properties of CdSe are explained in terms of the quantum confinement model, experimental efforts to elucidate the surface structure of these materials have been limited. Typically, colloidal CdSe QDs are coated with an organic surfactant, which typically consists of an organo-phosphine, -thiol, or -amine, that has the function of energetically relaxing defect states via coordination to partially coordinated surface atoms. The organic surfactant also acts to enhance carrier confinement and prevent agglomeration of the particles. Chemically, it has been shown that the bonding of the surfactant to the CdSe QD occurs through Cd atoms resulting cleavage of the Se atoms and formation of a Cd-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) particle [5].

  3. A detailed theory of excitons in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boero, M.; Rorison, J. M.; Duggan, G.; Inkson, J. C.

    1997-04-01

    Quantum-dot systems are confined semiconductor structures which exhibit a fully discrete spectrum due to the size confinement in all directions. The position of the energy levels inside such structures can be changed by adjusting their geometrical dimensions. Such structures are particularly interesting for optical applications for two reasons: (i) both the electrons and holes are confined in the same small physical region, and therefore the strength of recombination processes is increased, and (ii) by changing the position of the energy levels, one can in principle tune quantum-dot lasers over a wide range of wavelengths. The presence of size confinement gives rise to two competing effects: on one hand it causes an upward shift of the energy levels, and on the other it enhances the Coulomb attraction between electrons and holes. These effects tend to shift the position of the exciton energies in opposite directions, so that a careful modelling of such structures is required in order to understand which is the dominant effect and how the excitons behave as a function of confinement. While there have been several studies on ideal systems, we attempt to model a system more closely aligned to experiment. In this study we investigate: (i) the effect of the shape of the lateral potential of a quantum disk, i.e. parabolic and hard-wall; (ii) the effect of wave-function leakage in the barries; and (iii) the effect of the light-heavy hole mixing on the effective masses.

  4. Investigations on Landé factor in a strained GaxIn1-xAs/GaAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. R. Senthil; Peter, A. John

    2014-04-01

    The effective excitonic g-factor as functions of dot radius and the Ga alloy content, in a strained GaxIn1-xAs/GaAs quantum dot, is numerically measured. The heavy hole excitonic states are studied for various Ga alloy content taking into account the anisotropy, non-parabolicity of the conduction band and the geometrical confinement effects. The quantum dot is considered as spherical dot of InAs surrounded by a GaAs barrier material.

  5. Quantum confinement in Si and Ge nanostructures: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barbagiovanni, Eric G.; Lockwood, David J.; Simpson, Peter J.; Goncharova, Lyudmila V.

    2014-03-15

    The role of quantum confinement (QC) in Si and Ge nanostructures (NSs) including quantum dots, quantum wires, and quantum wells is assessed under a wide variety of fabrication methods in terms of both their structural and optical properties. Structural properties include interface states, defect states in a matrix material, and stress, all of which alter the electronic states and hence the measured optical properties. We demonstrate how variations in the fabrication method lead to differences in the NS properties, where the most relevant parameters for each type of fabrication method are highlighted. Si embedded in, or layered between, SiO{sub 2}, and the role of the sub-oxide interface states embodies much of the discussion. Other matrix materials include Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Si NSs exhibit a complicated optical spectrum, because the coupling between the interface states and the confined carriers manifests with varying magnitude depending on the dimension of confinement. Ge NSs do not produce well-defined luminescence due to confined carriers, because of the strong influence from oxygen vacancy defect states. Variations in Si and Ge NS properties are considered in terms of different theoretical models of QC (effective mass approximation, tight binding method, and pseudopotential method). For each theoretical model, we discuss the treatment of the relevant experimental parameters.

  6. Quantum confinement in Si and Ge nanostructures: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagiovanni, Eric G.; Lockwood, David J.; Simpson, Peter J.; Goncharova, Lyudmila V.

    2014-03-01

    The role of quantum confinement (QC) in Si and Ge nanostructures (NSs) including quantum dots, quantum wires, and quantum wells is assessed under a wide variety of fabrication methods in terms of both their structural and optical properties. Structural properties include interface states, defect states in a matrix material, and stress, all of which alter the electronic states and hence the measured optical properties. We demonstrate how variations in the fabrication method lead to differences in the NS properties, where the most relevant parameters for each type of fabrication method are highlighted. Si embedded in, or layered between, SiO2, and the role of the sub-oxide interface states embodies much of the discussion. Other matrix materials include Si3N4 and Al2O3. Si NSs exhibit a complicated optical spectrum, because the coupling between the interface states and the confined carriers manifests with varying magnitude depending on the dimension of confinement. Ge NSs do not produce well-defined luminescence due to confined carriers, because of the strong influence from oxygen vacancy defect states. Variations in Si and Ge NS properties are considered in terms of different theoretical models of QC (effective mass approximation, tight binding method, and pseudopotential method). For each theoretical model, we discuss the treatment of the relevant experimental parameters.

  7. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  8. Magnon-driven quantum dot refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Huang, Chuankun; Liao, Tianjun; Chen, Jincan

    2015-12-01

    A new model of refrigerator consisting of a spin-splitting quantum dot coupled with two ferromagnetic reservoirs and a ferromagnetic insulator is proposed. The rate equation is used to calculate the occupation probabilities of the quantum dot. The expressions of the electron and magnon currents are obtained. The region that the system can work in as a refrigerator is determined. The cooling power and coefficient of performance (COP) of the refrigerator are derived. The influences of the magnetic field, applied voltage, and polarization of two leads on the performance are discussed. The performances of two different magnon-driven quantum dot refrigerators are compared.

  9. Spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Maciej

    Recent advancements in nanotechnology create a need for a better understanding of the underlying physical processes that lead to the different behavior of nanoscale structures in comparison to bulk materials. The influence of the surrounding environment on the physical and optical properties of nanoscale objects embedded inside them is of particular interest. This research is focused on the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots which are zero-dimensional nanostructures. There are many investigation techniques for measuring the local parameters and structural characteristics of Quantum Dot structures. They include X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy, etc. However, none of these is suitable for the study of large areas of quantum dots matrices and substrates. The existence of spatial inhomogeneity in the quantum dots allows for a deeper and better understanding of underlying physical processes responsible in particular for the observed changes in photoluminescence (PL) characteristics. Spectroscopic PL mapping can reveal areas of improved laser performance of InAs - InGaAs quantum dots structures. Establishing physical mechanisms responsible for two different types of spatial PL inhomogeneity in InAs/InGaAs quantum dots structures for laser applications was the first objective of this research. Most of the bio-applications of semiconductor quantum dots utilize their superior optical properties over organic fluorophores. Therefore, optimization of QD labeling performance with biomolecule attachment was another focus of this research. Semiconductor quantum dots suspended in liquids were investigated, especially the influence of surrounding molecules that may be attached or bio-conjugated to the quantum dots for specific use in biological reactions on the photoluminescence spectrum. Provision of underlying physical mechanisms of optical property instability of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots used for biological

  10. GaN quantum dots as optical transducers for chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Weidemann, O.; Jegert, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Kandaswamy, P. K.; Monroy, E.

    2009-03-16

    GaN/AlN quantum dots were investigated as optical transducers for field effect chemical sensors. The structures were synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy and covered by a semitransparent catalytic Pt top contact. Due to the thin (3 nm) AlN barriers, the variation of the quantum dot photoluminescence with an external electric field along the [0001] axis is dominated by the tunneling current rather than by the quantum confined Stark effect. An increasing field results in a blueshift of the luminescence and a decreasing intensity. This effect is used to measure the optical response of quantum dot superlattices upon exposure to molecular hydrogen.

  11. Quantum dots and prion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Blazkova, Iva; Chomoucka, Jana; Drbohlavova, Jana; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kopel, Pavel; Hubalek, Jaromir; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    A diagnostics of infectious diseases can be done by the immunologic methods or by the amplification of nucleic acid specific to contagious agent using polymerase chain reaction. However, in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, the infectious agent, prion protein (PrPSc), has the same sequence of nucleic acids as a naturally occurring protein. The other issue with the diagnosing based on the PrPSc detection is that the pathological form of prion protein is abundant only at late stages of the disease in a brain. Therefore, the diagnostics of prion protein caused diseases represent a sort of challenges as that hosts can incubate infectious prion proteins for many months or even years. Therefore, new in vivo assays for detection of prion proteins and for diagnosis of their relation to neurodegenerative diseases are summarized. Their applicability and future prospects in this field are discussed with particular aim at using quantum dots as fluorescent labels. PMID:24055838

  12. Triple quantum dots as charge rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Busl, M; Platero, G

    2012-04-18

    We theoretically analyze electronic spin transport through a triple quantum dot in series, attached to electrical contacts, where the drain contact is coupled to the central dot. We show that current rectification is observed in the device due to current blockade. The current blocking mechanism is originated by a destructive interference of the electronic wavefunction at the drain dot. There, the electrons are coherently trapped in a singlet two-electron dark state, which is a coherent superposition of the electronic wavefunction in the source dot and in the dot isolated from the contacts. Its formation gives rise to zero current and current rectification as the voltage is swept. We analyze this behavior analytically and numerically for both zero and finite magnetic dc fields. On top of that, we include phenomenologically a finite spin relaxation rate and calculate the current numerically. Our results show that triple dots in series can be designed to behave as quantum charge rectifiers. PMID:22442135

  13. Entangled exciton states in quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Manfred

    2002-03-01

    Currently there is strong interest in quantum information processing(See, for example, The Physics of Quantum Information, eds. D. Bouwmeester, A. Ekert and A. Zeilinger (Springer, Berlin, 2000).) in a solid state environment. Many approaches mimic atomic physics concepts in which semiconductor quantum dots are implemented as artificial atoms. An essential building block of a quantum processor is a gate which entangles the states of two quantum bits. Recently a pair of vertically aligned quantum dots has been suggested as optically driven quantum gate(P. Hawrylak, S. Fafard, and Z. R. Wasilewski, Cond. Matter News 7, 16 (1999).)(M. Bayer, P. Hawrylak, K. Hinzer, S. Fafard, M. Korkusinski, Z.R. Wasilewski, O. Stern, and A. Forchel, Science 291, 451 (2001).): The quantum bits are individual carriers either on dot zero or dot one. The different dot indices play the same role as a "spin", therefore we call them "isospin". Quantum mechanical tunneling between the dots rotates the isospin and leads to superposition of these states. The quantum gate is built when two different particles, an electron and a hole, are created optically. The two particles form entangled isospin states. Here we present spectrocsopic studies of single self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules that support the feasibility of this proposal. The evolution of the excitonic recombination spectrum with varying separation between the dots allows us to demonstrate coherent tunneling of carriers across the separating barrier and the formation of entangled exciton states: Due to the coupling between the dots the exciton states show a splitting that increases with decreasing barrier width. For barrier widths below 5 nm it exceeds the thermal energy at room temperature. For a given barrier width, we find only small variations of the tunneling induced splitting demonstrating a good homogeneity within a molecule ensemble. The entanglement may be controlled by application of electromagnetic field. For

  14. Self-assembled quantum dots in a nanowire system for quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Heiss, M; Fontana, Y; Gustafsson, A; Wüst, G; Magen, C; O'Regan, D D; Luo, J W; Ketterer, B; Conesa-Boj, S; Kuhlmann, A V; Houel, J; Russo-Averchi, E; Morante, J R; Cantoni, M; Marzari, N; Arbiol, J; Zunger, A; Warburton, R J; Fontcuberta i Morral, A

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots embedded within nanowires represent one of the most promising technologies for applications in quantum photonics. Whereas the top-down fabrication of such structures remains a technological challenge, their bottom-up fabrication through self-assembly is a potentially more powerful strategy. However, present approaches often yield quantum dots with large optical linewidths, making reproducibility of their physical properties difficult. We present a versatile quantum-dot-in-nanowire system that reproducibly self-assembles in core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. The quantum dots form at the apex of a GaAs/AlGaAs interface, are highly stable, and can be positioned with nanometre precision relative to the nanowire centre. Unusually, their emission is blue-shifted relative to the lowest energy continuum states of the GaAs core. Large-scale electronic structure calculations show that the origin of the optical transitions lies in quantum confinement due to Al-rich barriers. By emitting in the red and self-assembling on silicon substrates, these quantum dots could therefore become building blocks for solid-state lighting devices and third-generation solar cells. PMID:23377293

  15. Theory Of Alkyl Terminated Silicon Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-08-19

    We have carried out a series of ab-initio calculations to investigate changes in the optical properties of Si quantum dots as a function of surface passivation. In particular, we have compared hydrogen passivated dots with those having alkyl groups at the surface. We find that, while on clusters with reconstructed surfaces a complete alkyl passivation is possible, steric repulsion prevents full passivation of Si dots with unreconstructed surfaces. In addition, our calculations show that steric repulsion may have a dominant effect in determining the surface structure, and eventually the stability of alkyl passivated clusters, with results dependent on the length of the carbon chain. Alkyl passivation weakly affects optical gaps of silicon quantum dots, while it substantially decreases ionization potentials and electron affinities and affect their excited state properties. On the basis of our results we propose that alkyl terminated quantum dots may be size selected taking advantage of the change in ionization potential as a function of the cluster size.

  16. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  17. Ground state energy of an exciton in a spherical quantum dot in the presence of an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan K, Luhluh Boda, Aalu; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-05-15

    The problem of an exciton trapped in a three dimensional Gaussian quantum dot is studied in the presence of an external magnetic field. A variational method is employed to obtain the ground state energy of the exciton as a function of the quantum dot size, the confinement strength and the magnetic field. It is also shown that the variation of the size of the exciton with the radius of the quantum dot.

  18. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J; Fay, Michael W; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn(2+) spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn-Mn interactions and minimization of Mn-nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn(2+) ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  19. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in

  20. Nanomaterials: Earthworms lit with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Richard D.; Cheong, Soshan

    2013-01-01

    Yeast, bacteria and fungi have been used to synthesize a variety of nanocrystals. Now, the metal detoxification process in the gut of an earthworm is exploited to produce biocompatible cadmium telluride quantum dots.

  1. Submonolayer Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Chang, Yia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for inserting submonolayer (SML) quantum dots (QDs) or SML QD stacks, instead of conventional Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) QDs, into the active region of intersubband photodetectors. A typical configuration would be InAs SML QDs embedded in thin layers of GaAs, surrounded by AlGaAs barriers. Here, the GaAs and the AlGaAs have nearly the same lattice constant, while InAs has a larger lattice constant. In QD infrared photodetector, the important quantization directions are in the plane perpendicular to the normal incidence radiation. In-plane quantization is what enables the absorption of normal incidence radiation. The height of the S-K QD controls the positions of the quantized energy levels, but is not critically important to the desired normal incidence absorption properties. The SML QD or SML QD stack configurations give more control of the structure grown, retains normal incidence absorption properties, and decreases the strain build-up to allow thicker active layers for higher quantum efficiency.

  2. Colloidal quantum dot materials for infrared optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinze, Ebuka S.; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Cheng, Yan; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are an attractive material for optoelectronic applications because they combine flexible, low-cost solution-phase synthesis and processing with the potential for novel functionality arising from their nanostructure. Specifically, the bandgap of films composed of arrays of CQDs can be tuned via the quantum confinement effect for tailored spectral utilization. PbS-based CQDs can be tuned throughout the near and mid-infrared wavelengths and are a promising materials system for photovoltaic devices that harvest non-visible solar radiation. The performance of CQD solar cells is currently limited by an absorption-extraction compromise, whereby photon absorption lengths in the near infrared spectral regime exceed minority carrier diffusion lengths in the bulk films. Several light trapping strategies for overcoming this compromise and increasing the efficiency of infrared energy harvesting will be reviewed. A thin-film interference technique for creating multi-colored and transparent solar cells will be presented, and a discussion of designing plasmonic nanomaterials based on earth-abundant materials for integration into CQD solar cells is developed. The results indicate that it should be possible to achieve high absorption and color-tunability in a scalable nanomaterials system.

  3. Synthesis, Characterization and Application Of PbS Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Sweety; Datta, Pranayee; Barua, Kishore Kr.; Karmakar, Sanjib

    2009-06-29

    Lead Chalcogenides (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) quantum dots (QDs) are ideal for fundamental studies of strongly quantum confined systems with possible technological applications. Tunable electronic transitions at near--infrared wavelengths can be obtained with these QDs. Applications of lead chalcogenides encompass quite a good number of important field viz. the fields of telecommunications, medical electronics, optoelectronics etc. Very recently, it has been proposed that 'memristor'(Memory resistor) can be realized in nanoscale systems with coupled ionic and electronic transports. The hystersis characteristics of 'memristor' are observed in many nanoscale electronic devices including semiconductor quantum dot devices. This paper reports synthesis of PbS QDs by chemical route. The fabricated samples are characterized by UV-Vis, XRD, SEM, TEM, EDS, etc. Observed characteristics confirm nano formation. I-V characteristics of the sample are studied for investigating their applications as 'memristor'.

  4. Valley Polarization in Size-Tunable Monolayer Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guohua; Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong; Lenferink, Erik J.; Stanev, Teodor K.; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    Controlling the size of semiconductor nanostructures allows manipulation of the optical and electrical properties of band carriers. We show that laterally-confined monolayer MoS2 quantum dots can be created through top-down nanopatterning of an atomically-thin two-dimensional semiconductor. Semiconductor-compatible nanofabrication processing allows for these low-dimensional materials to be integrated into complex systems that harness their controllable optical properties. Size-dependent exciton energy shifts and linewidths are observed, demonstrating the influence of quantum confinement. The patterned dots exhibit the same valley polarization characteristics as in a continuous MoS2 sheet, suggesting that monolayer semiconductor quantum dots could have potential for advancing quantum information applications. This work is supported by ISEN, the DOE-BES (DE-SC0012130), the NSF MRSEC program (DMR-1121262), and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, DOE-BES (DE-AC02-06CH11357). N.P.S. is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  5. Renormalization in Periodically Driven Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Eissing, A K; Meden, V; Kennes, D M

    2016-01-15

    We report on strong renormalization encountered in periodically driven interacting quantum dots in the nonadiabatic regime. Correlations between lead and dot electrons enhance or suppress the amplitude of driving depending on the sign of the interaction. Employing a newly developed flexible renormalization-group-based approach for periodic driving to an interacting resonant level we show analytically that the magnitude of this effect follows a power law. Our setup can act as a non-Markovian, single-parameter quantum pump. PMID:26824557

  6. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  7. Microstructural characterization of quantum dots with type-II band alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarney, W. L.; Little, J. W.; Svensson, S. P.

    2006-06-01

    We are investigating the structural, electrical, and infrared (IR) optical properties of a new material system comprising undoped self-assembled quantum dots having a type-II band alignment with the surrounding matrix. This materials system is fundamentally different from those using conventional type-I quantum dots that must be doped and that rely on intersubband transitions for IR photoresponse. Type-II quantum dots operate in the photovoltaic mode with IR photoresponse arising from electron-hole pair production involving three-dimensionally confined states in the dots and quantum well states in the matrix material. In this paper, we discuss the structural characterization of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown InSb quantum dots embedded in an In 0.53Ga 0.47As matrix lattice-matched to an InP substrate.

  8. Quantum Dots in Gated Nanowires and Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Hugh Olen Hill

    This thesis describes experiments on quantum dots made by locally gating one-dimensional quantum wires. The first experiment studies a double quantum dot device formed in a Ge/Si core/shell nanowire. In addition to measuring transport through the double dot, we detect changes in the charge occupancy of the double dot by capacitively coupling it to a third quantum dot on a separate nanowire using a floating gate. We demonstrate tunable tunnel coupling of the double dot and quantify the strength of the tunneling using the charge sensor. The second set of experiments concerns carbon nanotube double quantum dots. In the first nanotube experiment, spin-dependent transport through the double dot is compared in two sets of devices. The first set is made with carbon containing the natural abundance of 12C (99%) and 13C (1%), the second set with the 99% 13C and 1% 12C. In the devices with predominantly 13C, we find evidence in spin-dependent transport of the interaction between the electron spins and the 13C nuclear spins that was much stronger than expected and not present in the 12C devices. In the second nanotube experiment, pulsed gate experiments are used to measure the timescales of spin relaxation and dephasing in a two-electron double quantum dot. The relaxation time is longest at zero magnetic field and goes through a minimum at higher field, consistent with the spin-orbit-modified electronic spectrum of carbon nanotubes. We measure a short dephasing time consistent with the anomalously strong electron-nuclear interaction inferred from the first nanotube experiment.

  9. Strain-Induced Localized States Within the Matrix Continuum of Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dot-based infrared detectors often involve transitions from confined states of the dot to states above the minimum of the conduction band continuum of the matrix. We discuss the existence of two types of resonant states within this continuum in self-assembled dots: (i) virtual bound states, which characterize square wells even without strain and (ii) strain-induced localized states. The latter emerge due to the appearance of 'potential wings' near the dot, related to the curvature of the dots. While states (i) do couple to the continuum, states (ii) are sheltered by the wings, giving rise to sharp absorption peaks.

  10. Optimal control strategies for coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Esa; Putaja, Antti; Mardoukhi, Yousof

    2013-09-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are ideal candidates for quantum information applications in solid-state technology. However, advanced theoretical and experimental tools are required to coherently control, for example, the electronic charge in these systems. Here we demonstrate how quantum optimal control theory provides a powerful way to manipulate the electronic structure of coupled quantum dots with an extremely high fidelity. As alternative control fields we apply both laser pulses as well as electric gates, respectively. We focus on double and triple quantum dots containing a single electron or two electrons interacting via Coulomb repulsion. In the two-electron situation we also briefly demonstrate the challenges of timedependent density-functional theory within the adiabatic local-density approximation to produce comparable results with the numerically exact approach.

  11. Theory of Energy Level Tuning in Quantum Dots by Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Besides quantum confinement that provides control of the quantum dot (QD) band gap, surface ligands allow control of the absolute energy levels. We theoretically investigate energy level tuning in PbS QD by surfactant exchange. We perform direct calculations of real-size QD with various surfactants within the frame of the density functional theory and explicitly analyze the influence of the surfactants on the electronic properties of the QD. This work provides a hint for predictable control of the absolute energy levels and their fine tuning within 3 eV range by modification of big and small surfactants that simultaneously passivate the QD surface.

  12. Quantum phase transition in trigonal triple quantum dots: The case of quantum dots deviated from particle-hole symmetric point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Hyok; Kang, Chol-Jin; Kim, Yon-Il; Kim, Kwang-Hyon

    2015-05-01

    We consider a triple quantum dot system in a triangular geometry with one of the dots connected to metallic leads. We investigate quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point. The effect of on-site energy of dots on quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots is studied based on the analytical arguments and the numerical renormalization group method. The results show that the critical value of tunnel coupling between side dots decreases when the energy level of embedded dot rises up from the symmetric point to the Fermi level and the critical value increases when the energy levels of two side dots rise up. The study of the influence of on-site-energy changes on the quantum phase transitions in triple quantum dots has the importance for clarifying the mechanism of Kondo screening in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point.

  13. Multiple Exciton Generation in PbSe Quantum Dots and Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, M. C.; Semonin, O. E.; Nozik, A. J.; Midgett, A. G.; Luther, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple exciton generation in quantum dots (QDs) has been intensively studied as a way to enhance solar energy conversion by channeling the excess photon energy (energy greater than the bandgap) to produce multiple electron-hole pairs. Among other useful properties, quantum confinement can both increase Coulomb interactions that drive the MEG process and decrease the electron-phonon coupling that cools hot-excitons in bulk semiconductors. We have demonstrated that MEG in PbSe QDs is about two times as efficient at producing multiple electron-hole pairs than bulk PbSe. I will discuss our recent results investigating MEG in PbSe, PbS and PbSxSe1-x, which exhibits an interesting size-dependence of the MEG efficiency. Thin films of electronically coupled PbSe QDs have shown promise in simple photon-to-electron conversion architectures with power conversion efficiencies above 5%. We recently reported an enhancement in the photocurrent resulting from MEG in PbSe QD-based solar cells. We find that the external quantum efficiency (spectrally resolved ratio of collected charge carriers to incident photons) peaked at 114% in the best devices measured, with an internal quantum efficiency of 130%. These results demonstrate that MEG charge carriers can be collected in suitably designed QD solar cells. We compare our results to transient absorption measurements and find reasonable agreement.

  14. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhijun; Gong, Xiwen; Comin, Riccardo; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Yassitepe, Emre; Buin, Andrei; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-07-16

    Heteroepitaxy-atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate-is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned 'dots-in-a-matrix' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics. PMID:26178963

  15. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhijun; Gong, Xiwen; Comin, Riccardo; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Yassitepe, Emre; Buin, Andrei; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-07-01

    Heteroepitaxy--atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate--is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned `dots-in-a-matrix' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.

  16. Luminescent Quantum Dots as Ultrasensitive Biological Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2000-03-01

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots have been covalently coupled to biological molecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. This new class of luminescent labels is considerably brighter and more resistant againt photobleaching in comparison with organic dyes. Quantum dots labeled with the protein transferrin undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were conjugated to immunomolecules recognize specific antibodies or antigens. In addition, we show that DNA functionalized quantum dots can be used to target specific genes by hybridization. We expect that quantum dot bioconjugates will have a broad range of biological applications, such as ligand-receptor interactions, real-time monitoring of molecular trafficking inside living cells, multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), high-sensitivity detection in miniaturized devices (e.g., DNA chips), and fluorescent tagging of combinatorial chemical libraries. A potential clinical application is the use of quantum dots for ultrasensitive viral RNA detection, in which as low as 100 copies of hepatitis C and HIV viruses per ml blood should be detected.

  17. Spectroscopy characterization and quantum yield determination of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ortiz, S. N.; Mejía Ospino, E.; Cabanzo, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show the characterization of two kinds of quantum dots: hydrophilic and hydrophobic, with core and core/shell respectively, using spectroscopy techniques such as UV-Vis, fluorescence and Raman. We determined the quantum yield in the quantum dots using the quinine sulphate as standard. This salt is commonly used because of its quantum yield (56%) and stability. For the CdTe excitation, we used a wavelength of 549nm and for the CdSe/ZnS excitation a wavelength of 527nm. The results show that CdSe/ZnS (49%) has better fluorescence, better quantum dots, and confirm the fluorescence result. The quantum dots have shown a good fluorescence performance, so this property will be used to replace dyes, with the advantage that quantum dots are less toxic than some dyes like the rhodamine. In addition, in this work we show different techniques to find the quantum dots emission: fluorescence spectrum, synchronous spectrum and Raman spectrum.

  18. (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bouravleuv, Alexei; Sapega, Victor; Nevedomskii, Vladimir; Khrebtov, Artem; Samsonenko, Yuriy; Cirlin, George

    2014-12-08

    (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dots structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a Mn selective doping of the central parts of quantum dots. The study of the structural and magneto-optical properties of the samples with three and five layers of (In,Mn)As quantum dots has shown that during the quantum dots assembly, the out-diffusion of Mn from the layers with (In,Mn)As quantum dots can occur resulting in the formation of the extended defects. To produce a high quality structures using the elaborated technique of selective doping, the number of (In,Mn)As quantum dot layers should not exceed three.

  19. Quantum optics with quantum dots. Towards semiconductor sources of quantum light for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveratos, Alexios; Abram, Izo; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    For the past fifteen years, single semiconductor quantum dots, often referred to as solid-state artificial atoms, have been at the forefront of various research direction lines for experimental quantum information science, in particular in the development of practical sources of quantum states of light. Here we review the research to date, on the tailoring of the emission properties from single quantum dots producing single photons, indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon pairs. Finally, the progress and future prospects for applications of single dots in quantum information processing is considered.

  20. Optical properties of charged semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Praket P.

    The effect of n-type doping on the luminescence properties of II-VI quantum dots is studied. The addition of two shells of CdS on CdSe quantum dots prevents the creation of surface traps and makes the system stable under reducing environment. The injection of electrons into films of quantum dots leads to lower photoluminescence (PL) efficiency, with the extent of quenching dependent on both the number and the quantum states of the spectator charges in the nanocrystal. It is found that a 1Pe electron is an eightfold better PL quencher than the 1Se electron. Reduced threshold for stimulated emission is also observed in doped CdSe/CdS films. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements are used to extract the recombination rates of a charged exciton, called trion. It is observed that the negative trion has a radiative rate ˜2.2 +/- 0.4x faster than a neutral exciton, while its non-radiative recombination rate is slower than the biexciton non-radiative recombination rate by a factor of 7.5 +/- 1.7. The knowledge of the recombination rates of the trion enables us to calculate the quantum yield of a negative trion to be ˜10% for the nanocrystals investigated in our work. This is larger than the off state quantum yield from a single quantum dot photoluminescence trajectory and eliminates the formation of negative trion as the possible reason for the PL blinking of single quantum dots. Single quantum dot electrochemistry has also been achieved. It is shown that by varying the Fermi level of the system electrons can be reversibly injected into and extracted out of single CdSe/CdS and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles to modulate the photoluminescence.

  1. Optically controlled spins in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia

    2010-03-01

    Spins in charged semiconductor quantum dots are currently generating much interest, both from a fundamental physics standpoint, as well as for their potential technological relevance. Being naturally a two-level quantum system, each of these spins can encode a bit of quantum information. Optically controlled spins in quantum dots possess several desirable properties: their spin coherence times are long, they allow for all-optical manipulation---which translates into fast logic gates---and their coupling to photons offers a straightforward route to exchange of quantum information between spatially separated sites. Designing the laser fields to achieve the unprecedented amount of control required for quantum information tasks is a challenging goal, towards which there has been recent progress. Special properties of hyperbolic secant optical pulses enabled the design of single qubit rotations, initially developed about the growth axis z [1], and later about an arbitrary direction [2]. Recently we demonstrated our theoretical proposal [1] in an ensemble of InAs/GaAs quantum dots by implementing ultrafast rotations about the z axis by an arbitrary angle [3], with the angle of rotation as a function of the optical detuning in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction. We also developed two-qubit conditional control in a quantum dot `molecule' using the electron-hole exchange interaction [4]. In addition to its importance in quantum dot-based quantum computation, our two-qubit gate can also play an important role in photonic cluster state generation for measurement-based quantum computing [5]. [1] S. E. Economou, L. J. Sham, Y. Wu, D. S. Steel, Phys. Rev. 74, 205415 (2006) [2] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 217401 (2007) [3] A. Greilich, S. E. Economou et al, Nature Phys. 5, 262 (2009) [4] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. B, 78, 115306 (2008) [5] S. E. Economou, N. H. Lindner, and T. Rudolph, in preparation

  2. Transparent conducting films of CdSe(ZnS) core(shell) quantum dot xerogels.

    PubMed

    Korala, Lasantha; Li, Li; Brock, Stephanie L

    2012-09-01

    A method of fabricating sol-gel quantum dot (QD) films is demonstrated, and their optical, structural and electrical properties are evaluated. The CdSe(ZnS) xerogel films remain quantum confined, yet are highly conductive (10(-3) S cm(-1)). This approach provides a pathway for the exploitation of QD gels in optoelectronic applications. PMID:22801641

  3. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  4. Origins and optimization of entanglement in plasmonically coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Matthew; Larson, Jeffrey; Min, Misun; Wild, Stefan M.; Pelton, Matthew; Gray, Stephen K.

    2016-08-01

    A system of two or more quantum dots interacting with a dissipative plasmonic nanostructure is investigated in detail by using a cavity quantum electrodynamics approach with a model Hamiltonian. We focus on determining and understanding system configurations that generate multiple bipartite quantum entanglements between the occupation states of the quantum dots. These configurations include allowing for the quantum dots to be asymmetrically coupled to the plasmonic system. Analytical solution of a simplified limit for an arbitrary number of quantum dots and numerical simulations and optimization for the two- and three-dot cases are used to develop guidelines for maximizing the bipartite entanglements. For any number of quantum dots, we show that through simple starting states and parameter guidelines, one quantum dot can be made to share a strong amount of bipartite entanglement with all other quantum dots in the system, while entangling all other pairs to a lesser degree.

  5. Spin-orbit induced two-electron spin relaxation in double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhani, Massoud; Hu, Xuedong

    2011-03-01

    We study the spin decay of two electrons confined in a double quantum dots via the spin-orbit interaction and acoustic phonons. We have obtained a generic form for the spin Hamiltonian for two electrons confined in (elliptic) harmonic potentials in doubles dots and in the presence of an arbitrary applied magnetic field. Our focus is on the interdot bias regime where singlet-triplet splitting is small, in contrast to the spin-blockade regime. Our results clarify the spin-orbit mediated two-spin relaxation in lateral/nanowire quantum dots, particularly when the confining potentials are different in each dot. We thank support by NSA/LPS thorugh ARO.

  6. Dot-in-Well Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David; Hill, cory; Liu, John; Mumolo, Jason; Chang, Yia Chung

    2008-01-01

    Dot-in-well (DWELL) quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) [DWELL-QDIPs] are subjects of research as potentially superior alternatives to prior QDIPs. Heretofore, there has not existed a reliable method for fabricating quantum dots (QDs) having precise, repeatable dimensions. This lack has constituted an obstacle to the development of uniform, high-performance, wavelength-tailorable QDIPs and of focal-plane arrays (FPAs) of such QDIPs. However, techniques for fabricating quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) having multiple-quantum- well (MQW) structures are now well established. In the present research on DWELL-QDIPs, the arts of fabrication of QDs and QWIPs are combined with a view toward overcoming the deficiencies of prior QDIPs. The longer-term goal is to develop focal-plane arrays of radiationhard, highly uniform arrays of QDIPs that would exhibit high performance at wavelengths from 8 to 15 m when operated at temperatures between 150 and 200 K. Increasing quantum efficiency is the key to the development of competitive QDIP-based FPAs. Quantum efficiency can be increased by increasing the density of QDs and by enhancing infrared absorption in QD-containing material. QDIPs demonstrated thus far have consisted, variously, of InAs islands on GaAs or InAs islands in InGaAs/GaAs wells. These QDIPs have exhibited low quantum efficiencies because the numbers of QD layers (and, hence, the areal densities of QDs) have been small typically five layers in each QDIP. The number of QD layers in such a device must be thus limited to prevent the aggregation of strain in the InAs/InGaAs/GaAs non-lattice- matched material system. The approach being followed in the DWELL-QDIP research is to embed In- GaAs QDs in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum- well (MQW) structures (see figure). This material system can accommodate a large number of QD layers without excessive lattice-mismatch strain and the associated degradation of photodetection properties. Hence, this material

  7. Optical properties of colloidal aqueous synthesized 3 mercaptopropionic acid stabilized CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumanth Kumar, D.; Jai Kumar, B.; Mahesh H., M.

    2016-05-01

    We have explored an easiest and simplest aqueous route to synthesize bright green luminescent CdS QDs using 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a stabilizer in air ambient for solar cell applications. The CdS quantum dots showed a strong quantum confinement effect with good stability, size and excellent photoluminescence. MPA Capping on CdS QDs was confirmed through FTIR. The Optical absorption spectrum revealed the CdS quantum dots are highly transparent in the visible region with absorption peak at 380 nm, confirming the quantum confinement. Photoluminescence showed an emission peak at 525 nm wavelength. The optical band gap energy was found to be 3.19 eV and CdS quantum dots radius calculated using Brus equation is 1.5 nm. The results are presented and discussed in detail.

  8. Magnetic quantum dots and rings in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, C. A.; Portnoi, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the motion of electrons confined to a two-dimensional plane with an externally applied perpendicular inhomogeneous magnetic field, both with and without a Coulomb potential. We find that as long as the magnetic field is slowly decaying, bound states in magnetic quantum dots are indeed possible. Several example cases of such magnetic quantum dots are considered in which one can find the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in closed form, including two hitherto unknown quasi-exactly-solvable models treated with confluent and biconfluent Heun polynomials. It is shown how a modulation of the strength of the magnetic field can exclude magnetic vortexlike states, rotating with a certain angular momenta and possessing a definite spin orientation, from forming. This indicates one may induce localization-delocalization transitions and suggests a mechanism for spin separation.

  9. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Kędzierska, Barbara; Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Wach, Elżbieta; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M.

    2015-07-01

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot-ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes.

  10. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  11. Electron properties in directed self-assembly Ge/SiC/Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongyue

    Artificially ordered semiconductor quantum dot (QD) patterns may be used to implement functionalities such as spintronic bandgap systems, quantum simulation and quantum computing, by manipulating the interaction between confined carriers via direct exchange coupling. In this dissertation, magnetotransport measurements have been conducted to investigate the electronic orbital and spin states of directed self-assembly single- and few-Ge/SiC/Si QD devices, fabricated by a directed self-assembly QD growth technique developed by our group. Diamagnetic and Zeeman energy shifts of electrons confined around the QD have been observed from the magnetotransport experiments. A triple-barrier resonant tunneling model has been proposed to describe the electron and spin transport. The strength of the Coulomb interaction between electrons confined at neighboring QDs has been observed dependent on the dot separation, and represents an important parameter for fabricating QD-based molecules and artificial arrays, which may be implemented as building blocks for future quantum simulation and quantum computing architectures.

  12. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  13. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-19

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells. PMID:20975214

  14. Excitonic optical properties of wurtzite ZnS quantum dots under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zaiping; Garoufalis, Christos S.; Baskoutas, Sotirios; Bester, Gabriel

    2015-03-21

    By means of atomistic empirical pseudopotentials combined with a configuration interaction approach, we have studied the optical properties of wurtzite ZnS quantum dots in the presence of strong quantum confinement effects as a function of pressure. We find the pressure coefficients of quantum dots to be highly size-dependent and reduced by as much as 23% in comparison to the bulk value of 63 meV/GPa obtained from density functional theory calculations. The many-body excitonic effects on the quantum dot pressure coefficients are found to be marginal. The absolute gap deformation potential of quantum dots originates mainly from the energy change of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital state. Finally, we find that the exciton spin-splitting increases nearly linearly as a function of applied pressure.

  15. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  16. Quantum dot spin coherence governed by a strained nuclear environment.

    PubMed

    Stockill, R; Le Gall, C; Matthiesen, C; Huthmacher, L; Clarke, E; Hugues, M; Atatüre, M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a confined electron and the nuclei of an optically active quantum dot provides a uniquely rich manifestation of the central spin problem. Coherent qubit control combines with an ultrafast spin-photon interface to make these confined spins attractive candidates for quantum optical networks. Reaching the full potential of spin coherence has been hindered by the lack of knowledge of the key irreversible environment dynamics. Through all-optical Hahn echo decoupling we now recover the intrinsic coherence time set by the interaction with the inhomogeneously strained nuclear bath. The high-frequency nuclear dynamics are directly imprinted on the electron spin coherence, resulting in a dramatic jump of coherence times from few tens of nanoseconds to the microsecond regime between 2 and 3 T magnetic field and an exponential decay of coherence at high fields. These results reveal spin coherence can be improved by applying large magnetic fields and reducing strain inhomogeneity. PMID:27615704

  17. Biexciton induced refractive index changes in a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of linear and third order nonlinear refractive index changes in a optically driven disk-like GaN quantum dot. In our numerical calculations, we consider the three level system containing biexciton, exciton, and ground states and use the compact density matrix formalism and iterative method to obtain refractive index changes. Variational method through effective mass approximation are employed to calculate the ground state energy of biexciton and exciton states. The evolution of refractive index changes around one, two and three photon resonance is investigated and discussed for different quantum dot sizes and light intensities. Size-dependent three-photon nonlinear refractive index change versus incident photon energy compared to that of two-photon is obtained and analyzed. As main result, we found that around resonance frequency at exciton-biexciton transition the quantum confinement has great influence on the linear change in refractive index so that for very large quantum dots, it decreases. Moreover, it was found that third order refractive index changes for three photon process is strongly dependent on QD size and light intensity. Our study reveals that considering our simple model leads to results which are in good agreement with other rare numerical results. Comparison with experimental results has been done.

  18. Mapping Image Potential States on Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craes, Fabian; Runte, Sven; Klinkhammer, Jürgen; Kralj, Marko; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    Free-electron-like image potential states are observed in scanning tunneling spectroscopy on graphene quantum dots on Ir(111) acting as potential wells. The spectrum strongly depends on the size of the nanostructure as well as on the spatial position on top, indicating lateral confinement. Analysis of the substructure of the first state by the spatial mapping of the constant energy local density of states reveals characteristic patterns of confined states. The most pronounced state is not the ground state, but an excited state with a favorable combination of the local density of states and parallel momentum transfer in the tunneling process. Chemical gating tunes the confining potential by changing the local work function. Our experimental determination of this work function allows us to deduce the associated shift of the Dirac point.

  19. Mapping image potential states on graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Craes, Fabian; Runte, Sven; Klinkhammer, Jürgen; Kralj, Marko; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    Free-electron-like image potential states are observed in scanning tunneling spectroscopy on graphene quantum dots on Ir(111) acting as potential wells. The spectrum strongly depends on the size of the nanostructure as well as on the spatial position on top, indicating lateral confinement. Analysis of the substructure of the first state by the spatial mapping of the constant energy local density of states reveals characteristic patterns of confined states. The most pronounced state is not the ground state, but an excited state with a favorable combination of the local density of states and parallel momentum transfer in the tunneling process. Chemical gating tunes the confining potential by changing the local work function. Our experimental determination of this work function allows us to deduce the associated shift of the Dirac point. PMID:23952430

  20. Electrical control of quantum dot spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward Alexander

    This thesis presents experiments exploring the interactions of electron spins with electric fields in devices of up to four quantum dots. These experiments are particularly motivated by the prospect of using electric fields to control spin qubits. A novel hyperfine effect on a single spin in a quantum dot is presented in Chapter 2. Fluctuations of the nuclear polarization allow single-spin resonance to be driven by an oscillating electric field. Spin resonance spectroscopy revealed a nuclear polarization built up inside the quantum dot device by driving the resonance. The evolution of two coupled spins is controlled by the combination of hyperfine interaction, which tends to cause spin dephasing, and exchange, which tends to prevent it. In Chapter 3, dephasing is studied in a device with tunable exchange, probing the crossover between exchange-dominated and hyperfine-dominated regimes. In agreement with theoretical predictions, oscillations of the spin conversion probability and saturation of dephasing are observed. Chapter 4 deals with a three-dot device, suggested as a potential qubit controlled entirely by exchange. Preparation and readout of the qubit state are demonstrated, together with one out of two coherent exchange operations needed for arbitrary manipulations. A new readout technique allowing rapid device measurement is described. In Chapter 5, an attempt to make a two-qubit gate using a four-dot device is presented. Although spin qubit operation has not yet been possible, the electrostatic interaction between pairs of dots was measured to be sufficient in principle for coherent qubit coupling.

  1. Nonvolatile Quantum Dot Gate Memory (NVQDM): Tunneling Rate from Quantum Well Channel to Quantum Dot Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed; Heller, Evan; Bansal, Rajeev; Jain, Faquir

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we compute the tunneling of electrons in a nonvolatile quantum dot memory (NVQDM) cell during the WRITE operation. The transition rate of electrons from a quantum well channel to the quantum dots forming the floating gate is calculated using a recently reported method by Chuang et al.[1]. Tunneling current is computed based on transport of electrons from the channel to the floating quantum dots. The maximum number of electrons on a dot is calculated using surface electric field and break down voltage of the tunneling dielectric material. Comparison of tunneling for silicon oxide and high-k dielectric gate insulators is also described. Capacitance-Voltage characteristics of a NVQDM device are calculated by solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. In addition, the READ operation of the memory has been investigated analytically. Results for 70 nm channel length Si NVQDMs are presented. Threshold voltage is calculated including the effect of the charge on nanocrystal quantum dots. Current-voltage characteristics are obtained using BSIM3v3 model [2-3]. This work is supported by Office of Navel Research (N00014210883, Dr. D. Purdy, Program Monitor), Connecticut Innovations Inc./TranSwitch (CII # 00Y17), and National Science Foundation (CCR-0210428) grants. [1] S. L. Chuang and N. Holonyak, Appl. Phys. Lett., 80, pp. 1270, 2002. [2] Y. Chen et. al., BSIM3v3 Manual, Elect. Eng. and Comp. Dept., U. California, Berkeley, CA, 1996. [3] W. Liu, MOSFET Models for SPICE Simulation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001.

  2. Controlled Population Transfer in a Double Quantum Dot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoulakis, Antonios; Terzis, Andreas F.; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2007-12-26

    We study the potential for controlled population transfer between the ground states of two anharmonic coupled quantum dots. We propose a method based on the interaction of the quantum dot structure with external electromagnetic fields. The interaction of the quantum dot system with the electromagnetic fields is studied with the use of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present numerical results for an asymmetric quantum dot structure.

  3. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G; Kiselev, Andrey A; Fong, Bryan H; Holabird, Kevin S; Hazard, Thomas M; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E; Ross, Richard S; Gyure, Mark F; Hunter, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  4. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G.; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Fong, Bryan H.; Holabird, Kevin S.; Hazard, Thomas M.; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W.; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E.; Ross, Richard S.; Gyure, Mark F.; Hunter, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  5. Dirac electrons in graphene-based quantum wires and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Stauber, T.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we analyse the electronic properties of Dirac electrons in finite-size ribbons and in circular and hexagonal quantum dots. We show that due to the formation of sub-bands in the ribbons it is possible to spatially localize some of the electronic modes using a p-n-p junction. We also show that scattering of confined Dirac electrons in a narrow channel by an infinitely massive wall induces mode mixing, giving a qualitative reason for the fact that an analytical solution to the spectrum of Dirac electrons confined in a square box has not yet been found. A first attempt to solve this problem is presented. We find that only the trivial case k = 0 has a solution that does not require the existence of evanescent modes. We also study the spectrum of quantum dots of graphene in a perpendicular magnetic field. This problem is studied in the Dirac approximation, and its solution requires a numerical method whose details are given. The formation of Landau levels in the dot is discussed. The inclusion of the Coulomb interaction among the electrons is considered at the self-consistent Hartree level, taking into account the interaction with an image charge density necessary to keep the back-gate electrode at zero potential. The effect of a radial confining potential is discussed. The density of states of circular and hexagonal quantum dots, described by the full tight-binding model, is studied using the Lanczos algorithm. This is necessary to access the detailed shape of the density of states close to the Dirac point when one studies large systems. Our study reveals that zero-energy edge states are also present in graphene quantum dots. Our results are relevant for experimental research in graphene nanostructures. The style of writing is pedagogical, in the hope that newcomers to the subject will find this paper a good starting point for their research.

  6. Optical properties of dielectric thin films including quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, F.; Chen, Y. J.; Lee, C. C.; Escoubas, L.; Simon, J. J.; Torchio, P.; Le Rouzo, J.; Vedraine, S.; Derbal-Habak, Hassina; Ackermann, Jorg; Shupyk, Ivan; Didane, Yahia

    2010-08-01

    Depending on the minimum size of their micro/nano structure, thin films can exhibit very different behaviors and optical properties. From optical waveguides down to artificial anisotropy, through diffractive optics and photonic crystals, the application changes when decreasing the minimum feature size. Rigorous electromagnetic theory can be used to model most of the components but when the size is of a few nanometers, quantum theory has also to be used. These materials including quantum structures are of particular interest for other applications, in particular for solar cells, because of their luminescent and electronic properties. We show that the properties of electrons in multiple quantum wells can be easily modeled with a formalism similar to that used for multilayer waveguides. The effects of different parameters, in particular coupling between wells and well thickness dispersion, on possible discrete energy levels or energy band of electrons and on electron wave functions is given. When such quantum confinement appears the spectral absorption and the extinction coefficient dispersion with wavelength is modified. The dispersion of the real part of the refractive index can then be deduced from the Kramers- Krönig relations. Associated with homogenization theory this approach gives a new model of refractive index for thin films including quantum dots. Absorption spectra of samples composed of ZnO quantum dots in PMMA layers are in preparation are given.

  7. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry.

  8. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-20

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry. PMID:24132041

  9. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  10. Kondo effect in triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, R.; Bonča, J.; Ramšak, A.; Rejec, T.

    2006-04-01

    Numerical analysis of the simplest odd-numbered system of coupled quantum dots reveals an interplay between magnetic ordering, charge fluctuations, and the tendency of itinerant electrons in the leads to screen magnetic moments. The transition from local-moment to molecular-orbital behavior is visible in the evolution of correlation functions as the interdot coupling is increased. Resulting Kondo phases are presented in a phase diagram which can be sampled by measuring the zero-bias conductance. We discuss the origin of the even-odd effects by comparing with the double quantum dot.

  11. Ambipolar quantum dots in intrinsic silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, A. C. Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Podd, G.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2014-10-13

    We electrically measure intrinsic silicon quantum dots with electrostatically defined tunnel barriers. The presence of both p- and n-type ohmic contacts enables the accumulation of either electrons or holes. Thus, we are able to study both transport regimes within the same device. We investigate the effect of the tunnel barriers and the electrostatically defined quantum dots. There is greater localisation of charge states under the tunnel barriers in the case of hole conduction, leading to higher charge noise in the p-type regime.

  12. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  13. Quantum Optical Signature of Plasmonically Coupled Nanocrystal Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Karan, Niladri S; Nguyen, Hue Minh; Mangum, Benjamin D; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Sheehan, Chris J; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Htoon, Han

    2015-10-01

    Small clusters of two to three silica-coated nanocrystals coupled to plasmonic gap-bar antennas can exhibit photon antibunching, a characteristic of single quantum emitters. Through a detailed analysis of their photoluminescence emissions characteristics, it is shown that the observed photon antibunching is the evidence of coupled quantum dot formation resulting from the plasmonic enhancement of dipole-dipole interaction. PMID:26140499

  14. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  15. Mid-infrared quantum dot emitters utilizing planar photonic crystal technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Passmore, Brandon Scott; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-09-01

    The three-dimensional confinement inherent in InAs self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) yields vastly different optical properties compared to one-dimensionally confined quantum well systems. Intersubband transitions in quantum dots can emit light normal to the growth surface, whereas transitions in quantum wells emit only parallel to the surface. This is a key difference that can be exploited to create a variety of quantum dot devices that have no quantum well analog. Two significant problems limit the utilization of the beneficial features of SAQDs as mid-infrared emitters. One is the lack of understanding concerning how to electrically inject carriers into electronic states that allow optical transitions to occur efficiently. Engineering of an injector stage leading into the dot can provide current injection into an upper dot state; however, to increase the likelihood of an optical transition, the lower dot states must be emptied faster than upper states are occupied. The second issue is that SAQDs have significant inhomogeneous broadening due to the random size distribution. While this may not be a problem in the long term, this issue can be circumvented by using planar photonic crystal or plasmonic approaches to provide wavelength selectivity or other useful functionality.

  16. Size dependence in tunneling spectra of PbSe quantum-dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Ou, Y C; Cheng, S F; Jian, W B

    2009-07-15

    Interdot Coulomb interactions and collective Coulomb blockade were theoretically argued to be a newly important topic, and experimentally identified in semiconductor quantum dots, formed in the gate confined two-dimensional electron gas system. Developments of cluster science and colloidal synthesis accelerated the studies of electron transport in colloidal nanocrystal or quantum-dot solids. To study the interdot coupling, various sizes of two-dimensional arrays of colloidal PbSe quantum dots are self-assembled on flat gold surfaces for scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements at both room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The tip-to-array, array-to-substrate, and interdot capacitances are evaluated and the tunneling spectra of quantum-dot arrays are analyzed by the theory of collective Coulomb blockade. The current-voltage of PbSe quantum-dot arrays conforms properly to a scaling power law function. In this study, the dependence of tunneling spectra on the sizes (numbers of quantum dots) of arrays is reported and the capacitive coupling between quantum dots in the arrays is explored. PMID:19546498

  17. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-27

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research. PMID:27215815

  18. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research.

  19. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Takis

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics techniques have turned out to be instrumental to probe or manipulate the electronic states of nanoscale circuits. Recently, cavity QED architectures have been extended to quantum dot circuits. These circuits are appealing since other degrees of freedom than the traditional ones (e.g. those of superconducting circuits) can be investigated. I will show how one can use carbon nanotube based quantum dots in that context. In particular, I will focus on the coherent coupling of a single spin or non-local Cooper pairs to cavity photons. Quantum dots also exhibit a wide variety of many body phenomena. The cQED architecture could also be instrumental for understanding them. One of the most paradigmatic phenomenon is the Kondo effect which is at the heart of many electron correlation effects. I will show that a cQED architecture has allowed us to observe the decoupling of spin and charge excitations in a Kondo system.

  20. Formation and ordering of epitaxial quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Paola; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Bremner, Stephen P.; Ritchie, David A.

    2008-10-01

    Single quantum dots (QDs) have great potential as building blocks for quantum information processing devices. However, one of the major difficulties in the fabrication of such devices is the placement of a single dot at a pre-determined position in the device structure, for example, in the centre of a photonic cavity. In this article we review some recent investigations in the site-controlled growth of InAs QDs on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. The method we use is ex-situ patterning of the GaAs substrate by electron beam lithography and conventional wet or dry etching techniques to form shallow pits in the surface which then determine the nucleation site of an InAs dot. This method is easily scalable and can be incorporated with marker structures to enable simple post-growth lithographic alignment of devices to each site-controlled dot. We demonstrate good site-control for arrays with up to 10 micron spacing between patterned sites, with no dots nucleating between the sites. We discuss the mechanism and the effect of pattern size, InAs deposition amount and growth conditions on this site-control method. Finally we discuss the photoluminescence from these dots and highlight the remaining challenges for this technique. To cite this article: P. Atkinson et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  1. Low-energy trions in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.-C.; Lue, N.-Y.; Chen, Y.-C.; Wu, G. Y.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate, within the envelope function approximation, the low-energy states of trions in graphene quantum dots (QDs). The presence of valley pseudospin in graphene as an electron degree of freedom apart from spin adds convolution to the interplay between exchange symmetry and the electron-electron interaction in the trion, leading to new states of trions as well as a low-energy trion spectrum different from those in semiconductors. Due to the involvement of valley pseudospin, it is found that the low-energy spectrum is nearly degenerate and consists of states all characterized by having an antisymmetric (pseudospin) ⊗ (spin) component in the wave function, with the spin (pseudospin) part being either singlet (triplet) or triplet (singlet), as opposed to the spectrum in a semiconductor whose ground state is known to be nondegenerate and always a spin singlet in the case of X- trions. We investigate trions in the various regimes determined by the competition between quantum confinement and electron-electron interaction, both analytically and numerically. The numerical work is performed within a variational method accounting for electron mass discontinuity across the QD edge. The result for electron-hole correlation in the trion is presented. Effects of varying quantum dot size and confinement potential strength on the trion binding energy are discussed. The "relativistic effect" on the trion due to the unique relativistic type electron energy dispersion in graphene is also examined.

  2. Silicon based quantum dot hybrid qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun

    2015-03-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of an electron constitute natural bases for constructing quantum two level systems, or qubits, in semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dot charge qubit offers a simple architecture and high-speed operation, but generally suffers from fast dephasing due to strong coupling of the environment to the electron's charge. On the other hand, quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, but their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications. This talk will present experimental progress of a `hybrid' qubit, formed by three electrons in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, which combines desirable characteristics (speed and coherence) in the past found separately in qubits based on either charge or spin degrees of freedom. Using resonant microwaves, we first discuss qubit operations near the `sweet spot' for charge qubit operation. Along with fast (>GHz) manipulation rates for any rotation axis on the Bloch sphere, we implement two independent tomographic characterization schemes in the charge qubit regime: traditional quantum process tomography (QPT) and gate set tomography (GST). We also present resonant qubit operations of the hybrid qubit performed on the same device, DC pulsed gate operations of which were recently demonstrated. We demonstrate three-axis control and the implementation of dynamic decoupling pulse sequences. Performing QPT on the hybrid qubit, we show that AC gating yields π rotation process fidelities higher than 93% for X-axis and 96% for Z-axis rotations, which demonstrates efficient quantum control of semiconductor qubits using resonant microwaves. We discuss a path forward for achieving fidelities better than the threshold for quantum error correction using surface codes. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028), and by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  3. Pulsed-laser micropatterned quantum-dot array for white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Han, Hau-Vei; Li, Jie-Ru; Lee, Po-Tsung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Hong, Ming-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel photoluminescent quantum dots device with laser-processed microscale patterns has been demonstrated to be used as a white light emitting source. The pulsed laser ablation technique was employed to directly fabricate microscale square holes with nano-ripple structures onto the sapphire substrate of a flip-chip blue light-emitting diode, confining sprayed quantum dots into well-defined areas and eliminating the coffee ring effect. The electroluminescence characterizations showed that the white light emission from the developed photoluminescent quantum-dot light-emitting diode exhibits stable emission at different driving currents. With a flexibility of controlling the quantum dots proportions in the patterned square holes, our developed white-light emitting source not only can be employed in the display applications with color triangle enlarged by 47% compared with the NTSC standard, but also provide the great potential in future lighting industry with the correlated color temperature continuously changed in a wide range.

  4. Sized controlled synthesis, purification, and cell studies with silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Shiohara, Amane; Prabakar, Sujay; Faramus, Angelique; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Lai, Ping-Shan; Northcote, Peter T; Tilley, Richard D

    2011-08-01

    This article describes the size control synthesis of silicon quantum dots with simple microemulsion techniques. The silicon nanocrystals are small enough to be in the strong confinement regime and photoluminesce in the blue region of the visible spectrum and the emission can be tuned by changing the nanocrystal size. The silicon quantum dots were capped with allylamine either a platinum catalyst or UV-radiation. An extensive purification protocol is reported and assessed using (1)H NMR to produce ultra pure silicon quantum dots suitable for biological studies. The highly pure quantum dots were used in cellular uptake experiments and monitored using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the amine terminated silicon nanocrystals accumulated in lysosome but not in nuclei and could be used as bio-markers to monitor cancer cells over long timescales. PMID:21727983

  5. Structural Origin of Enhanced Luminescence Efficiency of Antimony Irradiated InAs Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, AM; Ben, Teresa; Sales, David; Sanchez, AM; Ripalda, JM; Taboada, Alfonso G; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J; Molina, S. I.

    2011-01-01

    We report that Sb irradiation combined with the presence of a GaAs intermediate layer previous to the deposition of a GaSb layer over InAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy improves the crystalline quality of these nanostructures. Moreover, this approach to develop III-V-Sb nanostructures causes the formation of quantum dots buried by a confining GaSb layer and, in this way, achieving a type II band alignment. Both phenomena, studied by Conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM) techniques are keys to achieve the best room temperature photoluminescence results from InAs/GaAs (001) quantum dots. The Sb flux contributes to the preservation of the quantum dots size and at the same time reduces In diffusion from the wetting layer.

  6. Reconfigurable visible quantum dot microlasers integrated on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabani, Simin; Hunt, Heather K.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2012-02-01

    Developing on-chip, dynamically reconfigurable visible lasers that can be integrated with additional optical and electronic components will enable adaptive optical components. In the present work, we demonstrate a reconfigurable quantum dot laser based on an integrated silica ultra high-Q microcavity. By attaching the quantum dot using a reversible, non-destructive bioconjugation process, the ability to remove and replace it with an alternative quantum dot without damaging the underlying microcavity device has been demonstrated. As a result of the absorption/emission characteristics of quantum dots, the same laser source can be used to excite quantum dots with distinct emission wavelengths.

  7. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Neetu Kapoor, Avinashi; Kumar, Vinod; Mehra, R. M.

    2014-04-24

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5.

  8. Electron transport and dephasing in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huibers, Andrew Gerrit A.

    At low temperatures, electrons in semiconductors can be phase coherent over distances exceeding tens of microns and are sufficiently monochromatic that a variety of interesting quantum interference phenomena can be observed and manipulated. This work discusses electron transport measurements through cavities (quantum dots) formed by laterally confining electrons in the two-dimensional sub-band of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction. Metal gates fabricated using e-beam lithography enable fine control of the cavity shape as well as the leads which connect the dot cavity to source and drain reservoirs. Quantum dots can be modeled by treating the devices as chaotic scatterers. Predictions of this theoretical description are found to be in good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of full conductance distributions at different temperatures. Weak localization, the suppression of conductance due to phase-coherent backscattering at zero magnetic field, is used to measure dephasing times in the system. Mechanisms responsible for dephasing, including electron-electron scattering and Nyquist phase relaxation, are investigated by studying the loss of phase coherence as a function of temperature. Coupling of external microwave fields to the device is also studied to shed light on the unexpected saturation of dephasing that is observed below an electron temperature of 100 mK. The effect of external fields in the present experiment is explained in terms of Joule heating from an ac bias.

  9. New small quantum dots for neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In "New Small Quantum Dots for Neuroscience," Paul Selvin (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) notes how the details of synapsis activity in the brain involves chemical receptors that facilitate the creation of the electrical connection between two nerves. In order to understand the details of this neuroscience phenomenon you need to be able to "see" what is happening at the scale of these receptors, which is around 10 nanometers. This is smaller than the diffraction limit of normal microscopy and it takes place on a 3 dimensional structure. Selvin describes the development of small quantum dots (on the order of 6-9 microns) that are surface-sensitized to interact with the receptors. This allows the application of photo-activated localized microscopy (PALM), a superresolution microscopy that can be scanned through focus to develop a 3D map on a scale that is the same size as the emitter, which in this case are the small quantum dots. The quantum dots are stable in time and provide access to the receptors which allows the imaging of the interactions taking place at the synoptic level.

  10. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.