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Sample records for quantum many-body system

  1. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems. PMID:26632587

  2. Measure synchronization in quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haibo; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Garcia-March, Miguel Angel; Polls, Artur

    2014-09-01

    The concept of measure synchronization between two coupled quantum many-body systems is presented. In general terms we consider two quantum many-body systems whose dynamics gets coupled through the contact particle-particle interaction. This coupling is shown to produce measure synchronization, a generalization of synchrony to a large class of systems which takes place in absence of dissipation. We find that in quantum measure synchronization, the many-body quantum properties for the two subsystems, e.g., condensed fractions and particle fluctuations, behave in a coordinated way. To illustrate the concept we consider a simple case of two species of bosons occupying two distinct quantum states. Measure synchronization can be readily explored with state-of-the-art techniques in ultracold atomic gases and, if properly controlled, be employed to build targeted quantum correlations in a sympathetic way.

  3. Parameter symmetries of quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Pavel Cejnar; Hendrik B. Geyer

    2001-10-17

    We analyze the occurrence of dynamically equivalent Hamiltonians in the parameter space of general many-body interactions for quantum systems, particularly those that conserve the total number of particles. As an illustration of the general framework, the appearance of parameter symmetries in the interacting boson model-1 and their absence in the Ginocchio SO(8) fermionic model are discussed.

  4. Exotic Freezing of Response in Quantum Many-Body System

    E-print Network

    Arnab Das

    2010-11-01

    We show that when a quantum many-body system is subjected to coherent periodic driving, the response may exhibit exotic freezing behavior in high driving frequency ($\\omega$) regime. In a periodically driven classical thermodynamic system, freezing at high $\\omega$ occurs when $1/\\omega$ is much smaller than the characteristic relaxation time of the system, and hence the freezing always increases there as $\\omega$ is increased. Here, in the contrary, we see surprising non-monotonic freezing behavior of the response with $\\omega$, showing curious peak-valley structure. Quite interestingly, the entire system tends to freeze almost absolutely (the freezing peaks) when driven with a certain combination of driving parameters values (amplitude and $\\omega$) due to coherent suppression of dynamics of the quantum many-body modes, which has no classical analog. We demonstrate this new freezing phenomenon analytically (supported by large-scale numerics) for a general class of integrable quantum spin systems.

  5. Universal Behavior beyond Multifractality in Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.; Alet, Fabien; Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2014-02-01

    How many states of a configuration space contribute to a wave function? Attempts to answer this ubiquitous question have a long history in physics and are keys to understanding, e.g., localization phenomena. Beyond single-particle physics, a quantitative study of the ground state complexity for interacting many-body quantum systems is notoriously difficult, mainly due to the exponential growth of the configuration (Hilbert) space with the number of particles. Here we develop quantum Monte Carlo schemes to overcome this issue, focusing on Shannon-Rényi entropies of ground states of large quantum many-body systems. Our simulations reveal a generic multifractal behavior while the very nature of quantum phases of matter and associated transitions is captured by universal subleading terms in these entropies.

  6. Boundary driven open quantum many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2014-01-08

    In this lecture course I outline a simple paradigm of non-eqjuilibrium quantum statistical physics, namely we shall study quantum lattice systems with local, Hamiltonian (conservative) interactions which are coupled to the environment via incoherent processes only at the system's boundaries. This is arguably the simplest nontrivial context where one can study far from equilibrium steady states and their transport properties. We shall formulate the problem in terms of a many-body Markovian master equation (the so-called Lindblad equation, and some of its extensions, e.g. the Redfield eqaution). The lecture course consists of two main parts: Firstly, and most extensively we shall present canonical Liouville-space many-body formalism, the so-called 'third quantization' and show how it can be implemented to solve bi-linear open many-particle problems, the key peradigmatic examples being the XY spin 1/2 chains or quasi-free bosonic (or harmonic) chains. Secondly, we shall outline several recent approaches on how to approach exactly solvable open quantum interacting many-body problems, such as anisotropic Heisenberg ((XXZ) spin chain or fermionic Hubbard chain.

  7. Frustration, Entanglement, and Correlations in Quantum Many Body Systems

    E-print Network

    U. Marzolino; S. M. Giampaolo; F. Illuminati

    2013-04-30

    We derive an exact lower bound to a universal measure of frustration in degenerate ground states of quantum many-body systems. The bound results in the sum of two contributions: entanglement and classical correlations arising from local measurements. We show that average frustration properties are completely determined by the behavior of the maximally mixed ground state. We identify sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to saturate the bound, and for models with twofold degeneracy we prove that average and local frustration coincide.

  8. Probing quantum many-body dynamics in nuclear systems

    E-print Network

    C. Simenel; M. Dasgupta; D. J. Hinde; A. Kheifets; A. Wakhle

    2013-08-31

    Quantum many-body nuclear dynamics is treated at the mean-field level with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. Low-lying and high-lying nuclear vibrations are studied using the linear response theory. The fusion mechanism is also described for light and heavy systems. The latter exhibit fusion hindrance due to quasi-fission. Typical characteristics of quasi-fission, such as contact time and partial symmetrisation of the fragments mass in the exit channel, are reproduced by TDHF calculations. The (multi-)nucleon transfer at sub-barrier energies is also discussed.

  9. Quantum Control of Many-Body Systems by the Density

    E-print Network

    S. E. B. Nielsen; M. Ruggenthaler; R. van Leeuwen

    2014-12-11

    In this work we focus on a recently introduced method [1] to construct the external potential $v$ that, for a given initial state, produces a prescribed time-dependent density in an interacting quantum many-body system. We show how this method can also be used to perform flexible and efficient quantum control. The simple interpretation of the density (the amount of electrons per volume) allows us to use our physical intuition to consider interesting control problems and to easily restrict the search space in optimization problems. The method's origin in time-dependent density-functional theory makes studies of large systems possible. We further discuss the generalization of the method to higher dimensions and its numerical implementation in great detail. We also present several examples to illustrate the flexibility, and to confirm that the scheme is efficient and stable even for large and rapid density variations irrespective of the initial state and interactions.

  10. Relaxation times of dissipative many-body quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Žnidari?, Marko

    2015-10-01

    We study relaxation times, also called mixing times, of quantum many-body systems described by a Lindblad master equation. We in particular study the scaling of the spectral gap with the system length, the so-called dynamical exponent, identifying a number of transitions in the scaling. For systems with bulk dissipation we generically observe different scaling for small and for strong dissipation strength, with a critical transition strength going to zero in the thermodynamic limit. We also study a related phase transition in the largest decay mode. For systems with only boundary dissipation we show a generic bound that the gap cannot be larger than ?1/L. In integrable systems with boundary dissipation one typically observes scaling of ?1/L^{3}, while in chaotic ones one can have faster relaxation with the gap scaling as ?1/L and thus saturating the generic bound. We also observe transition from exponential to algebraic gap in systems with localized modes. PMID:26565204

  11. Relaxation times of dissipative many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidari?, Marko

    2015-10-01

    We study relaxation times, also called mixing times, of quantum many-body systems described by a Lindblad master equation. We in particular study the scaling of the spectral gap with the system length, the so-called dynamical exponent, identifying a number of transitions in the scaling. For systems with bulk dissipation we generically observe different scaling for small and for strong dissipation strength, with a critical transition strength going to zero in the thermodynamic limit. We also study a related phase transition in the largest decay mode. For systems with only boundary dissipation we show a generic bound that the gap cannot be larger than ˜1 /L . In integrable systems with boundary dissipation one typically observes scaling of ˜1 /L3 , while in chaotic ones one can have faster relaxation with the gap scaling as ˜1 /L and thus saturating the generic bound. We also observe transition from exponential to algebraic gap in systems with localized modes.

  12. Single shot simulations of dynamic quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Kaspar Sakmann; Mark Kasevich

    2015-01-14

    The single-particle density is the most basic quantity that can be calculated from a given many-body wave function. It provides the probability to find a particle at a given position when the average over many realizations of an experiment is taken. However, the outcome of single experimental shots of ultracold atom experiments is determined by the $N$-particle probability density. This difference can lead to surprising results. For example, independent Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with definite particle numbers form interference fringes even though no fringes would be expected based on the single-particle density [1-4]. By drawing random deviates from the $N$-particle probability density single experimental shots can be simulated from first principles [1, 3, 5]. However, obtaining expressions for the $N$-particle probability density of realistic time-dependent many-body systems has so far been elusive. Here, we show how single experimental shots of general ultracold bosonic systems can be simulated based on numerical solutions of the many-body Schr\\"odinger equation. We show how full counting distributions of observables involving any number of particles can be obtained and how correlation functions of any order can be evaluated. As examples we show the appearance of interference fringes in interacting independent BECs, fluctuations in the collisions of strongly attractive BECs, the appearance of randomly fluctuating vortices in rotating systems and the center of mass fluctuations of attractive BECs in a harmonic trap. The method described is broadly applicable to bosonic many-body systems whose phenomenology is driven by information beyond what is typically available in low-order correlation functions.

  13. Characterizing and quantifying frustration in quantum many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Giampaolo, S M; Gualdi, G; Monras, A; Illuminati, F

    2011-12-23

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. We introduce a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems and we relate it to a class of entanglement monotones via an exact inequality. If all the (pure) ground states of a given Hamiltonian saturate the inequality, then the system is said to be inequality saturating. We introduce sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to be inequality saturating and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems. The models satisfying these conditions can be reasonably identified as geometrically unfrustrated and subject to frustration of purely quantum origin. Our results therefore establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration. PMID:22243147

  14. Characterizing and Quantifying Frustration in Quantum Many-Body Systems

    E-print Network

    S. M. Giampaolo; G. Gualdi; A. Monras; F. Illuminati

    2012-01-05

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. We introduce a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems and we relate it to a class of entanglement monotones via an exact inequality. If all the (pure) ground states of a given Hamiltonian saturate the inequality, then the system is said to be inequality saturating. We introduce sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to be inequality saturating and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems. The models satisfying these conditions can be reasonably identified as geometrically unfrustrated and subject to frustration of purely quantum origin. Our results therefore establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration.

  15. Quantum Field Theory of Many-body Systems from the Origin of Sound

    E-print Network

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    Quantum Field Theory of Many-body Systems ­ from the Origin of Sound to an Origin of Light-model, quantum gauge theory, dualities, projective construction, and exactly soluble models beyond one: Condensed mater physics, many-body, quantum field theory, gauge theory, topological order, quantum matter

  16. Quantum control of infinite-dimensional many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Roger S.; Burgarth, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    A major challenge to the control of infinite-dimensional quantum systems is the irreversibility which is often present in the system dynamics. Here we consider systems with discrete-spectrum Hamiltonians operating over a Schwartz space domain and show that by utilizing the implications of the quantum recurrence theorem this irreversibility may be overcome, in the case of individual states more generally, but also in certain specified cases over larger subsets of the Hilbert space. We discuss briefly the possibility of using these results in the control of infinite-dimensional coupled harmonic oscillators and also draw attention to some of the issues and open questions arising from this and related work.

  17. Quantum effects in many-body gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovko, V. A.

    2005-07-01

    A hierarchy of equations for equilibrium reduced density matrices obtained earlier is used to consider systems of spinless bosons bound by forces of gravity alone. The systems are assumed to be at absolute zero of temperature under conditions of Bose condensation. In this case, a peculiar interplay of quantum effects and of very weak gravitational interaction between microparticles occurs. As a result, there can form spatially bounded equilibrium structures macroscopic in size, both immobile and rotating. The size of a structure is inversely related to the number of particles in the structure. When the number of particles is relatively small the size can be enormous, whereas if this number equals Avogadro's number the radius of the structure is about 30 cm in the case that the structure consists of hydrogen atoms. The rotating objects have the form of rings and exhibit superfluidity. An atmosphere that can be captured by tiny celestial bodies from the ambient medium is considered too. The thickness of the atmosphere decreases as its mass increases. If short-range intermolecular forces are taken into account, the results obtained hold for excited states whose lifetime can however be very long. The results of the paper can be utilized for explaining the first stage of formation of celestial bodies from interstellar and even intergalactic gases.

  18. Dissipative effects in dipolar, quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Capogrosso-Sansone, Barbara; Rey, Ana Maria

    2015-03-01

    We use Quantum Monte Carlo simulations, by the Worm algorithm, to study the ground state phase diagram of two-dimensional, dipolar lattice bosons where each site is coupled, via density operators, to an external reservoir. A recent related study of the XXZ model with ohmic coupling to an external reservoir reported the existence of a bath-induced Bose metal phase in the ground state phase diagram away from half filling, and a Luttinger liquid and a charge density wave at half-filling. Our work extends this methodology to higher dimensional systems with long-range interactions. In the case of hard-core bosons, our method can be applied to experimental systems featuring dipolar fermionic molecules in the presence of losses. This work utilized the Janus supercomputer, which is supported by the NSF (award number CNS-0821794) and the University of Colorado Boulder, and is a joint effort with the University of Colorado Denver and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, as well as OU Supercomputing Center for Education and Research (OSCER) at the University of Oklahoma. NIST, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, NSF-PHY11-25915, ARO, ARO-DARPA-OLE, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  19. Quantum effects in many-body gravitating systems

    E-print Network

    V. A. Golovko

    2015-04-07

    A hierarchy of equations for equilibrium reduced density matrices obtained earlier is used to consider systems of spinless bosons bound by forces of gravity alone. The systems are assumed to be at absolute zero of temperature under conditions of Bose condensation. In this case, a peculiar interplay of quantum effects and of very weak gravitational interaction between microparticles occurs. As a result, there can form spatially-bounded equilibrium structures macroscopic in size, both immobile and rotating. The size of a structure is inversely related to the number of particles in the structure. When the number of particles is relatively small the size can be enormous, whereas if this numbder equals Avogadro's number the radius of the structure is about 30 cm in the case that the structure consists of hydrogen atoms. The rotating objects have the form of rings and exhibit superfluidity. An atmosphere that can be captured by tiny celestial bodies from the ambient medium is considered too. The thickness of the atmosphere decreases as its mass increases. If short-range intermolecular forces are taken into account, the results obtained hold for excited states whose lifetime can however be very long. The results of the paper can be utilized for explaining the first stage of formation of celestial bodies from interstellar and even intergalactic gases.

  20. Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, David

    2009-03-01

    The simulation of quantum many-body systems is a notoriously hard problem in condensed matter physics, but it could easily be handled by a quantum computer [4,1]. There is however one catch: while a quantum computer can naturally implement the dynamics of a quantum system --- i.e. solve Schr"odinger's equation --- there was until now no general method to initialize the computer in a low-energy state of the simulated system. We present a quantum algorithm [5] that can prepare the ground state and thermal states of a quantum many-body system in a time proportional to the square-root of its Hilbert space dimension. This is the same scaling as required by the best known algorithm to prepare the ground state of a classical many-body system on a quantum computer [3,2]. This provides strong evidence that for a quantum computer, preparing the ground state of a quantum system is in the worst case no more difficult than preparing the ground state of a classical system. 1 D. Aharonov and A. Ta-Shma, Adiabatic quantum state generation and statistical zero knowledge, Proc. 35th Annual ACM Symp. on Theo. Comp., (2003), p. 20. F. Barahona, On the computational complexity of ising spin glass models, J. Phys. A. Math. Gen., 15 (1982), p. 3241. C. H. Bennett, E. Bernstein, G. Brassard, and U. Vazirani, Strengths and weaknessess of quantum computing, SIAM J. Comput., 26 (1997), pp. 1510--1523, quant-ph/9701001. S. Lloyd, Universal quantum simulators, Science, 273 (1996), pp. 1073--1078. D. Poulin and P. Wocjan, Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer, 2008, arXiv:0809.2705.

  1. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems arise in many areas of physics, but their complexity generally precludes exact solutions to their dynamics. We explored a strongly interacting two-level system formed by the clock states in (87)Sr as a laboratory for the study of quantum many-body effects. Our collective spin measurements reveal signatures of the development of many-body correlations during the dynamical evolution. We derived a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, severely distorted lineshapes, and correlated spin noise. These investigations open the door to further explorations of quantum many-body effects and entanglement through use of highly coherent and precisely controlled optical lattice clocks. PMID:23929976

  2. Quantum Field Theory of Many-body Systems from the Origin of Sound

    E-print Network

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    Quantum Field Theory of Many-body Systems ­ from the Origin of Sound to an Origin of Light. It is useful to organize our discussion using the analogy to the well understood theory of quantum par- ticles words, a string condensed state is a quantum liquid of large strings. We would like to have a theory

  3. Quantum Phase Space, Quantization Hierarchy, and Eclectic Quantum Many-Body System

    E-print Network

    Dong-Sheng Wang

    2014-10-05

    An operator-valued quantum phase space formula is constructed. The phase space formula of Quantum Mechanics provides a natural link between first and second quantization, thus contributing to the understanding of quantization problem. By the combination of quantization and hamiltonization of dynamics, a quantization hierarchy is introduced, beyond the framework of first and second quantization and generalizing the standard quantum theory. We apply our quantization method to quantum many-body system and propose an eclectic model, in which the dimension of Hilbert space does not scale exponentially with the number of particles due to the locality of interaction, and the evolution is a constrained Hamiltonian dynamics.

  4. Measuring entanglement entropy of a generic many-body system with a quantum switch.

    PubMed

    Abanin, Dmitry A; Demler, Eugene

    2012-07-13

    Entanglement entropy has become an important theoretical concept in condensed matter physics because it provides a unique tool for characterizing quantum mechanical many-body phases and new kinds of quantum order. However, the experimental measurement of entanglement entropy in a many-body system is widely believed to be unfeasible, owing to the nonlocal character of this quantity. Here, we propose a general method to measure the entanglement entropy. The method is based on a quantum switch (a two-level system) coupled to a composite system consisting of several copies of the original many-body system. The state of the switch controls how different parts of the composite system connect to each other. We show that, by studying the dynamics of the quantum switch only, the Rényi entanglement entropy of the many-body system can be extracted. We propose a possible design of the quantum switch, which can be realized in cold atomic systems. Our work provides a route towards testing the scaling of entanglement in critical systems as well as a method for a direct experimental detection of topological order. PMID:23030142

  5. NON-EQUILIBRIUM DYNAMICS OF MANY-BODY QUANTUM SYSTEMS: FUNDAMENTALS AND NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    DeMille, David; LeHur, Karyn

    2013-11-27

    Rapid progress in nanotechnology and naofabrication techniques has ushered in a new era of quantum transport experiments. This has in turn heightened the interest in theoretical understanding of nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated quantum systems. This project has advanced the frontiers of understanding in this area along several fronts. For example, we showed that under certain conditions, quantum impurities out of equilibrium can be reformulated in terms of an effective equilibrium theory; this makes it possible to use the gamut of tools available for quantum systems in equilibrium. On a different front, we demonstrated that the elastic power of a transmitted microwave photon in circuit QED systems can exhibit a many-body Kondo resonance. We also showed that under many circumstances, bipartite fluctuations of particle number provide an effective tool for studying many-body physics—particularly the entanglement properties of a many-body system. This implies that it should be possible to measure many-body entanglement in relatively simple and tractable quantum systems. In addition, we studied charge relaxation in quantum RC circuits with a large number of conducting channels, and elucidated its relation to Kondo models in various regimes. We also extended our earlier work on the dynamics of driven and dissipative quantum spin-boson impurity systems, deriving a new formalism that makes it possible to compute the full spin density matrix and spin-spin correlation functions beyond the weak coupling limit. Finally, we provided a comprehensive analysis of the nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in the case of a spinless dissipative resonant-level model. This project supported the research of two Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral researchers, whose training will allow them to further advance the field in coming years.

  6. Editorial: Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalilla, M. A.; Rigol, M.

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics and thermalization of classical systems have been extensively studied in the past. However, the corresponding quantum phenomena remain, to a large extent, uncharted territory. Recent experiments with ultracold quantum gases have at last allowed exploration of the coherent dynamics of isolated quantum systems, as well as observation of non-equilibrium phenomena that challenge our current understanding of the dynamics of quantum many-body systems. These experiments have also posed many new questions. How can we control the dynamics to engineer new states of matter? Given that quantum dynamics is unitary, under which conditions can we expect observables of the system to reach equilibrium values that can be predicted by conventional statistical mechanics? And, how do the observables dynamically approach their statistical equilibrium values? Could the approach to equilibrium be hampered if the system is trapped in long-lived metastable states characterized, for example, by a certain distribution of topological defects? How does the dynamics depend on the way the system is perturbed, such as changing, as a function of time and at a given rate, a parameter across a quantum critical point? What if, conversely, after relaxing to a steady state, the observables cannot be described by the standard equilibrium ensembles of statistical mechanics? How would they depend on the initial conditions in addition to the other properties of the system, such as the existence of conserved quantities? The search for answers to questions like these is fundamental to a new research field that is only beginning to be explored, and to which researchers with different backgrounds, such as nuclear, atomic, and condensed-matter physics, as well as quantum optics, can make, and are making, important contributions. This body of knowledge has an immediate application to experiments in the field of ultracold atomic gases, but can also fundamentally change the way we approach and understand many-body quantum systems. This focus issue of New Journal Physics brings together both experimentalists and theoreticians working on these problems to provide a comprehensive picture of the state of the field. Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems Contents Spin squeezing of high-spin, spatially extended quantum fields Jay D Sau, Sabrina R Leslie, Marvin L Cohen and Dan M Stamper-Kurn Thermodynamic entropy of a many-body energy eigenstate J M Deutsch Ground states and dynamics of population-imbalanced Fermi condensates in one dimension Masaki Tezuka and Masahito Ueda Relaxation dynamics in the gapped XXZ spin-1/2 chain Jorn Mossel and Jean-Sébastien Caux Canonical thermalization Peter Reimann Minimally entangled typical thermal state algorithms E M Stoudenmire and Steven R White Manipulation of the dynamics of many-body systems via quantum control methods Julie Dinerman and Lea F Santos Multimode analysis of non-classical correlations in double-well Bose-Einstein condensates Andrew J Ferris and Matthew J Davis Thermalization in a quasi-one-dimensional ultracold bosonic gas I E Mazets and J Schmiedmayer Two simple systems with cold atoms: quantum chaos tests and non-equilibrium dynamics Cavan Stone, Yassine Ait El Aoud, Vladimir A Yurovsky and Maxim Olshanii On the speed of fluctuations around thermodynamic equilibrium Noah Linden, Sandu Popescu, Anthony J Short and Andreas Winter A quantum central limit theorem for non-equilibrium systems: exact local relaxation of correlated states M Cramer and J Eisert Quantum quench dynamics of the sine-Gordon model in some solvable limits A Iucci and M A Cazalilla Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics of atomic dark solitons A D Martin and J Ruostekoski Quantum quenches in the anisotropic spin-1?2 Heisenberg chain: different approaches to many-body dynamics far from equilibrium Peter Barmettler, Matthias Punk, Vladimir Gritsev, Eugene Demler and Ehud Altman Crossover from adiabatic to sudden interaction quenches in the Hubbard model: prethermalization and non-equilibrium dynamics Mic

  7. Nonlocality in many-body quantum systems detected with two-body correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tura, J.; Augusiak, R.; Sainz, A. B.; Lücke, B.; Klempt, C.; Lewenstein, M.; Acín, A.

    2015-11-01

    Contemporary understanding of correlations in quantum many-body systems and in quantum phase transitions is based to a large extent on the recent intensive studies of entanglement in many-body systems. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum nonlocality in these systems, mostly because the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve high-order correlations among many particles, which are hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Standard, "theorist- and experimentalist-friendly" many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. Typically, there is no multipartite Bell inequality for this scenario based on such low-order correlations. Recently, however, we have succeeded in constructing multipartite Bell inequalities that involve two- and one-body correlations only, and showed how they revealed the nonlocality in many-body systems relevant for nuclear and atomic physics [Tura et al., Science 344 (2014) 1256]. With the present contribution we continue our work on this problem. On the one hand, we present a detailed derivation of the above Bell inequalities, pertaining to permutation symmetry among the involved parties. On the other hand, we present a couple of new results concerning such Bell inequalities. First, we characterize their tightness. We then discuss maximal quantum violations of these inequalities in the general case, and their scaling with the number of parties. Moreover, we provide new classes of two-body Bell inequalities which reveal nonlocality of the Dicke states-ground states of physically relevant and experimentally realizable Hamiltonians. Finally, we shortly discuss various scenarios for nonlocality detection in mesoscopic systems of trapped ions or atoms, and by atoms trapped in the vicinity of designed nanostructures.

  8. Variational principle for steady states of dissipative quantum many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Hendrik

    2015-01-30

    We present a novel generic framework to approximate the nonequilibrium steady states of dissipative quantum many-body systems. It is based on the variational minimization of a suitable norm of the quantum master equation describing the dynamics. We show how to apply this approach to different classes of variational quantum states and demonstrate its successful application to a dissipative extension of the Ising model, which is of importance to ongoing experiments on ultracold Rydberg atoms, as well as to a driven-dissipative variant of the Bose-Hubbard model. Finally, we identify several advantages of the variational approach over previously employed mean-field-like methods. PMID:25679882

  9. Variational principle for steady states of dissipative quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Hendrik Weimer

    2015-02-19

    We present a novel generic framework to approximate the non-equilibrium steady states of dissipative quantum many-body systems. It is based on the variational minimization of a suitable norm of the quantum master equation describing the dynamics. We show how to apply this approach to different classes of variational quantum states and demonstrate its successful application to a dissipative extension of the Ising model, which is of importance to ongoing experiments on ultracold Rydberg atoms. Finally, we identify several advantages of the variational approach over previously employed mean-field-like methods.

  10. Coherent Imaging Spectroscopy of a Quantum Many-Body Spin System

    E-print Network

    C. Senko; J. Smith; P. Richerme; A. Lee; W. C. Campbell; C. Monroe

    2014-01-22

    Quantum simulators, in which well controlled quantum systems are used to reproduce the dynamics of less understood ones, have the potential to explore physics that is inaccessible to modeling with classical computers. However, checking the results of such simulations will also become classically intractable as system sizes increase. In this work, we introduce and implement a coherent imaging spectroscopic technique to validate a quantum simulation, much as magnetic resonance imaging exposes structure in condensed matter. We use this method to determine the energy levels and interaction strengths of a fully-connected quantum many-body system. Additionally, we directly measure the size of the critical energy gap near a quantum phase transition. We expect this general technique to become an important verification tool for quantum simulators once experiments advance beyond proof-of-principle demonstrations and exceed the resources of conventional computers.

  11. Isolated many-body quantum systems far from equilibrium: Relaxation process and thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Santos, Lea F.

    2014-10-15

    We present an overview of our recent numerical and analytical results on the dynamics of isolated interacting quantum systems that are taken far from equilibrium by an abrupt perturbation. The studies are carried out on one-dimensional systems of spins-1/2, which are paradigmatic models of many-body quantum systems. Our results show the role of the interplay between the initial state and the post-perturbation Hamiltonian in the relaxation process, the size of the fluctuations after equilibration, and the viability of thermalization.

  12. Fluctuations and Stochastic Processes in One-Dimensional Many-Body Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stimming, H.-P.; Mauser, N. J.; Mazets, I. E.

    2010-07-02

    We study the fluctuation properties of a one-dimensional many-body quantum system composed of interacting bosons and investigate the regimes where quantum noise or, respectively, thermal excitations are dominant. For the latter, we develop a semiclassical description of the fluctuation properties based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process. As an illustration, we analyze the phase correlation functions and the full statistical distributions of the interference between two one-dimensional systems, either independent or tunnel-coupled, and compare with the Luttinger-liquid theory.

  13. Thermopower as a tool to investigate many-body effects in quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kristinsdóttir, L. H.; Bengtsson, J.; Reimann, S. M.; Wacker, A.; Linke, H.

    2014-08-25

    Measuring the thermopower of a confined quantum system reveals important information about its excitation spectrum. Our simulations show how this kind of transport spectroscopy is able to extract a clear signal for the onset of Wigner localization in a nanowire segment. This demonstrates that thermopower measurements provide a tool for investigating complex many-body quantum effects, which is less intrusive than the usual charge-stability diagram as no high source-drain bias is required. While the effect is most pronounced for weak tunnel coupling and low temperatures, the excited states also significantly affect the thermopower spectrum at moderate temperature, adding distinct features to the characteristic thermopower lineshape.

  14. Switching the Anomalous DC Response of an AC-driven Quantum Many-body system

    E-print Network

    Arnab Das; R. Moessner

    2012-08-01

    For a class of integrable quantum many-body systems, symmetric AC driving can generically produce a steady DC response. We show how such dynamical freezing can be switched off, not by forcing the system to follow the (arbitrarily fast) driving field, but rather through a much slower but complete oscillation of each individual mode of the system at a frequency of its own, with the slowest mode exhibiting a divergent period. This switching can be controlled in detail, its sharpness depending on a particular parameter of the Hamiltonian. The phenomenon has a robust manifestation even in the few-body limit, perhaps the most promising setting for realisation within existing frameworks.

  15. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in finite many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejnar, Pavel; Stránský, Pavel; Kloc, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Quantum spectra of excited states of numerous collective many-body models show singularities related to stable and unstable stationary points of the corresponding classical dynamics. We show several examples of these singularities and discuss some of their consequences.

  16. Equivalent dynamical complexity in a many-body quantum and collective human system

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Neil F; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Quiroga, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of Complexity Science believe that the huge variety of emergent phenomena observed throughout nature, are generated by relatively few microscopic mechanisms [1-7]. Skeptics however point to the lack of concrete examples in which a single mechanistic model manages to capture relevant macroscopic and microscopic properties for two or more distinct systems operating across radically different length and time scales. Here we show how a single complexity model built around cluster coalescence and fragmentation, can cross the fundamental divide between many-body quantum physics and social science. It simultaneously (i) explains a mysterious recent finding concerning quantum many-body effects in cuprate superconductors [8,9] (i.e. scale of 10^{-9}-10^{-4} meters and 10^{-12}-10^{-6} seconds), (ii) explains the apparent universality of the casualty distributions in distinct human insurgencies and terrorism [10] (i.e. scale of 10^{3}-10^{6} meters and 10^{4}-10^{8} seconds), (iii) shows consistency with var...

  17. Quantum versus mean-field collapse in a many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Malomed, B. A.

    2015-10-01

    The recent analysis, based on the mean-field approximation (MFA), has predicted that the critical quantum collapse of the bosonic wave function, pulled to the center by the inverse-square potential in the three-dimensional space, is suppressed by the repulsive cubic nonlinearity in the bosonic gas, the collapsing ground state being replaced by a regular one. We demonstrate that a similar stabilization acts in a quantum many-body system, beyond the MFA. While the collapse remains possible, repulsive two-particle interactions give rise to a metastable gaseous state, which is separated by a potential barrier from the collapsing regime. The stability of this state improves with the increase of the number of particles. The results are produced by calculations of the variational energy, with the help of the Monte Carlo method.

  18. Spin, angular momentum and spin-statistics for a relativistic quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of Wigner’s induced representation for a relativistic quantum theory making possible the construction of wave packets and admitting covariant expectation values for the coordinate operator x? introduces a foliation on the Hilbert space of states. The spin-statistics relation for fermions and bosons implies the universality of the parametrization of orbits of the induced representation, implying that all particles within identical particle sets transform under the same SU(2) subgroup of the Lorentz group, and therefore their spins and angular momentum states can be computed using the usual Clebsch-Gordan coefficients associated with angular momentum. Important consequences, such as entanglement for subsystems at unequal times, covariant statistical correlations in many-body systems and the construction of relativistic boson and fermion statistical ensembles, as well as implications for the foliation of the Fock space and for quantum field theory are briefly discussed. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Constantin Piron.

  19. Seniority in quantum many-body systems. I. Identical particles in a single shell

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2014-10-15

    A discussion of the seniority quantum number in many-body systems is presented. The analysis is carried out for bosons and fermions simultaneously but is restricted to identical particles occupying a single shell. The emphasis of the paper is on the possibility of partial conservation of seniority which turns out to be a peculiar property of spin-9/2 fermions but prevalent in systems of interacting bosons of any spin. Partial conservation of seniority is at the basis of the existence of seniority isomers, frequently observed in semi-magic nuclei, and also gives rise to peculiar selection rules in one-nucleon transfer reactions. - Highlights: • Unified derivation of conditions for the total and partial conservation of seniority. • General analysis of the partial conservation of seniority in boson systems. • Why partial conservation of seniority is crucial for seniority isomers in nuclei. • The effect of partial conservation of seniority on one-nucleon transfer intensities.

  20. Spectrum of quantum transfer matrices via classical many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsky, A.; Zabrodin, A.; Zotov, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we clarify the relationship between inhomogeneous quantum spin chains and classical integrable many-body systems. It provides an alternative (to the nested Bethe ansatz) method for computation of spectra of the spin chains. Namely, the spectrum of the quantum transfer matrix for the inhomogeneous n -invariant XXX spin chain on N sites with twisted boundary conditions can be found in terms of velocities of particles in the rational N -body Ruijsenaars-Schneider model. The possible values of the velocities are to be found from intersection points of two Lagrangian submanifolds in the phase space of the classical model. One of them is the Lagrangian hyperplane corresponding to fixed coordinates of all N particles and the other one is an N -dimensional Lagrangian submanifold obtained by fixing levels of N classical Hamiltonians in involution. The latter are determined by eigenvalues of the twist matrix. To support this picture, we give a direct proof that the eigenvalues of the Lax matrix for the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider model, where velocities of particles are substituted by eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians, calculated through the Bethe equations, coincide with eigenvalues of the twist matrix, with certain multiplicities. We also prove a similar statement for the n Gaudin model with N marked points (on the quantum side) and the Calogero-Moser system with N particles (on the classical side). The realization of the results obtained in terms of branes and supersymmetric gauge theories is also discussed.

  1. Theory of classical and quantum frustration in quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Giampaolo, S M; Monras, A; Illuminati, F

    2011-01-01

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. After introducing a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems, we derive for it an exact inequality in terms of a class of entanglement monotones. We then state sufficient conditions for the ground states of quantum spin systems to saturate the inequality and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems and establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration.

  2. Negative differential gain in quantum dot systems: Interplay of structural properties and many-body effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, E. Jahnke, F.; Lorke, M.; Frauenheim, T.

    2014-06-16

    The saturation behaviour of optical gain with increasing excitation density is an important factor for laser device performance. For active materials based on self-organized InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, we study the interplay between structural properties of the quantum dots and many-body effects of excited carriers in the optical properties via a combination of tight-binding and quantum-kinetic calculations. We identify regimes where either phase-space filling or excitation-induced dephasing dominates the saturation behavior of the optical gain. The latter can lead to the emergence of a negative differential material gain.

  3. Measuring the dynamic structure factor of a dissipative quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Tobias; Landig, Renate; Mottl, Rafael; Hruby, Lorenz; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-05-01

    A Bose-Einstein condensate whose motional degrees of freedom are coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity via a transverse pump beam constitutes a dissipative quantum many-body system with long range interactions. These interactions can induce a structural phase transition from a flat to a density-modulated state. The transverse pump field simultaneously represents a probe of the atomic density via cavity-enhanced Bragg scattering. By spectrally analysing the light field leaking out of the cavity, we measure non-destructively the dynamic structure factor of the fluctuating atomic density while the system undergoes the phase transition. An observed asymmetry in the dynamic structure factor is attributed to the coupling to dissipative baths. Critical exponents for both sides of the phase transition can be extracted from the data. We further discuss our progress in adding strong short-range interactions to this system, in order to explore Bose-Hubbard physics with cavity-mediated long-range interactions and self-organization in lower dimensions.

  4. Lattice mapping for many-body open quantum systems and its application to atoms in photonic cystals

    E-print Network

    Ines de Vega

    2014-10-17

    We present a derivation that maps the original problem of a many body open quantum system (OQS) coupled to a harmonic oscillator reservoir into that of a many body OQS coupled to a lattice of harmonic oscillators. The present method is particularly suitable to analyse the dynamics of atoms arranged in a periodic structure and coupled the EM field within a photonic crystal. It allows to solve the dynamics of a many body OQS with methods alternative to the commonly used master, stochastic Schr\\"{o}dinger and Heisenberg equations, and thus to reach regimes well beyond the weak coupling and Born-Markov approximations.

  5. Variational Jastrow coupled-cluster theory of quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Y.

    2008-04-01

    We study many-body correlations in the ground state of a general quantum system of bosons or fermions by including an additional Jastrow function in our recently proposed variational coupled-cluster method. Our approach combines the advantages of state-dependent correlations in the coupled-cluster theory and of the strong, short-ranged correlations of the Jastrow function. We apply a generalized linked-cluster expansion for the Jastrow wave function and provide a detailed analysis for practical evaluation of the Hamiltonian expectation value as an energy functional of the Jastrow function and the bare density-distribution functions introduced and calculated in our earlier publications; a simple, first-order energy functional is derived and detailed formulas for the higher-order contributions are provided. Our energy functional does not suffer the divergence as most coupled-cluster calculations often do when applying to Hamiltonians with hardcore potentials. We also discuss possible applications of our technique, including applications to strongly correlated fermion systems.

  6. Entanglement and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in an exactly solvable quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvrie, Peter A.; Majtey, Ana P.; Tichy, Malte C.; Dehesa, Jesus S.; Plastino, Angel R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the correlations between different bipartitions of an exactly solvable one-dimensional many-body Moshinsky model consisting of Nn "nuclei" and Ne "electrons." We study the dependence of entanglement on the inter-particle interaction strength, on the number of particles, and on the particle masses. Consistent with kinematic intuition, the entanglement between two subsystems vanishes when the subsystems have very different masses, while it attains its maximal value for subsystems of comparable mass. We show how this entanglement feature can be inferred by means of the Born-Oppenheimer Ansatz, whose validity and breakdown can be understood from a quantum information point of view.

  7. A link of information entropy and kinetic energy for quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    S. E. Massen; C. P. Panos

    2001-01-19

    A direct connection of information entropy $S$ and kinetic energy $T$ is obtained for nuclei and atomic clusters, which establishes $T$ as a measure of the information in a distribution. It is conjectured that this is a universal property for fermionic many-body systems. We also check rigorous inequalities previously found to hold between S and T for atoms and verify that they hold for nuclei and atomic clusters as well. These inequalities give a relationship of Shannon's information entropy in position-space with an experimental quantity i.e. the rms radius of nuclei and clusters.

  8. An experimental approach for investigating many-body phenomena in Rydberg-interacting quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, C S; Schempp, H; Müller, N L M; Faber, A; Busche, H; Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M; Whitlock, S; Weidemüller, M

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of ultracold Rydberg gases demand an advanced level of experimental sophistication, in which high atomic and optical densities must be combined with excellent control of external fields and sensitive Rydberg atom detection. We describe a tailored experimental system used to produce and study Rydberg-interacting atoms excited from dense ultracold atomic gases. The experiment has been optimized for fast duty cycles using a high flux cold atom source and a three beam optical dipole trap. The latter enables tuning of the atomic density and temperature over several orders of magnitude, all the way to the Bose-Einstein condensation transition. An electrode structure surrounding the atoms allows for precise control over electric fields and single-particle sensitive field ionization detection of Rydberg atoms. We review two experiments which highlight the influence of strong Rydberg--Rydberg interactions on different many-body systems. First, the Rydberg blockade effect is used to pre...

  9. Entanglement patterns and generalized correlation functions in quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, G.; Noack, R. M.; Sólyom, J.; Legeza, Ö.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce transition operators that in a given basis of the single-site states of a many-body system have a single nonvanishing matrix element and introduce their correlation functions. We show that they fall into groups that decay with the same rate. The mutual information defined in terms of the von Neumann entropy between two sites is given in terms of these so-called generalized correlation functions. We confirm numerically that the long-distance decay of the mutual information follows the square of that of the most slowly decaying generalized correlation function. The main advantage of our procedure is that, in order to identify the most relevant physical processes, there is no need to know a priori the nature of the ordering in the system, i.e., no need to explicitly construct particular physical correlation functions. We explore the behavior of the mutual information and the generalized correlation functions for comformally invariant models and for the SU(n ) Hubbard model with n =2 ,3 ,4 , and 5, which are, in general, not conformally invariant. In this latter case, we show that for filling f =1 /q and q

  10. Entanglement and quantum correlations in many-body systems: a unified approach via local unitary operations

    E-print Network

    M. Cianciaruso; S. M. Giampaolo; W. Roga; G. Zonzo; M. Blasone; F. Illuminati

    2015-10-22

    Local unitary operations allow for a unifying approach to the quantification of quantum correlations among the constituents of a bipartite quantum system. For pure states, the distance between a given state and its image under least-perturbing local unitary operations is a bona fide measure of quantum entanglement, the so-called entanglement of response, which can be extended to mixed states via the convex roof construction. On the other hand, when defined directly on mixed states perturbed by local unitary operations, such a distance turns out to be a bona fide measure of quantum correlations, the so-called discord of response. Exploiting this unified framework, we perform a detailed comparison between two-body entanglement and two-body quantum discord in infinite XY quantum spin chains both in symmetry-preserving and symmetry-breaking ground states as well as in thermal states at finite temperature. The results of the investigation show that in symmetry-preserving ground states the two-point quantum discord dominates over the two-point entanglement, while in symmetrybreaking ground states the two-point quantum discord is strongly suppressed and the two-point entanglement is essentially unchanged. In thermal states, for certain regimes of Hamiltonian parameters, we show that the pairwise quantum discord and the pairwise entanglement can increase with increasing thermal fluctuations.

  11. Quantum Measurement-induced Dynamics of Many-Body Ultracold Bosonic and Fermionic Systems in Optical Lattices

    E-print Network

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Elliott, Thomas J; Mekhov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Although the light is a key ingredient in such systems, its quantum properties are typically neglected, reducing the role of light to a classical tool for atom manipulation. Here we show how elevating light to the quantum level leads to novel phenomena, inaccessible in setups based on classical optics. Interfacing a many-body atomic system with quantum light opens it to the environment in an essentially nonlocal way, where spatial coupling can be carefully designed. The competition between typical processes in strongly correlated systems (local tunnelling and interaction) with global measurement backaction leads to novel multimode dynamics and the appearance of long-range correlated tunnelling capable of entangling distant lattices sites, even when tunnelling between neighbouring sites is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the break-up and protection of strongly interacting fermion ...

  12. Distributed thermal tasks on many-body systems through a single quantum machine

    E-print Network

    Bruno Leggio; Pierre Doyeux; Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

    2015-11-30

    We propose a configuration of a single three-level quantum emitter embedded in a non-equilibrium steady electromagnetic environment, able to stabilize and control the local temperatures of a target system it interacts with, consisting of a collection of coupled two-level systems. The temperatures are induced by dissipative processes only, without the need of further external couplings for each qubit. Moreover, by acting on a set of easily tunable geometric parameters, we demonstrate the possibility to manipulate and tune each qubit temperature independently over a remarkably broad range of values. These findings address one standard problem in quantum-scale thermodynamics, providing a way to induce a desired distribution of temperature among interacting qubits and to protect it from external noise sources.

  13. Parisi symmetry of the many-body quantum theory of randomly interacting fermionic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, R.; Rosenow, B.

    1999-10-01

    We show that fermion systems with random and frustrated interactions display a strong coupling between glassy order and fermionic correlations, which culminates in the implementation of Parisi replica permutation symmetry breaking (RPSB) in their zero-temperature quantum field theories. RPSB effects, setting in below fermionic de Almeida-Thouless (dAT) lines, become stronger as the temperature T decreases and play a crucial role for many physical properties within the entire low-T regime. The Parisi ultrametric structure is shown to determine the dynamic behavior of fermionic correlations (Green's functions) for large times and for the corresponding low-energy excitation spectra, which is predicted to affect transport properties in metallic (and superconducting) spin glasses. Thus we reveal the existence and the detailed form of a number of quantum-dynamical fingerprints of the Parisi scheme. These effects, being strongest as T-->0, are contrasted with the replica-symmetric nature of the critical field theory of quantum spin glass transitions at T=0, which display only small corrections at low T from RPSB. RPSB effects moreover appear to influence the loci of the ground state transitions at O(T0) and hence the phase diagrams. From explicit solutions for arbitrary T we find a representation of the Green's function in the T=0 limit. This leads to a map of the fermionic (insulating) spin glass solution to the local limit of a Hubbard model with random repulsive interaction. This map holds for any number of replica-symmetry-breaking steps K. We obtain the distribution of the Hubbard interaction U and its dependence on the order of RPSB. A generalized mapping between metallic spin glass and random U Hubbard model is conjectured. We also suggest that the new representation of the Green's function at T=0 can be used for generalizations to superconductors with spin glass phases. Further generalizations due to Coulomb effects including a crossover from four-state per site to effectively three-state per site models in the U-->? limit are briefly considered. We compare our spin glass results with recent d=? (clean) Hubbard model analyses, paying particular attention to the common role of the corresponding Onsager reaction fields. We also present details of the phase diagrams, emphasizing the important role of the chemical potential ?. The insulating fermionic Ising spin glass model is shown to reveal different entangled magnetic instabilities and phase transitions. We review tricritical phenomena related to the strong correspondence between charge and spin fluctuations and controlled by quantum statistics. A comparison with the diluted Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin glass and with classical spin 1 models such as the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model is given. Our detailed analysis for the infinite-range model shows that spin glass order must decay discontinuously as ? exceeds a critical value, provided T is below the tricritical Tc3 and that the T=0 transition is of classical type. RPSB occurs in any case on the irreversible side of the (modified) dAT lines for the fermionic SK model and hence at least everywhere within a fermionic spin glass phase. Although the critical field theory of the quantum paramagnet to spin glass transition in metallic systems remains replica symmetric at T=0, with only small corrections at low T from RPSB, the phase diagram is affected at O(T0) by RPSB. Generalizing our results for the fermionic Ising spin glass we consider modifications in phase diagrams of models with spin and charge quantum dynamics such as metallic spin glasses.

  14. Transport of quantum excitations coupled to spatially extended nonlinear many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Stefano Iubini; Octavi Boada; Yasser Omar; Francesco Piazza

    2015-12-06

    The role of noise in the transport properties of quantum excitations is a topic of great importance in many fields, from organic semiconductors for technological applications to light-harvesting complexes in photosynthesis. In this paper we study a semi-classical model where a tight-binding Hamiltonian is fully coupled to an underlying spatially extended nonlinear chain of atoms. We show that the transport properties of a quantum excitation are subtly modulated by (i) the specific type (local vs non-local) of exciton-phonon coupling and by (ii) nonlinear effects of the underlying lattice. We report a non-monotonic dependence of the exciton diffusion coefficient on temperature, in agreement with earlier predictions, as a direct consequence of the lattice-induced fluctuations in the hopping rates due to long-wavelength vibrational modes. A standard measure of transport efficiency confirms that both nonlinearity in the underlying lattice and off-diagonal exciton-phonon coupling promote transport efficiency at high temperatures, preventing the Zeno-like quench observed in other models lacking an explicit noise-providing dynamical system.

  15. Transport of quantum excitations coupled to spatially extended nonlinear many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, Stefano; Boada, Octavi; Omar, Yasser; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The role of noise in the transport properties of quantum excitations is a topic of great importance in many fields, from organic semiconductors for technological applications to light-harvesting complexes in photosynthesis. In this paper we study a semi-classical model where a tight-binding Hamiltonian is fully coupled to an underlying spatially extended nonlinear chain of atoms. We show that the transport properties of a quantum excitation are subtly modulated by (i) the specific type (local versus non-local) of exciton–phonon coupling and by (ii) nonlinear effects of the underlying lattice. We report a non-monotonic dependence of the exciton diffusion coefficient on temperature, in agreement with earlier predictions, as a direct consequence of the lattice-induced fluctuations in the hopping rates due to long-wavelength vibrational modes. A standard measure of transport efficiency confirms that both nonlinearity in the underlying lattice and off-diagonal exciton–phonon coupling promote transport efficiency at high temperatures, preventing the Zeno-like quench observed in other models lacking an explicit noise-providing dynamical system.

  16. Applicability of Quantum Thermal Baths to Complex Many-Body Systems with Various Degrees of Anharmonicity.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Calvo, Florent; Noya, Eva Gonzalez

    2015-03-10

    The semiclassical method of quantum thermal baths by colored noise thermostats has been used to simulate various atomic systems in the molecular and bulk limits, at finite temperature and in moderately to strongly anharmonic regimes. In all cases, the method performs relatively well against alternative approaches in predicting correct energetic properties, including in the presence of phase changes, provided that vibrational delocalization is not too strong-neon appearing already as an upper limiting case. In contrast, the dynamical behavior inferred from global indicators such as the root-mean-square bond length fluctuation index or the vibrational spectrum reveals more marked differences caused by zero-point energy leakage, except in the case of isolated molecules with well separated vibrational modes. To correct for such deficiencies and reduce the undesired transfer among modes, empirical modifications of the noise power spectral density were attempted to better describe thermal equilibrium but still failed when used as semiclassical preparation for microcanonical trajectories. PMID:26579740

  17. On some nonlinear partial differential equations for classical and quantum many body systems

    E-print Network

    Marahrens, Daniel

    2012-11-13

    with the rigorous derivation of a macroscopic PDE descrip- 17 Introduction tion from a microscopic stochastic particle dynamics. The derivation of limit descriptions from stochastic interacting particle systems has a long history that can be traced back to Ludwig... Boltzmann. Since a rigorous approach is so far only feasible for simple models, we concentrate on a well-studied interacting particle system, the zero range process on a domain with periodic boundary conditions. The zero range process is a stochastic jump...

  18. Local switch controlling global properties in a closed many-body quantum system

    E-print Network

    Maurizio Fagotti

    2015-08-18

    We consider non-equilibrium time evolution after a quench of a global Hamiltonian parameter in a system described by a Hamiltonian with local interactions. Within this background, we propose a protocol that allows to change global properties of the state by flipping a switch that modifies a local term of the Hamiltonian. A light-cone that separates two globally different regions originates from the switch. The expectation values of macroscopic observables, that is to say local observables that are spatially averaged within a subsystem, experience a characteristic linear time evolution. Remarkably, the process is almost reversible: flipping again the switch produces a new light-cone with the same morphology. Finally, we test the protocol under repeated projective measurements. As explicit example we study the dynamics in a simple exactly solvable model, but the same description applies to more general situations.

  19. Two-Time Correlations Probing the Dynamics of Dissipative Many-Body Quantum Systems: Aging and Fast Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciolla, Bruno; Poletti, Dario; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-05-01

    We use two-time correlation functions to study the complex dynamics of dissipative many-body quantum systems. In order to measure, understand, and categorize these correlations we extend the framework of the adiabatic elimination method. We show that, for the same parameters and times, two-time correlations can display two distinct behaviors depending on the observable considered: a fast exponential decay or a much slower dynamics. We exemplify these findings by studying strongly interacting bosons in a double well subjected to phase noise. While the single-particle correlations decay exponentially fast with time, the density-density correlations display slow aging dynamics. We also show that this slow relaxation regime is robust against particle losses. Additionally, we use the developed framework to show that the dynamic properties of dissipatively engineered states can be drastically different from their Hamiltonian counterparts.

  20. Real-time observation of fluctuations in a driven-dissipative quantum many-body system undergoing a phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    A Bose-Einstein condensate whose motional degrees of freedom are coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity via a transverse pump beam constitutes a dissipative quantum many-body system with long range interactions. These interactions can induce a structural phase transition from a flat to a density-modulated state. The transverse pump field simultaneously represents a probe of the atomic density via cavity- enhanced Bragg scattering. By spectrally analyzing the light field leaking out of the cavity, we measure non-destructively the dynamic structure factor of the fluctuating atomic density while the system undergoes the phase transition. An observed asymmetry in the dynamic structure factor is attributed to the coupling to dissipative baths. Critical exponents for both sides of the phase transition can be extracted from the data. We further discuss our progress in adding strong short-range interactions to this system, in order to explore Bose-Hubbard physics with cavity-mediated long-range interactions and self-organization in lower dimensions.

  1. Quantum many-body fluctuations around nonlinear Schrödinger dynamics

    E-print Network

    Chiara Boccato; Serena Cenatiempo; Benjamin Schlein

    2015-12-21

    We consider the many body quantum dynamics of systems of bosons interacting through a two-body potential $N^{3\\beta-1} V (N^\\beta x)$, scaling with the number of particles $N$. For $0dynamics, governed by a quadratic generator.

  2. Many-Body Localization in Dipolar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, N. Y.; Laumann, C. R.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Knap, M.; Müller, M.; Demler, E. A.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Systems of strongly interacting dipoles offer an attractive platform to study many-body localized phases, owing to their long coherence times and strong interactions. We explore conditions under which such localized phases persist in the presence of power-law interactions and supplement our analytic treatment with numerical evidence of localized states in one dimension. We propose and analyze several experimental systems that can be used to observe and probe such states, including ultracold polar molecules and solid-state magnetic spin impurities.

  3. Many-body localization in dipolar systems.

    PubMed

    Yao, N Y; Laumann, C R; Gopalakrishnan, S; Knap, M; Müller, M; Demler, E A; Lukin, M D

    2014-12-12

    Systems of strongly interacting dipoles offer an attractive platform to study many-body localized phases, owing to their long coherence times and strong interactions. We explore conditions under which such localized phases persist in the presence of power-law interactions and supplement our analytic treatment with numerical evidence of localized states in one dimension. We propose and analyze several experimental systems that can be used to observe and probe such states, including ultracold polar molecules and solid-state magnetic spin impurities. PMID:25541771

  4. Advancements in the path integral Monte Carlo method for many-body quantum systems at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esler, Kenneth Paul

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) is a quantum-level simulation method based on a stochastic sampling of the many-body thermal density matrix. Utilizing the imaginary-time formulation of Feynman's sum-over-histories, it includes thermal fluctuations and particle correlations in a natural way. Over the past two decades, PIMC has been applied to the study of the electron gas, hydrogen under extreme pressure, and superfluid helium with great success. However, the computational demand scales with a high power of the atomic number, preventing its application to systems containing heavier elements. In this dissertation, we present the methodological developments necessary to apply this powerful tool to these systems. We begin by introducing the PIMC method. We then explain how effective potentials with position-dependent electron masses can be used to significantly reduce the computational demand of the method for heavier elements, while retaining high accuracy. We explain how these pseudohamiltonians can be integrated into the PIMC simulation by computing the density matrix for the electron-ion pair. We then address the difficulties associated with the long-range behavior of the coulomb potential, and improve a method to optimally partition particle interactions into real-space and reciprocal-space summations. We discuss the use of twist-averaged boundary conditions to reduce the finite-size effects in our simulations and the fixed-phase method needed to enforce the boundary conditions. Finally, we explain how a PIMC simulation of the electrons can be coupled to a classical Langevin dynamics simulation of the ions to achieve an efficient sampling of all degrees of freedom. After describing these advancements in methodology, we apply our new technology to fluid sodium near its liquid-vapor critical point. In particular, we explore the microscopic mechanisms which drive the continuous change from a dense metallic liquid to an expanded insulating vapor above the critical temperature. We show that the dynamic aggregation and dissociation of clusters of atoms play a significant role in determining the conductivity and that the formation of these clusters is highly density and temperature dependent. Finally, we suggest several avenues for research to further improve our simulations.

  5. Entanglement and Nonlocality in Many-Body Systems: a primer

    E-print Network

    J. Tura; A. B. Sainz; T. Grass; R. Augusiak; A. Acín; M. Lewenstein

    2015-01-12

    Current understanding of correlations and quantum phase transitions in many-body systems has significantly improved thanks to the recent intensive studies of their entanglement properties. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum non-locality in these systems. On the one hand, standard, "theorist- and experimentalist-friendly" many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. On the other hand, most of the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve correlations among many particles. Such correlations are notoriously hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Typically, there is no Bell inequality for many-body systems built only from low-order correlation functions. Recently, however, it has been shown in [J. Tura et al., Science 344, 1256 (2014)] that multipartite Bell inequalities constructed only from two-body correlation functions are strong enough to reveal non-locality in some many-body states, in particular those relevant for nuclear and atomic physics. The purpose of this lecture is to provide an overview of the problem of quantum correlations in many-body systems - from entanglement to nonlocality - and the methods for their characterization.

  6. Hypergeometric resummation of self-consistent sunset diagrams for electron-boson quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium

    E-print Network

    Mera, Hector; Nikolic, Branislav K

    2015-01-01

    A newly developed hypergeometric resummation technique [H. Mera et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 143001 (2015)] provides an easy-to-use recipe to obtain conserving approximations within the self-consistent nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory. We demonstrate the usefulness of this technique by calculating the phonon-limited electronic current in a model of a single-molecule junction within the self-consistent Born approximation for the electron-phonon interacting system, where the perturbation expansion for the nonequilibrium Green function in powers of the free bosonic propagator typically consists of a series of non-crossing \\sunset" diagrams. Hypergeometric resummation preserves conservation laws and it is shown to provide substantial convergence acceleration relative to more standard approaches to self-consistency. This result strongly suggests that the convergence of the self-consistent \\sunset" series is limited by a branch-cut singularity, which is accurately described by Gauss hypergeometric func...

  7. Quantum power functional theory for many-body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    We construct a one-body variational theory for the time evolution of nonrelativistic quantum many-body systems. The position- and time-dependent one-body density, particle current, and time derivative of the current act as three variational fields. The generating (power rate) functional is minimized by the true current time derivative. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation, together with the continuity equation for the density, forms a closed set of one-body equations of motion. Space- and time-nonlocal one-body forces are generated by the superadiabatic contribution to the functional. The theory applies to many-electron systems.

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisert, Jens; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-02-01

    Quantum many-body models describing natural systems or materials and physical systems assembled piece by piece in the laboratory for the purpose of realizing quantum information processing share an important feature: intricate correlations that originate from the coherent interaction between a large number of constituents. In recent years it has become manifest that the cross-fertilization between research devoted to quantum information science and to quantum many-body physics leads to new ideas, methods, tools, and insights in both fields. Issues of criticality, quantum phase transitions, quantum order and magnetism that play a role in one field find relations to the classical simulation of quantum systems, to error correction and fault tolerance thresholds, to channel capacities and to topological quantum computation, to name but a few. The structural similarities of typical problems in both fields and the potential for pooling of ideas then become manifest. Notably, methods and ideas from quantum information have provided fresh approaches to long-standing problems in strongly correlated systems in the condensed matter context, including both numerical methods and conceptual insights. Focus on quantum information and many-body theory Contents TENSOR NETWORKS Homogeneous multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz tensor networks for quantum critical systems M Rizzi, S Montangero, P Silvi, V Giovannetti and Rosario Fazio Concatenated tensor network states R Hübener, V Nebendahl and W Dür Entanglement renormalization in free bosonic systems: real-space versus momentum-space renormalization group transforms G Evenbly and G Vidal Finite-size geometric entanglement from tensor network algorithms Qian-Qian Shi, Román Orús, John Ove Fjærestad and Huan-Qiang Zhou Characterizing symmetries in a projected entangled pair state D Pérez-García, M Sanz, C E González-Guillén, M M Wolf and J I Cirac Matrix product operator representations B Pirvu, V Murg, J I Cirac and F Verstraete SIMULATION AND DYNAMICS A quantum differentiation of k-SAT instances B Tamir and G Ortiz Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits Joseph Geraci and Daniel A Lidar Exact matrix product solutions in the Heisenberg picture of an open quantum spin chain S R Clark, J Prior, M J Hartmann, D Jaksch and M B Plenio Exact solution of Markovian master equations for quadratic Fermi systems: thermal baths, open XY spin chains and non-equilibrium phase transition Tomaž Prosen and Bojan Žunkovi? Quantum kinetic Ising models R Augusiak, F M Cucchietti, F Haake and M Lewenstein ENTANGLEMENT AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES Ground states of unfrustrated spin Hamiltonians satisfy an area law Niel de Beaudrap, Tobias J Osborne and Jens Eisert Correlation density matrices for one-dimensional quantum chains based on the density matrix renormalization group W Münder, A Weichselbaum, A Holzner, Jan von Delft and C L Henley The invariant-comb approach and its relation to the balancedness of multipartite entangled states Andreas Osterloh and Jens Siewert Entanglement scaling of fractional quantum Hall states through geometric deformations Andreas M Läuchli, Emil J Bergholtz and Masudul Haque Entanglement versus gap for one-dimensional spin systems Daniel Gottesman and M B Hastings Entanglement spectra of critical and near-critical systems in one dimension F Pollmann and J E Moore Macroscopic bound entanglement in thermal graph states D Cavalcanti, L Aolita, A Ferraro, A García-Saez and A Acín Entanglement at the quantum phase transition in a harmonic lattice Elisabeth Rieper, Janet Anders and Vlatko Vedral Multipartite entanglement and frustration P Facchi, G Florio, U Marzolino, G Parisi and S Pascazio Entropic uncertainty relations—a survey Stephanie Wehner and Andreas Winter Entanglement in a spin system with inverse square statistical interaction D Giuliano, A Sindona, G Falcone, F Plastina and L Amico APPLICATIONS Time-dependent currents of one-dimensional bosons in an optical lattice J Schachenmayer, G Pupillo and A J Daley Implementing quantum gates using t

  9. Exploring flocking via quantum many-body physics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souslov, Anton; Loewe, Benjamin; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Flocking refers to the spontaneous breaking of spatial isotropy and time-reversal symmetries in collections of bodies such as birds, fish, locusts, bacteria, and artificial active systems. The transport of matter along biopolymers using molecular motors also involves the breaking of these symmetries, which in some cases are known to be broken explicitly. We study these classical nonequilibrium symmetry-breaking phenomena by means of models of many strongly interacting particles that hop on a periodic lattice. We employ a mapping between the classical and quantum dynamics of many-body systems, combined with tools from many-body theory. In particular, we examine the formation and properties of nematic and polar order in low-dimensional, strongly-interacting active systems using techniques familiar from fermionic systems, such as self-consistent field theory and bosonization. Thus, we find that classical active systems can exhibit analogs of quantum phenomena such as spin-orbit coupling, magnetism, and superconductivity. The models we study connect the physics of asymmetric exclusion processes to the spontaneous emergence of transport and flow, and also provide a soluble cousin of Vicsek's model system of self-propelled particles.

  10. Studying many-body physics through quantum coding theory

    E-print Network

    Yoshida, Beni

    2012-01-01

    The emerging closeness between correlated spin systems and error-correcting codes enables us to use coding theoretical techniques to study physical properties of many-body spin systems. This thesis illustrates the use of ...

  11. Entanglement replication in driven-dissipative many body systems

    E-print Network

    S. Zippilli; M. Paternostro; G. Adesso; F. Illuminati

    2013-01-13

    We study the dissipative dynamics of two independent arrays of many-body systems, locally driven by a common entangled field. We show that in the steady state the entanglement of the driving field is reproduced in an arbitrarily large series of inter-array entangled pairs over all distances. Local nonclassical driving thus realizes a scale-free entanglement replication and long-distance entanglement distribution mechanism that has immediate bearing on the implementation of quantum communication networks.

  12. Entanglement replication in driven dissipative many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Zippilli, S; Paternostro, M; Adesso, G; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-25

    We study the dissipative dynamics of two independent arrays of many-body systems, locally driven by a common entangled field. We show that in the steady state the entanglement of the driving field is reproduced in an arbitrarily large series of inter-array entangled pairs over all distances. Local nonclassical driving thus realizes a scale-free entanglement replication and long-distance entanglement distribution mechanism that has immediate bearing on the implementation of quantum communication networks. PMID:25166146

  13. Collective versus Single--Particle Motion in Quantum Many--Body Systems from the Perspective of an Integrable Model

    E-print Network

    Jens Hammerling; Boris Gutkin; Thomas Guhr

    2009-11-13

    We study the emergence of collective dynamics in the integrable Hamiltonian system of two finite ensembles of coupled harmonic oscillators. After identification of a collective degree of freedom, the Hamiltonian is mapped onto a model of Caldeira-Leggett type, where the collective coordinate is coupled to an internal bath of phonons. In contrast to the usual Caldeira-Leggett model, the bath in the present case is part of the system. We derive an equation of motion for the collective coordinate which takes the form of a damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the distribution of quantum transition strengths induced by the collective mode is determined by its classical dynamics.

  14. Quantum many body physics in single and bilayer graphene

    E-print Network

    Nandkishore, Rahul (Rahul Mahajan )

    2012-01-01

    Two dimensional electron systems (2DES) provide a uniquely promising avenue for investigation of many body physics. Graphene constitutes a new and unusual 2DES, which may give rise to unexpected collective phenomena. ...

  15. Scattering approach to quantum transport and many body effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2010-12-21

    We review a series of works discussing how the scattering approach to quantum transport developed by Landauer and Buttiker for one body elastic scatterers can be extended to the case where electron-electron interactions act inside the scattering region and give rise to many body scattering. Firstly, we give an exact numerical result showing that at zero temperature a many body scatterer behaves as an effective one body scatterer, with an interaction dependent transmission. Secondly, we underline that this effective scatterer depends on the presence of external scatterers put in its vicinity. The implications of this non local scattering are illustrated studying the conductance of a quantum point contact where electrons interact with a scanning gate microscope. Thirdly, using the numerical renormalization group developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem, we study a double dot spinless model with an inter-dot interaction U and inter-dot hopping t{sub d}, coupled to leads by hopping terms t{sub c}. We show that the quantum conductance as a function of t{sub d} is given by a universal function, independently of the values of U and t{sub c}, if one measures t{sub d} in units of a characteristic scale {tau}(U,t{sub c}). Mapping the double dot system without spin onto a single dot Anderson model with spin and magnetic field, we show that {tau}(U,t{sub c}) 2T{sub K}, where T{sub K} is the Kondo temperature of the Anderson model.

  16. Tracking ultracold many-body systems in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The variety of available probing techniques have established ultracold atoms as popular systems to study quantum many body physics. However, conventional approaches are usually destructive to the full ensemble, such that real time observation is challenging. In a recent publication, Manthey et al (2015 New J. Phys. 17 103024) present a novel method to overcome this challenge via weak measurements based on laser excitation to Rydberg states. Their technique is even sensitive to the local density by selecting long-range Rydberg molecules as the final state. This achievement provides a new tool to characterize ultracold atom many-body systems, which might be especially valuable to study time correlations in out-of-equilibrium situations.

  17. Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project

    E-print Network

    Scott Bogner; Aurel Bulgac; Joseph A. Carlson; Jonathan Engel; George Fann; Richard J. Furnstahl; Stefano Gandolfi; Gaute Hagen; Mihai Horoi; Calvin W. Johnson; Markus Kortelainen; Ewing Lusk; Pieter Maris; Hai Ah Nam; Petr Navratil; Witold Nazarewicz; Esmond G. Ng; Gustavo P. A. Nobre; Erich Ormand; Thomas Papenbrock; Junchen Pei; Steven C. Pieper; Sofia Quaglioni; Kenneth J. Roche; Jason Sarich; Nicolas Schunck; Masha Sosonkina; Jun Terasaki; Ian J. Thompson; James P. Vary; Stefan M. Wild

    2013-04-12

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  18. Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project

    E-print Network

    Bogner, Scott; Carlson, Joseph A; Engel, Jonathan; Fann, George; Furnstahl, Richard J; Gandolfi, Stefano; Hagen, Gaute; Horoi, Mihai; Johnson, Calvin W; Kortelainen, Markus; Lusk, Ewing; Maris, Pieter; Nam, Hai Ah; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond G; Nobre, Gustavo P A; Ormand, Erich; Papenbrock, Thomas; Pei, Junchen; Pieper, Steven C; Quaglioni, Sofia; Roche, Kenneth J; Sarich, Jason; Schunck, Nicolas; Sosonkina, Masha; Terasaki, Jun; Thompson, Ian J; Vary, James P; Wild, Stefan M

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  19. Many-body energy localization transition in periodically driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    D’Alessio, Luca; Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 ; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-06-15

    According to the second law of thermodynamics the total entropy of a system is increased during almost any dynamical process. The positivity of the specific heat implies that the entropy increase is associated with heating. This is generally true both at the single particle level, like in the Fermi acceleration mechanism of charged particles reflected by magnetic mirrors, and for complex systems in everyday devices. Notable exceptions are known in noninteracting systems of particles moving in periodic potentials. Here the phenomenon of dynamical localization can prevent heating beyond certain threshold. The dynamical localization is known to occur both at classical (Fermi–Ulam model) and at quantum levels (kicked rotor). However, it was believed that driven ergodic systems will always heat without bound. Here, on the contrary, we report strong evidence of dynamical localization transition in both classical and quantum periodically driven ergodic systems in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. -- Highlights: •A dynamical localization transition in periodically driven ergodic systems is found. •This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. •Our results are valid for classical and quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit. •At critical frequency, the short time expansion for the evolution operator breaks down. •The transition is associated to a divergent time scale.

  20. Measuring entanglement entropies in many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klich, Israel; Refael, Gil; Silva, Alessandro

    2006-09-15

    We explore the relation between entanglement entropy of quantum many-body systems and the distribution of corresponding, properly selected, observables. Such a relation is necessary to actually measure the entanglement entropy. We show that, in general, the Shannon entropy of the probability distribution of certain symmetry observables gives a lower bound to the entropy. In some cases this bound is saturated and directly gives the entropy. We also show other cases in which the probability distribution contains enough information to extract the entropy: we show how this is done in several examples including BEC wave functions, the Dicke model, XY spin chain, and chains with strong randomness.

  1. Collective versus Single--Particle Motion in Quantum Many--Body Systems: Spreading and its Semiclassical Interpretation

    E-print Network

    Jens Hammerling; Boris Gutkin; Thomas Guhr

    2010-12-14

    We study the interplay between collective and incoherent single-particle motion in a model of two chains of particles whose interaction comprises a non-integrable part. In the perturbative regime, but for a general form of the interaction, we calculate the spectral density for collective excitations. We obtain the remarkable result that it always has a unique semiclassical interpretation. We show this by a proper renormalization procedure which allows us to map our system to a Caldeira-Leggett--type of model in which the bath is part of the system.

  2. Far-from-Equilibrium Field Theory of Many-Body Quantum Spin Systems: Prethermalization and Relaxation of Spin Spiral States in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Demler, Eugene; Knap, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the far-from-equilibrium relaxation dynamics of spin spiral states in the three-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model. The investigated problem serves as an archetype for understanding quantum dynamics of isolated many-body systems in the vicinity of a spontaneously broken continuous symmetry. We present a field-theoretical formalism that systematically improves on the mean field for describing the real-time quantum dynamics of generic spin-1 /2 systems. This is achieved by mapping spins to Majorana fermions followed by a 1 /N expansion of the resulting two-particle-irreducible effective action. Our analysis reveals rich fluctuation-induced relaxation dynamics in the unitary evolution of spin spiral states. In particular, we find the sudden appearance of long-lived prethermalized plateaus with diverging lifetimes as the spiral winding is tuned toward the thermodynamically stable ferro- or antiferromagnetic phases. The emerging prethermalized states are characterized by different bosonic modes being thermally populated at different effective temperatures and by a hierarchical relaxation process reminiscent of glassy systems. Spin-spin correlators found by solving the nonequilibrium Bethe-Salpeter equation provide further insight into the dynamic formation of correlations, the fate of unstable collective modes, and the emergence of fluctuation-dissipation relations. Our predictions can be verified experimentally using recent realizations of spin spiral states with ultracold atoms in a quantum gas microscope [S. Hild et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 147205 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.147205].

  3. Many-body energy localization transition in periodically driven systems

    E-print Network

    Luca D'Alessio; Anatoli Polkovnikov

    2013-03-19

    According to the second law of thermodynamics the total entropy of a system is increased during almost any dynamical process. The positivity of the specific heat implies that the entropy increase is associated with heating. This is generally true both at the single particle level, like in the Fermi acceleration mechanism of charged particles reflected by magnetic mirrors, and for complex systems in everyday devices. Notable exceptions are known in noninteracting systems of particles moving in periodic potentials. Here the phenomenon of dynamical localization can prevent heating beyond certain threshold. The dynamical localization is known to occur both at classical (Fermi-Ulam model) and at quantum levels (kicked rotor). However, it was believed that driven ergodic systems will always heat without bound. Here, on the contrary, we report strong evidence of dynamical localization transition in periodically driven ergodic systems in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space.

  4. Many-body localization and quantum ergodicity in disordered long-range Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Philipp; Heyl, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Ergodicity in quantum many-body systems is—despite its fundamental importance—still an open problem. Many-body localization provides a general framework for quantum ergodicity and may therefore offer important insights. However, the characterization of many-body localization through simple observables is a difficult task. In this article, we introduce a measure for distances in Hilbert space for spin-1/2 systems that can be interpreted as a generalization of the Anderson localization length to many-body Hilbert space. We show that this many-body localization length is equivalent to a simple local observable in real space, which can be measured in experiments of superconducting qubits, polar molecules, Rydberg atoms, and trapped ions. By using the many-body localization length and a necessary criterion for ergodicity that it provides, we study many-body localization and quantum ergodicity in power-law-interacting Ising models subject to disorder in a transverse field. Based on the nonequilibrium dynamical renormalization group, numerically exact diagonalization, and an analysis of the statistics of resonances, we find a many-body localized phase at infinite temperature for small power-law exponents. Within the applicability of these methods, we find no indications of a delocalization transition.

  5. Many-body localization and quantum ergodicity in disordered long-range Ising models

    E-print Network

    Philipp Hauke; Markus Heyl

    2015-08-30

    Ergodicity in quantum many-body systems is - despite its fundamental importance - still an open problem. Many-body localization provides a general framework for quantum ergodicity, and may therefore offer important insights. However, the characterization of many-body localization through simple observables is a difficult task. In this article, we introduce a measure for distances in Hilbert space for spin-1/2 systems that can be interpreted as a generalization of the Anderson localization length to the many-body Hilbert space. We show that this many-body localization length is equivalent to a simple local observable in real space, which can be measured in experiments of superconducting qubits, polar molecules, Rydberg atoms, and trapped ions. Using the many-body localization length and a necessary criterion for ergodicity that it provides, we study many-body localization and quantum ergodicity in power-law-interacting Ising models subject to disorder in the transverse field. Based on the nonequilibrium dynamical renormalization group, numerically exact diagonalization, and an analysis of the statistics of resonances we find a many-body localized phase at infinite temperature for small power-law exponents. Within the applicability of these methods, we find no indications of a delocalization transition.

  6. Many-body localization protected quantum state transfer

    E-print Network

    Norman Y. Yao; Chris R. Laumann; Ashvin Vishwanath

    2015-08-27

    In thermal phases, the quantum coherence of individual degrees of freedom is rapidly lost to the environment. Many-body localized (MBL) phases limit the spread of this coherence and appear promising for quantum information applications. However, such applications require not just long coherence times but also a means to transport and manipulate information. We demonstrate that this can be done in a one dimensional model of interacting spins at infinite temperature. Our protocol utilizes protected qubits which emerge at the boundary between topological and trivial phases. State transfer occurs via dynamic shifts of this boundary and is shown to preserve quantum information. As an example, we discuss the implementation of a universal, two-qubit gate based upon MBL-protected quantum state transfer.

  7. Critical quasienergy states in driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas Valencia, Victor Manuel; Engelhardt, Georg; Perez-Fernandez, Pedro; Vogl, Malte; Brandes, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is characterized by non-analyticities of ground-state properties at the critical points. Recently it has been shown that quantum criticality emerges also in excited states of the system, which is referred to as an excited-state quantum phase transition (ESQPT). This kind of quantum criticality is intimately related to a level clustering at critical energies, which results in a logarithmic singularity in the density of states. Most of the previous studies on quantum criticality in excited states have been focused on time independent systems. Here we study spectral singularities that appear in periodically-driven many-body systems and show how the external control allows one to engineer geometrical features of the quasienergy landscape. In particular, we study singularities in the quasienergy spectrum of a fully-connected network consisting of two-level systems with time-dependent interactions. We discuss the characteristic signatures of these singularities in observables like the magnetization, which should be measurable with current technology. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the DFG via grants BRA 1528/7, BRA 1528/8, SFB 910 (V.M.B., T.B.), the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Grants No. FIS2011-28738-C02-01) and Junta de Andalucia (Grants No. FQM160).

  8. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, George I

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  9. Measuring entanglement entropy through the interference of quantum many-body twins

    E-print Network

    Rajibul Islam; Ruichao Ma; Philipp M. Preiss; M. Eric Tai; Alexander Lukin; Matthew Rispoli; Markus Greiner

    2015-09-03

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is rapidly gaining prominence in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. Despite this generality, measuring entanglement remains challenging. This is especially true in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Leveraging our single-site resolved control of ultra-cold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare and interfere two identical copies of a many-body state. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Renyi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly-correlated many-body systems.

  10. Ideal quantum glass transitions: Many-body localization without quenched disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Schiulaz, M.; Müller, M.

    2014-08-20

    We explore the possibility for translationally invariant quantum many-body systems to undergo a dynamical glass transition, at which ergodicity and translational invariance break down spontaneously, driven entirely by quantum effects. In contrast to analogous classical systems, where the existence of such an ideal glass transition remains a controversial issue, a genuine phase transition is predicted in the quantum regime. This ideal quantum glass transition can be regarded as a many-body localization transition due to self-generated disorder. Despite their lack of thermalization, these disorder-free quantum glasses do not possess an extensive set of local conserved operators, unlike what is conjectured for many-body localized systems with strong quenched disorder.

  11. Efficient simulation of many-body localized systems

    E-print Network

    Yichen Huang

    2015-08-19

    An efficient numerical method is developed using the matrix product formalism for computing the properties at finite energy densities in one-dimensional (1D) many-body localized (MBL) systems. Arguing that any efficient (possibly quantum) algorithm can only have a polynomially small energy resolution, we propose a (rigorous) polynomial-time (classical) algorithm that outputs a diagonal density operator supported on a microcanonical ensemble of an inverse polynomial bandwidth. The proof uses no other conditions for MBL but assumes that the effect of any local perturbation (e.g., injecting conserved charges) is restricted to a region whose radius grows logarithmically with time. A non-optimal version of this algorithm efficiently simulates the quantum phase estimation algorithm in 1D MBL systems; a heuristic version of the algorithm can be easily coded and used to, e.g., detect energy-tuned dynamical quantum phase transitions between MBL phases. We extend the algorithm to two and higher spatial dimensions using the projected entangled pair formalism.

  12. Experimental Characterization of Quantum Dynamics Through Many-Body Interactions

    E-print Network

    Nigg, Daniel

    We report on the implementation of a quantum process tomography technique known as direct characterization of quantum dynamics applied on coherent and incoherent single-qubit processes in a system of trapped [superscript ...

  13. Many-body methods for nuclear systems at subnuclear densities

    E-print Network

    Armen Sedrakian; John W. Clark

    2007-10-03

    This article provides a concise review of selected topics in the many-body physics of low density nuclear systems. The discussion includes the condensation of alpha particles in supernova envelopes, formation of three-body bound states and the BEC-BCS crossover in dilute nuclear matter, and neutrino production in $S$-wave paired superfluid neutron matter.

  14. Petascale Many Body Methods for Complex Correlated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruschke, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Correlated systems constitute an important class of materials in modern condensed matter physics. Correlation among electrons are at the heart of all ordering phenomena and many intriguing novel aspects, such as quantum phase transitions or topological insulators, observed in a variety of compounds. Yet, theoretically describing these phenomena is still a formidable task, even if one restricts the models used to the smallest possible set of degrees of freedom. Here, modern computer architectures play an essential role, and the joint effort to devise efficient algorithms and implement them on state-of-the art hardware has become an extremely active field in condensed-matter research. To tackle this task single-handed is quite obviously not possible. The NSF-OISE funded PIRE collaboration ``Graduate Education and Research in Petascale Many Body Methods for Complex Correlated Systems'' is a successful initiative to bring together leading experts around the world to form a virtual international organization for addressing these emerging challenges and educate the next generation of computational condensed matter physicists. The collaboration includes research groups developing novel theoretical tools to reliably and systematically study correlated solids, experts in efficient computational algorithms needed to solve the emerging equations, and those able to use modern heterogeneous computer architectures to make then working tools for the growing community.

  15. Many-Body Localization in Periodically Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte, Pedro; Papi?, Z.; Huveneers, François; Abanin, Dmitry A.

    2015-04-01

    We consider disordered many-body systems with periodic time-dependent Hamiltonians in one spatial dimension. By studying the properties of the Floquet eigenstates, we identify two distinct phases: (i) a many-body localized (MBL) phase, in which almost all eigenstates have area-law entanglement entropy, and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) is violated, and (ii) a delocalized phase, in which eigenstates have volume-law entanglement and obey the ETH. The MBL phase exhibits logarithmic in time growth of entanglement entropy when the system is initially prepared in a product state, which distinguishes it from the delocalized phase. We propose an effective model of the MBL phase in terms of an extensive number of emergent local integrals of motion, which naturally explains the spectral and dynamical properties of this phase. Numerical data, obtained by exact diagonalization and time-evolving block decimation methods, suggest a direct transition between the two phases.

  16. Many-body localization in periodically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Pedro; Papi?, Z; Huveneers, François; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2015-04-10

    We consider disordered many-body systems with periodic time-dependent Hamiltonians in one spatial dimension. By studying the properties of the Floquet eigenstates, we identify two distinct phases: (i) a many-body localized (MBL) phase, in which almost all eigenstates have area-law entanglement entropy, and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) is violated, and (ii) a delocalized phase, in which eigenstates have volume-law entanglement and obey the ETH. The MBL phase exhibits logarithmic in time growth of entanglement entropy when the system is initially prepared in a product state, which distinguishes it from the delocalized phase. We propose an effective model of the MBL phase in terms of an extensive number of emergent local integrals of motion, which naturally explains the spectral and dynamical properties of this phase. Numerical data, obtained by exact diagonalization and time-evolving block decimation methods, suggest a direct transition between the two phases. PMID:25910094

  17. Scaling in many-body systems and proton structure function

    E-print Network

    Omar Benhar

    2001-10-17

    The observation of scaling in processes in which a weakly interacting probe delivers large momentum ${\\bf q}$ to a many-body system simply reflects the dominance of incoherent scattering off target constituents. While a suitably defined scaling function may provide rich information on the internal dynamics of the target, in general its extraction from the measured cross section requires careful consideration of the nature of the interaction driving the scattering process. The analysis of deep inelastic electron-proton scattering in the target rest frame within standard many-body theory naturally leads to the emergence of a scaling function that, unlike the commonly used structure functions $F_1$ and $F_2$, can be directly identified with the intrinsic proton response.

  18. Moments of generalized Husimi distributions and complexity of many-body quantum states

    E-print Network

    Ayumu Sugita

    2003-08-12

    We consider generalized Husimi distributions for many-body systems, and show that their moments are good measures of complexity of many-body quantum states. Our construction of the Husimi distribution is based on the coherent state of the single-particle transformation group. Then the coherent states are independent-particle states, and, at the same time, the most localized states in the Husimi representation. Therefore delocalization of the Husimi distribution, which can be measured by the moments, is a sign of many-body correlation (entanglement). Since the delocalization of the Husimi distribution is also related to chaoticity of the dynamics, it suggests a relation between entanglement and chaos. Our definition of the Husimi distribution can be applied not only to the systems of distinguishable particles, but also to those of identical particles, i.e., fermions and bosons. We derive an algebraic formula to evaluate the moments of the Husimi distribution.

  19. Many-Body Quantum Spin Dynamics with Monte Carlo Trajectories on a Discrete Phase Space

    E-print Network

    Johannes Schachenmayer; Alexander Pikovski; Ana Maria Rey

    2015-02-25

    Interacting spin systems are of fundamental relevance in different areas of physics, as well as in quantum information science, and biology. These spin models represent the simplest, yet not fully understood, manifestation of quantum many-body systems. An important outstanding problem is the efficient numerical computation of dynamics in large spin systems. Here we propose a new semiclassical method to study many-body spin dynamics in generic spin lattice models. The method is based on a discrete Monte Carlo sampling in phase-space in the framework of the so-called truncated Wigner approximation. Comparisons with analytical and numerically exact calculations demonstrate the power of the technique. They show that it correctly reproduces the dynamics of one- and two-point correlations and spin squeezing at short times, thus capturing entanglement. Our results open the possibility to study the quantum dynamics accessible to recent experiments in regimes where other numerical methods are inapplicable.

  20. Many-Body Quantum Spin Dynamics with Monte Carlo Trajectories on a Discrete Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, J.; Pikovski, A.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Interacting spin systems are of fundamental relevance in different areas of physics, as well as in quantum information science and biology. These spin models represent the simplest, yet not fully understood, manifestation of quantum many-body systems. An important outstanding problem is the efficient numerical computation of dynamics in large spin systems. Here, we propose a new semiclassical method to study many-body spin dynamics in generic spin lattice models. The method is based on a discrete Monte Carlo sampling in phase space in the framework of the so-called truncated Wigner approximation. Comparisons with analytical and numerically exact calculations demonstrate the power of the technique. They show that it correctly reproduces the dynamics of one- and two-point correlations and spin squeezing at short times, thus capturing entanglement. Our results open the possibility to study the quantum dynamics accessible to recent experiments in regimes where other numerical methods are inapplicable.

  1. Critical quasienergy states in driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, V. M.; Engelhardt, G.; Pérez-Fernández, P.; Vogl, M.; Brandes, T.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss singularities in the spectrum of driven many-body spin systems. In contrast to undriven models, the driving allows us to control the geometry of the quasienergy landscape. As a consequence, one can engineer singularities in the density of quasienergy states by tuning an external control. We show that the density of levels exhibits logarithmic divergences at the saddle points, while jumps are due to local minima of the quasienergy landscape. We discuss the characteristic signatures of these divergences in observables such as the magnetization, which should be measurable with current technology.

  2. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umer; Bayat, Abolfazl; Mancini, Stefano; Bose, Sougato

    2015-04-01

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatic preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground-state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it a good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic quantum information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground-state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  3. Spectral statistics of chaotic many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Rémy Dubertrand; Sebastian Müller

    2015-09-08

    We derive a trace formula that expresses the level density of chaotic many-body systems as a smooth term plus a sum over contributions associated to solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. Our formula applies to bosonic systems with discretised positions, such as the Bose-Hubbard model, in the semiclassical limit as well as in the limit where the number of particles is taken to infinity. We use the trace formula to investigate the spectral statistics of these systems, by studying interference between solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. We show that in the limits taken the statistics of fully chaotic many-particle systems becomes universal and agrees with predictions from the Wigner-Dyson ensembles of random matrix theory. The conditions for Wigner-Dyson statistics involve a gap in the spectrum of the Frobenius-Perron operator, leaving the possibility of different statistics for systems with weaker chaotic properties.

  4. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    E-print Network

    Umer Farooq; Abolfazl Bayat; Stefano Mancini; Sougato Bose

    2015-04-27

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatically preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic classical information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  5. Many-Body Green Function of Degenerate Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brouder, Christian; Panati, Gianluca; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2009-12-04

    A rigorous nonperturbative adiabatic approximation of the evolution operator in the many-body physics of degenerate systems is derived. This approximation is used to solve the long-standing problem of the choice of the initial states of H{sub 0} leading to eigenstates of H{sub 0}+V for degenerate systems. These initial states are eigenstates of P{sub 0}VP{sub 0}, where P{sub 0} is the projection onto a degenerate eigenspace of H{sub 0}. This result is used to give the proper definition of the Green function, the statistical Green function and the nonequilibrium Green function of degenerate systems. The convergence of these Green functions is established.

  6. Phase-space characterization of complexity in quantum many-body dynamics.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Vinitha; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio; Gong, Jiangbin

    2010-10-01

    We propose a phase-space Wigner harmonics entropy measure for many-body quantum dynamical complexity. This measure, which reduces to the well-known measure of complexity in classical systems and which is valid for both pure and mixed states in single-particle and many-body systems, takes into account the combined role of chaos and entanglement in the realm of quantum mechanics. The effectiveness of the measure is illustrated in the example of the Ising chain in a homogeneous tilted magnetic field. We provide numerical evidence that the multipartite entanglement generation leads to a linear increase in entropy until saturation in both integrable and chaotic regimes, so that in both cases the number of harmonics of the Wigner function grows exponentially with time. The entropy growth rate can be used to detect quantum phase transitions. The proposed entropy measure can also distinguish between integrable and chaotic many-body dynamics by means of the size of long-term fluctuations which become smaller when quantum chaos sets in. PMID:21230374

  7. Low-frequency conductivity in many-body localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Müller, Markus; Khemani, Vedika; Knap, Michael; Demler, Eugene; Huse, David A.

    2015-09-01

    We argue that the ac conductivity ? (? ) in the many-body localized phase is a power law of frequency ? at low frequency: specifically, ? (? ) ˜?? with the exponent ? approaching 1 at the phase transition to the thermal phase, and asymptoting to 2 deep in the localized phase. We identify two separate mechanisms giving rise to this power law: deep in the localized phase, the conductivity is dominated by rare resonant pairs of configurations; close to the transition, the dominant contributions are rare regions that are locally critical or in the thermal phase. We present numerical evidence supporting these claims, and discuss how these power laws can also be seen through polarization-decay measurements in ultracold atomic systems.

  8. Exploring dynamics of unstable many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    In this work we acquaint reader with the Continuum Shell Model (CSM), which is a proper theoretical tool for the description of physics of unstable systems. We describe the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian of the CSM and concentrate on specific aspects of dynamics using realistic examples. The continuum effects are discussed in the case of weakly bound heavy oxygen isotopes, where inclusion of continuum coupling is necessary to improve the traditional nuclear shell model techniques. Physics of overlapping resonances is illustrated using recent experimental information on 8B nucleus. In the limit of strong continuum coupling the many-body states restructure relative to continuum leading to a few very broad super-radiant states, while at the same time other states become narrow and nearly decoupled from decay. The recent observations of very broad alpha clustering states in 18O is one of the most transparent manifestations of super-radiance.

  9. Exploring dynamics of unstable many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-10-15

    In this work we acquaint reader with the Continuum Shell Model (CSM), which is a proper theoretical tool for the description of physics of unstable systems. We describe the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian of the CSM and concentrate on specific aspects of dynamics using realistic examples. The continuum effects are discussed in the case of weakly bound heavy oxygen isotopes, where inclusion of continuum coupling is necessary to improve the traditional nuclear shell model techniques. Physics of overlapping resonances is illustrated using recent experimental information on {sup 8}B nucleus. In the limit of strong continuum coupling the many-body states restructure relative to continuum leading to a few very broad super-radiant states, while at the same time other states become narrow and nearly decoupled from decay. The recent observations of very broad alpha clustering states in {sup 18}O is one of the most transparent manifestations of super-radiance.

  10. Many-body Quantum Reaction Dynamics near the Fusion Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Luong, D. H.; Hinde, D. J.; Evers, M.

    2014-03-01

    The understanding of quantum effects in determining nuclear reaction outcomes is evolving as improved experimental techniques reveal new facets of interaction dynamics. Whilst the phenomenon of coupling-enhanced quantum tunnelling is understood to arise due to quantum superposition, the observed inhibition of fusion at energies well below the barrier is not yet quantitatively understood. Collisions involving weakly-bound nuclei, which have low energy thresholds against breakup, present further challenges. Recent coincidence measurements for reactions of weakly bound stable nuclei have not only provided a complete picture of the physical mechanisms triggering breakup, but have also shown how information on reaction dynamics occurring on time-scales of ~zepto-seconds can be obtained experimentally. These new experimental findings demand major developments in quantum models of near-barrier nuclear reactions.

  11. Quantum drude oscillators for accurate many-body intermolecular forces 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    One of the important early applications of Quantum Mechanics was to explain the Van-der-Waal’s 1/R6 potential that is observed experimentally between two neutral species, such as noble gas atoms, in terms of correlated ...

  12. How an interacting many-body system tunnels through a potential barrier to open space

    PubMed Central

    Lode, Axel U.J.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Sakmann, Kaspar; Alon, Ofir E.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2012-01-01

    The tunneling process in a many-body system is a phenomenon which lies at the very heart of quantum mechanics. It appears in nature in the form of ?-decay, fusion and fission in nuclear physics, and photoassociation and photodissociation in biology and chemistry. A detailed theoretical description of the decay process in these systems is a very cumbersome problem, either because of very complicated or even unknown interparticle interactions or due to a large number of constituent particles. In this work, we theoretically study the phenomenon of quantum many-body tunneling in a transparent and controllable physical system, an ultracold atomic gas. We analyze a full, numerically exact many-body solution of the Schrödinger equation of a one-dimensional system with repulsive interactions tunneling to open space. We show how the emitted particles dissociate or fragment from the trapped and coherent source of bosons: The overall many-particle decay process is a quantum interference of single-particle tunneling processes emerging from sources with different particle numbers taking place simultaneously. The close relation to atom lasers and ionization processes allows us to unveil the great relevance of many-body correlations between the emitted and trapped fractions of the wave function in the respective processes. PMID:22869703

  13. Dynamics of many-body localization in a translation-invariant quantum glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Horssen, Merlijn; Levi, Emanuele; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2015-09-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of a translationally invariant quantum spin chain, based on the East kinetically constrained glass model, in search for evidence of many-body localization in the absence of disorder. Numerical simulations indicate a change, controlled by a coupling parameter, from a regime of fast relaxation-corresponding to thermalization-to a regime of very slow relaxation. This slowly relaxing regime is characterized by dynamical features usually associated with nonergodicity and many-body localization (MBL): memory of initial conditions, logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy, and nonexponential decay of time correlators. We show that slow relaxation is a consequence of sensitivity to spatial fluctuations in the initial state. While numerical results and physical considerations indicate that relaxation time scales grow markedly with size, our finite size results are consistent both with an MBL transition, expected to only occur in disordered systems, and with a pronounced quasi-MBL crossover.

  14. Dynamics of many-body localisation in a translation invariant quantum glass model

    E-print Network

    Merlijn van Horssen; Emanuele Levi; Juan P. Garrahan

    2015-05-26

    We study the real-time dynamics of a translationally invariant quantum spin chain, based on the East kinetically constrained glass model, in search for evidence of many-body localisation in the absence of disorder. Numerical simulations indicate a change, controlled by a coupling parameter, from a regime of fast relaxation---corresponding to thermalisation---to a regime of very slow relaxation. This slowly relaxing regime is characterised by dynamical features usually associated with non-ergodicity and many-body localisation (MBL): memory of initial conditions, logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy, and non-exponential decay of time-correlators. We show that slow relaxation is a consequence of sensitivity to spatial fluctuations in the initial state. While numerics indicate that certain relaxation timescales grow markedly with size, our finite size results are consistent both with an MBL transition, expected to only occur in disordered systems, or with a pronounced quasi-MBL crossover.

  15. Conservative chaotic map as a model of quantum many-body environment

    E-print Network

    Davide Rossini; Giuliano Benenti; Giulio Casati

    2006-06-08

    We study the dynamics of the entanglement between two qubits coupled to a common chaotic environment, described by the quantum kicked rotator model. We show that the kicked rotator, which is a single-particle deterministic dynamical system, can reproduce the effects of a pure dephasing many-body bath. Indeed, in the semiclassical limit the interaction with the kicked rotator can be described as a random phase-kick, so that decoherence is induced in the two-qubit system. We also show that our model can efficiently simulate non-Markovian environments.

  16. Scale-free entanglement replication in driven-dissipative many body systems

    E-print Network

    Zippilli, S; Adesso, G; Illuminati, F

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of independent arrays of many-body dissipative systems, subject to a common driving by an entangled light field. We show that in the steady state the global system orders in a series of inter-array strongly entangled pairs over all distances. Such scale-free entanglement replication and long-distance distribution mechanism has potential applications for the implementation of robust quantum networked communication.

  17. Some aspects of the dynamics of many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Irene

    In this thesis multiple aspects of several many-body systems are studied using different techniques. Most of the chapters are self-contained and I will now briefly summarize their content. Chapter 1 is introductory and gives a brief overview of the topics. In chapter 2, after solving the Schrodinger equation for a time dependent two-electron system, we calculate the enact exchange-correlation potential vxc, that, in the mainframe of Time Dependent Density Functional Theory, enters the ``Kohn-Sham'' equations. This enact result will be compared with various approximate forms for vxc 1. In chapter 3 we study the collective dynamics of electrons at the edge of a system. Using the continuum elasticity theory, we analyze the modes that propagate along the edge of a two-dimensional electron system (liquid or crystal) in a magnetic field. We find that, if the wave vector q is sufficiently small, the system presents a universal dispersion curve and we provide analytical formulas for the dispersion and damping of the modes in various physical regimes2. In chapter 4 we develop the theory of the spin Coulomb drag: in spin polarized transport there is an intrinsic source of friction for spin currents due to the fact that, because of Coulomb interactions, the up and down components of the momentum are not separately conserved. We calculate the ``spin trans- resistivity'' and suggest an experiment to measure it3. Chapter 5 is dedicated to further study spin transport. We examine the mobility and diffusion constants of a spin packet in semiconductors doped with (i)non-magnetic and (ii)magnetic impurities. In the paramagnetic phase we find that the diffusion constant Ds is always reduced by interactions. On the other hand our formulas show that Ds is a critical quantity-i.e. vanishes at the onset of the ferromagnetic transition. For temperatures lower than the critical temperature, the diffusion constant can be greatly increased by the enhancement of the carrier spin stiffness due to polarization4. In the last chapter I sketch part of my work on charged colloidal system. I will focus on the possibility of effective attraction between like-charged macroions, i.e. what happens when the Coulomb coupling between macroions and counterions becomes very strong. I will introduce and point out the importance of the ``depletion force'', that, in the regime we studied, is responsible for attraction5. 1I. D'Amico and G. Vignale, Phys. Rev. B 59, 7876 (1999). 2I. D'Amico and G. Vignale, Phys. Rev. B 60, 2084 (1999). 3I. D'Amico and G. Vignale, in print, Phys. Rev. B (2000). 4I. D'Amico and G. Vignale, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000); I. D'Amico and G. Vignale, in progress (2000). 5E. Allahyarov, I. D'Amico and H. Loewen, Phys. Rev. Lett . 81, 1334 (1998)

  18. Many-Body Effects and Lineshape of Intersubband Transitions in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Intersubband Transition (ISBT) infrared (IR) absorption and PL in InAs/AlSb were studied for narrow Quantum Wells (QWs). A large redshift was observed (7-10 meV) as temperature increased. A comprehensive many-body theory was developed for ISBTs including contributions of c-c and c-phonon scatterings. Many-body effects were studied systematically for ISBTs. Redshift and linewidth dependence on temperature, as well as spectral features were well explained by theory.

  19. Entanglement and dynamics in many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Anushya

    In the first part of this dissertation, we study the dynamics of isolated and clean quantum systems out of equilibrium. We initially address the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) problem of determining the dynamical evolution of a system close to its critical point under slow changes of a control parameter. We formulate a scaling limit in which the nonequilibrium behavior is universal and discuss the universal content. We then report computations of some scaling functions in model Gaussian and large-N problems. Next, we apply KZ scaling to topologically ordered systems with no local order parameter. In the examples of the Ising gauge theory and the SU(2)k phases of the Levin-Wen models, we observe a slow, coarsening dynamics for the string-net that underlies the physics of the topological phase at late times for ramps across transitions that reduce topological order. We conclude by studying quenches in the quantum O(N) model in the infinite N limit in varying spatial dimensions. Despite the failure to equilibrate owing to an infinite number of emergent conservation laws, the qualitative features of late time states following quenches is predicted by the equilibrium phase diagram. In the second part of this dissertation, we explore the relationship between entanglement and topological order in fractional quantum Hall (FQH) phases. In 2008, Li and Haldane conjectured that the entanglement spectrum (ES), a presentation of the Schmidt values of a real space cut, reflects the energy spectrum of the FQH chiral edge. Specifically, both spectra should have the same quasi-degeneracy of eigenvalues everywhere in the phase. We offer an analytic, microscopic proof of this conjecture in the Read-Rezayi sequence of model states. We further identify a different ES that reflects the bulk quasihole spectrum and prove a bulk-edge correspondence in the ES. Finally, we show that the finite-size corrections of the ES of the Laughlin states reveal the fractionalization of the underlying quasiparticles.

  20. The many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method for time-dependent ab-initio quantum simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of ab-initio approaches is the simulation of many-body quantum systems from the first principles of quantum mechanics. These methods are traditionally based on the many-body Schrödinger equation which represents an incredible mathematical challenge. In this paper, we introduce the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method in the context of distinguishable particles and in the absence of spin-dependent effects. Despite these restrictions, the method has several advantages. First of all, the Wigner formalism is intuitive, as it is based on the concept of a quasi-distribution function. Secondly, the Monte Carlo numerical approach allows scalability on parallel machines that is practically unachievable by means of other techniques based on finite difference or finite element methods. Finally, this method allows time-dependent ab-initio simulations of strongly correlated quantum systems. In order to validate our many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method, as a case study we simulate a relatively simple system consisting of two particles in several different situations. We first start from two non-interacting free Gaussian wave packets. We, then, proceed with the inclusion of an external potential barrier, and we conclude by simulating two entangled (i.e. correlated) particles. The results show how, in the case of negligible spin-dependent effects, the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method provides an efficient and reliable tool to study the time-dependent evolution of quantum systems composed of distinguishable particles.

  1. Quantum simulator for many-body electron-electron Coulomb interaction with ion traps

    E-print Network

    Da-Wei Luo; P. V. Pyshkin; Michele. Modugno; Mike Guidry; J. Q. You; Lian-Ao Wu

    2015-12-16

    We propose an analog quantum simulator that uses ion traps to realize the many-body electron-electron Coulomb interaction of an electron gas. This proposal maps a system that is difficult to solve and control to an experimentally-feasible setup that can be realized with current technologies. Using a dilatation transform, we show that ion traps can efficiently simulate electronic Coulomb interactions. No complexity overhead is added if only the energy spectrum is desired, and only a simple unitary transform is needed on the initial state otherwise. The runtime of the simulation is found to be much shorter than the timescale of the corresponding electronic system, minimizing susceptibility of the proposed quantum simulator to external noise and decoherence. This proposal works in any number of dimensions, and could be used to simulate different topological phases of electrons in graphene-like structures, by using ions trapped in honeycomb lattices.

  2. Hidden Quantum Markov Models and non-adaptive read-out of many-body states

    E-print Network

    Alex Monras; Almut Beige; Karoline Wiesner

    2012-08-30

    Stochastic finite-state generators are compressed descriptions of infinite time series. Alternatively, compressed descriptions are given by quantum finite- state generators [K. Wiesner and J. P. Crutchfield, Physica D 237, 1173 (2008)]. These are based on repeated von Neumann measurements on a quantum dynamical system. Here we generalise the quantum finite-state generators by replacing the von Neumann pro jections by stochastic quantum operations. In this way we assure that any time series with a stochastic compressed description has a compressed quantum description. Moreover, we establish a link between our stochastic generators and the sequential readout of many-body states with translationally-invariant matrix product state representations. As an example, we consider the non-adaptive read-out of 1D cluster states. This is shown to be equivalent to a Hidden Quantum Model with two internal states, providing insight on the inherent complexity of the process. Finally, it is proven by example that the quantum description can have a higher degree of compression than the classical stochastic one.

  3. Quantum-circuit design for efficient simulations of many-body quantum dynamics

    E-print Network

    Sadegh Raeisi; Nathan Wiebe; Barry C. Sanders

    2012-10-10

    We construct an efficient autonomous quantum-circuit design algorithm for creating efficient quantum circuits to simulate Hamiltonian many-body quantum dynamics for arbitrary input states. The resultant quantum circuits have optimal space complexity and employ a sequence of gates that is close to optimal with respect to time complexity. We also devise an algorithm that exploits commutativity to optimize the circuits for parallel execution. As examples, we show how our autonomous algorithm constructs circuits for simulating the dynamics of Kitaev's honeycomb model and the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer model of superconductivity. Furthermore we provide numerical evidence that the rigorously proven upper bounds for the simulation error here and in previous work may sometimes overestimate the error by orders of magnitude compared to the best achievable performance for some physics-inspired simulations.

  4. The nonequilibrium quantum many-body problem as a paradigm for extreme data science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freericks, J. K.; Nikoli?, B. K.; Frieder, O.

    2014-12-01

    Generating big data pervades much of physics. But some problems, which we call extreme data problems, are too large to be treated within big data science. The nonequilibrium quantum many-body problem on a lattice is just such a problem, where the Hilbert space grows exponentially with system size and rapidly becomes too large to fit on any computer (and can be effectively thought of as an infinite-sized data set). Nevertheless, much progress has been made with computational methods on this problem, which serve as a paradigm for how one can approach and attack extreme data problems. In addition, viewing these physics problems from a computer-science perspective leads to new approaches that can be tried to solve more accurately and for longer times. We review a number of these different ideas here.

  5. Exact numerical methods for a many-body Wannier-Stark system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Murillo, Carlos A.; Madroñero, Javier; Wimberger, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    We present exact methods for the numerical integration of the Wannier-Stark system in a many-body scenario including two Bloch bands. Our ab initio approaches allow for the treatment of a few-body problem with bosonic statistics and strong interparticle interaction. The numerical implementation is based on the Lanczos algorithm for the diagonalization of large, but sparse symmetric Floquet matrices. We analyze the scheme efficiency in terms of the computational time, which is shown to scale polynomially with the size of the system. The numerically computed eigensystem is applied to the analysis of the Floquet Hamiltonian describing our problem. We show that this allows, for instance, for the efficient detection and characterization of avoided crossings and their statistical analysis. We finally compare the efficiency of our Lanczos diagonalization for computing the temporal evolution of our many-body system with an explicit fourth order Runge-Kutta integration. Both implementations heavily exploit efficient matrix-vector multiplication schemes. Our results should permit an extrapolation of the applicability of exact methods to increasing sizes of generic many-body quantum problems with bosonic statistics.

  6. Synergetic approach to many-body problems: From scattering charge transfer to arrays of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onufriev, Alexey Vlad

    We call synergetic an approach in which the use of analytical and numerical methods interweave, the results naturally complimenting each other. Analytical results improve numerical approximations and vice versa. We apply this philosophy to two particularly interesting many-body problems involving charge transfer. First, we consider charge transfer between alkali atoms and metallic scattering surfaces. The question is this: what is the final charge state of an atom scattered off a metal surface as a function of its initial state and other experimental parameters, such as atom's velocity and surface work function? We use a generalized time-dependent Newns-Anderson Hamiltonian which includes electron spin, multiple atomic orbitals with image shifted levels, intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion, and resonant exchange. A variational electronic many-body wave function solves the dynamical problem. The wave function consists of sectors with either zero, one, or two particle-hole pairs: the wave function ansatz is equivalent to a 1/N expansion (we set N = 2 for the physical case of electrons). The equations of motion are integrated numerically without further approximation. The solution shows loss-of-memory--the final charge state is independent of the initial one--in agreement with theoretical and experimental expectations. We develop a picture of probability flow between different sectors of the Hilbert space, and show that retaining sectors up to the second order in 1/N is sufficient for an accurate description of charge transfer. As further tests of the theory, we reproduce the experimentally observed peak in the excited neutral Li(2p) occupancy at intermediate work functions starting from different initial conditions. We include Auger processes by adding two-body interaction terms to the many-body Hamiltonian. Preliminary experimental evidence for an upturn in the Li(2p) occupancy at the lowest work-functions may be explained by Auger transitions. Next, we turn our attention to a different class of physical systems which involve charge transfer, namely arrays of semiconducting quantum dots. The physics of these structures is rich, as novel phases are attainable. We find conditions under which enhanced symmetry characterized by the group SU(4) occurs in isolated semiconducting quantum dots. A Hubbard model then describes a pillar array of coupled dots and at half-filling it can be mapped onto a SU(4) spin chain, which has a reach phase diagram. The chain spontaneously dimerizes which we confirm numerically by using a recent numerical technique--the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG). We suggest further improvements to the method. Our DMRG analysis also shows that this state is robust to perturbations which break SU(4) symmetry. We propose ways to experimentally verify the phases.

  7. The Rigorous Derivation of the 2D Cubic Focusing NLS from Quantum Many-body Evolution

    E-print Network

    Xuwen Chen; Justin Holmer

    2015-10-02

    We consider a 2D time-dependent quantum system of $N$-bosons with harmonic external confining and \\emph{attractive} interparticle interaction in the Gross-Pitaevskii scaling. We derive stability of matter type estimates showing that the $k$-th power of the energy controls the $H^{1}$ Sobolev norm of the solution over $k$-particles. This estimate is new and more difficult for attractive interactions than repulsive interactions. For the proof, we use a version of the finite-dimensional quantum di Finetti theorem from [49]. A high particle-number averaging effect is at play in the proof, which is not needed for the corresponding estimate in the repulsive case. This a priori bound allows us to prove that the corresponding BBGKY hierarchy converges to the GP limit as was done in many previous works treating the case of repulsive interactions. As a result, we obtain that the \\emph{focusing} nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is the mean-field limit of the 2D time-dependent quantum many-body system with attractive interatomic interaction and asymptotically factorized initial data. An assumption on the size of the $L^{1}$-norm of the interatomic interaction potential is needed that corresponds to the sharp constant in the 2D Gagliardo-Nirenberg inequality though the inequality is not directly relevant because we are dealing with a trace instead of a power.

  8. Two, three, many body systems involving mesons. Multimeson condensates

    E-print Network

    E. Oset; M. Bayar; A. Dote; T. Hyodo; P. K. Khemchandani; W. H. Liang; A. Martinez Torres; M. Oka; L. Roca; T. Uchino; C. W. Xiao

    2015-10-19

    In this talk we review results from studies with unconventional many hadron systems containing mesons: systems with two mesons and one baryon, three mesons, some novel systems with two baryons and one meson, and finally systems with many vector mesons, up to six, with their spins aligned forming states of increasing spin. We show that in many cases one has experimental counterparts for the states found, while in some other cases they remain as predictions, which we suggest to be searched in BESIII, Belle, LHCb, FAIR and other facilities.

  9. Dynamical Phase Transitions and Instabilities in Open Atomic Many-Body Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Sebastian; Micheli, Andrea; Zoller, Peter; Tomadin, Andrea; Fazio, Rosario

    2010-07-02

    We discuss an open driven-dissipative many-body system, in which the competition of unitary Hamiltonian and dissipative Liouvillian dynamics leads to a nonequilibrium phase transition. It shares features of a quantum phase transition in that it is interaction driven, and of a classical phase transition, in that the ordered phase is continuously connected to a thermal state. We characterize the phase diagram and the critical behavior at the phase transition approached as a function of time. We find a novel fluctuation induced dynamical instability, which occurs at long wavelength as a consequence of a subtle dissipative renormalization effect on the speed of sound.

  10. Order-disorder transitions in a sheared many body system

    E-print Network

    Jens C. Pfeifer; Tobias Bischoff; Georg Ehlers; Bruno Eckhardt

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by experiments on sheared suspensions that show a transition between ordered and disordered phases, we here study the long-time behavior of a sheared and overdamped 2-d system of particles interacting by repulsive forces. As a function of interaction strength and shear rate we find transitions between phases with vanishing and large single-particle diffusion. In the phases with vanishing single-particle diffusion, the system evolves towards regular lattices, usually on very slow time scales. Different lattices can be approached, depending on interaction strength and forcing amplitude. The disordered state appears in parameter regions where the regular lattices are unstable. Correlation functions between the particles reveal the formation of shear bands. In contrast to single particle densities, the spatially resolved two-particle correlation functions vary with time and allow to determine the phase within a period. As in the case of the suspensions, motion in the state with low diffusivity is essentially reversible, whereas in the state with strong diffusion it is not.

  11. The structure of many-body entanglement

    E-print Network

    Swingle, Brian Gordon

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss the general spatial structure of quantum entanglement in local many-body systems. A central theme is the organizing power of the renormalization group for thinking about many-body entanglement. ...

  12. Unveiling hidden structure of many-body wavefunctions of integrable systems via sudden expansion experiments

    E-print Network

    Zhongtao Mei; L. Vidmar; F. Heidrich-Meisner; C. J. Bolech

    2015-09-02

    In the theory of Bethe-ansatz integrable quantum systems, rapidities play an important role as they are used to specify many-body states, apart from phases. The physical interpretation of rapidities going back to Sutherland is that they are the asymptotic momenta after letting a quantum gas expand into a larger volume making it dilute and noninteracting. We exploit this picture to make a direct connection to quantities that are accessible in sudden-expansion experiments with ultracold quantum gases. By a direct comparison of Bethe-ansatz and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group results, we demonstrate that the expansion velocity of a one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model can be predicted from knowing the distribution of occupied rapidities defined by the initial state. Curiously, an approximate Bethe-ansatz solution works well also for the Bose-Hubbard model.

  13. Computational approaches to many-body dynamics of unstable nuclear systems

    E-print Network

    Alexander Volya

    2014-12-19

    The goal of this presentation is to highlight various computational techniques used to study dynamics of quantum many-body systems. We examine the projection and variable phase methods being applied to multi-channel problems of scattering and tunneling; here the virtual, energy-forbidden channels and their treatment are of particular importance. The direct time-dependent solutions using Trotter-Suzuki propagator expansion provide yet another approach to exploring the complex dynamics of unstable systems. While presenting computational tools, we briefly revisit the general theory of the quantum decay of unstable states. The list of questions here includes those of the internal dynamics in decaying systems, formation and evolution of the radiating state, and low-energy background that dominates at remote times. Mathematical formulations and numerical approaches to time-dependent problems are discussed using the quasi-stationary methods involving effective Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian formulation.

  14. Algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics using dynamical coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, M.; Kosloff, R.

    2010-04-15

    An algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics having su(2) spectrum-generating algebra is developed. The algorithm is based on the idea of dynamical coarse-graining. The original unitary dynamics of the target observables--the elements of the spectrum-generating algebra--is simulated by a surrogate open-system dynamics, which can be interpreted as weak measurement of the target observables, performed on the evolving system. The open-system state can be represented by a mixture of pure states, localized in the phase space. The localization reduces the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension n by factor n{sup 3/2}(ln n){sup -1} compared to conventional sparse-matrix methods. The guidelines for the choice of parameters for the simulation are presented and the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension of the system is estimated. The algorithm is applied to the simulation of the dynamics of systems of 2x10{sup 4} and 2x10{sup 6} cold atoms in a double-well trap, described by the two-site Bose-Hubbard model.

  15. Quantum simulation of many-body physics with neutral atoms, molecules, and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss-Feig, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The achievement of quantum degeneracy in alkali vapors has enabled the simulation of iconic condensed-matter models. However, ultracold alkali atoms are not yet cold enough to simulate the most interesting and poorly understood low-temperature properties of those models. In this talk, I will emphasize how the rich internal structure of alkaline earth atoms, ions, and molecules can be leveraged to simulate complex many-body physics in presently accessible experimental settings. I will begin by examining how alkaline earth atoms can be used to simulate the physics of so-called heavy fermion materials, and will show how the exotic groundstate properties of those materials manifests in non-equilibrium dynamics at relatively warm temperatures. Not surprisingly, the rich structure of alkaline earth atoms and molecules comes with a price, in many cases increasing the susceptibility of these systems to decoherence. A particularly troubling feature common to alkaline earth atoms and many molecules is the possibility of two-body loss. However, I will show that such loss can be harnessed to drive optically excited alkaline earth atoms and reactive molecules into highly-entangled non-equilibrium steady states, which could be used in the near future to improve the accuracy of high precision atomic clocks operated with alkaline earth atoms. The fate of interacting quantum systems in the presence of decoherence is of interest much more broadly, and I will conclude by describing how trapped ion systems provide a natural platform for addressing this issue. In particular, I will describe an exact solution of the dissipative Ising models that govern trapped ion systems, which affords both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the effects of decoherence on these large-scale quantum simulators.

  16. Quantum simulation of many-body physics with neutral atoms, molecules, and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss-Feig, Michael

    Real materials are extremely complicated, and any attempt to understand their bulk properties must begin with the appropriate choice of an idealized model, or Hamiltonian. There are many situations where such models have furnished a decisive understanding of complex quantum phenomena, such as BCS superconductivity and quantum magnetism. There are also cases, for instance the unconventional superconductivity of doped cuprates or heavy-fermion metals, where even the simplest conceivable models are intractable to current theoretical techniques. A promising route toward understanding the physics of such models is to simulate them directly with a highly controlled quantum system. Ultracold neutral atoms, polar molecules, and ions are in many ways ideally suited to this task. In this thesis, we emphasize how the unique features of particular atomic and molecular systems can be leveraged to access interesting physics in experimentally feasible temperature regimes. In chapter 3, we consider prospects for simulation of the Kondo lattice model using alkaline-earth atoms. In particular, we show how groundstate properties—for instance anomalous mass enhancement—can be probed by looking at far-from equilibrium dynamics, which are a standard diagnostic tool in ultracold atom experiments. Chapter 4 describes a realistic implementation of a bosonic version of the Kondo lattice model, and we show how the Kondo interaction qualitatively changes the superfluid to Mott insulator phase transition. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 are unified through an attempt to understand the effects of dissipation in many-body quantum systems. In chapter 5, our goal is mainly to understand the detrimental effects of two-body reactive collisions on dipolar molecules in a 3D optical lattice. Chapter 6 takes a rather different perspective, and shows that this type of loss naturally induces quantum correlations in the steady state of reactive fermionic molecules or alkaline earth atoms. In chapter 7, we develop an exact analytic solution for the non-equilibrium dynamics of long-ranged Ising models with Markovian decoherence. We apply our solution to the benchmarking of dynamics in an existing trapped-ion quantum simulator, which due to its large size and long-ranged, frustrated, interactions is well beyond the reach of a brute force numerical description.

  17. Radiative heat transfer in anisotropic many-body systems: Tuning and enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Nikbakht, Moladad

    2014-09-07

    A general formalism for calculating the radiative heat transfer in many body systems with anisotropic component is presented. Our scheme extends the theory of radiative heat transfer in isotropic many body systems to anisotropic cases. In addition, the radiative heating of the particles by the thermal bath is taken into account in our formula. It is shown that the radiative heat exchange (HE) between anisotropic particles and their radiative cooling/heating (RCH) could be enhanced several order of magnitude than that of isotropic particles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the HE and RCH can be tuned dramatically by particles relative orientation in many body systems.

  18. Collective many-body van der Waals interactions in molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    DiStasio, Robert A.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) interactions are ubiquitous in molecules and condensed matter, and play a crucial role in determining the structure, stability, and function for a wide variety of systems. The accurate prediction of these interactions from first principles is a substantial challenge because they are inherently quantum mechanical phenomena that arise from correlations between many electrons within a given molecular system. We introduce an efficient method that accurately describes the nonadditive many-body vdW energy contributions arising from interactions that cannot be modeled by an effective pairwise approach, and demonstrate that such contributions can significantly exceed the energy of thermal fluctuations—a critical accuracy threshold highly coveted during molecular simulations—in the prediction of several relevant properties. Cases studied include the binding affinity of ellipticine, a DNA-intercalating anticancer agent, the relative energetics between the A- and B-conformations of DNA, and the thermodynamic stability among competing paracetamol molecular crystal polymorphs. Our findings suggest that inclusion of the many-body vdW energy is essential for achieving chemical accuracy and therefore must be accounted for in molecular simulations. PMID:22923693

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Many-Body Quantum Theory in Condensed Matter Physics—An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, D. E.

    2005-02-01

    This is undoubtedly an ambitious book. It aims to provide a wide ranging, yet self-contained and pedagogical introduction to techniques of quantum many-body theory in condensed matter physics, without losing mathematical `rigor' (which I hope means rigour), and with an eye on physical insight, motivation and application. The authors certainly bring plenty of experience to the task, the book having grown out of their graduate lectures at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen over a five year period, with the feedback and refinement this presumably brings. The book is also of course ambitious in another sense, for it competes in the tight market of general graduate/advanced undergraduate texts on many-particle physics. Prospective punters will thus want reasons to prefer it to, or at least give it space beside, well established texts in the field. Subject-wise, the book is a good mix of the ancient and modern, the standard and less so. Obligatory chapters deal with the formal cornerstones of many-body theory, from second quantization, time-dependence in quantum mechanics and linear response theory, to Green's function and Feynman diagrams. Traditional topics are well covered, including two chapters on the electron gas, chapters on phonons and electron phonon coupling, and a concise account of superconductivity (confined, no doubt judiciously, to the conventional BCS case). Less mandatory, albeit conceptually vital, subjects are also aired. These include a chapter on Fermi liquid theory, from both semi-classical and microscopic perspectives, and a freestanding account of one-dimensional electron gases and Luttinger liquids which, given the enormity of the topic, is about as concise as it could be without sacrificing clarity. Quite naturally, the authors' own interests also influence the choice of material covered. A persistent theme, which brings a healthy topicality to the book, is the area of transport in mesoscopic systems or nanostructures. Two chapters, some fifty pages of the book, are devoted to electron transport in mesoscopic systems; the one on interacting systems is preceded by a brief account of equation of motion techniques a relative rarity in a general text, used here to provide background to subsequent discussion of the Coulomb blockade in quantum dots. So does it work, and will it find a niche beside other established, wide ranging texts? On the whole I think the answer has to be yes. To begin with, the book is well organised and user-friendly, which must surely appeal to students (and their mentors). The chapters are typically bite-sized and digestible. Each is accompanied by a summary/outlook, which in doing just that attempts to place the specific topic in a wider context, together with a set of problems that illustrate, and in many cases expand substantially on, the basic subject matter. A particularly healthy feature of the book is the extent to which the authors have sought where possible to include physical and/or material applications of basic theory, thereby enlivening old material and enhancing appreciation of the new. The first chapter on the electron gas, for example, introduces the reader to a range of material examples, including 2D heterostructures, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots. A chapter on the formalism of Green's functions takes time out to explain how the single-particle spectral function can be measured by tunnelling spectroscopy, while discussion of impurity scattering and conductivity is refreshed by consideration of weak localization in bulk and mesoscopic systems, and the phenomenon of universal conductance fluctuations. And so on: in a text that could readily descend to the purely formal, the authors have clearly taken seriously the task of incorporating relevant, topical applications of the underlying theory. In a book as wide ranging as this any reviewer is of course bound to perceive the occasional deficiency. I felt for example that some aspects of the discussion of conductance in quantum dots, notably the Coulomb blockade and the Kondo effect, were not quite up to scratch

  20. Code C# for chaos analysis of relativistic many-body systems

    E-print Network

    I. V. Grossu; C. Besliu; Al. Jipa; D. Felea; C. C. Bordeianu; E. Stan; T. Esanu

    2010-03-16

    This work presents a new Microsoft Visual C# .NET code library, conceived as a general object oriented solution for chaos analysis of three-dimensional, relativistic many-body systems. In this context, we implemented the Lyapunov exponent and the "fragmentation level" (defined using the graph theory and the Shannon entropy). Inspired by existing studies on billiard nuclear models and clusters of galaxies, we tried to apply the virial theorem for a simplified many-body system composed by nucleons. A possible application of the "virial coefficient" to the stability analysis of chaotic systems is also discussed.

  1. Many-body Effects in a Laterally Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Quantum Well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Li, Jian-Zhong; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many body effects on conduction and diffusion of electrons and holes in a semiconductor quantum well are studied using a microscopic theory. The roles played by the screened Hartree-Fock (SHE) terms and the scattering terms are examined. It is found that the electron and hole conductivities depend only on the scattering terms, while the two-component electron-hole diffusion coefficients depend on both the SHE part and the scattering part. We show that, in the limit of the ambipolax diffusion approximation, however, the diffusion coefficients for carrier density and temperature are independent of electron-hole scattering. In particular, we found that the SHE terms lead to a reduction of density-diffusion coefficients and an increase in temperature-diffusion coefficients. Such a reduction or increase is explained in terms of a density-and temperature dependent energy landscape created by the bandgap renormalization.

  2. More many-body perturbation theory for an electron-ion system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.; Johnson, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    From previous finite-temperature, quantum, many-body perturbation theory results for the grand partition function of an electron-ion fluid through order {epsilon}{sup 4}, we compute the electron and ion fugacities in terms of the volume per ion and the temperature to that same order in perturbation theory. From these results we also give the pressure, again to the same order in perturbation theory about the values for the non-interacting fluid.

  3. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    E-print Network

    Salvatore M. Giampaolo; Fabrizio Illuminati

    2009-11-21

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: Patterns that allow for perfect long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely, such such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence of edge impurities in lattices with single periodicity, it is possible to realize models endowed with nonvanishing LDE or QLDE. We then study how to realize models that optimize the robustness of QLDE at finite temperature and in the presence of imperfections using suitably engineered arrays of coupled optical cavities. We finally introduce LDE-based schemes of long-distance quantum teleportation in linear arrays of coupled cavities and show that they allow for high-fidelity and high success rates even at moderately high temperatures.

  4. Chaos Many-Body Engine v03: A new version of code C# for chaos analysis of relativistic many-body systems with reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossu, I. V.; Besliu, C.; Jipa, Al.; Felea, D.; Esanu, T.; Stan, E.; Bordeianu, C. C.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present a new version of the Chaos Many-Body Engine C# application (Grossu et al. 2012 [1]). In order to benefit from the latest technological advantages, we migrated the application from .Net Framework 2.0 to .Net Framework 4.0. New tools were implemented also. Trying to estimate the particle interactions dependence on initial conditions, we considered a new distance, which takes into account only the structural differences between two systems. We used this distance for implementing the “Structural Lyapunov” function. We propose also a new precision test based on temporal reversed simulations. New version program summaryProgram title: Chaos Many-Body Engine v03 Catalogue identifier: AEGH_v3_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGH_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 214429 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9512380 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Visual C# .Net 2010 Computer: PC Operating system: .Net Framework 4.0 running on MS Windows RAM: 128 MB Classification: 24.60.Lz, 05.45.a Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEGH_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Computer Physics Communications 183 (2012) 1055-1059 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Chaos analysis of three-dimensional, relativistic many-body systems with reactions. Solution method: Second order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Implementation of temporal reversed simulation precision test, and “Structural Lyapunov” function. In order to benefit from the advantages involved in the latest technologies (e.g. LINQ Queries [2]), Chaos Many-Body Engine was migrated from .Net Framework 2.0 to .Net Framework 4.0. In addition to existing energy conservation assessment [3], we propose also a reverse simulation precision test. Thus, for a regular simulation, we considered the corresponding reversed process: initial time equals the end time of regular simulation, and temporal resolution dt<0. One can compare the initial state of the regular system, and the final state of the reversed one (t=0) using, for example, the phase-space distance. Trying to measure particle interactions dependence on initial conditions, we considered the following distance, which takes into account only the structure differences between two many-body systems with reactions: ds=?{?i=1n where Ni1 represents the number of particles of type “i” from the first system, and Ni2 is the corresponding number for the second system. We sum over all particle types. Inspired by the Lyapunov Exponent method [4], we implemented the evolution in time of the “Structural Lyapunov” function, for two identical systems with slightly different initial conditions: Ls(t)=ln ds(t)/ds(0). Migration from .Net Framework 2.0 to .Net Framework 4.0 Reverse simulation precision test “Structural Lyapunov” function. In [1] we applied the Chaos Many-Body Engine to some nuclear relativistic collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c (SKM 200 collaboration [5,6]). We considered also some first tests on He+He head-on collisions at 1 A TeV/c (choose the Simulation?Collision menu, and set the appropriate parameters Fig. 1). However, in this case, more complex reaction schemas should be considered. Further investigation on higher energies is currently in progress. He+He central, head-on collision at 1 A TeV/c (example of use). Restrictions: The reverse simulation precision test does not apply for: systems with reactions, parallel simulations, and Monte Carlo simulations. Running time: quadratic complexity.

  5. QUANTUM GASES. Observation of many-body localization of interacting fermions in a quasirandom optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean S; Bordia, Pranjal; Lüschen, Henrik P; Fischer, Mark H; Vosk, Ronen; Altman, Ehud; Schneider, Ulrich; Bloch, Immanuel

    2015-08-21

    Many-body localization (MBL), the disorder-induced localization of interacting particles, signals a breakdown of conventional thermodynamics because MBL systems do not thermalize and show nonergodic time evolution. We experimentally observed this nonergodic evolution for interacting fermions in a one-dimensional quasirandom optical lattice and identified the MBL transition through the relaxation dynamics of an initially prepared charge density wave. For sufficiently weak disorder, the time evolution appears ergodic and thermalizing, erasing all initial ordering, whereas above a critical disorder strength, a substantial portion of the initial ordering persists. The critical disorder value shows a distinctive dependence on the interaction strength, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Our experiment paves the way to further detailed studies of MBL, such as in noncorrelated disorder or higher dimensions. PMID:26229112

  6. Quantum properties of light scattered from structured many-body phases of ultracold atoms in quantum optical lattices

    E-print Network

    Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F

    2015-01-01

    Quantum trapping potentials for ultracold gases change the landscape of classical properties of scattered light and matter. The atoms in a quantum many-body correlated phase of matter change the properties of light and vice versa. The properties of both light and matter can be tuned by design and depend on the interplay between long-range (nonlocal) interactions mediated by an optical cavity and short-range processes of the atoms. Moreover, the quantum properties of light get significantly altered by this interplay, leading the light to have nonclassical features. Further, these nonclassical features can be designed and optimised.

  7. Code C# for chaos analysis of relativistic many-body systems with reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossu, I. V.; Besliu, C.; Jipa, Al.; Stan, E.; Esanu, T.; Felea, D.; Bordeianu, C. C.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a reaction module for “Chaos Many-Body Engine” (Grossu et al., 2010 [1]). Following our goal of creating a customizable, object oriented code library, the list of all possible reactions, including the corresponding properties (particle types, probability, cross section, particle lifetime, etc.), could be supplied as parameter, using a specific XML input file. Inspired by the Poincaré section, we propose also the “Clusterization Map”, as a new intuitive analysis method of many-body systems. For exemplification, we implemented a numerical toy-model for nuclear relativistic collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c (the SKM200 Collaboration). An encouraging agreement with experimental data was obtained for momentum, energy, rapidity, and angular ? distributions. Catalogue identifier: AEGH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 184 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 905 425 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Visual C#.NET 2005 Computer: PC Operating system: Net Framework 2.0 running on MS Windows Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Each many-body system is simulated on a separate execution thread. One processor used for each many-body system. RAM: 128 Megabytes Classification: 6.2, 6.5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEGH_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 1464 External routines: Net Framework 2.0 Library Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Chaos analysis of three-dimensional, relativistic many-body systems with reactions. Solution method: Second order Runge-Kutta algorithm for simulating relativistic many-body systems with reactions. Object oriented solution, easy to reuse, extend and customize, in any development environment which accepts .Net assemblies or COM components. Treatment of two particles reactions and decays. For each particle, calculation of the time measured in the particle reference frame, according to the instantaneous velocity. Possibility to dynamically add particle properties (spin, isospin, etc.), and reactions/decays, using a specific XML input file. Basic support for Monte Carlo simulations. Implementation of: Lyapunov exponent, “fragmentation level”, “average system radius”, “virial coefficient”, “clusterization map”, and energy conservation precision test. As an example of use, we implemented a toy-model for nuclear relativistic collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c. Reasons for new version: Following our goal of applying chaos theory to nuclear relativistic collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c, we developed a reaction module integrated with the Chaos Many-Body Engine. In the previous version, inheriting the Particle class was the only possibility of implementing more particle properties (spin, isospin, and so on). In the new version, particle properties can be dynamically added using a dictionary object. The application was improved in order to calculate the time measured in the own reference frame of each particle. two particles reactions: a+b?c+d, decays: a?c+d, stimulated decays, more complicated schemas, implemented as various combinations of previous reactions. Following our goal of creating a flexible application, the reactions list, including the corresponding properties (cross sections, particles lifetime, etc.), could be supplied as parameter, using a specific XML configuration file. The simulation output files were modified for systems with reactions, assuring also the backward compatibility. We propose the “Clusterization Map” as a new investigation method of many-body systems. The multi-dimensional Lyapunov Exponent was adapted in order to be used for systems with variable structure. Basic support for Monte Carlo simulations was also added. Additiona

  8. Quantum Drude oscillator model of atoms and molecules: Many-body polarization and dispersion interactions for atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew P.; Crain, Jason; Sokhan, Vlad P.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2013-04-01

    Treating both many-body polarization and dispersion interactions is now recognized as a key element in achieving the level of atomistic modeling required to reveal novel physics in complex systems. The quantum Drude oscillator (QDO), a Gaussian-based, coarse grained electronic structure model, captures both many-body polarization and dispersion and has linear scale computational complexity with system size, hence it is a leading candidate next-generation simulation method. Here, we investigate the extent to which the QDO treatment reproduces the desired long-range atomic and molecular properties. We present closed form expressions for leading order polarizabilities and dispersion coefficients and derive invariant (parameter-free) scaling relationships among multipole polarizability and many-body dispersion coefficients that arise due to the Gaussian nature of the model. We show that these “combining rules” hold to within a few percent for noble gas atoms, alkali metals, and simple (first-row hydride) molecules such as water; this is consistent with the surprising success that models with underlying Gaussian statistics often exhibit in physics. We present a diagrammatic Jastrow-type perturbation theory tailored to the QDO model that serves to illustrate the rich types of responses that the QDO approach engenders. QDO models for neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, designed to reproduce gas phase properties, are constructed and their condensed phase properties explored via linear scale diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. Good agreement with experimental data for structure, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus is found, demonstrating a degree of transferability that cannot be achieved using current empirical models or fully ab initio descriptions.

  9. Morphology of Laplacian growth processes and statistics of equivalent many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, R.

    1994-11-01

    The authors proposes a theory for the nonlinear evolution of two dimensional interfaces in Laplacian fields. The growing region is conformally mapped onto the unit disk, generating an equivalent many-body system whose dynamics and statistics are studied. The process is shown to be Hamiltonian, with the Hamiltonian being the imaginary part of the complex electrostatic potential. Surface effects are introduced through the Hamiltonian as an external field. An extension to a continuous density of particles is presented. The results are used to study the morphology of the interface using statistical mechanics for the many-body system. The distribution of the curvature and the moments of the growth probability along the interface are calculated exactly from the distribution of the particles. In the dilute limit, the distribution of the curvature is shown to develop algebraic tails, which may, for the first time, explain the origin of fractality in diffusion controlled processes.

  10. Formation of fractal structure in many-body systems with attractive power-law potentials

    E-print Network

    Hiroko Koyama; Tetsuro Konishi

    2005-12-13

    We study the formation of fractal structure in one-dimensional many-body systems with attractive power-law potentials. Numerical analysis shows that the range of the index of the power for which fractal structure emerges is limited. Dependence of the growth rate on wavenumber and power-index is obtained by linear analysis of the collisionless Boltzmann equation, which supports the numerical results.

  11. PREFACE: Many-body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Urban, Michael; Yamada, Taiichi

    2011-09-01

    The International EFES-IN2P3 conference on "Many body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems" was held at the Institut Henri Poincaré (IHP), Paris, France, from 15-18 February 2011, on the occasion of the retirement of our colleague Peter Schuck. Correlations play a decisive role in various many-body systems such as nuclear systems, condensed matter and quantum gases. Important examples include: pairing correlations (Cooper pairs) which give rise to nuclear superfluidity (analogous to superconductivity in condensed matter); particle-hole (RPA) correlations in the description of the ground state beyond mean-field theory; clusters; and ?-particle correlations in certain nuclei. Also, the nucleons themselves can be viewed as clusters of three quarks. During the past few years, researchers have started to study how the character of these correlations changes with the variation of the density. For instance, the Cooper pairs in dense matter can transform into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of true bound states at low density (this is the BCS-BEC crossover studied in ultracold Fermi gases). Similar effects play a role in neutron matter at low density, e.g., in the "neutron skin" of exotic nuclei. The ?-cluster correlation becomes particularly important at lower density, such as in the excited states of some nuclei (e.g., the ?-condensate-like structure in the Hoyle state of 12C) or in the formation of compact stars. In addition to nuclear physics, topics from astrophysics (neutron stars), condensed matter, and quantum gases were discussed in 48 talks and 19 posters, allowing the almost 90 participants from different communities to exchange their ideas, experiences and methods. The conference dinner took place at the Musée d'Orsay, and all the participants enjoyed the very pleasant atmosphere. One session of the conference was dedicated to the celebration of Peter's retirement. We would like to take this opportunity to wish Peter all the best and we hope that he will continue his scientific work full of creative and original ideas. We would like to thank all those who helped to make the conference a success: Nguyen van Giai, S Fujii, J Margueron, K Hagino, and Y Kanada-En'yo for their help with the organization; the advisory committee for suggesting invited speakers; V Frois for her administrative help; L Petizon for the website; and the director of IPN Orsay, F Azaiez, for his support. We are indebted to IHP for providing the lecture hall free of charge, and we acknowledge the financial support from JSPS through its EFES core-to-core program, from CNRS (IN2P3 and INP), and from LIA France-Japon. Last but not least, we are grateful to all of the participants for making the conference exciting and successful. Takaharu Otsuka, Michael Urban, Taiichi YamadaEditors of the proceedings

  12. Exponential Orthogonality Catastrophe in Single-Particle and Many-Body Localized Systems

    E-print Network

    Dong-Ling Deng; J. H. Pixley; Xiaopeng Li; S. Das Sarma

    2015-10-25

    We investigate the statistical orthogonality catastrophe (StOC) in single-particle and many-body localized systems by studying the response of the many-body ground state to a local quench. Using scaling arguments and exact numerical calculations, we establish that the StOC gives rise to a wave function overlap between the pre- and post-quench ground states that has an \\emph{exponential} decay with the system size, in sharp contrast to the well-known power law Anderson orthogonality catastrophe in metallic systems. This exponential decay arises from a statistical charge transfer process where a particle can be effectively "transported" to an arbitrary lattice site. In a many-body localized phase, this non-local transport and the associated exponential StOC phenomenon persist in the presence of interactions. We study experimental consequences of the exponential StOC on Loschmidt echo and spectral function, establishing that this phenomenon should be observable in cold atomic experiments through Ramsey interference and radio-frequency spectroscopy.

  13. Entanglement Holographic Mapping of Many-Body Localized System by Spectrum Bifurcation Renormalization Group

    E-print Network

    Yi-Zhuang You; Xiao-Liang Qi; Cenke Xu

    2015-08-14

    We introduce the spectrum bifurcation renormalization group (SBRG) as a generalization of the real-space renormalization group for the many-body localized (MBL) system without truncating the Hilbert space. Starting from a disordered many-body Hamiltonian in the full MBL phase, the SBRG flows to the MBL fixed-point Hamiltonian, and generates the local conserved quantities and the matrix product state representations for all eigenstates. The method is applicable to both spin and fermion models with arbitrary interaction strength on any lattice in all dimensions, as long as the models are in the MBL phase. In particular, we focus on the $1d$ interacting Majorana chain with strong disorder, and map out its phase diagram using the entanglement entropy. The SBRG flow also generates an entanglement holographic mapping, which duals the MBL state to a fragmented holographic space decorated with small blackholes.

  14. Code C# for chaos analysis of relativistic many-body systems with reactions

    E-print Network

    I. V. Grossu; C. Besliu; Al. Jipa; E. Stan; T. Esanu; D. Felea; C. C. Bordeianu

    2010-09-11

    In this work we present a reactions module for "Chaos Many-Body Engine" (Grossu et al., 2010 [1]). Following our goal of creating a customizable, object oriented code library, the list of all possible reactions, including the corresponding properties (particle types, probability, cross-section, particles lifetime etc.), could be supplied as parameter, using a specific XML input file. Inspired by the Poincare section, we propose also the "Clusterization map", as a new intuitive analysis method of many-body systems. For exemplification, we implemented a numerical toy-model for nuclear relativistic collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c (the SKM200 collaboration). An encouraging agreement with experimental data was obtained for momentum, energy, rapidity, and angular {\\pi}- distributions.

  15. Chaos in fermionic many-body systems and the metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, T.; Pluhar, Z.; Tithof, J.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2011-03-15

    We show that finite Fermi systems governed by a mean field and a few-body interaction generically possess spectral fluctuations of the Wigner-Dyson type and are, thus, chaotic. Our argument is based on an analogy to the metal-insulator transition. We construct a sparse random-matrix scaffolding ensemble (ScE) that mimics this transition. Our claim then follows from the fact that the generic random-matrix ensemble modeling a fermionic interacting many-body system is much less sparse than ScE.

  16. Chaos in Fermionic Many-Body Systems and the Metal Insulator Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas F; Pluhar, Z.; Tithof, J.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    We show that finite Fermi systems governed by a mean field and a few-body interaction generically possess spectral fluctuations of the Wigner-Dyson type and are thus chaotic. Our proof is based on an analogy to the metal-insulator transition. We construct a sparse random-matrix ensemble H^{cr} that mimicks that transition. Our claim then follows from the fact that the generic random-matrix ensemble modeling a fermionic interacting many-body is much less sparse than H^{cr}.

  17. Quantum quenches and many-body localization in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baoming; Iyer, Deepak; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-04-01

    We use thermalization indicators and numerical linked cluster expansions to probe the onset of many-body localization in a disordered one-dimensional hard-core boson model in the thermodynamic limit. We show that after equilibration following a quench from a delocalized state, the momentum distribution indicates a freezing of one-particle correlations at higher values than in thermal equilibrium. The position of the delocalization to localization transition, identified by the breakdown of thermalization with increasing disorder strength, is found to be consistent with the value from the level statistics obtained via full exact diagonalization of finite chains. Our results strongly support the existence of a many-body localized phase in the thermodynamic limit.

  18. Long-range interacting many-body systems with alkaline-earth-metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Olmos, B; Yu, D; Singh, Y; Schreck, F; Bongs, K; Lesanovsky, I

    2013-04-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms can exhibit long-range dipolar interactions, which are generated via the coherent exchange of photons on the (3)P(0) - (3)D(1) transition of the triplet manifold. In the case of bosonic strontium, which we discuss here, this transition has a wavelength of 2.6 ?m and a dipole moment of 4.03 D, and there exists a magic wavelength permitting the creation of optical lattices that are identical for the states (3)P(0) and (3)D(1). This interaction enables the realization and study of mixtures of hard-core lattice bosons featuring long-range hopping, with tunable disorder and anisotropy. We derive the many-body master equation, investigate the dynamics of excitation transport, and analyze spectroscopic signatures stemming from coherent long-range interactions and collective dissipation. Our results show that lattice gases of alkaline-earth-metal atoms permit the creation of long-lived collective atomic states and constitute a simple and versatile platform for the exploration of many-body systems with long-range interactions. As such, they represent an alternative to current related efforts employing Rydberg gases, atoms with large magnetic moment, or polar molecules. PMID:25166986

  19. Long-range interacting many-body systems with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    E-print Network

    B. Olmos; D. Yu; Y. Singh; F. Schreck; K. Bongs; I. Lesanovsky

    2013-04-11

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms exhibit long-range dipolar interactions, which are generated via the coherent exchange of photons on the 3P_0-3D_1-transition of the triplet manifold. In case of bosonic strontium, which we discuss here, this transition has a wavelength of 2.7 \\mu m and a dipole moment of 2.46 Debye, and there exists a magic wavelength permitting the creation of optical lattices that are identical for the states 3P_0 and 3D_1. This interaction enables the realization and study of mixtures of hard-core lattice bosons featuring long-range hopping, with tuneable disorder and anisotropy. We derive the many-body Master equation, investigate the dynamics of excitation transport and analyze spectroscopic signatures stemming from coherent long-range interactions and collective dissipation. Our results show that lattice gases of alkaline-earth-metal atoms permit the creation of long-lived collective atomic states and constitute a simple and versatile platform for the exploration of many-body systems with long-range interactions. As such, they represent an alternative to current related efforts employing Rydberg gases, atoms with large magnetic moment, or polar molecules.

  20. The partition function of an interacting many body system . Beyond the perturbed static path approximation (PSPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, C.; Ankerhold, J.

    2002-09-01

    Based on the path integral approach the partition function of a many body system with separable two body interaction is calculated in the sense of a semiclassical approximation. The commonly used Gaussian type of approximation, known as the perturbed static path approximation (PSPA), breaks down near a crossover temperature due to instabilities of the classical mean field solution. It is shown how the PSPA is systematically improved within the crossover region by taking into account large non-Gaussian fluctuations and an approximation applicable down to very low temperatures is carried out. These findings are tested against exact results for the archetypical cases of a particle moving in a one dimensional double well and the exactly solvable Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model. The extensions should have applications in finite systems at low temperatures as in nuclear physics and mesoscopic systems, e.g. for gap fluctuations in nanoscale superconducting devices previously studied within a PSPA type of approximation.

  1. Equations of state for many-body systems at high densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Gao, Bo

    2004-05-01

    For a many-body system at high densities, the equation of state depends not only on the scattering length, but also on further details of the inter-particle potential. For a many-atom system, in particular, its behavior at high densities will depend on the van der Waals interaction. We are exploring the behavior of a many-atom system in this density regime using the variational Monte Carlo method, in combination with the concept of effective potential introduced in a recent work(B. Gao, J. Phys. B 36), 2111 (2003).. As an initial test, we will compare our hard-sphere results with those of Gross-Pitevaskii equation and diffussion Monte Carlo method(D. Blume and C. H. Greene, Phys. Rev. A 63), 063601 (2001)..

  2. Quantum many-body theory for qubit decoherence in a finite-size spin bath

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Wen; Liu Renbao

    2008-11-07

    We develop a cluster-correlation expansion theory for the many-body dynamics of a finite-size spin bath in a time scale relevant to the decoherence of a center spin or qubit embedded in the bath. By introducing the cluster correlation as the evolution of a group of bath spins divided by the correlations of all the subgroups, the propagator of the whole bath is factorized into the product of all possible cluster correlations. Each cluster-correlation term accounts for the authentic (non-factorizable) collective excitations within that group. Convergent results can be obtained by truncating the cluster-correlation expansion up to a certain cluster size, as verified in an exactly solvable spin-chain model.

  3. The mystery of relationship of mechanics and field in the many-body quantum world

    E-print Network

    Michal Svrcek

    2012-09-18

    We have revealed three fatal errors incurred from a blind transferring of quantum field methods into the quantum mechanics. This had tragic consequences because it produced crippled model Hamiltonians, unfortunately considered sufficient for a description of solids including superconductors. From there, of course, Fr\\"ohlich derived wrong effective Hamiltonian, from which incorrect BCS theory arose. 1) Mechanical and field patterns cannot be mixed. Instead of field methods applied to the mechanical Born-Oppenheimer approximation we have entirely to avoid it and construct an independent and standalone field pattern. This leads to a new form of the Bohr's complementarity on the level of composite systems. 2) We have correctly to deal with the center of gravity, which is under the field pattern "materialized" in the form of new quasipartiles - rotons and translons. This leads to a new type of relativity of internal and external degrees of freedom and one-particle way of bypassing degeneracies (gap formation). 3) The possible symmetry cannot be apriori loaded but has to be aposteriori obtained as a solution of field equations, formulated in a general form without translational or any other symmetry. This leads to an utterly revised view of symmetry breaking in non-adiabatic systems, namely Jahn-Teller effect and superconductivity. These two phenomena are synonyms and share a unique symmetry breaking.

  4. Stability and Clustering for Lattice Many-Body Quantum Hamiltonians with Multiparticle Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We analyze a quantum system of N identical spinless particles of mass m, in the lattice Z^d, given by a Hamiltonian H_N=T_N+V_N, with kinetic energy T_N? 0 and potential V_N=V_{N,2}+V_{N,3} composed of attractive pair and repulsive 3-body contact-potentials. This Hamiltonian is motivated by the desire to understand the stability of quantum field theories, with massive single particles and bound states in the energy-momentum spectrum, in terms of an approximate Hamiltonian for their N-particle sector. We determine the role of the potentials V_{N,2} and V_{N,3} on the physical stability of the system, such as to avoid a collapse of the N particles. Mathematically speaking, stability is associated with an N-linear lower bound for the infimum of the H_N spectrum, \\underline{? }(H_N)? -cN, for c>0 independent of N. For V_{N,3}=0, H_N is unstable, and the system collapses. If V_{N,3}not =0, H_N is stable and, for strong enough repulsion, we obtain \\underline{? }(H_N)? -c' N, where c'N is the energy of ( N/2) isolated bound pairs. This result is physically expected. A much less trivial result is that, as N varies, we show [ \\underline{? }(V_N)/N ] has qualitatively the same behavior as the well-known curve for minus the nuclear binding energy per nucleon. Moreover, it turns out that there exists a saturation value N_s of N at and above which the system presents a clustering: the N particles distributed in two fragments and, besides lattice translations of particle positions, there is an energy degeneracy of all two fragments with particle numbers N_r and N_s-N_r, with N_r=1,ldots ,N_s-1.

  5. Many-body localization in disorder-free systems: The importance of finite-size constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi?, Z.; Stoudenmire, E. Miles; Abanin, Dmitry A.

    2015-11-01

    Recently it has been suggested that many-body localization (MBL) can occur in translation-invariant systems, and candidate 1D models have been proposed. We find that such models, in contrast to MBL systems with quenched disorder, typically exhibit much more severe finite-size effects due to the presence of two or more vastly different energy scales. In a finite system, this can artificially split the density of states (DOS) into bands separated by large gaps. We argue for such models to faithfully represent the thermodynamic limit behavior, the ratio of relevant coupling must exceed a certain system-size depedent cutoff, chosen such that various bands in the DOS overlap one another. Setting the parameters this way to minimize finite-size effects, we study several translation-invariant MBL candidate models using exact diagonalization. Based on diagnostics including entanglement and local observables, we observe thermal (ergodic), rather than MBL-like behavior. Our results suggest that MBL in translation-invariant systems with two or more very different energy scales is less robust than perturbative arguments suggest, possibly pointing to the importance of non-perturbative effects which induce delocalization in the thermodynamic limit.

  6. Many-Body Localization and Quantum Nonergodicity in a Model with a Single-Particle Mobility Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Ganeshan, Sriram; Pixley, J. H.; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate many-body localization in the presence of a single-particle mobility edge. By considering an interacting deterministic model with an incommensurate potential in one dimension we find that the single-particle mobility edge in the noninteracting system leads to a many-body mobility edge in the corresponding interacting system for certain parameter regimes. Using exact diagonalization, we probe the mobility edge via energy resolved entanglement entropy (EE) and study the energy resolved applicability (or failure) of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). Our numerical results indicate that the transition separating area and volume law scaling of the EE does not coincide with the nonthermal to thermal transition. Consequently, there exists an extended nonergodic phase for an intermediate energy window where the many-body eigenstates violate the ETH while manifesting volume law EE scaling. We also establish that the model possesses an infinite temperature many-body localization transition despite the existence of a single-particle mobility edge. We propose a practical scheme to test our predictions in atomic optical lattice experiments which can directly probe the effects of the mobility edge.

  7. Many-Body Localization and Quantum Nonergodicity in a Model with a Single-Particle Mobility Edge.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Ganeshan, Sriram; Pixley, J H; Das Sarma, S

    2015-10-30

    We investigate many-body localization in the presence of a single-particle mobility edge. By considering an interacting deterministic model with an incommensurate potential in one dimension we find that the single-particle mobility edge in the noninteracting system leads to a many-body mobility edge in the corresponding interacting system for certain parameter regimes. Using exact diagonalization, we probe the mobility edge via energy resolved entanglement entropy (EE) and study the energy resolved applicability (or failure) of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). Our numerical results indicate that the transition separating area and volume law scaling of the EE does not coincide with the nonthermal to thermal transition. Consequently, there exists an extended nonergodic phase for an intermediate energy window where the many-body eigenstates violate the ETH while manifesting volume law EE scaling. We also establish that the model possesses an infinite temperature many-body localization transition despite the existence of a single-particle mobility edge. We propose a practical scheme to test our predictions in atomic optical lattice experiments which can directly probe the effects of the mobility edge. PMID:26565483

  8. Many-body study of a quantum point contact in the fractional quantum Hall regime at ?=5/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulé, Paul; Jolicoeur, Thierry; Lecheminant, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    We study a quantum point contact in the fractional quantum Hall regime at Landau level filling factors ?=1/3 and 5/2. By using exact diagonalizations in the cylinder geometry, we identify the edge modes in the presence of a parabolic confining potential. By changing the sign of the potential, we can access both the tunneling through the bulk of the fluid and the tunneling between spatially separated droplets. This geometry is realized in the quantum point contact geometry for two-dimensional electron gases. In the case of the model Moore-Read Pfaffian state at filling factor ?=5/2, we identify the conformal towers of many-body eigenstates including the non-Abelian sector. By a Monte-Carlo technique, we compute the various scaling exponents that characterize the edge modes. In the case of hard-core interactions whose ground states are exact model wave functions, we find equality of neutral and charged velocities, both bosonic and fermionic, for the Pfaffian state.

  9. Stochastic many-body problems in ecology, evolution, neuroscience, and systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas C.

    Using the tools of many-body theory, I analyze problems in four different areas of biology dominated by strong fluctuations: The evolutionary history of the genetic code, spatiotemporal pattern formation in ecology, spatiotemporal pattern formation in neuroscience and the robustness of a model circadian rhythm circuit in systems biology. In the first two research chapters, I demonstrate that the genetic code is extremely optimal (in the sense that it manages the effects of point mutations or mistranslations efficiently), more than an order of magnitude beyond what was previously thought. I further show that the structure of the genetic code implies that early proteins were probably only loosely defined. Both the nature of early proteins and the extreme optimality of the genetic code are interpreted in light of recent theory [1] as evidence that the evolution of the genetic code was driven by evolutionary dynamics that were dominated by horizontal gene transfer. I then explore the optimality of a proposed precursor to the genetic code. The results show that the precursor code has only limited optimality, which is interpreted as evidence that the precursor emerged prior to translation, or else never existed. In the next part of the dissertation, I introduce a many-body formalism for reaction-diffusion systems described at the mesoscopic scale with master equations. I first apply this formalism to spatially-extended predator-prey ecosystems, resulting in the prediction that many-body correlations and fluctuations drive population cycles in time, called quasicycles. Most of these results were previously known, but were derived using the system size expansion [2, 3]. I next apply the analytical techniques developed in the study of quasi-cycles to a simple model of Turing patterns in a predator-prey ecosystem. This analysis shows that fluctuations drive the formation of a new kind of spatiotemporal pattern formation that I name "quasi-patterns." These quasi-patterns exist over a much larger range of physically accessible parameters than the patterns predicted in mean field theory and therefore account for the apparent observations in ecology of patterns in regimes where Turing patterns do not occur. I further show that quasi-patterns have statistical properties that allow them to be distinguished empirically from mean field Turing patterns. I next analyze a model of visual cortex in the brain that has striking similarities to the activator-inhibitor model of ecosystem quasi-pattern formation. Through analysis of the resulting phase diagram, I show that the architecture of the neural network in the visual cortex is configured to make the visual cortex robust to unwanted internally generated spatial structure that interferes with normal visual function. I also predict that some geometric visual hallucinations are quasi-patterns and that the visual cortex supports a new phase of spatially scale invariant behavior present far from criticality. In the final chapter, I explore the effects of fluctuations on cycles in systems biology, specifically the pervasive phenomenon of circadian rhythms. By exploring the behavior of a generic stochastic model of circadian rhythms, I show that the circadian rhythm circuit exploits leaky mRNA production to safeguard the cycle from failure. I also show that this safeguard mechanism is highly robust to changes in the rate of leaky mRNA production. Finally, I explore the failure of the deterministic model in two different contexts, one where the deterministic model predicts cycles where they do not exist, and another context in which cycles are not predicted by the deterministic model.

  10. Many-Body Physics: Collective fermionic excitations in quark-gluon plasmas and cold atom systems

    E-print Network

    Jean-Paul Blaizot

    2014-05-13

    In this talk I discuss collective excitations that carry fermion quantum numbers. Such excitations occur in the quark-gluon plasma and can also be produced in cold atom systems under special conditions.

  11. Renormalization of myoglobin-ligand binding energetics by quantum many-body effects

    E-print Network

    Weber, Cedric; O'Regan, David D; Payne, Mike C

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a first-principles atomistic study of the electronic mechanisms of ligand binding and discrimination in the myoglobin protein. Electronic correlation effects are taken into account using one of the most advanced methods currently available, namely a linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) approach wherein the treatment of localized iron 3d electrons is further refined using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). This combination of methods explicitly accounts for dynamical and multi-reference quantum physics, such as valence and spin fluctuations, of the 3d electrons, whilst treating a significant proportion of the protein (more than 1000 atoms) with density functional theory. The computed electronic structure of the myoglobin complexes and the nature of the Fe-O2 bonding are validated against experimental spectroscopic observables. We elucidate and solve a long standing problem related to the quantum-mechanical description of the respiration process, namely that DFT calculations predict a st...

  12. Efficient Implementation of Many-body Quantum Chemical Methods on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Kowalski, Karol

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the implementation and performance of the highly accurate CCSD(T) quantum chemistry method on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor within the context of the NWChem computational chemistry package. The widespread use of highly correlated methods in electronic structure calculations is contingent upon the interplay between advances in theory and the possibility of utilizing the ever-growing computer power of emerging heterogeneous architectures. We discuss the design decisions of our implementation as well as the optimizations applied to the compute kernels and data transfers between host and coprocessor. We show the feasibility of adopting the Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture and the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor for developing efficient computational chemistry modeling tools. Remarkable scalability is demonstrated by benchmarks. Our solution scales up to a total of 62560 cores with the concurrent utilization of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors.

  13. COVER IMAGE How quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    Squeezed states -- which permit precision beyond the scope of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation -- are well properties in hole-doped BaFe2As2 Philipp Werner, Michele Casula, Takashi Miyake, Ferdi Aryasetiawan, Andrew

  14. Simulating many-body lattice systems on a single nano-mechanical resonator

    E-print Network

    Kurt Jacobs

    2012-09-12

    We show that lattice systems, such as the Bose-Hubbard model, can be simulated on a single nano- or micro-mechanical resonator, by exploiting its many modes. The on-site Hamiltonians are engineered by coupling the mechanical modes to the modes of a pair of optical or stripline resonators, and the connections between the lattice sites are engineered in a similar way. The lattice network structure is encoded in the frequency components of the fields driving the resonators. This three-resonator configuration also allows universal quantum computing on the nano-resonator.

  15. Understanding the many-body expansion for large systems. I. Precision considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Ryan M.; Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M.

    2014-07-07

    Electronic structure methods based on low-order “n-body” expansions are an increasingly popular means to defeat the highly nonlinear scaling of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations, taking advantage of the inherently distributable nature of the numerous subsystem calculations. Here, we examine how the finite precision of these subsystem calculations manifests in applications to large systems, in this case, a sequence of water clusters ranging in size up to (H{sub 2}O){sub 47}. Using two different computer implementations of the n-body expansion, one fully integrated into a quantum chemistry program and the other written as a separate driver routine for the same program, we examine the reproducibility of total binding energies as a function of cluster size. The combinatorial nature of the n-body expansion amplifies subtle differences between the two implementations, especially for n ? 4, leading to total energies that differ by as much as several kcal/mol between two implementations of what is ostensibly the same method. This behavior can be understood based on a propagation-of-errors analysis applied to a closed-form expression for the n-body expansion, which is derived here for the first time. Discrepancies between the two implementations arise primarily from the Coulomb self-energy correction that is required when electrostatic embedding charges are implemented by means of an external driver program. For reliable results in large systems, our analysis suggests that script- or driver-based implementations should read binary output files from an electronic structure program, in full double precision, or better yet be fully integrated in a way that avoids the need to compute the aforementioned self-energy. Moreover, four-body and higher-order expansions may be too sensitive to numerical thresholds to be of practical use in large systems.

  16. Non-equilibrium Quantum Many-Body Green Function Formalism in the light of Quantum Information Theory

    E-print Network

    A. K. Rajgaopal

    2014-05-12

    The following issues are discussed inspired by the recent paper of Kadanoff (arXiv: 1403:6162): (a) Construction of a generalized one-particle Wigner distribution (GWD) function (analog of the classical distribution function) from which the quantum kinetic equation due to Kadanoff and Baym (KB) is derived, often called the Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE); (b) The equation obeyed by this has a collision contribution in the form of a two-particle Green function. This term is manipulated to have Kinetic Entropy in parallel to its counterpart in the classical Boltzmann kinetic equation for the classical distribution function. This proved to be problematic in that unlike in the classical Boltzmann kinetic equation, the contribution from the kinetic entropy term was non-positive; (3) Kadanoff surmised that this situation could perhaps be related to quantum entanglement that may not have been included in his theory. It is shown that GWD is not positive everywhere (indicating dynamical quantumness) just like the commonly recognized property of the Wigner function (negative property indicating quantumness of the state). The issue of non-positive feature appearing in approximate evaluation of patently positive entities in many particle systems is here pointed to an early discussion of this issue (Phys. Rev. A10, 1852 (1974)) in terms of a theorem on truncation of cumulant expansion of a probability distribution function due to Marcinkeiwicz. The last issue of presence or absence of entanglement in an approximate evaluation of a many particle correlation poses a new problem; it is considered here in terms of fermionic entanglement theory in the light of density matrix and Green function theory of many-fermion systems. The clue comes from the fact that the Hartree-Fock approximation exhbits no entantanglement in two-particle fermion density matrix and hence also in two-particle Green function.

  17. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To study defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. These results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy.

  18. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T; Santana, Juan A; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To study defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. These results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy. PMID:26520546

  19. Physics 832: Quantum Many-Body Physics Lecture: TuTh 2:003:15 in Phy 2202 by Michael Levin (Office: Phy 2220).

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Physics 832: Quantum Many-Body Physics Fall 2011 Lecture: TuTh 2:00­3:15 in Phy 2202 by Michael Levin (Office: Phy 2220). Prerequisites: Quantum mechanics (Physics 402), Statistical physics (Physics 404). Philosophy: This course will introduce some of the basic tools and physical pictures nec- essary

  20. Introduction to the Statistical Physics of Integrable Many-body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šamaj, Ladislav Å.; Bajnok, Zoltán

    2013-05-01

    Preface; Part I. Spinless Bose and Fermi Gases: 1. Particles with nearest-neighbour interactions: Bethe ansatz and the ground state; 2. Bethe ansatz: zero-temperature thermodynamics and excitations; 3. Bethe ansatz: finite-temperature thermodynamics; 4. Particles with inverse-square interactions; Part II. Quantum Inverse Scattering Method: 5. QISM: Yang-Baxter equation; 6. QISM: transfer matrix and its diagonalization; 7. QISM: treatment of boundary conditions; 8. Nested Bethe ansatz for spin-1/2 fermions with delta interactions; 9. Thermodynamics of spin-1/2 fermions with delta interactions; Part III. Quantum Spin Chains: 10. Quantum Ising chain in a transverse field; 11. XXZ Heisenberg chain: Bethe ansatz and the ground state; 12. XXZ Heisenberg chain: ground state in the presence of magnetic field; 13. XXZ Heisenberg chain: excited states; 14. XXX Heisenberg chain: thermodynamics with strings; 15. XXZ Heisenberg chain: thermodynamics without strings; 16. XYZ Heisenberg chain; 17. Integrable isotropic chains with arbitrary spin; Part IV. Strongly Correlated Electrons: 18. Hubbard model; 19. Kondo effect; 20. Luttinger many-fermion model; 21. Integrable BCS superconductors; Part V. Sine-Gordon Model: 22. Classical sine-Gordon theory; 23. Conformal quantization; 24. Lagrangian quantization; 25. Bootstrap quantization; 26. UV-IR relation; 27. Exact finite volume description from XXZ; 28. Two-dimensional Coulomb gas; Appendix A. Spin and spin operators on chain; Appendix B. Elliptic functions; References; Index.

  1. Quantum geometric phase in Majorana's stellar representation: mapping onto a many-body Aharonov-Bohm phase.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Patrick

    2012-06-15

    The (Berry-Aharonov-Anandan) geometric phase acquired during a cyclic quantum evolution of finite-dimensional quantum systems is studied. It is shown that a pure quantum state in a (2J+1)-dimensional Hilbert space (or, equivalently, of a spin-J system) can be mapped onto the partition function of a gas of independent Dirac strings moving on a sphere and subject to the Coulomb repulsion of 2J fixed test charges (the Majorana stars) characterizing the quantum state. The geometric phase may be viewed as the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by the Majorana stars as they move through the gas of Dirac strings. Expressions for the geometric connection and curvature, for the metric tensor, as well as for the multipole moments (dipole, quadrupole, etc.), are given in terms of the Majorana stars. Finally, the geometric formulation of the quantum dynamics is presented and its application to systems with exotic ordering such as spin nematics is outlined. PMID:23004240

  2. Multi-meson systems in lattice QCD / Many-body QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, William

    2013-08-31

    Nuclear physics entails the study of the properties and interactions of hadrons, such as the proton and neutron, and atomic nuclei and it is central to our understanding of our world at the smallest scales. The underlying basis for nuclear physics is provided by the Standard Model of particle physics which describes how matter interacts through the strong, electromagnetic and weak (electroweak) forces. This theory was developed in the 1970s and provides an extremely successful description of our world at the most fundamental level to which it has been probed. The Standard Model has been, and continues to be, subject to stringent tests at particle accelerators around the world, so far passing without blemish. However, at the relatively low energies that are relevant for nuclear physics, calculations involving the strong interaction, governed by the equations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), are enormously challenging, and to date, the only systematic way to perform them is numerically, using a framework known as lattice QCD (LQCD). In this approach, one discretizes space-time and numerically solves the equations of QCD on a space-time lattice; for realistic calculations, this requires highly optimized algorithms and cutting-edge high performance computing (HPC) resources. Progress over the project period is discussed in detail in the following subsections

  3. Double decimation and sliding vacua in the nuclear many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. E.; Rho, Mannque

    2004-06-01

    We propose that effective field theories for nuclei and nuclear matter comprise of “double decimation”: (1) the chiral symmetry decimation (CSD) and (2) Fermi liquid decimation (FLD). The Brown-Rho scaling recently identified as the parametric dependence intrinsic in the “vector manifestation” of hidden local symmetry theory of Harada and Yamawaki results from the first decimation. This scaling governs dynamics down to the scale at which the Fermi surface is formed as a quantum critical phenomenon. The next decimation to the top of the Fermi sea where standard nuclear physics is operative makes up the FLD. Thus, nuclear dynamics are dictated by two fixed points, namely, the vector manifestation fixed point and the Fermi liquid fixed point. It has been a prevalent practice in nuclear physics community to proceed with the second decimation only, assuming density-independent masses, without implementing the first, CSD. We show why most nuclear phenomena can be reproduced by theories using either density-independent, or density-dependent masses, a grand conspiracy of nature that is an aspect that could be tied to the Cheshire Cat phenomenon in hadron physics. We identify what is left out in the FLD that does not incorporate the CSD. Experiments such as the dilepton production in relativistic heavy ion reactions, which are specifically designed to observe effects of dropping masses, could exhibit large effects from the reduced masses. However, they are compounded with effects that are not directly tied to chiral symmetry. We discuss a recent STAR/RHIC observation where BR scaling can be singled out in a pristine environment.

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 036710 (2012) Transition path sampling algorithm for discrete many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Mora, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Cedex 05, France (Received 3 February 2012; published 29 March 2012) We propose a Monte Carlo method of probability between the steady states. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo technique for sampling-energy spin configurations and rarely explores the intermediate states in between. In frustrated spin systems

  5. Many-body effects on optical gain in GaAsPN/GaPN quantum well lasers for silicon integration

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seoung-Hwan

    2014-02-14

    Many-body effects on the optical gain in GaAsPN/GaP QW structures were investigated by using the multiband effective-mass theory and the non-Markovian gain model with many-body effects. The free-carrier model shows that the optical gain peak slightly increases with increasing N composition. In addition, the QW structure with a larger As composition shows a larger optical gain than that with a smaller As composition. On the other hand, in the case of the many-body model, the optical gain peak decreases with increasing N composition. Also, the QW structure with a smaller As composition is observed to have a larger optical gain than that with a larger As composition. This can be explained by the fact that the QW structure with a smaller As or N composition shows a larger Coulomb enhancement effect than that with a larger As or N composition. This means that it is important to consider the many-body effect in obtaining guidelines for device design issues.

  6. Multiple-time-scale Landau-Zener transitions in many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Jonas Larson

    2015-01-27

    Motivated by recent cold atom experiments in optical lattices, we consider a lattice version of the Landau-Zener problem. Every single site is described by a Landau-Zener problem, but due to particle tunnelling between neighboring lattice sites this onsite single particle Landau-Zener dynamics couples to the particle motion within the lattice. The lattice, apart from having a dephasing effect on single site Landau-Zener transitions, also implies, in the presence of a confining trap, an inter-site particle flow induced by the Landau-Zener sweeping. This gives rise to an interplay between intra- and inter-site dynamics. The adiabaticity constrain is therefor not simply given by the standard one; the Hamiltonian rate of change relative to the gap of the onsite problem. In experimentally realistic situations, the full system evolution is well described by Franck-Condon physics, e.g. non-adiabatic excitations are predominantly external ones characterized by large phononic vibrations in the atomic cloud, while internal excitations are very weak as close to perfect onsite transitions take place.

  7. Multiple-time-scale Landau-Zener transitions in many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent cold-atom experiments in optical lattices, we consider a lattice version of the Landau-Zener problem. Every single site is described by a Landau-Zener problem, but due to particle tunneling between neighboring lattice sites this on-site single-particle Landau-Zener dynamics couples to the particle motion within the lattice. The lattice, apart from having a dephasing effect on single-site Landau-Zener transitions, also implies, in the presence of a confining trap, an intersite particle flow induced by the Landau-Zener sweeping. This gives rise to an interplay between intra- and intersite dynamics. The adiabaticity constraint is therefore not simply given by the standard one, the Hamiltonian rate of change relative to the gap of the on-site problem. In experimentally realistic situations, the full system evolution is well described by Franck-Condon physics; e.g., nonadiabatic excitations are predominantly external ones characterized by large phononic vibrations in the atomic cloud, while internal excitations are very weak as close-to-perfect on-site transitions take place.

  8. Relativistic nuclear many-body theory

    SciTech Connect

    Serot, B.D. ); Walecka, J.D. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

    1991-09-11

    Nonrelativistic models of nuclear systems have provided important insight into nuclear physics. In future experiments, nuclear systems will be examined under extreme conditions of density and temperature, and their response will be probed at momentum and energy transfers larger than the nucleon mass. It is therefore essential to develop reliable models that go beyond the traditional nonrelativistic many-body framework. General properties of physics, such as quantum mechanics, Lorentz covariance, and microscopic causality, motivate the use of quantum field theories to describe the interacting, relativistic, nuclear many-body system. Renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. Some applications and successes of quantum hadrodynamics are described, with an emphasis on the new features arising from relativity. Examples include the nuclear equation of state, the shell model, nucleon-nucleus scattering, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. Current issues and problems are also considered, such as the construction of improved approximations, the full role of the quantum vacuum, and the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics. We also speculate on future developments. 103 refs., 18 figs.

  9. A Many-Body RAGE Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampart, Jonas; Lewin, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    We prove a generalized version of the RAGE theorem for N-body quantum systems. The result states that only bound states of systems with {0 ?slant n ?slant N} particles persist in the long time average. The limit is formulated by means of an appropriate weak topology for many-body systems, which was introduced by the second author in a previous work, and is based on reduced density matrices. This topology is connected to the weak-* topology of states on the algebras of canonical commutation or anti-commutation relations, and we give a formulation of our main result in this setting.

  10. A many-body RAGE theorem

    E-print Network

    Jonas Lampart; Mathieu Lewin

    2015-07-20

    We prove a generalized version of the RAGE theorem for N-body quantum systems. The result states that only bound states of systems with $0\\leq n\\leq N$ particles persist in the long time average. The limit is formulated by means of an appropriate weak topology for many-body systems, which was introduced by the second author in a previous work, and is based on reduced density matrices. This topology is connected to the weak-* topology of states on the algebras of canonical commutation or anti-commutation relations, and we give a formulation of our main result in this setting.

  11. Toward an Accurate Modeling of Hydrodynamic Effects on the Translational and Rotational Dynamics of Biomolecules in Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    D?ugosz, Maciej; Antosiewicz, Jan M

    2015-07-01

    Proper treatment of hydrodynamic interactions is of importance in evaluation of rigid-body mobility tensors of biomolecules in Stokes flow and in simulations of their folding and solution conformation, as well as in simulations of the translational and rotational dynamics of either flexible or rigid molecules in biological systems at low Reynolds numbers. With macromolecules conveniently modeled in calculations or in dynamic simulations as ensembles of spherical frictional elements, various approximations to hydrodynamic interactions, such as the two-body, far-field Rotne-Prager approach, are commonly used, either without concern or as a compromise between the accuracy and the numerical complexity. Strikingly, even though the analytical Rotne-Prager approach fails to describe (both in the qualitative and quantitative sense) mobilities in the simplest system consisting of two spheres, when the distance between their surfaces is of the order of their size, it is commonly applied to model hydrodynamic effects in macromolecular systems. Here, we closely investigate hydrodynamic effects in two and three-body systems, consisting of bead-shell molecular models, using either the analytical Rotne-Prager approach, or an accurate numerical scheme that correctly accounts for the many-body character of hydrodynamic interactions and their short-range behavior. We analyze mobilities, and translational and rotational velocities of bodies resulting from direct forces acting on them. We show, that with the sufficient number of frictional elements in hydrodynamic models of interacting bodies, the far-field approximation is able to provide a description of hydrodynamic effects that is in a reasonable qualitative as well as quantitative agreement with the description resulting from the application of the virtually exact numerical scheme, even for small separations between bodies. PMID:26068580

  12. Few- and many-body physics of dipoles in ion traps and optical lattice simulators

    E-print Network

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of strong interactions in quantum many-body systems makes the analytical treatment of such systems very difficult. In this thesis we explore two possible proposals for simulating strongly correlated, quantum ...

  13. Communication: Dominance of extreme statistics in a prototype many-body Brownian Evan Hohlfeld and Phillip L. Geissler

    E-print Network

    Geissler, Phillip

    complexity in a many-body quantum and collective human system AIP Advances 1, 012114 (2011); 10 used to discuss and rationalize the behavior of many- body systems that are less tractable but moreCommunication: Dominance of extreme statistics in a prototype many-body Brownian ratchet Evan

  14. On the ground state calculation of a many-body system using a self-consistent basis and quasi-Monte Carlo: An application to water hexamer

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, Ionu? Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.; Jitomirskaya, Svetlana

    2013-11-28

    Given a quantum many-body system, the Self-Consistent Phonons (SCP) method provides an optimal harmonic approximation by minimizing the free energy. In particular, the SCP estimate for the vibrational ground state (zero temperature) appears to be surprisingly accurate. We explore the possibility of going beyond the SCP approximation by considering the system Hamiltonian evaluated in the harmonic eigenbasis of the SCP Hamiltonian. It appears that the SCP ground state is already uncoupled to all singly- and doubly-excited basis functions. So, in order to improve the SCP result at least triply-excited states must be included, which then reduces the error in the ground state estimate substantially. For a multidimensional system two numerical challenges arise, namely, evaluation of the potential energy matrix elements in the harmonic basis, and handling and diagonalizing the resulting Hamiltonian matrix, whose size grows rapidly with the dimensionality of the system. Using the example of water hexamer we demonstrate that such calculation is feasible, i.e., constructing and diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in a triply-excited SCP basis, without any additional assumptions or approximations. Our results indicate particularly that the ground state energy differences between different isomers (e.g., cage and prism) of water hexamer are already quite accurate within the SCP approximation.

  15. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. II. Application to the many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Baranov, M.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.

    2010-08-01

    We analyze the ground-state phase diagram of attractive lattice bosons, which are stabilized by a three-body onsite hardcore constraint. A salient feature of this model is an Ising-type transition from a conventional atomic superfluid to a dimer superfluid with vanishing atomic condensate. The study builds on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory of coupled bosons with polynomial interactions, proposed in a related paper [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064509 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevB.82.064509]. In this framework, we focus by analytical means on aspects of the phase diagram which are intimately connected to interactions, and are thus not accessible in a mean-field plus spin-wave approach. First, we determine shifts in the mean-field phase border, which are most pronounced in the low-density regime. Second, the investigation of the strong coupling limit reveals the existence of a “continuous supersolid,” which emerges as a consequence of enhanced symmetries in this regime. We discuss its experimental signatures. Third, we show that the Ising-type phase transition, driven first order via the competition of long-wavelength modes at generic fillings, terminates into a true Ising quantum critical point in the vicinity of half filling.

  16. A protein is a many-body system with 3N degrees of freedom (where N is the number of atoms in the molecule). In most

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    A protein is a many-body system with 3N degrees of freedom (where N is the number of atoms the flexibility of the peptide chain (grey). Some regions of a protein structure are kept tightly together by a large number of interactions, whereas others, such as loop regions, which often function as binding

  17. PHYS415 Lecture 11 -Many-body systems: interacting 1 1996 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-print Network

    Boal, David

    . All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited. #12;PHYS415 Lecture 11 - Many or copying is strictly prohibited. #12;PHYS415 Lecture 11 - Many-body systems: interacting 3 © 1996 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited

  18. Many-Body Physics, Topology and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar Sankar

    2015-06-01

    The challenge of condensed matter physics is to use non relativistic quantum ideas to explain and predict the observed oscopic properties of matter. To do this great ingenuity and imagination is required. The Hamiltonian H of a many-body system can be written down schematically as H = H0 + HI where H0 represents the sum of free Hamiltonians representing the constituent particles (atoms/molecules) of the system, while HI represents the interactions between these particles. These interactions are usually represented by static potential energy terms where the potential energy is taken to be the sum of two-body potentials i.e. potentials which only depend on the positions of pairs of particles. Many-body potentials, where the potential energy depends on the coordinates of more than two particles, are usually not considered, but seem to be required to understand certain systems, for example for modeling water. They also sometimes appear from theoretical calculations. For example the Casimir potential between a collection of parallel strings depends on all the string positions...

  19. Nuclear Many-Body Physics Where Structure And Reactions Meet

    E-print Network

    Naureen Ahsan; Alexander Volya

    2009-06-24

    The path from understanding a simple reaction problem of scattering or tunneling to contemplating the quantum nuclear many-body system, where structure and continuum of reaction-states meet, overlap and coexist, is a complex and nontrivial one. In this presentation we discuss some of the intriguing aspects of this route.

  20. Quantum Many-Body Culling

    E-print Network

    A. M. Dudarev; M. G. Raizen; Qian Niu

    2006-07-11

    We propose a method to produce a definite number of ground-state atoms by adiabatic reduction of the depth of a potential well that confines a degenerate Bose gas with repulsive interactions. Using a variety of methods, we map out the maximum number of particles that can be supported by the well as a function of the well depth and interaction strength, covering the limiting case of a Tonks gas as well as the mean-field regime. We also estimate the time scales for adiabaticity and discuss the recent observation of atomic number squeezing (Chuu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 95}, 260403 (2005)).

  1. Scalable dissipative preparation of many-body entanglement

    E-print Network

    Florentin Reiter; David Reeb; Anders S. Sørensen

    2015-01-26

    Entanglement is an essential resource for quantum information, quantum computation and quantum communication. While small entangled states of few particles have been used to demonstrate non-locality of nature and elementary quantum communication protocols, more advanced quantum computation and simulation tasks as well as quantum-enhanced measurements require many-body entanglement. Over the past years, impressive progress has been made on entangling larger numbers of qubits using unitary quantum gates. Entangled states are, however, sensitive to interactions with the environment, which are present in any open system. In particular decoherence and dissipation have remained a challenge. Here we show that by taking an approach alternative to quantum gates one can actively use dissipation to generate many-body entanglement. We demonstrate that by adding sources of dissipation and engineering decay processes, multi-particle entangled states can be prepared efficiently as steady states of the dissipative time evolution. Our protocols pave the way for the dissipative production of many-body entanglement in physical systems such as trapped ions.

  2. Many-body Study of Core-valence Partitioning and Correlation in Systems with Large-Z Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana

    This thesis presents optical trapping of various single nanoparticles, and the method for integrating the optical trap system into a microfluidic channel to examine the trapping stiffness and to study binding at the single molecule level. Optical trapping is the capability to immobilize, move, and manipulate small objects in a gentle way. Conventional trapping methods are able to trap dielectric particles with size greater than 100 nm. Optical trapping using nanostructures has overcome this limitation so that it has been of interest to trap nanoparticles for bio-analytical studies. In particular, aperture optical trapping allows for trapping at low powers, and easy detection of the trapping events by noting abrupt jumps in the transmission intensity of the trapping beam through the aperture. Improved trapping efficiency has been achieved by changing the aperture shape from a circle; for example, to a rectangle, double nanohole (DNH), or coaxial aperture. The DNH has the advantage of a well-defined trapping region between the two cusps where the nanoholes overlap, which typically allows only single particle trapping due to steric hindrance. Trapping of 21 nm encapsulated quantum dot has been achieved which shows optical trapping can be used in technologies that seek to place a quantum dot at a specific location in a plasmonic or nanophotonic structure. The DNH has been used to trap and unfold a single protein. The high signal-to-noise ratio of 33 in monitoring single protein trapping and unfolding shows a tremendous potential for using the double nanohole as a sensor for protein binding events at a single molecule level. The DNH integrated in a microfluidic chip with flow to show that stable trapping can be achieved under reasonable flow rates of a few microL/min. With such stable trapping under flow, it is possible to envision co-trapping of proteins to study their interactions. Co-trapping is achieved for the case where we flow in a protein (bovine serum albumin -- BSA) and co-trap its antibody (anti-BSA).

  3. Gravitational Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, J.

    2008-04-29

    In this paper, we briefly review some aspects of the gravitational many-body problem, which is one of the oldest problems in the modern mathematical science. Then we review our GRAPE project to design computers specialized to this problem.

  4. Effective Hamiltonians for Rapidly Driven Many-Body Lattice Systems: Induced Exchange Interactions and Density-Dependent Hoppings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, A. P.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2015-08-01

    We consider 1D lattices described by Hubbard or Bose-Hubbard models, in the presence of periodic high-frequency perturbations, such as uniform ac force or modulation of hopping coefficients. Effective Hamiltonians for interacting particles are derived using an averaging method resembling classical canonical perturbation theory. As is known, a high-frequency force may renormalize hopping coefficients, causing interesting phenomena such as coherent destruction of tunneling and creation of artificial gauge fields. We find explicitly additional corrections to the effective Hamiltonians due to interactions, corresponding to nontrivial processes such as single-particle density-dependent tunneling, correlated pair hoppings, nearest neighbor interactions, etc. Some of these processes arise also in multiband lattice models, and are capable of giving rise to a rich variety of quantum phases. The apparent contradiction with other methods, e.g., Floquet-Magnus expansion, is explained. The results may be useful for designing effective Hamiltonian models in experiments with ultracold atoms, as well as in the field of ultrafast nonequilibrium magnetism. An example of manipulating exchange interaction in a Mott-Hubbard insulator is considered, where our corrections play an essential role.

  5. Effective Hamiltonians for Rapidly Driven Many-Body Lattice Systems: Induced Exchange Interactions and Density-Dependent Hoppings.

    PubMed

    Itin, A P; Katsnelson, M I

    2015-08-14

    We consider 1D lattices described by Hubbard or Bose-Hubbard models, in the presence of periodic high-frequency perturbations, such as uniform ac force or modulation of hopping coefficients. Effective Hamiltonians for interacting particles are derived using an averaging method resembling classical canonical perturbation theory. As is known, a high-frequency force may renormalize hopping coefficients, causing interesting phenomena such as coherent destruction of tunneling and creation of artificial gauge fields. We find explicitly additional corrections to the effective Hamiltonians due to interactions, corresponding to nontrivial processes such as single-particle density-dependent tunneling, correlated pair hoppings, nearest neighbor interactions, etc. Some of these processes arise also in multiband lattice models, and are capable of giving rise to a rich variety of quantum phases. The apparent contradiction with other methods, e.g., Floquet-Magnus expansion, is explained. The results may be useful for designing effective Hamiltonian models in experiments with ultracold atoms, as well as in the field of ultrafast nonequilibrium magnetism. An example of manipulating exchange interaction in a Mott-Hubbard insulator is considered, where our corrections play an essential role. PMID:26317726

  6. The design of Kinetic Functionals for Many-Body Electron Systems : Combining analytical theory with Monte Carlo sampling of electronic configurations

    E-print Network

    Luca M. Ghiringhelli; Luigi Delle Site

    2007-11-12

    In a previous work [L.Delle Site, J.Phys.A 40, 2787 (2007)] the derivation of an analytic expression for the kinetic functional of a many-body electron system has been proposed. Though analytical, the formula is still non local (multidimensional) and thus not ideal for numerical applications. In this work, by treating the test case of a uniform gas of interacting spinless electrons, we propose a computational protocol which combines the previous analytic results with the Monte Carlo (MC) sampling of electronic configurations in space. This, we show, leads to an internally consistent scheme to design well founded local kinetic functionals.

  7. PHYS415 Lecture 10 -Many-body systems: non-interacting 1 1996 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-print Network

    Boal, David

    University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited. #12;PHYS415 Lecture 10; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited. #12;PHYS415 Lecture 10 - Many-body systems: non is strictly prohibited. #12;PHYS415 Lecture 10 - Many-body systems: non-interacting 4 © 1996 by David Boal

  8. $\\bar{D}^{0}D^{0*}$ $(D^{0}\\bar{D}^{0*})$ Systems in QCD-Improved Many Body Potential

    E-print Network

    M. Imran Jamil; Bilal Masud; Faisal Akram; S. M. Sohail Gilani

    2015-06-18

    For a system of current interest (composed of charm, anticharm quarks and a pair of light ones), we show trends in phenomenological implications of QCD-based improvements to a simple quark model treatment. We employ resonating group method to render this difficult four-body problem manageable. We use a quadratic confinement so as to be able to improve beyond the Born approximation. We report the position of the pole corresponding to $\\bar{D}^{0}D^{0*}$ molecule for the best fit of a model parameter to the relevant QCD simulations. We point out the interesting possibility that the pole can be shifted to $3872$ MeV by introducing another parameter that changes the strength of the interaction. The revised value of this second parameter can guide future trends in modeling of the exotic meson $X(3872)$. We also report the related variations in the $S$-wave spin average cross sections for $\\bar{D}^{0}D^{0*}\\longrightarrow\\omega J/\\psi$ and $\\bar{D}^{0}D^{0*}\\longrightarrow\\rho J/\\psi$ and show that the pole shows its appearance here as well.

  9. Atomistic simulations of stainless steels: a many-body potential for the Fe-Cr-C system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Björkas, C.; Nordlund, K.

    2013-11-01

    Stainless steels found in real-world applications usually have some C content in the base Fe-Cr alloy, resulting in hard and dislocation-pinning carbides—Fe3C (cementite) and Cr23C6—being present in the finished steel product. The higher complexity of the steel microstructure has implications, for example, for the elastic properties and the evolution of defects such as Frenkel pairs and dislocations. This makes it necessary to re-evaluate the effects of basic radiation phenomena and not simply to rely on results obtained from purely metallic Fe-Cr alloys. In this report, an analytical interatomic potential parameterization in the Abell-Brenner-Tersoff form for the entire Fe-Cr-C system is presented to enable such calculations. The potential reproduces, for example, the lattice parameter(s), formation energies and elastic properties of the principal Fe and Cr carbides (Fe3C, Fe5C2, Fe7C3, Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6), the Fe-Cr mixing energy curve, formation energies of simple C point defects in Fe and Cr, and the martensite lattice anisotropy, with fair to excellent agreement with empirical results. Tests of the predictive power of the potential show, for example, that Fe-Cr nanowires and bulk samples become elastically stiffer with increasing Cr and C concentrations. High-concentration nanowires also fracture at shorter relative elongations than wires made of pure Fe. Also, tests with Fe3C inclusions show that these act as obstacles for edge dislocations moving through otherwise pure Fe.

  10. Universal Properties of Many-Body Delocalization Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Andrew C.; Vasseur, Romain; Parameswaran, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the dynamical melting of "hot" one-dimensional many-body localized systems. As disorder is weakened below a critical value, these nonthermal quantum glasses melt via a continuous dynamical phase transition into classical thermal liquids. By accounting for collective resonant tunneling processes, we derive and numerically solve an effective model for such quantum-to-classical transitions and compute their universal critical properties. Notably, the classical thermal liquid exhibits a broad regime of anomalously slow subdiffusive equilibration dynamics and energy transport. The subdiffusive regime is characterized by a continuously evolving dynamical critical exponent that diverges with a universal power at the transition. Our approach elucidates the universal long-distance, low-energy scaling structure of many-body delocalization transitions in one dimension, in a way that is transparently connected to the underlying microscopic physics. We discuss experimentally testable signatures of the predicted scaling properties.

  11. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, A.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Kraus, C.V.; Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck ; Martin, M.J.; Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 ; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D.

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  12. Effective Field Theory in Nuclear Many-Body Physics

    E-print Network

    Brian D. Serot; John Dirk Walecka

    2000-10-10

    Recent progress in Lorentz-covariant quantum field theories of the nuclear many-body problem (quantum hadrodynamics, or QHD) is discussed. The importance of modern perspectives in effective field theory and density functional theory for understanding the successes of QHD is emphasized. To appear in: 150 Years of Quantum Many-Body Theory: A conference in honour of the 65th birthdays of John W. Clark, Alpo J. Kallio, Manfred L. Ristig, and Sergio Rosati.

  13. Tensor network states for the description of quantum many-body systems

    E-print Network

    Thorsten B. Wahl

    2015-09-20

    This thesis is divided into two mainly independent parts: In the first part, we derive a criterion to determine when a translationally invariant Matrix Product State (MPS) has long range localizable entanglement, which indicates that the corresponding state has some kind of non-local hidden order. We give examples fulfilling this criterion and eventually use it to obtain all such MPS with bond dimension 2 and 3. In the second part, we show that Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS) in two spatial dimensions can describe chiral topological states by explicitly constructing a family of such states with a non-trivial Chern number. We demonstrate that such free fermionic PEPS must necessarily be non-injective and have gapless parent Hamiltonians. Moreover, we provide numerical evidence that they can nevertheless approximate well the physical properties of Chern insulators with local Hamiltonians at arbitrary temperatures. We also construct long range, topological Hamiltonians with a flat energy spectrum for which those PEPS are unique ground states. As for non-chiral topological PEPS, the non-trivial, topological properties can be traced down to the existence of a symmetry on the virtual level of the PEPS tensor that is used to build the state. We use the special properties of PEPS to build the boundary theory and show how the symmetry results in the appearance of chiral modes, a ground state degeneracy of the parent Hamiltonian on the torus and a universal correction to the area law for the zero R\\'enyi entropy. Finally, we show that PEPS can also describe chiral topologically ordered phases. For that, we construct a simple PEPS for spin-1/2 particles in a two-dimensional lattice. We reveal a symmetry of the PEPS tensor that gives rise to the global topological character. We also extract characteristic quantities of the edge Conformal Field Theory using the bulk-boundary correspondence.

  14. The Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy and Fokker-Planck equation for many-body dissipative randomly driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliusarenko, O. Yu.; Chechkin, A. V.; Slyusarenko, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    By generalizing Bogolyubov's reduced description method, we suggest a formalism to derive kinetic equations for many-body dissipative systems in external stochastic field. As a starting point, we use a stochastic Liouville equation obtained from Hamilton's equations taking dissipation and stochastic perturbations into account. The Liouville equation is then averaged over realizations of the stochastic field by an extension of the Furutsu-Novikov formula to the case of a non-Gaussian field. As the result, a generalization of the classical Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy is derived. In order to get a kinetic equation for the single-particle distribution function, we use a regular cutoff procedure of the BBGKY hierarchy by assuming weak interaction between the particles and weak intensity of the field. Within this approximation, we get the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the system in a non-Gaussian stochastic field. Two particular cases are discussed by assuming either Gaussian statistics of external perturbation or homogeneity of the system.

  15. Many-body localization and thermalization in disordered Hubbard chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, Rubem; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    We study the many-body localization transition in one-dimensional Hubbard chains using exact diagonalization and quantum chaos indicators. We also study dynamics in the delocalized (ergodic) and localized phases and discuss thermalization and eigenstate thermalization, or the lack thereof, in such systems. Consistently within the indicators and observables studied, we find that ergodicity is very robust against disorder, namely, even in the presence of weak Hubbard interactions the disorder strength needed for the system to localize is large. We show that this robustness might be hidden by finite size effects in experiments with ultracold fermions.

  16. Studying non-equilibrium many-body dynamics using one-dimensional Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Tim; Gring, Michael; Kuhnert, Maximilian; Rauer, Bernhard; Geiger, Remi; Mazets, Igor; Smith, David Adu; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Kitagawa, Takuya; Demler, Eugene

    2014-12-04

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems play an important role in many areas of physics. However, a general answer to the question of how these systems relax is still lacking. We experimentally study the dynamics of ultracold one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases. This reveals the existence of a quasi-steady prethermalized state which differs significantly from the thermal equilibrium of the system. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of non-equilibrium quantum many-body systems is a far richer process than has been assumed in the past.

  17. Many-body coherent destruction of tunneling in photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2011-03-15

    An optical realization of the phenomenon of many-body coherent destruction of tunneling, recently predicted for interacting many-boson systems by Gong, Molina, and Haenggi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 133002 (2009)], is proposed for light transport in engineered waveguide arrays. The optical system enables a direct visualization in Fock space of the many-body tunneling control process.

  18. Emergence of stationary many-body entanglement in driven-dissipative Rydberg lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun Kyung; Cho, Jaeyoon; Choi, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Non-equilibrium quantum dynamics represents an emerging paradigm for condensed matter physics, quantum information science, and statistical mechanics. Strongly interacting Rydberg atoms offer an attractive platform to examine driven-dissipative dynamics of quantum spin models with long-range order. Here, we explore the conditions under which stationary many-body entanglement persists with near-unit fidelity and high scalability. In our approach, coherent many-body dynamics is driven by Rydberg-mediated laser transitions, while atoms at the lattice boundary locally reduce the entropy of the many-body system. Surprisingly, the many-body entanglement is established by continuously evolving a locally dissipative Rydberg system towards the steady state, precisely as with optical pumping. We characterize the dynamics of multipartite entanglement in an one-dimensional lattice by way of quantum uncertainty relations, and demonstrate the long-range behavior of the stationary entanglement with finite-size scaling. Our work opens a route towards dissipative preparation of many-body entanglement with unprecedented scaling behavior.

  19. Entanglement in the many-body localized phase and transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardarson, Jens H.

    2015-03-01

    The study of entanglement, both in eigenstates and its evolution after quenches, has been instrumental in advancing our understanding of many-body localized phases--the interacting analogs of the Anderson insulator. In this talk I will discuss in detail three observations related to the entanglement properties of many-body localized systems: (i) A global quench within the many-body localized phase gives rise to a slowly (logarithmically) increasing entanglement entropy. This is due to interaction induced dephasing that is absent in the Anderson insulator and therefore serves as a unique signature of the many-body localized phase. (ii) A local quench from an eigenstate leads to an extensive increase in the entanglement entropy only at the many-body localization transition itself. And (iii) at the many-body localization transition the distribution of entanglement entropies becomes extensively broad, while it vanishes both in the extended metallic phase and in the localized phases. The width of the entanglement distribution, like the long time limit of the local quench, is therefore a useful diagnostic for a many-body localization transition. I explicitly demonstrate how all these features are observed in microscopic spin chain models of many-body localization, and, in particular, discuss how they can be used to detect a many-body mobility edge.

  20. Stochastic gene expression as a many-body problem

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Masaki; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression has a stochastic component because of the single-molecule nature of the gene and the small number of copies of individual DNA-binding proteins in the cell. We show how the statistics of such systems can be mapped onto quantum many-body problems. The dynamics of a single gene switch resembles the spin-boson model of a two-site polaron or an electron transfer reaction. Networks of switches can be approximately described as quantum spin systems by using an appropriate variational principle. In this way, the concept of frustration for magnetic systems can be taken over into gene networks. The landscape of stable attractors depends on the degree and style of frustration, much as for neural networks. We show the number of attractors, which may represent cell types, is much smaller for appropriately designed weakly frustrated stochastic networks than for randomly connected networks. PMID:12606710

  1. Many-Body Models for Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, A.; Carretta, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Pavarini, E.

    2013-04-01

    We present a flexible and effective ab initio scheme to build many-body models for molecular nanomagnets, and to calculate magnetic exchange couplings and zero-field splittings. It is based on using localized Foster-Boys orbitals as a one-electron basis. We apply this scheme to three paradigmatic systems, the antiferromagnetic rings Cr8 and Cr7Ni, and the single-molecule magnet Fe4. In all cases we identify the essential magnetic interactions and find excellent agreement with experiments.

  2. Many-body wave scattering by small bodies and applications

    E-print Network

    Many-body wave scattering by small bodies and applications A. G. Ramm (Mathematics Department, wave scattering by small bodies, small particles, "smart" materials, negative refraction. Abstract A rigorous reduction of the many-body wave scattering problem to solving a linear algebraic system is given

  3. Control of the dephasing process due to many-body interactions among excitons by using non-Markovian effect in GaAs single quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Minami, F.

    2013-12-04

    We show the coherent control of dephasing process of exciton polarization due to heavy hole-heavy hole and heavy hole-light hole scatterings in a GaAs single quantum well. The memory time of the exction scattering is estimated as 0.47 ps.

  4. Bipartite Fluctuations as a Probe of Many-Body Entanglement

    E-print Network

    Song, H Francis; Flindt, Christian; Klich, Israel; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Hur, Karyn Le

    2011-01-01

    We investigate in detail the behavior of the bipartite fluctuations of particle number $\\hat{N}$ and spin $\\hat{S}^z$ in many-body quantum systems, focusing on systems where such U(1) charges are both conserved and fluctuate within subsystems due to exchange of charges between subsystems. We propose that the bipartite fluctuations are an effective tool for studying many-body physics, particularly its entanglement properties, in the same way that noise and Full Counting Statistics have been used in mesoscopic transport and cold atomic gases. For systems that can be mapped to a problem of non-interacting fermions we show that the fluctuations and higher-order cumulants fully encode the information needed to determine the entanglement entropy as well as the full entanglement spectrum through the R\\'{e}nyi entropies. In this connection we derive a simple formula that explicitly relates the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix to the R\\'{e}nyi entropies of integer order for any finite density matrix. In other...

  5. Spectral statistics across the many-body localization transition

    E-print Network

    Maksym Serbyn; Joel E. Moore

    2015-08-28

    The many-body localization transition (MBLT) between ergodic and many-body localized phase in disordered interacting systems is a subject of much recent interest. Statistics of eigenenergies is known to be a powerful probe of crossovers between ergodic and integrable systems in simpler examples of quantum chaos. We consider the evolution of the spectral statistics across the MBLT, starting with mapping to a Brownian motion process that analytically relates the spectral properties to the statistics of matrix elements. We demonstrate that the flow from Wigner-Dyson to Poisson statistics is a two-stage process. First, fractal enhancement of matrix elements upon approaching the MBLT from the metallic side produces an effective power-law interaction between energy levels, and leads to a plasma model for level statistics. At the second stage, the gas of eigenvalues has local interaction and level statistics belongs to a semi-Poisson universality class. We verify our findings numerically on the XXZ spin chain. We provide a microscopic understanding of the level statistics across the MBLT and discuss implications for the transition that are strong constraints on possible theories.

  6. Relativistically covariant many-body perturbation procedure

    E-print Network

    Lindgren, Ingvar

    and effective Hamiltonian, and it is the basic tool for our unified theory. The Green's operator leads, when theory of relativity. Many-body perturbation theories available today, on the other hand. This operator, which is a field-theoretical concept, is closely related to the many-body wave operator

  7. Dynamical Stability of a Many-body Kapitza Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Roberta Citro; Emanuele G. Dalla Torre; Luca DÁlessio; Anatoli Polkovnikov; Mehrtash Babadi; Takashi Oka; Eugene Demler

    2015-01-22

    We consider a many-body generalization of the Kapitza pendulum: the periodically-driven sine-Gordon model. We show that this interacting system is dynamically stable to periodic drives with finite frequency and amplitude. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that periodically-driven unbounded interacting systems should always tend to an absorbing infinite-temperature state. The transition to an unstable absorbing state is described by a change in the sign of the kinetic term in the effective Floquet Hamiltonian and controlled by the short-wavelength degrees of freedom. We investigate the stability phase diagram through an analytic high-frequency expansion, a self-consistent variational approach, and a numeric semiclassical calculations. Classical and quantum experiments are proposed to verify the validity of our results.

  8. Many-Body Dispersion Interactions in Molecular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distasio, Robert A., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we have developed an efficient method for obtaining an accurate theoretical description of van der Waals (vdW) interactions that includes both long-range Coulomb electrodynamic response screening effects as well as treatment of the many-body vdW energy to infinite order. This method goes beyond the standard C6 /R6 pairwise additive approximation and can easily be coupled to a wide array of theoretical methods, ranging from classical force fields to higher-level quantum chemical calculations. To demonstrate the increasingly important role played by many-body vdW interactions in large, structurally complex molecular systems, we use this method to investigate several pertinent molecular properties, such as binding energies/affinities in gas-phase molecular dimers and supramolecular complexes, relative conformational energetics in small polypeptides, and thermodynamic stabilities among competing molecular crystal polymorphs. This work received funding from the Department of Energy under Grant Nos.: DOE DE-SC0008626 and DOE DE-FG02ER46201 and the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant VDW-CMAT).

  9. Towards Efficient and General Method for Many-Body van-der-Waals Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Van der Waals interactions are intrinsically many-body phenomena, arising from collective electron fluctuations in a given material. Adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) allows to compute the many-body vdW interactions accurately. However, the ACFDT computational cost is prohibitive for real materials, even when the random-phase approximation is employed for the response function. We show how the problem of computing the long-range many-body vdW energy for real systems can be solved efficiently by mapping the system (molecule or condensed matter) onto a collection of quantum harmonic oscillators. Currently, our method, which couples density-functional theory with the many-body dispersion energy (DFT+MBD), is developed for non-metallic system [A. Tkatchenko, R. A. DiStasio Jr., R. Car, M. Scheffler, submitted]. The DFT+MBD method includes the hybridization effects by using the Tkatchenko-Scheffler approach [PRL 102, 073005 (2009)], the long-range Coulomb screening through classical electrodynamics [B. U. Felderhof, Physica 29, 1569 (1974)], and the many-body vdW energy from the coupled-fluctuating dipole model [M. W. Cole et al., Mol. Simul. 35, 849 (2009)]. The successes of the DFT+MBD approach and the many challenges that lie ahead will be discussed.

  10. Non equilibrium dissipation-driven steady many-body entanglement

    E-print Network

    Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

    2015-04-03

    We study an ensemble of two-level quantum systems (qubits) interacting with a common electromagnetic field in proximity of a dielectric slab whose temperature is held different from that of some far surrounding walls. We show that the dissipative dynamics of the qubits driven by this stationary and out of thermal equilibrium (OTE) field, allows the production of steady many-body entangled states, differently from the case at thermal equilibrium where steady states are always non-entangled. By studying up to ten qubits, we point out the role of symmetry in the entanglement production, which is exalted in the case of permutationally invariant configurations. In the case of three qubits, we find a strong dependence of tripartite entanglement on the spatial disposition of the qubits, and in the case of six qubits, we find several highly entangled bipartitions where entanglement can, remarkably, survive for large qubit-qubit distances up to 100 $\\mu$m.

  11. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in a strongly-correlated ultracold Rydberg gas

    E-print Network

    Nobuyuki Takei; Christian Sommer; Claudiu Genes; Guido Pupillo; Haruka Goto; Kuniaki Koyasu; Hisashi Chiba; Matthias Weidemüller; Kenji Ohmori

    2015-04-14

    Many-body interactions govern a variety of important quantum phenomena ranging from superconductivity and magnetism in condensed matter to solvent effects in chemistry. Understanding those interactions beyond mean field is a holy grail of modern sciences. AMO physics with advanced laser technologies has recently emerged as a new platform to study quantum many-body systems. One of its latest developments is the study of long-range interactions among ultracold particles to reveal the effects of many-body correlations. Rydberg atoms distinguish themselves by their large dipole moments and tunability of dipolar interactions. Most of ultracold Rydberg experiments have been performed with narrow-band lasers in the Rydberg blockade regime. Here we demonstrate an ultracold Rydberg gas in a complementary regime, where electronic coherence is created using a broadband picosecond laser pulse, thus circumventing the Rydberg blockade to induce strong many-body correlations. The effects of long-range Rydberg interactions have been investigated by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. This approach allows for the real-time observation of coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics in which the electronic coherence is modulated by the interaction-induced correlations. The modulation evolves more rapidly than expected for two-body correlations by several orders of magnitude. We have actively controlled such ultrafast many-body dynamics by tuning the principal quantum number and the population of the Rydberg state. The observed Ramsey interferograms are well reproduced by a theoretical model beyond mean-field approximation, which can be relevant to other similar many-body phenomena in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Our new approach opens a new avenue to observe and manipulate nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly-correlated quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale.

  12. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories (MBT17)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Boronat, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    These are the proceedings of the XVII International Conference on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories, which was held from 8-13 September 2013 in Rostock, Germany. The conference continued the triennial series initiated in Trieste in 1978 and was devoted to new developments in the field of many-body theories. The conference series encourages the exchange of ideas between physicists working in such diverse areas as nuclear physics, quantum chemistry, lattice Hamiltonians or quantum uids. Many-body theories are an integral part in different fields of theoretical physics such as condensed matter, nuclear matter and field theory. Phase transitions and macroscopic quantum effects such as magnetism, Bose-Einstein condensation, super uidity or superconductivity have been investigated within ultra-cold gases, finite systems or various nanomaterials. The conference series on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories is devoted to foster the interaction and to cross-fertilize between different fields and to discuss future lines of research. The topics of the 17th meeting were Cluster Physics Cold Gases High Energy Density Matter and Intense Lasers Magnetism New Developments in Many-Body Techniques Nuclear Many-Body and Relativistic Theories Quantum Fluids and Solids Quantum Phase Transitions Topological Insulators and Low Dimensional Systems. 109 participants from 20 countries participated. 44 talks and 61 posters werde presented. As a particular highlight of the conference, The Eugene Feenberg Memorial Medal for outstanding results in the field of many-body theory and The Hermann Kümmel Early Achievement Award in Many-Body Physics for young scientists in that field were awarded. The Feenberg Medal went jointly to Patrick Lee (MIT, USA) for his fundamental contributions to condensed-matter theory, especially in regard to the quantum Hall effect, to universal conductance uctuations, and to the Kondo effect in quantum dots, and Douglas Scalapino (UC Santa Barbara, USA) for his imaginative use and development of the Monte-Carlo approach and for his ground-breaking contributions to superconductivity. The Kümmel Award went to Max Metlitski (UC Santa Barbara) for remarkable advances in the theory of quantum criticality in metals. The nominations for the Kümmel Award were of such high standard that the Committee announced Honourable Mentions to Martin Eckstein (MPDS/U Hamburg, Germany) for his leading contributions in the development of non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory, Emanuel Gull (U Michigan, USA) for the development of the Continuous-Time Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Method and for its use in understanding the interplay of the pseudogap and superconductivity in the Hubbard model and Kai Sun (U Michigan, USA) for seminal contributions to the theory of topological effects in strongly correlated electron systems. The Conference continues the series of conferences held before in Trieste, Italy (1979); Oaxtapec, Mexico (1981); Odenthal-Altenberg, Germany (1983); San Francisco, USA (1985); Oulu, Finland (1987); Arad, Israel (1989); Minneapolis, USA (1991); Schloé Segau, Austria (1994); Sydney, Australia (1997); Seattle, USA (1999); Manchester, UK (2001); Santa Fe, USA (2004); Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005); Barcelona, Spain (2007); Columbus, USA (2009) and Bariloche, Argentina (2011). It has been a great pleasure to prepare for the conference. We thank the IAC and in particular Susana Hernandez and David Neilson as well as the International Programme Committee for their great support and advice. Many more people have been involved locally in organizing this international meeting and thanks goes to them, in particular to the members of the LOC Sonja Lorenzen, Dieter Bauer, Niels-Uwe Bastian, Marina Hertzfeldt, Volker Mosert and Gerd Röpke. The next meeting will take place in Buffalo, USA in 2015 and we look forward to yet another exciting exchange on Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories. Heidi Reinholz and Jordi Boronat Guest editors Conference photograph Details of the committees are available in the PDF.

  13. Spatially partitioned many-body vortices

    E-print Network

    Shachar Klaiman; Ofir E. Alon

    2014-12-14

    A vortex in Bose-Einstein condensates is a localized object which looks much like a tiny tornado storm. It is well described by mean-field theory. In the present work we go beyond the current paradigm and introduce many-body vortices. These are made of {\\it spatially-partitioned} clouds, carry definite total angular momentum, and are fragmented rather than condensed objects which can only be described beyond mean-field theory. A phase diagram based on a mean-field model assists in predicting the parameters where many-body vortices occur. Implications are briefly discussed.

  14. Many-body singlets by dynamic spin polarization

    E-print Network

    Wang Yao

    2011-01-20

    We show that dynamic spin polarization by collective raising and lowering operators can drive a spin ensemble from arbitrary initial state to many-body singlets, the zero-collective-spin states with large scale entanglement. For an ensemble of $N$ arbitrary spins, both the variance of the collective spin and the number of unentangled spins can be reduced to O(1) (versus the typical value of O(N)), and many-body singlets can be occupied with a population of $\\sim 20 %$ independent of the ensemble size. We implement this approach in a mesoscopic ensemble of nuclear spins through dynamic nuclear spin polarization by an electron. The result is of two-fold significance for spin quantum technology: (1) a resource of entanglement for nuclear spin based quantum information processing; (2) a cleaner surrounding and less quantum noise for the electron spin as the environmental spin moments are effectively annihilated.

  15. Many-body characterization of particle-conserving topological superfluids.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Dukelsky, Jorge; Cobanera, Emilio; Esebbag, Carlos; Beenakker, Carlo

    2014-12-31

    What distinguishes trivial superfluids from topological superfluids in interacting many-body systems where the number of particles is conserved? Building on a class of integrable pairing Hamiltonians, we present a number-conserving, interacting variation of the Kitaev model, the Richardson-Gaudin-Kitaev chain, that remains exactly solvable for periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. Our model allows us to identify fermion parity switches that distinctively characterize topological superconductivity (fermion superfluidity) in generic interacting many-body systems. Although the Majorana zero modes in this model have only a power-law confinement, we may still define many-body Majorana operators by tuning the flux to a fermion parity switch. We derive a closed-form expression for an interacting topological invariant and show that the transition away from the topological phase is of third order. PMID:25615376

  16. Many-body wave scattering by small bodies and applications

    E-print Network

    Many-body wave scattering by small bodies and applications A. G. Ramma Mathematics Department scattering problem to solving a linear algebraic system is given bypassing solving the usual system with desired refraction coefficient are discussed in Refs. 7, 9, 8, and 15. Wave scattering by small bodies

  17. Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J.L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a 29Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits. PMID:25205440

  18. Time-Evolution of the Coherent and the Squeezed States of Many-Body Systems Based on the Basic Idea of the Boson Mapping and the TDHF Method

    E-print Network

    A. Kuriyama; J. da Providencia; Y. Tsue; M. Yamamura

    2000-08-08

    Various works performed by the present authors in the 1990s are reviewed. The topics discussed in this paper are mainly related to the time-evolution of the coherent and the squeezed states of the systems obeying the su(2)- and the su(1,1)-algebra. The formulations are based on the basic idea of the boson mapping and the TDHF theory in canonical form. Under the time-dependent variational procedure for trial states appropriately chosen, the time-evolution of the systems under investigation is described. Further, it is shown that this method enables us to obtain the classical counterparts of the original quantal systems.

  19. Dynamic calculation of rail vehicles: A concept for the application of the process of statistical linearization in the many body program system MEDYNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renger, A.

    A substructure for the wheel sets is developed. The problem of relating the substructures to the general body system by the calculation of statistical linearized, generalized force vectors for various linear and nonlinear joining elements is solved. Nonlinear spring and damper connections, Coulomb translation friction dampers, and Coulomb rotation friction dampers are covered. Statistically linearized dynamic connecting elements are modelized. It is shown how the general differential equation system is to be constructed. The iteration process for the determination of the free linearization parameter is presented.

  20. Many-Body Localization Implies that Eigenvectors are Matrix-Product States.

    PubMed

    Friesdorf, M; Werner, A H; Brown, W; Scholz, V B; Eisert, J

    2015-05-01

    The phenomenon of many-body localization has received a lot of attention recently, both for its implications in condensed-matter physics of allowing systems to be an insulator even at nonzero temperature as well as in the context of the foundations of quantum statistical mechanics, providing examples of systems showing the absence of thermalization following out-of-equilibrium dynamics. In this work, we establish a novel link between dynamical properties--a vanishing group velocity and the absence of transport--with entanglement properties of individual eigenvectors. For systems with a generic spectrum, we prove that strong dynamical localization implies that all of its many-body eigenvectors have clustering correlations. The same is true for parts of the spectrum, thus allowing for the existence of a mobility edge above which transport is possible. In one dimension these results directly imply an entanglement area law; hence, the eigenvectors can be efficiently approximated by matrix-product states. PMID:25978216

  1. Many-Body Basis Set Superposition Effect.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, John F; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2015-11-10

    The basis set superposition effect (BSSE) arises in electronic structure calculations of molecular clusters when questions relating to interactions between monomers within the larger cluster are asked. The binding energy, or total energy, of the cluster may be broken down into many smaller subcluster calculations and the energies of these subsystems linearly combined to, hopefully, produce the desired quantity of interest. Unfortunately, BSSE can plague these smaller fragment calculations. In this work, we carefully examine the major sources of error associated with reproducing the binding energy and total energy of a molecular cluster. In order to do so, we decompose these energies in terms of a many-body expansion (MBE), where a "body" here refers to the monomers that make up the cluster. In our analysis, we found it necessary to introduce something we designate here as a many-ghost many-body expansion (MGMBE). The work presented here produces some surprising results, but perhaps the most significant of all is that BSSE effects up to the order of truncation in a MBE of the total energy cancel exactly. In the case of the binding energy, the only BSSE correction terms remaining arise from the removal of the one-body monomer total energies. Nevertheless, our earlier work indicated that BSSE effects continued to remain in the total energy of the cluster up to very high truncation order in the MBE. We show in this work that the vast majority of these high-order many-body effects arise from BSSE associated with the one-body monomer total energies. Also, we found that, remarkably, the complete basis set limit values for the three-body and four-body interactions differed very little from that at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level for the respective subclusters embedded within a larger cluster. PMID:26574311

  2. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  3. On the simulation of indistinguishable fermions in the many-body Wigner formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of quantum systems consisting of interacting, indistinguishable fermions is an incredible mathematical problem which poses formidable numerical challenges. Many sophisticated methods addressing this problem are available which are based on the many-body Schrödinger formalism. Recently a Monte Carlo technique for the resolution of the many-body Wigner equation has been introduced and successfully applied to the simulation of distinguishable, spinless particles. This numerical approach presents several advantages over other methods. Indeed, it is based on an intuitive formalism in which quantum systems are described in terms of a quasi-distribution function, and highly scalable due to its Monte Carlo nature. In this work, we extend the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method to the simulation of indistinguishable fermions. To this end, we first show how fermions are incorporated into the Wigner formalism. Then we demonstrate that the Pauli exclusion principle is intrinsic to the formalism. As a matter of fact, a numerical simulation of two strongly interacting fermions (electrons) is performed which clearly shows the appearance of a Fermi (or exchange–correlation) hole in the phase-space, a clear signature of the presence of the Pauli principle. To conclude, we simulate 4, 8 and 16 non-interacting fermions, isolated in a closed box, and show that, as the number of fermions increases, we gradually recover the Fermi–Dirac statistics, a clear proof of the reliability of our proposed method for the treatment of indistinguishable particles.

  4. Many-body entropies, correlations, and emergence of statistical relaxation in interaction quench dynamics of ultracold bosons

    E-print Network

    A. U. J. Lode; B. Chakrabarti; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-07-01

    We study the quantum many-body dynamics and the entropy production triggered by an interaction quench in a system of $N=10$ interacting identical bosons in an external one-dimensional harmonic trap. The multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB) is used for solving the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation at a high level of accuracy. We consider many-body entropy measures such as the Shannon information entropy, number of principal components, and occupation entropy that are computed from the time-dependent many-body basis set used in MCTDHB. These measures quantify relevant physical features such as irregular or chaotic dynamics, statistical relaxation and thermalization. We monitor the entropy measures as a function of time and assess how they depend on the interaction strength. For larger interaction strength, the many-body information entropy approaches the value predicted for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices and implies statistical relaxation. The basis states of MCTDHB are explicitly time-dependent and optimized by the variational principle in a way that minimizes the number of significantly contributing ones. It is therefore a non-trivial fact that statistical relaxation prevails in MCTDHB computations. Moreover, we demonstrate a fundamental connection between the production of entropy, the build-up of correlations and loss of coherence in the system. Since the coherence and correlations are experimentally accessible, their present connection to many-body entropies can be scrutinized to detect statistical relaxation. Our results are the first ones obtained for thermalization of finite quantum systems using an optimized time-dependent and genuinely many-body basis set.

  5. Simulating typical entanglement with many-body Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Yoshifumi; Murao, Mio

    2011-11-15

    We study the time evolution of the amount of entanglement generated by one-dimensional spin-1/2 Ising-type Hamiltonians composed of many-body interactions. We investigate sets of states randomly selected during the time evolution generated by several types of time-independent Hamiltonians by analyzing the distributions of the amount of entanglement of the sets. We compare such entanglement distributions with that of typical entanglement, entanglement of a set of states randomly selected from a Hilbert space with respect to the unitarily invariant measure. We show that the entanglement distribution obtained by a time-independent Hamiltonian can simulate the average and standard deviation of the typical entanglement, if the Hamiltonian contains suitable many-body interactions. We also show that the time required to achieve such a distribution is polynomial in the system size for certain types of Hamiltonians.

  6. Observation of coherent quench dynamics in a metallic many-body state of fermionic atoms.

    PubMed

    Will, Sebastian; Iyer, Deepak; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Quantum simulation with ultracold atoms has become a powerful technique to gain insight into interacting many-body systems. In particular, the possibility to study nonequilibrium dynamics offers a unique pathway to understand correlations and excitations in strongly interacting quantum matter. So far, coherent nonequilibrium dynamics has exclusively been observed in ultracold many-body systems of bosonic atoms. Here we report on the observation of coherent quench dynamics of fermionic atoms. A metallic state of ultracold spin-polarized fermions is prepared along with a Bose-Einstein condensate in a shallow three-dimensional optical lattice. After a quench that suppresses tunnelling between lattice sites for both the fermions and the bosons, we observe long-lived coherent oscillations in the fermionic momentum distribution, with a period that is determined solely by the Fermi-Bose interaction energy. Our results show that coherent quench dynamics can serve as a sensitive probe for correlations in delocalized fermionic quantum states and for quantum metrology. PMID:25625799

  7. Observation of coherent quench dynamics in a metallic many-body state of fermionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian; Iyer, Deepak; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Quantum simulation with ultracold atoms has become a powerful technique to gain insight into interacting many-body systems. In particular, the possibility to study nonequilibrium dynamics offers a unique pathway to understand correlations and excitations in strongly interacting quantum matter. So far, coherent nonequilibrium dynamics has exclusively been observed in ultracold many-body systems of bosonic atoms. Here we report on the observation of coherent quench dynamics of fermionic atoms. A metallic state of ultracold spin-polarized fermions is prepared along with a Bose-Einstein condensate in a shallow three-dimensional optical lattice. After a quench that suppresses tunnelling between lattice sites for both the fermions and the bosons, we observe long-lived coherent oscillations in the fermionic momentum distribution, with a period that is determined solely by the Fermi-Bose interaction energy. Our results show that coherent quench dynamics can serve as a sensitive probe for correlations in delocalized fermionic quantum states and for quantum metrology.

  8. Influence of many-body interactions during the ionization of gases by short intense optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Schuh, K; Hader, J; Moloney, J V; Koch, S W

    2014-03-01

    The excitation of atomic gases by short high-intensity optical pulses leads to significant electron ionization. In dilute systems, the generated distribution of ionized electrons is highly anisotropic, reflecting the quantum mechanical properties of the atomic states involved in the many photon transitions. For higher atomic densities, the Coulomb interaction in the electron-ion system leads to the development of an isotropic electron plasma. To study the ionization process in the presence of the many-body interaction, a fully microscopic model is developed that combines a generalized version of the optical Bloch equations describing the optical excitation with a microscopic description of the many-body interactions. The numerical evaluation shows that the Coulomb interaction significantly modifies the distribution anisotropy already during the excitation process. Whereas a reduced anisotropy is still present after the pulse for low ionization degrees and pressures, it is completely absent for elevated gas densities. An ionization degree is predicted that is significantly enhanced by the many-body interactions. PMID:24730952

  9. First-principles many-body theory for ultra-cold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Peter D.; Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji

    2010-06-15

    Recent breakthroughs in the creation of ultra-cold atoms in the laboratory have ushered in unprecedented changes in physical science. These enormous changes in the coldest temperatures available in the laboratory mean that many novel experiments are possible. There is unprecedented control and simplicity in these novel systems, meaning that quantum many-body theory is now facing severe challenges in quantitatively understanding these new results. We discuss some of the new experiments and recently developed theoretical techniques required to predict the results obtained.

  10. Coexistence of energy diffusion and spin sub-diffusion in the ergodic phase of a many body localizable spin chain

    E-print Network

    Alessio Lerose; Vipin Kerala Varma; Francesca Pietracaprina; John Goold; Antonello Scardicchio

    2015-11-30

    The phenomenon of many-body localization (MBL) in disordered quantum many-body systems occurs when all transport is suppressed despite the excitations of the system being interacting. In this letter we report on the numerical simulation of autonomous quantum dynamics for disordered Heisenberg chains when the system is prepared with a strong inhomogeneity in either spin or energy density. Using exact diagonalisation and a dynamical code based on Krylov subspaces we are able to simulate dynamics for up to $L=26$ spins. We find, as expected, the breakdown of equilibration of the spatial profiles as the system enters the MBL phase. However, in the ergodic phase we also find a large region in parameter space where the energy dynamics remains diffusive but where spins transport has been evidenced to occur only sub-diffusively. This suggestive finding points towards a peculiar ergodic phase where particles do not diffuse but energy does, reminiscent of the situation in amorphous solids.

  11. Quantum simulations with 8?8?Sr+? ions on planar lattice traps

    E-print Network

    Lin, Ziliang (Ziliang Carter)

    2008-01-01

    Quantum simulations are the use of well controlled many-body quantum systems to simulate and solve other many-body quantum systems that are not understood. This thesis describes theoretical proposals and experimental ...

  12. Fate of dynamical many-body localization in the presence of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Analabha; Das, Arnab

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical localization is one of the most startling manifestations of quantum interference, where the evolution of a simple system is frozen out under a suitably tuned coherent periodic drive. Here we show that, although any randomness in the interactions of a many-body system kills dynamical localization eventually, spectacular remnants survive even when the disorder is strong. We consider a disordered quantum Ising chain where the transverse magnetization relaxes exponentially with time with a decay time-scale ? due to random longitudinal interactions between the spins. We show that, under external periodic drive, this relaxation slows down (? shoots up) by orders of magnitude as the ratio of the drive frequency ? and amplitude h0 tends to certain specific values (the freezing condition). If ? is increased while maintaining the ratio h0/? at a fixed freezing value, then ? diverges exponentially with ? . The results can be easily extended for a larger family of disordered fermionic and bosonic systems.

  13. The fate of dynamical many-body localization in the presence of disorder

    E-print Network

    Analabha Roy; Arnab Das

    2015-03-02

    Dynamical localization is one of the most startling manifestations of quantum interference, where the evolution of a simple system is frozen out under a suitably tuned coherent periodic drive. Here, we show that, although any randomness in the interactions of a many body system kills dynamical localization eventually, spectacular remnants survive even when the disorder is strong. We consider a disordered quantum Ising chain where the transverse magnetization relaxes exponentially with time with a decay time-scale $\\tau$ due to random longitudinal interactions between the spins. We show that, under external periodic drive, this relaxation slows down ($\\tau$ shoots up) by orders of magnitude as the ratio of the drive frequency $\\omega$ and amplitude $h_{0}$ tends to certain specific values (the freezing condition). If $\\omega$ is increased while maintaining the ratio $h_0/\\omega$ at a fixed freezing value, then $\\tau$ diverges exponentially with $\\omega.$ The results can be easily extended for a larger family of disordered fermionic and bosonic systems.

  14. Probing many-body localization by spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dibyendu; Singh, Rajeev; Moessner, Roderich

    2015-11-01

    We propose to apply spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) to detect many-body localization (MBL) in disordered spin systems. The SNS methods are relatively noninvasive techniques to probe spontaneous spin fluctuations. Here, we show that the spin noise signals obtained by cross-correlation SNS with two probe beams can be used to separate the MBL phase from a noninteracting Anderson localized phase and a delocalized (diffusive) phase in the studied models for which we numerically calculate real-time spin noise signals and their power spectra. For an archetypical case of the disordered XXZ spin chain, we also develop a simple phenomenological model.

  15. Generalizing the self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo approach to finite temperature: a path for the optimization of low-energy many-body basis expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    The self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo method for complex functions [F. A. Reboredo J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 136}, 204101 (2012)] and some ideas of the correlation function Monte Carlo approach [D. M. Ceperley and B. Bernu, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 89}, 6316 (1988)] are blended to obtain a method for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of many-body systems at low temperatures. In order to allow the evolution in imaginary time to describe the density matrix, we remove the fixed-node restriction using complex antisymmetric trial wave functions. A statistical method is derived for the calculation of finite temperature properties of many-body systems near the ground state. In the process we also obtain a parallel algorithm that optimizes the many-body basis of a small subspace of the many-body Hilbert space. This small subspace is optimized to have maximum overlap with the one expanded by the lower energy eigenstates of a many-body Hamiltonian. We show in a model system that the Helmholtz free energy is minimized within this subspace as the iteration number increases. We show that the subspace expanded by the small basis systematically converges towards the subspace expanded by the lowest energy eigenstates. Possible applications of this method to calculate the thermodynamic properties of many-body systems near the ground state are discussed. The resulting basis can be also used to accelerate the calculation of the ground or excited states with Quantum Monte Carlo.

  16. Quantum circuits for strongly correlated quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Frank Verstraete; J. Ignacio Cirac; Jose I. Latorre

    2008-04-11

    In recent years, we have witnessed an explosion of experimental tools by which quantum systems can be manipulated in a controlled and coherent way. One of the most important goals now is to build quantum simulators, which would open up the possibility of exciting experiments probing various theories in regimes that are not achievable under normal lab circumstances. Here we present a novel approach to gain detailed control on the quantum simulation of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems by constructing the explicit quantum circuits that diagonalize their dynamics. We show that the exact quantum circuits underlying some of the most relevant many-body Hamiltonians only need a finite amount of local gates. As a particularly simple instance, the full dynamics of a one-dimensional Quantum Ising model in a transverse field with four spins is shown to be reproduced using a quantum circuit of only six local gates. This opens up the possibility of experimentally producing strongly correlated states, their time evolution at zero time and even thermal superpositions at zero temperature. Our method also allows to uncover the exact circuits corresponding to models that exhibit topological order and to stabilizer states.

  17. Control of Quantum Systems

    E-print Network

    John W. Clark; Dennis G. Lucarelli; Tzyh-Jong Tarn

    2002-05-01

    A quantum system subject to external fields is said to be controllable if these fields can be adjusted to guide the state vector to a desired destination in the state space of the system. Fundamental results on controllability are reviewed against the background of recent ideas and advances in two seemingly disparate endeavors: (i) laser control of chemical reactions and (ii) quantum computation. Using Lie-algebraic methods, sufficient conditions have been derived for global controllability on a finite-dimensional manifold of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, in the case that the Hamiltonian and control operators, possibly unbounded, possess a common dense domain of analytic vectors. Some simple examples are presented. A synergism between quantum control and quantum computation is creating a host of exciting new opportunities for both activities. The impact of these developments on computational many-body theory could be profound.

  18. Photon-mediated interactions: a scalable tool to create and sustain entangled many-body states

    E-print Network

    Camille Aron; Manas Kulkarni; Hakan E. Türeci

    2014-12-29

    Generation and sustenance of entangled many-body states is of fundamental and applied interest. Recent experimental progress in the stabilization of two-qubit Bell states in superconducting quantum circuits using an autonomous feedback scheme [S. Shankar et al., Nature 504, 419 (2013)] has demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of driven-dissipative approaches, i.e. engineering a fine balance between driven-unitary and dissipative dynamics. Despite the remarkable theoretical and experimental progress in those approaches for superconducting circuits, no demonstrably scalable scheme exists to drive an arbitrary number of spatially separated qubits to a desired entangled quantum many-body state. Here we propose and study such a scalable scheme, based on engineering photon-mediated interactions, for driving a register of spatially separated qubits into multipartite entangled states. We demonstrate how generalized W-states can be generated with remarkable fidelities and the entanglement sustained for an indefinite time. The protocol is primarily discussed for a superconducting circuit architecture but is ideally realized in any platform that permits controllable delivery of coherent light to specified locations in a network of Cavity QED systems.

  19. No-go theorem for one-way quantum computing on naturally occurring two-level systems

    E-print Network

    Chen, Jianxin

    The ground states of some many-body quantum systems can serve as resource states for the one-way quantum computing model, achieving the full power of quantum computation. Such resource states are found, for example, in ...

  20. Many-body formalism for fermions: Enforcing the Pauli principle on paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D. K.

    2015-07-01

    Confined quantum systems involving N identical interacting fermions are found in many areas of physics, including condensed matter, atomic, nuclear, and chemical physics. In a previous series of papers, a many-body perturbation method that is applicable to both weakly and strongly interacting systems of bosons has been set forth by the author and coworkers. A symmetry-invariant perturbation theory was developed that uses group theory coupled with the dimension of space as the perturbation parameter to obtain an analytic correlated wave function through first order for a system under spherical confinement with a general two-body interaction. In the present paper, we extend this formalism to large systems of fermions, circumventing the numerical demands of applying the Pauli principle by enforcing the Pauli principle on paper. The method does not scale in complexity with N and has minimal numerical cost. We apply the method to a unitary Fermi gas and compare to recent Monte Carlo values.

  1. A Many-Body Field Theory Approach to Stochastic Models in Population Biology

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Peter J.; Ferguson, Neil M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Many models used in theoretical ecology, or mathematical epidemiology are stochastic, and may also be spatially-explicit. Techniques from quantum field theory have been used before in reaction-diffusion systems, principally to investigate their critical behavior. Here we argue that they make many calculations easier and are a possible starting point for new approximations. Methodology We review the many-body field formalism for Markov processes and illustrate how to apply it to a ‘Brownian bug’ population model, and to an epidemic model. We show how the master equation and the moment hierarchy can both be written in particularly compact forms. The introduction of functional methods allows the systematic computation of the effective action, which gives the dynamics of mean quantities. We obtain the 1-loop approximation to the effective action for general (space-) translation invariant systems, and thus approximations to the non-equilibrium dynamics of the mean fields. Conclusions The master equations for spatial stochastic systems normally take a neater form in the many-body field formalism. One can write down the dynamics for generating functional of physically-relevant moments, equivalent to the whole moment hierarchy. The 1-loop dynamics of the mean fields are the same as those of a particular moment-closure. PMID:19730742

  2. Many-body entropies, correlations, and emergence of statistical relaxation in interaction quench dynamics of ultracold bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lode, Axel U. J.; Chakrabarti, Barnali; Kota, Venkata K. B.

    2015-09-01

    We study the quantum many-body dynamics and the entropy production triggered by an interaction quench in a system of N =10 interacting identical bosons in an external one-dimensional harmonic trap. The multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB) is used for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation at a high level of accuracy. We consider many-body entropy measures such as the Shannon information entropy, number of principal components, and occupation entropy that are computed from the time-dependent many-body basis set used in MCTDHB. These measures quantify relevant physical features such as irregular or chaotic dynamics, statistical relaxation, and thermalization. We monitor the entropy measures as a function of time and assess how they depend on the interaction strength. For larger interaction strength, the many-body information and occupation entropies approach the value predicted for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. This implies statistical relaxation. The basis states of MCTDHB are explicitly time-dependent and optimized by the variational principle in a way that minimizes the number of significantly contributing ones. It is therefore a nontrivial fact that statistical relaxation prevails in MCTDHB computations. Moreover, we demonstrate a fundamental connection between the production of entropy, the buildup of correlations and loss of coherence in the system. Our findings imply that mean-field approaches such as the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation cannot capture statistical relaxation and thermalization because they neglect correlations. Since the coherence and correlations are experimentally accessible, their present connection to many-body entropies can be scrutinized to detect statistical relaxation. In this work we use the recent recursive software implementation of the MCTDHB (R-MCTDHB).

  3. Creating collective many-body states with highly excited atoms

    E-print Network

    B. Olmos; R. González-Férez; I. Lesanovsky

    2009-11-12

    We study the collective excitation of a gas of highly excited atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice, where the ground and the excited states are coupled resonantly via a laser field. Our attention is focused on the regime where the interaction between the highly excited atoms is very weak in comparison to the Rabi frequency of the laser. We demonstrate that in this case the many-body excitations of the system can be expressed in terms of free spinless fermions. The complex many-particle states arising in this regime are characterized and their properties, e.g. their correlation functions, are studied. In addition we investigate how one can actually experimentally access some of these many-particle states by a temporal variation of the laser parameters.

  4. Creating collective many-body states with highly excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Olmos, B.; Gonzalez-Ferez, R.; Lesanovsky, I.

    2010-02-15

    The collective excitation of a gas of highly excited atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice is studied, where the ground and the excited states are resonantly coupled via a laser field. Attention is focused on the regime where the interaction between the highly excited atoms is very weak in comparison to the Rabi frequency of the laser. In this case, the many-body excitations of the system can be expressed in terms of free spinless fermions. The complex many-particle states arising in this regime are characterized and their properties, for example their correlation functions, are studied. Additional investigation into how some of these many-particle states can actually be experimentally accessed by a temporal variation of the laser parameters is performed.

  5. Adiabatic quantum metrology with strongly correlated quantum optical systems

    E-print Network

    P. A. Ivanov; D. Porras

    2013-05-24

    We show that the quasi-adiabatic evolution of a system governed by the Dicke Hamiltonian can be described in terms of a self-induced quantum many-body metrological protocol. This effect relies on the sensitivity of the ground state to a small symmetry-breaking perturbation at the quantum phase transition, that leads to the collapse of the wavefunciton into one of two possible ground states. The scaling of the final state properties with the number of atoms and with the intensity of the symmetry breaking field, can be interpreted in terms of the precession time of an effective quantum metrological protocol. We show that our ideas can be tested with spin-phonon interactions in trapped ion setups. Our work points to a classification of quantum phase transitions in terms of the capability of many-body quantum systems for parameter estimation.

  6. Quantum Friction: Cooling Quantum Systems with Unitary Time Evolution

    E-print Network

    Aurel Bulgac; Michael McNeil Forbes; Kenneth J. Roche; Gabriel Wlaz?owski

    2013-05-29

    We introduce a type of quantum dissipation -- local quantum friction -- by adding to the Hamiltonian a local potential that breaks time-reversal invariance so as to cool the system. Unlike the Kossakowski-Lindblad master equation, local quantum friction directly effects unitary evolution of the wavefunctions rather than the density matrix: it may thus be used to cool fermionic many-body systems with thousands of wavefunctions that must remain orthogonal. In addition to providing an efficient way to simulate quantum dissipation and non-equilibrium dynamics, local quantum friction coupled with adiabatic state preparation significantly speeds up many-body simulations, making the solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation significantly simpler than the solution of its stationary counterpart.

  7. Quantum chaotic system as a model of decohering environment

    E-print Network

    Jayendra N. Bandyopadhyay

    2009-04-24

    As a model of decohering environment, we show that quantum chaotic system behave equivalently as many-body system. An approximate formula for the time evolution of the reduced density matrix of a system interacting with a quantum chaotic environment is derived. This theoretical formulation is substantiated by the numerical study of decoherence of two qubits interacting with a quantum chaotic environment modeled by a chaotic kicked top. Like the many-body model of environment, the quantum chaotic system is efficient decoherer, and it can generate entanglement between the two qubits which have no direct interaction.

  8. Many-body Rabi oscillations of Rydberg excitation in small mesoscopic samples

    E-print Network

    J. Stanojevic; R. Côté

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the collective aspects of Rydberg excitation in ultracold mesoscopic systems. Strong interactions between Rydberg atoms influence the excitation process and impose correlations between excited atoms. The manifestations of the collective behavior of Rydberg excitation are the many-body Rabi oscillations, spatial correlations between atoms as well as the fluctuations of the number of excited atoms. We study these phenomena in detail by numerically solving the many-body Schr\\"edinger equation.

  9. Identifying the local conserved quantities in Many-Body-Localized matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Tian, Binbin; Yu, Xiongji; Clark, Bryan; Oganesyan, Vadim

    2015-05-01

    Typically, many-body systems with interactions tend to thermalize. However, adding sufficient disorder (or possibly via other mechanisms) one can induce many-body localization. The localization occurs by the spontaneous appearance of local conserved quantities. We describe how to identify these conserved quantities and explore their localization properties. We also comment on how these conserved quantities are reflected in cold atom experiments on localized matter.

  10. Communication: Random phase approximation renormalized many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Furche, Filipp

    2013-11-07

    We derive a renormalized many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) starting from the random phase approximation (RPA). This RPA-renormalized perturbation theory extends the scope of single-reference MBPT methods to small-gap systems without significantly increasing the computational cost. The leading correction to RPA, termed the approximate exchange kernel (AXK), substantially improves upon RPA atomization energies and ionization potentials without affecting other properties such as barrier heights where RPA is already accurate. Thus, AXK is more balanced than second-order screened exchange [A. Grüneis et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154115 (2009)], which tends to overcorrect RPA for systems with stronger static correlation. Similarly, AXK avoids the divergence of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) theory for small gap systems and delivers a much more consistent performance than MP2 across the periodic table at comparable cost. RPA+AXK thus is an accurate, non-empirical, and robust tool to assess and improve semi-local density functional theory for a wide range of systems previously inaccessible to first-principles electronic structure calculations.

  11. Understanding many-body physics in one dimension from the Lieb–Liniger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu-Zhu; Chen, Yang-Yang; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an elementary introduction on various aspects of the prototypical integrable model the Lieb–Liniger Bose gas ranging from the cooperative to the collective features of many-body phenomena. In 1963, Lieb and Liniger first solved this quantum field theory many-body problem using Bethe’s hypothesis, i.e., a particular form of wavefunction introduced by Bethe in solving the one-dimensional Heisenberg model in 1931. Despite the Lieb–Liniger model is arguably the simplest exactly solvable model, it exhibits rich quantum many-body physics in terms of the aspects of mathematical integrability and physical universality. Moreover, the Yang–Yang grand canonical ensemble description for the model provides us with a deep understanding of quantum statistics, thermodynamics, and quantum critical phenomena at the many-body physical level. Recently, such fundamental physics of this exactly solved model has been attracting growing interest in experiments. Since 2004, there have been more than 20 experimental papers that reported novel observations of different physical aspects of the Lieb–Liniger model in the laboratory. So far the observed results are in excellent agreement with results obtained using the analysis of this simplest exactly solved model. Those experimental observations reveal the unique beauty of integrability. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB922101) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374331 and 11304357).

  12. Stochastic many-body perturbation theory for anharmonic molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2014-08-28

    A new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for anharmonic vibrational zero-point energies and transition frequencies is developed, which combines the diagrammatic vibrational many-body perturbation theory based on the Dyson equation with Monte Carlo integration. The infinite sums of the diagrammatic and thus size-consistent first- and second-order anharmonic corrections to the energy and self-energy are expressed as sums of a few m- or 2m-dimensional integrals of wave functions and a potential energy surface (PES) (m is the vibrational degrees of freedom). Each of these integrals is computed as the integrand (including the value of the PES) divided by the value of a judiciously chosen weight function evaluated on demand at geometries distributed randomly but according to the weight function via the Metropolis algorithm. In this way, the method completely avoids cumbersome evaluation and storage of high-order force constants necessary in the original formulation of the vibrational perturbation theory; it furthermore allows even higher-order force constants essentially up to an infinite order to be taken into account in a scalable, memory-efficient algorithm. The diagrammatic contributions to the frequency-dependent self-energies that are stochastically evaluated at discrete frequencies can be reliably interpolated, allowing the self-consistent solutions to the Dyson equation to be obtained. This method, therefore, can compute directly and stochastically the transition frequencies of fundamentals and overtones as well as their relative intensities as pole strengths, without fixed-node errors that plague some QMC. It is shown that, for an identical PES, the new method reproduces the correct deterministic values of the energies and frequencies within a few cm{sup ?1} and pole strengths within a few thousandths. With the values of a PES evaluated on the fly at random geometries, the new method captures a noticeably greater proportion of anharmonic effects.

  13. Many-Body Coulomb Gauge Exotic and Charmed Hybrids

    E-print Network

    Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Stephen R. Cotanch

    2000-10-25

    Utilizing a QCD Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian with linear confinement specified by lattice, we report a relativistic many-body calculation for the light exotic and charmed hybrid mesons. The Hamiltonian successfully describes both quark and gluon sectors, with vacuum and quasiparticle properties generated by a BCS transformation and more elaborate TDA and RPA diagonalizations for the meson ($q\\bar{q}$) and glueball ($gg$) masses. Hybrids entail a computationally intense relativistic three quasiparticle ($q\\bar{q}g$) calculation with the 9 dimensional Hamiltonian matrix elements evaluated variationally by Monte Carlo techniques. Our new TDA (RPA) spectrum for the nonexotic $1^{--}$ charmed ($c\\bar{c}$ and $c\\bar{c}g$) system provides an explanation for the overpopulation of the observed $J/\\psi$ states. For the important $1^{-+}$ light exotic channel we obtain hybrid masses above 2 $GeV$, in broad agreement with lattice and flux tube models, indicating that the recently observed resonances at 1.4 and 1.6 $GeV$ are of different, perhaps four quark, structure.

  14. Particle diagrams and statistics of many-body random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Rupert A.; Müller, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    We present a method using Feynman-like diagrams to calculate the statistical properties of random many-body potentials. This method provides a promising alternative to existing techniques typically applied to this class of problems, such as the method of supersymmetry and the eigenvector expansion technique pioneered in Benet et al. (2001). We use it here to calculate the fourth, sixth and eighth moments of the average level density for systems with m bosons or fermions that interact through a random k-body Hermitian potential (k ? m); the ensemble of such potentials with a Gaussian weight is known as the embedded Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (eGUE) (Mon and French, 1975). Our results apply in the limit where the number l of available single-particle states is taken to infinity. A key advantage of the method is that it provides an efficient way to identify only those expressions which will stay relevant in this limit. It also provides a general argument for why these terms have to be the same for bosons and fermions. The moments are obtained as sums over ratios of binomial expressions, with a transition from moments associated to a semi-circular level density for m < 2 k to Gaussian moments in the dilute limit k ? m ? l. Regarding the form of this transition, we see that as m is increased, more and more diagrams become relevant, with new contributions starting from each of the points m = 2 k , 3 k , … , nk for the 2 nth moment.

  15. Groundstatable fermionic wavefunctions and their associated many-body Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, Daniel Chamon, Claudio

    2010-01-15

    In the vast majority of many-body problems, it is the kinetic energy part of the Hamiltonian that is best known microscopically, and it is the detailed form of the interactions between the particles, the potential energy term, that is harder to determine from first principles. An example is the case of high temperature superconductors: while a tight-binding model captures the kinetic term, it is not clear that there is superconductivity with only an onsite repulsion and, thus, that the problem is accurately described by the Hubbard model alone. Here we pose the question of whether, once the kinetic energy is fixed, a candidate ground state is groundstatable or not. The easiness to answer this question is strongly related to the presence or the absence of a sign problem in the system. When groundstatability is satisfied, it is simple to obtain the potential energy that will lead to such a ground state. As a concrete case study, we apply these ideas to different fermionic wavefunctions with superconductive or spin-density wave correlations and we also study the influence of Jastrow factors. The kinetic energy considered is a simple nearest neighbor hopping term.

  16. Enhancement models of momentum densities of annihilating electron-positron pairs: The many-body picture of natural geminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkonen, Ilja; Ervasti, Mikko M.; Siro, Topi; Harju, Ari

    2014-01-01

    The correlated motion of a positron surrounded by electrons is a fundamental many-body problem. We approach this by modeling the momentum density of annihilating electron-positron pairs using the framework of reduced density matrices, natural orbitals, and natural geminals (electron-positron pair wave functions) of the quantum theory of many-particle systems. We find that an expression based on the natural geminals provides an exact, unique, and compact expression for the momentum density. The natural geminals can be used to define and to determine enhancement factors for enhancement models going beyond the independent-particle model for a better understanding of the results of positron annihilation experiments.

  17. Experimental signatures of semiclassical gravity and the many-body Schrodinger-Newton equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam

    2015-04-01

    In semiclassical gravity, the many-body Schrodinger-Newton (SN) equation, which governs the evolution of a many-particle system under self gravity, predicts that classical and quantum eigenfrequencies of a macroscopic mechanical oscillator are different. For high- Q and low-frequency (~ 10s of mHz) torsional pendulums made with atoms with small internal motion fluctuations, such as Tungsten or Platinum, this difference can be considerably larger than the classical eigenfrequency of the pendulum. We exploit this split in the design of an optomechanics experiment which, in contrast with experiments that test for quantum gravity, is feasible with current technology and which distinguishes, at low temperatures and within about a year, between the predictions of the SN equation and standard quantum mechanics. Specifically, we propose using light to probe the motion of such oscillators. Moreover, the nonlinearity induced by the SN equation forces us to revisit the wavefunction collapse postulate, resulting in two proposed prescriptions for how the measurement of the light is performed. Each predict a noticeable feature in the spectrum of the outgoing light that is separate from the features of classical force noise.

  18. Experimental signatures of semiclassical gravity and the many-body Schrödinger-Newton equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam; Miao, Haixing; Yang, Huan; Chen, Yanbei

    2015-04-01

    In semiclassical gravity, the many-body Schrödinger-Newton (SN) equation, which governs the evolution of a many-particle system under self gravity, predicts that classical and quantum eigenfrequencies of a macroscopic mechanical oscillator are different. For high- Q and low-frequency (~10s of mHz) torsional pendulums made with atoms with small internal motion fluctuations, such as Tungsten or Platinum, this difference can be considerably larger than the classical eigenfrequency of the pendulum. We exploit this split in the design of an optomechanics experiment which, in contrast with experiments that test for quantum gravity, is feasible with current technology and which distinguishes, at low temperatures and within about a year, between the predictions of the SN equation and standard quantum mechanics. Specifically, we propose using light to probe the motion of such oscillators. Moreover, the nonlinearity induced by the SN equation forces us to revisit the wavefunction collapse postulate, resulting in two proposed prescriptions for how the measurement of the light is performed. Each predict a noticeable feature in the spectrum of the outgoing light that is separate from the features of classical force noise.

  19. Many-body tunneling dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates and vortex states in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beinke, Raphael; Klaiman, Shachar; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Alon, Ofir E.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we study the out-of-equilibrium many-body tunneling dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a two-dimensional radial double well. We investigate the impact of interparticle repulsion and compare the influence of angular momentum on the many-body tunneling dynamics. Accurate many-body dynamics are obtained by solving the full many-body Schrödinger equation. We demonstrate that macroscopic vortex states of definite total angular momentum indeed tunnel and that, even in the regime of weak repulsions, a many-body treatment is necessary to capture the correct tunneling dynamics. As a general rule, many-body effects set in at weaker interactions when the tunneling system carries angular momentum.

  20. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medders, Gregory R.; Götz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  1. On the representation of many-body interactions in water.

    PubMed

    Medders, Gregory R; Götz, Andreas W; Morales, Miguel A; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-14

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water. PMID:26374013

  2. Observing CP Violation in Many-Body Decays

    E-print Network

    Mike Williams

    2011-05-26

    It is well known that observing CP violation in many-body decays could provide strong evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Many searches have been carried out; however, no 5sigma evidence for CP violation has yet been found in these types of decays. A novel model-independent method for observing CP violation in many-body decays is presented in this paper. It is shown that the sensitivity of this method is significantly larger than those used to-date.

  3. Short history of nuclear many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    This is a very short presentation regarding developments in the theory of nuclear many-body problems, as seen and experienced by the author during the past 60 years with particular emphasis on the contributions of Gerry Brown and his research-group. Much of his work was based on Brueckner's formulation of the nuclear many-body problem. It is reviewed briefly together with the Moszkowski-Scott separation method that was an important part of his early work. The core polarisation and his work related to effective interactions in general are also addressed.

  4. Total correlations of the diagonal ensemble herald the many-body localization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goold, J.; Gogolin, C.; Clark, S. R.; Eisert, J.; Scardicchio, A.; Silva, A.

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing phenomenon of many-body localization (MBL) has attracted significant interest recently, but a complete characterization is still lacking. In this work we introduce the total correlations, a concept from quantum information theory capturing multipartite correlations, to the study of this phenomenon. We demonstrate that the total correlations of the diagonal ensemble provides a meaningful diagnostic tool to pin-down, probe, and better understand the MBL transition and ergodicity breaking in quantum systems. In particular, we show that the total correlations has sublinear dependence on the system size in delocalized, ergodic phases, whereas we find that it scales extensively in the localized phase developing a pronounced peak at the transition. We exemplify the power of our approach by means of an exact diagonalization study of a Heisenberg spin chain in a disordered field. By a finite size scaling analysis of the peak position and crossover point from log to linear scaling we collect evidence that ergodicity is broken before the MBL transition in this model.

  5. 221B Lecture Notes Many-Body Problems II

    E-print Network

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Many-Body Problems II Atomic Physics 1 Single-Electron atoms When there is only one electron going around a nucleus, it is a hydrogen- like atom: H, He+ , Li++ , Be3+ , etc in this notes. 2 Two-Electron atoms Multi-electron atoms are quite complicated. In addition to the central poten

  6. Localization in a random XY model with long-range interactions: Intermediate case between single-particle and many-body problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burin, Alexander L.

    2015-09-01

    Many-body localization in an XY model with a long-range interaction is investigated. We show that in the regime of a high strength of disordering compared to the interaction an off-resonant flip-flop spin-spin interaction (hopping) generates the effective Ising interactions of spins in the third order of perturbation theory in a hopping. The combination of hopping and induced Ising interactions for the power-law distance dependent hopping V (R ) ?R-? always leads to the localization breakdown in a thermodynamic limit of an infinite system at ? <3 d /2 where d is a system dimension. The delocalization takes place due to the induced Ising interactions U (R ) ?R-2 ? of "extended" resonant pairs. This prediction is consistent with the numerical finite size scaling in one-dimensional systems. Many-body localization in an XY model is more stable with respect to the long-range interaction compared to a many-body problem with similar Ising and Heisenberg interactions requiring ? ?2 d which makes the practical implementations of this model more attractive for quantum information applications. The full summary of dimension constraints and localization threshold size dependencies for many-body localization in the case of combined Ising and hopping interactions is obtained using this and previous work and it is the subject for the future experimental verification using cold atomic systems.

  7. Many-body characterization of topological superconductivity: The Richardson-Gaudin-Kitaev chain

    E-print Network

    Gerardo Ortiz; Jorge Dukelsky; Emilio Cobanera; Carlos Esebbag; Carlo Beenakker

    2014-07-14

    What distinguishes trivial from topological superluids in interacting many-body systems where the number of particles is conserved? Building on a class of integrable pairing Hamiltonians, we present a number-conserving, interacting variation of the Kitaev model, the Richardson-Gaudin-Kitaev chain, that remains exactly solvable for periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions. Our model allows us to identify fermionic parity switches that distinctively characterize topological superconductivity in interacting many-body systems. Although the Majorana zero-modes in this model have only a power-law confinement, we may still define many-body Majorana operators by tuning the flux to a fermion parity switch. We derive a closed-form expression for an interacting topological invariant and show that the transition away from the topological phase is of third order.

  8. Many-body correlations and Isospin equilibration in multi-fragmentation processes

    E-print Network

    M. Papa; G. Giuliani

    2008-01-28

    Isospin equilibration in multi-fragmentation processes is studied for the system $^{40}Cl+^{28}Si$ at 40 MeV/nucleon. The investigation is performed through semiclassical microscopic many-body calculations based on the CoMD-II model. The study has been developed to describe isospin equilibration processes involving the gas and liquid "phases" of the total system formed in the collision processes. The investigation of the behavior of this observable in terms of the repulsive/attractive action of the symmetry term, highlights many-body correlations which are absent in semiclassical mean-field approaches.

  9. Generalizing the self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo approach to finite temperature: A path for the optimization of low-energy many-body bases

    SciTech Connect

    Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2014-02-21

    A statistical method is derived for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of many-body systems at low temperatures. This method is based on the self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo method for complex functions [F. A. Reboredo, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 204101 (2012)] and some ideas of the correlation function Monte Carlo approach [D. M. Ceperley and B. Bernu, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 6316 (1988)]. In order to allow the evolution in imaginary time to describe the density matrix, we remove the fixed-node restriction using complex antisymmetric guiding wave functions. In the process we obtain a parallel algorithm that optimizes a small subspace of the many-body Hilbert space to provide maximum overlap with the subspace spanned by the lowest-energy eigenstates of a many-body Hamiltonian. We show in a model system that the partition function is progressively maximized within this subspace. We show that the subspace spanned by the small basis systematically converges towards the subspace spanned by the lowest energy eigenstates. Possible applications of this method for calculating the thermodynamic properties of many-body systems near the ground state are discussed. The resulting basis can also be used to accelerate the calculation of the ground or excited states with quantum Monte Carlo.

  10. Many-Body Effects on Bandgap Shrinkage, Effective Masses, and Alpha Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many-body Coulomb effects influence the operation of quantum-well (QW) laser diode (LD) strongly. In the present work, we study a two-band electron-hole plasma (EHP) within the Hatree-Fock approximation and the single plasmon pole approximation for static screening. Full inclusion of momentum dependence in the many-body effects is considered. An empirical expression for carrier density dependence of the bandgap renormalization (BGR) in an 8 nm GaAs/Al(0.3)G(4.7)As single QW will be given, which demonstrates a non-universal scaling behavior for quasi-two-dimension structures, due to size-dependent efficiency of screening. In addition, effective mass renormalization (EMR) due to momentum-dependent self-energy many-body correction, for both electrons and holes is studied and serves as another manifestation of the many-body effects. Finally, the effects on carrier density dependence of the alpha factor is evaluated to assess the sensitivity of the full inclusion of momentum dependence.

  11. Many-body interactions in quasi-freestanding graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, David; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Hwang, Choongyu; Deslippe, Jack; Fedorov, Alexei; Louie, Steven; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    The Landau-Fermi liquid picture for quasiparticles assumes that charge carriers are dressed by many-body interactions, forming one of the fundamental theories of solids. Whether this picture still holds for a semimetal such as graphene at the neutrality point, i.e., when the chemical potential coincides with the Dirac point energy, is one of the long-standing puzzles in this field. Here we present such a study in quasi-freestanding graphene by using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We see the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions go through substantial changes when the semimetallic regime is approached, including renormalizations due to strong electron-electron interactions with similarities to marginal Fermi liquid behavior. These findings set a new benchmark in our understanding of many-body physics in graphene and a variety of novel materials with Dirac fermions.

  12. Bilayer superfluidity of fermionic polar molecules: Many-body effects

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, M. A.; Micheli, A.; Ronen, S.; Zoller, P.

    2011-04-15

    We study the BCS superfluid transition in a single-component fermionic gas of dipolar particles loaded in a tight bilayer trap, with the electric dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the layers. Based on the detailed analysis of the interlayer scattering, we calculate the critical temperature of the interlayer superfluid pairing transition when the layer separation is both smaller (dilute regime) and on the order or larger (dense regime) than the mean interparticle separation in each layer. Our calculations go beyond the standard BCS approach and include the many-body contributions resulting in the mass renormalization, as well as additional contributions to the pairing interaction. We find that the many-body effects have a pronounced effect on the critical temperature and can either decrease (in the very dilute limit) or increase (in the dense and moderately dilute limits) the transition temperature as compared to the BCS approach.

  13. Many-body mobility edge due to symmetry-constrained dynamics and strong interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondragon-Shem, Ian; Pal, Arijeet; Hughes, Taylor L.; Laumann, Chris R.

    2015-08-01

    We provide numerical evidence combined with an analytical understanding of the many-body mobility edge for the strongly anisotropic spin-1 /2 XXZ model in a random magnetic field. The system dynamics can be understood in terms of symmetry-constrained excitations about parent states with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic short range order. These two regimes yield vastly different dynamics producing an observable, tunable many-body mobility edge. We compute a set of diagnostic quantities that verify the presence of the mobility edge and discuss how weakly correlated disorder can tune the mobility edge further.

  14. 221B Lecture Notes Many-Body Problems II

    E-print Network

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Many-Body Problems II Atomic Physics 1 Single-Electron atoms When there is only one electron going around a nucleus, it is a hydrogen- like atom: H, He+ , Li++ , Be3+ , etc(x) = a-3/2 6 12 r a e-r/2a Y m 1 (, ). (4) Here, a = aB/Z. 2 Two-Electron atoms Multi-electron atoms

  15. Automatic Generation of Vacuum Amplitude Many-Body Perturbation Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.

    An algorithm and a computer program in Fortran 95 are presented which enumerate the Hugenholtz diagram representation of the many-body perturbation series for the ground state energy with a two-body interaction. The output is in a form suitable for post-processing such as automatic code generation. The result of a particular application, generation of LATEX code to draw the diagrams, is shown.

  16. Combined coupled-cluster and many-body perturbation theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, So; Fan, Peng-Dong; Auer, Alexander A.; Nooijen, Marcel; Piecuch, Piotr

    2004-12-01

    Various approximations combining coupled-cluster (CC) and many-body perturbation theories have been derived and implemented into the parallel execution programs that take into account the spin, spatial (real Abelian), and permutation symmetries and that are applicable to closed- and open-shell molecules. The implemented models range from the CCSD(T), CCSD[T], CCSD(2)T, CCSD(2)TQ, and CCSDT(2)Q methods to the completely renormalized (CR) CCSD(T) and CCSD[T] approaches, where CCSD (CCSDT) stands for the CC method with connected single and double (single, double, and triple) cluster operators, and subscripted or parenthesized 2, T, and Q indicate the perturbation order or the excitation ranks of the cluster operators included in the corrections. The derivation and computer implementation have been automated by the algebraic and symbolic manipulation program TENSOR CONTRACTION ENGINE (TCE). The TCE-synthesized subroutines generate the tensors with the highest excitation rank in a blockwise manner so that they need not be stored in their entirety, while enabling the efficient reuse of other precalculated intermediate tensors defined by prioritizing the memory optimization as well as operation minimization. Consequently, the overall storage requirements for the corrections due to connected triple and quadruple cluster operators scale as O(n4) and O(n6), respectively (n being a measure of the system size). For systems with modest multireference character of their wave functions, we found that the order of accuracy is CCSD

  17. Aiming for Benchmark Accuracy with the Many-Body Expansion Ryan M. Richard,

    E-print Network

    Herbert, John

    Aiming for Benchmark Accuracy with the Many-Body Expansion Ryan M. Richard, Ka Un Lao, and John M of these methods for large systems, with the goal of reproducing benchmark-quality calculations, ideally meaning the possibility of serious loss-of-precision problems that are not widely appreciated. Tight thresholds

  18. Dynamical many-body phases of the parametrically driven, dissipative Dicke model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, R.; Zilberberg, O.

    2015-08-01

    Control and manipulation of quantum engineered systems allows for the utilization of time-dependent parametric modulations for accessing novel out-of-equilibrium phenomena. In the absence of such driving, the dissipative Dicke model exhibits a fascinating out-of-equilibrium many-body phase transition as a function of a coupling between a driven photonic cavity and numerous two-level atoms. We study the effect of a parametric modulation of this coupling and discover a rich phase diagram as a function of the modulation strength. We find that in addition to the established normal and super-radiant phases, a new phase with pulsed superradiance, which we term dynamical normal phase, appears when the system is parametrically driven. Employing different methods, we characterize the different phases and the transitions between them. Specific heed is paid to the role of dissipation in determining the phase boundaries. Our analysis paves the road for the experimental study of dynamically stabilized phases of interacting light and matter.

  19. Topological and nematic ordered phases in many-body cluster-Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, S. M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a fully analytically solvable family of models with many-body cluster interaction and Ising interaction. This family exhibits two phases, dubbed cluster and Ising phases, respectively. The critical point turns out to be independent of the cluster size n +2 and is reached exactly when both interactions are equally weighted. For even n we prove that the cluster phase corresponds to a nematic ordered phase and in the case of odd n to a symmetry-protected topological ordered phase. Though complex, we are able to quantify the multiparticle entanglement content of neighboring spins. We prove that there exists no bipartite or, in more detail, no n +1 -partite entanglement. This is possible since the nontrivial symmetries of the Hamiltonian restrict the state space. Indeed, only if the Ising interaction is strong enough (local) genuine n +2 -partite entanglement is built up. Due to their analytical solvableness the n -cluster-Ising models serve as a prototype for studying nontrivial-spin orderings, and due to their peculiar entanglement properties they serve as a potential reference system for the performance of quantum information tasks.

  20. The Axial-Vector Current in Nuclear Many-Body Physics

    E-print Network

    Sergei M. Ananyan; Brian D. Serot; John Dirk Walecka

    2002-09-16

    Weak-interaction currents are studied in a recently proposed effective field theory of the nuclear many-body problem. The Lorentz-invariant effective field theory contains nucleons, pions, isoscalar scalar ($\\sigma$) and vector ($\\omega$) fields, and isovector vector ($\\rho$) fields. The theory exhibits a nonlinear realization of $SU(2)_L \\times SU(2)_R$ chiral symmetry and has three desirable features: it uses the same degrees of freedom to describe the axial-vector current and the strong-interaction dynamics, it satisfies the symmetries of the underlying theory of quantum chromodynamics, and its parameters can be calibrated using strong-interaction phenomena, like hadron scattering or the empirical properties of finite nuclei. Moreover, it has recently been verified that for normal nuclear systems, it is possible to systematically expand the effective lagrangian in powers of the meson fields (and their derivatives) and to reliably truncate the expansion after the first few orders. Here it is shown that the expressions for the axial-vector current, evaluated through the first few orders in the field expansion, satisfy both PCAC and the Goldberger--Treiman relation, and it is verified that the corresponding vector and axial-vector charges satisfy the familiar chiral charge algebra. Explicit results are derived for the Lorentz-covariant, axial-vector, two-nucleon amplitudes, from which axial-vector meson-exchange currents can be deduced.

  1. Many-body dispersion effects in the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Ruiz, Victor G.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    A correct description of electronic exchange and correlation effects for molecules in contact with extended (metal) surfaces is a challenging task for first-principles modeling. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of collective van der Waals dispersion effects beyond the pairwise approximation for organic-inorganic systems on the example of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures adsorbed on metals. We use the recently developed many-body dispersion (MBD) approach in the context of density-functional theory [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012) and Ambrosetti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A508 (2014)] and assess its ability to correctly describe the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces. We briefly review the MBD method and highlight its similarities to quantum-chemical approaches to electron correlation in a quasiparticle picture. In particular, we study the binding properties of xenon, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid, and a graphene sheet adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Accounting for MBD effects, we are able to describe changes in the anisotropic polarizability tensor, improve the description of adsorbate vibrations, and correctly capture the adsorbate-surface interaction screening. Comparison to other methods and experiment reveals that inclusion of MBD effects improves adsorption energies and geometries, by reducing the overbinding typically found in pairwise additive dispersion-correction approaches.

  2. Many-body dispersion effects in the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Ruiz, Victor G; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-09-14

    A correct description of electronic exchange and correlation effects for molecules in contact with extended (metal) surfaces is a challenging task for first-principles modeling. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of collective van der Waals dispersion effects beyond the pairwise approximation for organic-inorganic systems on the example of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures adsorbed on metals. We use the recently developed many-body dispersion (MBD) approach in the context of density-functional theory [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012) and Ambrosetti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A508 (2014)] and assess its ability to correctly describe the binding of adsorbates on metal surfaces. We briefly review the MBD method and highlight its similarities to quantum-chemical approaches to electron correlation in a quasiparticle picture. In particular, we study the binding properties of xenon, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid, and a graphene sheet adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Accounting for MBD effects, we are able to describe changes in the anisotropic polarizability tensor, improve the description of adsorbate vibrations, and correctly capture the adsorbate-surface interaction screening. Comparison to other methods and experiment reveals that inclusion of MBD effects improves adsorption energies and geometries, by reducing the overbinding typically found in pairwise additive dispersion-correction approaches. PMID:26374001

  3. Benchmark Many-Body GW and Bethe-Salpeter Calculations for Small Transition Metal Molecules.

    PubMed

    Körbel, Sabine; Boulanger, Paul; Duchemin, Ivan; Blase, Xavier; Marques, Miguel A L; Botti, Silvana

    2014-09-01

    We study the electronic and optical properties of 39 small molecules containing transition metal atoms and 7 others related to quantum-dots for photovoltaics. We explore in particular the merits of the many-body GW formalism, as compared to the ?SCF approach within density functional theory, in the description of the ionization energy and electronic affinity. Mean average errors of 0.2-0.3 eV with respect to experiment are found when using the PBE0 functional for ?SCF and as a starting point for GW. The effect of partial self-consistency at the GW level is explored. Further, for optical excitations, the Bethe-Salpeter formalism is found to offer similar accuracy as time-dependent DFT-based methods with the hybrid PBE0 functional, with mean average discrepancies of about 0.3 and 0.2 eV, respectively, as compared to available experimental data. Our calculations validate the accuracy of the parameter-free GW and Bethe-Salpeter formalisms for this class of systems, opening the way to the study of large clusters containing transition metal atoms of interest for photovoltaic applications. PMID:26588537

  4. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  5. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: a many-body analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillan, M J; Alfè, D; Bartók, A P; Csányi, G

    2013-12-28

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water. PMID:24387379

  6. First-principles energetics of water clusters and ice: A many-body analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Thomas Young Centre, UCL, London WC1H 0AH; Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT; Department of Earth Sciences, UCL, London WC1E 6BT ; Bartók, A. P.; Csányi, G.

    2013-12-28

    Standard forms of density-functional theory (DFT) have good predictive power for many materials, but are not yet fully satisfactory for cluster, solid, and liquid forms of water. Recent work has stressed the importance of DFT errors in describing dispersion, but we note that errors in other parts of the energy may also contribute. We obtain information about the nature of DFT errors by using a many-body separation of the total energy into its 1-body, 2-body, and beyond-2-body components to analyze the deficiencies of the popular PBE and BLYP approximations for the energetics of water clusters and ice structures. The errors of these approximations are computed by using accurate benchmark energies from the coupled-cluster technique of molecular quantum chemistry and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The systems studied are isomers of the water hexamer cluster, the crystal structures Ih, II, XV, and VIII of ice, and two clusters extracted from ice VIII. For the binding energies of these systems, we use the machine-learning technique of Gaussian Approximation Potentials to correct successively for 1-body and 2-body errors of the DFT approximations. We find that even after correction for these errors, substantial beyond-2-body errors remain. The characteristics of the 2-body and beyond-2-body errors of PBE are completely different from those of BLYP, but the errors of both approximations disfavor the close approach of non-hydrogen-bonded monomers. We note the possible relevance of our findings to the understanding of liquid water.

  7. Approaching the complete-basis limit with a truncated many-body expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Ryan M.; Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M.

    2013-12-14

    High-accuracy electronic structure calculations with correlated wave functions demand the use of large basis sets and complete-basis extrapolation, but the accuracy of fragment-based quantum chemistry methods has most often been evaluated using double-? basis sets, with errors evaluated relative to a supersystem calculation using the same basis set. Here, we examine the convergence towards the basis-set limit of two- and three-body expansions of the energy, for water clusters and ion–water clusters, focusing on calculations at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Several different corrections for basis-set superposition error (BSSE), each consistent with a truncated many-body expansion, are examined as well. We present a careful analysis of how the interplay of errors (from all sources) influences the accuracy of the results. We conclude that fragment-based methods often benefit from error cancellation wherein BSSE offsets both incompleteness of the basis set as well as higher-order many-body effects that are neglected in a truncated many-body expansion. An n-body counterpoise correction facilitates smooth extrapolation to the MP2 basis-set limit, and at n = 3 affords accurate results while requiring calculations in subsystems no larger than trimers.

  8. Many-body tight-binding model for aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Staszewska, Grazyna; Staszewski, Przemyslaw; Schultz, Nathan E.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2005-01-15

    A new, parametrized many-body tight-binding model is proposed for calculating the potential energy surface for aluminum nanoparticles. The parameters have been fitted to reproduce the energies for a variety of aluminum clusters (Al{sub 2}, Al{sub 3}, Al{sub 4}, Al{sub 7}, Al{sub 13}) calculated recently by the PBE0/MG3 method as well as the experimental face-centered-cubic cohesive energy, lattice constant, and a small set of Al cluster ionization potentials. Several types of parametrization are presented and compared. The mean unsigned error per atom for the best model is less than 0.03 eV.

  9. Many-body effects in topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaconis, Jason; Balents, Leon

    2015-06-01

    We study the effect of interactions on the properties of a model 2D topological Kondo insulator phase. Loosely motivated by recent proposals where graphene is hybridized with impurity bands from heavy adatoms with partially filled d shells, we introduce a model Hamiltonian which we believe captures the essential physics of the different competing phases. We show that there are generically three possible phases with different combinations of Kondo screening and magnetic order. Perhaps the most dramatic example of many-body physics in symmetry-protected topological phases is the existence of the exotic edge states. We demonstrate that our mean-field model contains a region with a time-reversal-invariant bulk phase but where time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken at the edge. Such a phase would not be possible in a noninteracting model. We also comment on the stability of this phase beyond mean-field theory.

  10. Evolution of regulatory complexes: a many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouemohammad, Armita; Laessig, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotes, many genes have complex regulatory input, which is encoded by multiple transcription factor binding sites linked to a common function. Interactions between transcription factors and site complexes on DNA control the production of protein in cells. Here, we present a quantitative evolutionary analysis of binding site complexes in yeast. We show that these complexes have a joint binding phenotype, which is under substantial stabilizing selection and is well conserved within Saccharomyces paradoxus populations and between three species of Saccharomyces. At the same time, individual low-affinity sites evolve near-neutrally and show considerable affinity variation even within one population. Thus, functionality of and selection on regulatory complexes emerge from the entire cloud of sites, but cannot be pinned down to individual sites. Our method is based on a biophysical model, which determines site occupancies and establishes a joint affinity phenotype for binding site complexes. We infer a fitness landscape depending on this phenotype using yeast whole-genome polymorphism data and a new method of quantitative trait analysis. Our fitness landscape predicts the amount of binding phenotype conservation, as well as ubiquitous compensatory changes between sites in the cloud. Our results open a new avenue to understand the regulatory ``grammar'' of eukaryotic genomes based on quantitative evolution models. Carl-Icahn Laboratory, Washington Road, Princeton 08544 NJ

  11. Relaxation of isolated quantum systems beyond chaos

    E-print Network

    Ignacio García-Mata; Augusto J. Roncaglia; Diego A. Wisniacki

    2015-01-23

    In classical statistical mechanics there is a clear correlation between relaxation to equilibrium and chaos. In contrast, for isolated quantum systems this relation is -- to say the least -- fuzzy. In this work we try to unveil the intricate relation between the relaxation process and the transition from integrability to chaos. We study the approach to equilibrium in two different many body quantum systems that can be parametrically tuned from regular to chaotic. We show that a universal relation between relaxation and delocalization of the initial state in the perturbed basis can be established regardless of the chaotic nature of system.

  12. Relaxation of isolated quantum systems beyond chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Mata, Ignacio; Roncaglia, Augusto J.; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2015-01-01

    In classical statistical mechanics there is a clear correlation between relaxation to equilibrium and chaos. In contrast, for isolated quantum systems this relation is—to say the least—fuzzy. In this work we try to unveil the intricate relation between the relaxation process and the transition from integrability to chaos. We study the approach to equilibrium in two different many-body quantum systems that can be parametrically tuned from regular to chaotic. We show that a universal relation between relaxation and delocalization of the initial state in the perturbed basis can be established regardless of the chaotic nature of system.

  13. Many-body manifestation of interaction-free measurement: the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb

    E-print Network

    Oded Zilberberg; Alessandro Romito; Yuval Gefen

    2015-12-03

    We consider an implementation of the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb experiment in a DC-biased electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a leakage port on one of its arms playing the role of a "lousy bom". Many-body correlations tend to screen out manifestations of interaction-free measurement. Analyzing the correlations between the current at the interformeter's drains and at the leakage port, we identify the limit where the originally proposed single-particle effect is recovered. Specifically, we find that in the regime of sufficiently diluted injected electron beam and short measurement times, effects of quantum mechanical wave-particle duality emerge in the cross-current correlations.

  14. Many-body localization and mobility edge in a disordered spin-1/2 Heisenberg ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baygan, Elliott; Lim, S. P.; Sheng, D. N.

    2015-11-01

    We examine the interplay of interaction and disorder for a Heisenberg spin-1/2 ladder system with random fields. We identify many-body localized states based on the entanglement entropy scaling, where delocalized and localized states have volume and area laws, respectively. We first establish the dynamic phase transition at a critical random field strength hc˜8.5 ±0.5 , where all energy eigenstates are localized beyond that value. Interestingly, the entanglement entropy and fluctuations of the bipartite magnetization show distinct probability distributions which characterize different phases. Furthermore, we show that for weaker h , energy eigenstates with higher-energy density are delocalized while states at lower-energy density are localized, which defines a mobility edge separating these two phases. With increasing disorder strength, the mobility edge moves towards higher-energy density, which drives the system to the phase of the full many-body localization.

  15. Stretched exponential decay of Majorana edge modes in many-body localized Kitaev chains under dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmele, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Kraus, Christina; Dalmonte, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the resilience of symmetry-protected topological edge states at the boundaries of Kitaev chains in the presence of a bath which explicitly introduces symmetry-breaking terms. Specifically, we focus on single-particle losses and gains, violating the protecting parity symmetry, which could generically occur in realistic scenarios. For homogeneous systems we show that the Majorana mode decays exponentially fast. By the inclusion of strong disorder, where the closed system enters a many-body localized phase, we find that the Majorana mode can be stabilized substantially. The decay of the Majorana converts into a stretched exponential form for particle losses or gains occurring in the bulk. In particular, for pure loss dynamics we find a universal exponent ? ?2 /3 . We show that this holds both in the Anderson and many-body localized regimes. Our results thus provide a first step to stabilize edge states even in the presence of symmetry-breaking environments.

  16. Direct observation of many-body charge density oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessi, Paolo; Silkin, Vyacheslav M.; Nechaev, Ilya A.; Bathon, Thomas; El-Kareh, Lydia; Chulkov, Evgueni V.; Echenique, Pedro M.; Bode, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Quantum interference is a striking manifestation of one of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics: the particle-wave duality. A spectacular visualization of this effect is the standing wave pattern produced by elastic scattering of surface electrons around defects, which corresponds to a modulation of the electronic local density of states and can be imaged using a scanning tunnelling microscope. To date, quantum-interference measurements were mainly interpreted in terms of interfering electrons or holes of the underlying band-structure description. Here, by imaging energy-dependent standing-wave patterns at noble metal surfaces, we reveal, in addition to the conventional surface-state band, the existence of an `anomalous' energy band with a well-defined dispersion. Its origin is explained by the presence of a satellite in the structure of the many-body spectral function, which is related to the acoustic surface plasmon. Visualizing the corresponding charge oscillations provides thus direct access to many-body interactions at the atomic scale.

  17. Direct observation of many-body charge density oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Sessi, Paolo; Silkin, Vyacheslav M; Nechaev, Ilya A; Bathon, Thomas; El-Kareh, Lydia; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Echenique, Pedro M; Bode, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Quantum interference is a striking manifestation of one of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics: the particle-wave duality. A spectacular visualization of this effect is the standing wave pattern produced by elastic scattering of surface electrons around defects, which corresponds to a modulation of the electronic local density of states and can be imaged using a scanning tunnelling microscope. To date, quantum-interference measurements were mainly interpreted in terms of interfering electrons or holes of the underlying band-structure description. Here, by imaging energy-dependent standing-wave patterns at noble metal surfaces, we reveal, in addition to the conventional surface-state band, the existence of an 'anomalous' energy band with a well-defined dispersion. Its origin is explained by the presence of a satellite in the structure of the many-body spectral function, which is related to the acoustic surface plasmon. Visualizing the corresponding charge oscillations provides thus direct access to many-body interactions at the atomic scale. PMID:26498368

  18. Simulations of dipolar fluids using effective many-body isotropic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindt, Julien O.; Camp, Philip J.

    2015-07-01

    The partition function of a system with pairwise-additive anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions is equal to that of a hypothetical system with many-body isotropic interactions [G. Stell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32, 286 (1974)]. The effective many-body interactions contain n-body contributions of all orders. Each contribution is known as an expansion in terms of the particle-particle distances r, and the coefficients are temperature dependent. The leading-order two-body term is the familiar -r-6 attraction, and the leading-order three-body term is equivalent to the Axilrod-Teller interaction. In this work, a fluid of particles with the leading-order two-body and three-body interactions is compared to an equivalent dipolar soft-sphere fluid. Molecular simulations are used to determine the conditions under which the effective many-body interactions reproduce the fluid-phase structures of the dipolar system. The effective many-body interaction works well at moderately high temperatures but fails at low temperatures where particle chaining is expected to occur. It is shown that an adjustment of the coefficients of the two-body and three-body terms leads to a good description of the structure of the dipolar fluid even in the chaining regime, due primarily to the ground-state linear configuration of the three-body Axilrod-Teller interaction. The vapor-liquid phase diagrams of systems with different Axilrod-Teller contributions are determined. As the strength of the three-body interaction is increased, the critical temperature and density both decrease and disappear completely above a threshold strength, where chaining eventually suppresses the condensation transition.

  19. Many-body forces, isospin asymmetry and dense hyperonic matter

    E-print Network

    R. O. Gomes; V. Dexheimer; S. Schramm; C. A. Z. Vascconcellos

    2015-04-10

    The equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter at high densities is a key topic for the description of matter inside neutron stars. The determination of the properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, such as the symmetry energy ($a_{sym}$) and the slope of the symmetry energy ($L_0$) at saturation density, has been exaustively studied in order to better constrain the nuclear matter EoS. However, differently from symmetric matter properties that are reasonably constrained, the symmetry energy and its slope still large uncertainties in their experimental values. Regarding this subject, some studies point towards small values of the slope of the symmetry energy, while others suggest rather higher values. Such a lack of agreement raised a certain debate in the scientific community. In this paper, we aim to analyse the role of these properties on the behavior of asymmetric hyperonic matter. Using the formalism presented in Ref. (R.O. Gomes et al 2014}, which considers many-body forces contributions in the meson-baryon coupling, we calculate the EoS of asymmetric hyperonic matter and apply it to describe hyperonic matter and hyperon stars.

  20. Many-body central force potentials for tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.; Grigorev, P.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-based alloys are the primary candidate materials for plasma facing components in fusion reactors. The exposure to high-energy radiation, however, severely degrades the performance and lifetime limits of the in-vessel components. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms driving the materials' degradation at the atomic level, large-scale atomistic simulations are performed to complement experimental investigations. At the core of such simulations lies the interatomic potential, on which all subsequent results hinge. In this work we review 19 central force many-body potentials and benchmark their performance against experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As basic features we consider the relative lattice stability, elastic constants and point-defect properties. In addition, we also investigate extended lattice defects, namely: free surfaces, symmetric tilt grain boundaries, the 1/2<1?1?1>{1?1?0} and 1/2<1?1?1> {1?1?2} stacking fault energy profiles and the 1/2<1?1?1> screw dislocation core. We also provide the Peierls stress for the 1/2<1?1?1> edge and screw dislocations as well as the glide path of the latter at zero Kelvin. The presented results serve as an initial guide and reference list for both the modelling of atomically-driven phenomena in bcc tungsten, and the further development of its potentials.

  1. The explosion of chiral many-body forces: How to deal with it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, R.

    2015-02-01

    During the past two decades, it has been demonstrated that chiral effective field theory represents a powerful tool to deal with nuclear forces in a systematic and model- independent way. Two-, three-, and four-nucleon forces have been derived up to next-to-next-to- next-to-leading order (N3LO) and (partially) applied in nuclear few- and many-body systems- with, in general, a good deal of success. But in spite of these achievements, we are still faced with some great challenges. Among them is the problem of a proper renormalization of the two- nucleon potential. Another issue are the subleading many-body forces, where the "explosion" of the number of terms with increasing order and the order-by-order convergence are reasons for concern. In this talk, I will mainly focus on the latter topic.

  2. Kohn-Sham density-functional theory and renormalization of many-body perturbation expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, Marat

    1998-03-01

    Numerous practical applications provide strong evidence that despite its simplicity and crude approximations, density-functional theory leads to a rather accurate description of ground state properties of various condensed matter systems. Although well documented numerically, to our knowledge a theoretical explanation of the accuracy of density-functional theory has not been given. This issue is clarified in this work by demonstrating that density-functional theory represents a particular renormalization procedure of a many-body perturbation expansion. In other words, it is shown that density-functional theory is a many-body perturbation theory whose convergence properties have been optimized. The realization of this fact brings new meaning into density-functional theory and explains the success of density-functional based calculations. For more information go to http://alchemy.ucsd.edu/marat/ .

  3. Early Breakdown of Area-Law Entanglement at the Many-Body Delocalization Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devakul, Trithep; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce the numerical linked cluster expansion as a controlled numerical tool for the study of the many-body localization transition in a disordered system with continuous nonperturbative disorder. Our approach works directly in the thermodynamic limit, in any spatial dimension, and does not rely on any finite size scaling procedure. We study the onset of many-body delocalization through the breakdown of area-law entanglement in a generic many-body eigenstate. By looking for initial signs of an instability of the localized phase, we obtain a value for the critical disorder, which we believe should be a lower bound for the true value, that is higher than current best estimates from finite size studies. This implies that most current methods tend to overestimate the extent of the localized phase due to finite size effects making the localized phase appear stable at small length scales. We also study the mobility edge in these systems as a function of energy density, and we find that our conclusion is the same at all examined energies.

  4. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2015-12-21

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom's local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the SN2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM/MM interactions. PMID:26696050

  5. Fast Track Communication Nonlinear spectroscopy of controllable many-body

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    .1088/1367-2630/16/9/092001 Abstract We establish a novel approach to probing spatially resolved multitime correla- tion functions-site addressability enables us, for example, to distinguish coherent from incoherent transport pro- cesses control in diverse areas of modern quantum science, from quantum information processing [1­3] over photo-induced

  6. Relativistic Many-Body Hamiltonian Approach to Mesons

    E-print Network

    Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Stephen R. Cotanch

    2001-01-09

    We represent QCD at the hadronic scale by means of an effective Hamiltonian, $H$, formulated in the Coulomb gauge. As in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, chiral symmetry is explicity broken, however our approach is renormalizable and also includes confinement through a linear potential with slope specified by lattice gauge theory. This interaction generates an infrared integrable singularity and we detail the computationally intensive procedure necessary for numerical solution. We focus upon applications for the $u, d, s$ and $c$ quark flavors and compute the mass spectrum for the pseudoscalar, scalar and vector mesons. We also perform a comparative study of alternative many-body techniques for approximately diagonalizing $H$: BCS for the vacuum ground state; TDA and RPA for the excited hadron states. The Dirac structure of the field theoretical Hamiltonian naturally generates spin-dependent interactions, including tensor, spin-orbit and hyperfine, and we clarify the degree of level splitting due to both spin and chiral symmetry effects. Significantly, we find that roughly two-thirds of the $\\pi$-$\\rho$ mass difference is due to chiral symmetry and that only the RPA preserves chiral symmetry. We also document how hadronic mass scales are generated by chiral symmetry breaking in the model vacuum. In addition to the vacuum condensates, we compute meson decay constants and detail the Nambu-Goldstone realization of chiral symmetry by numerically verifying the Gell-Mann-Oaks-Renner relation. Finally, by including D waves in our charmonium calculation we have resolved the anomalous overpopulation of $J/\\Psi$ states relative to observation.

  7. Many-body wave scattering by small bodies, J. Math. Phys., 48, N2, 023512, (2007) Many-body wave scattering by small bodies

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    Many-body wave scattering by small bodies, J. Math. Phys., 48, N2, 023512, (2007) 1 #12;Many-body wave scattering by small bodies A.G. Ramm Mathematics Department, Kansas State University, Manhattan://www.math.ksu.edu/ ramm Abstract Scattering problem by several bodies, small in comparison with the wavelength, is reduced

  8. Transverse Ising Chain under Periodic Instantaneous Quenches: Dynamical Many-Body Freezing and Emergence of Solitary Oscillation

    E-print Network

    Sirshendu Bhattacharyya; Arnab Das; Subinay Dasgupta

    2012-08-10

    We study the real-time dynamics of a quantum Ising chain driven periodically by instantaneous quenches of the transverse field (the transverse field varying as rectangular wave symmetric about zero). Two interesting phenomena are reported and analyzed: (1) We observe dynamical many-body freezing or DMF (Phys. Rev. B, vol. 82, 172402, 2010), i.e. strongly non-monotonic freezing of the response (transverse magnetization) with respect to the driving parameters (pulse width and height) resulting from equivocal freezing behavior of all the many-body modes. The freezing occurs due to coherent suppression of dynamics of the many-body modes. For certain combination of the pulse height and period, maximal freezing (freezing peaks) are observed. For those parameter values, a massive collapse of the entire Floquet spectrum occurs. (2) Secondly, we observe emergence of a distinct solitary oscillation with a single frequency, which can be much lower than the driving frequency. This slow oscillation, involving many high-energy modes, dominates the response remarkably in the limit of long observation time. We identify this slow oscillation as the unique survivor of destructive quantum interference between the many-body modes. The oscillation is found to decay algebraically with time to a constant value. All the key features are demonstrated analytically with numerical evaluations for specific results.

  9. Statistical Mechanics of the Cosmological Many-body Problem and its Relation to Galaxy Clustering

    E-print Network

    Saslaw, W C

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological many-body problem is effectively an infinite system of gravitationally interacting masses in an expanding universe. Despite the interactions' long-range nature, an analytical theory of statistical mechanics describes the spatial and velocity distribution functions which arise in the quasi-equilibrium conditions that apply to many cosmologies. Consequences of this theory agree well with the observed distribution of galaxies. Further consequences such as thermodynamics provide insights into the physical properties of this system, including its robustness to mergers, and its transition from a grand canonical ensemble to a collection of microcanonical ensembles with negative specific heat.

  10. Accepted Manuscript Dynamical stability of a many-body Kapitza pendulum

    E-print Network

    Demler, Eugene

    Accepted Manuscript Dynamical stability of a many-body Kapitza pendulum Roberta Citro, Emanuele G of a many-body Kapitza pendulum, Annals of Physics (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aop.2015 disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain. #12;Dynamical Stability of a Many-body Kapitza Pendulum Roberta

  11. Symmetry-protected many-body Aharonov-Bohm effect

    E-print Network

    Santos, Luiz H.

    It is known as a purely quantum effect that a magnetic flux affects the real physics of a particle, such as the energy spectrum, even if the flux does not interfere with the particle's path—the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Here ...

  12. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches

    E-print Network

    A. Rios; A. Polls; A. Ramos; H. Müther

    2008-10-20

    The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well established prediction of finite temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the Self-Consistent Green's Functions approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

  13. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches

    E-print Network

    Rios, A; Ramos, A; Müther, H

    2008-01-01

    The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well established prediction of finite temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the Self-Consistent Green's Functions approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

  14. Observing the emergence of chaos in a many-particle quantum system

    E-print Network

    J. Tomkovi?; W. Muessel; H. Strobel; S. Löck; P. Schlagheck; R. Ketzmerick; M. K. Oberthaler

    2015-09-06

    Accessing the connection between classical chaos and quantum many-body systems has been a long-standing experimental challenge. Here, we investigate the onset of chaos in periodically driven two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, whose small quantum uncertainties allow for exploring the phase space with high resolution. By analyzing the uncertainties of time-evolved many-body states, we find signatures of elliptic and hyperbolic periodic orbits generated according to the Poincar\\'e-Birkhoff theorem, and the formation of a chaotic region at increasing driving strengths. The employed fluctuation analysis allows for probing the phase-space structure by use of only short-time quantum dynamics.

  15. Revisiting Many-body Localization with Random Networks of Tensors

    E-print Network

    Benoît Descamps; Frank Verstraete

    2015-12-09

    We argue first that translational invariant Matrix Product can be interpreted as a stationary sea of particles. Next, rather than starting from some local Hamiltonian with random potentials, we consider fluctuations of the local tensors of a continuous one-parameter family of Matrix Product States. This leads to a mapping from 1+1+0 to 0+1+1, being time-space-$\\lambda$. We argue that both pictures are equivalent. Finally, the holography principle and an operational argumentation is used to map the problem onto 1+0+1. Localization in 1-dimension, can be understood from a simple study spectral and mixing properties of finite dimensional quantum channels.

  16. Many-body and model-potential calculations of low-energy photoionization parameters for Fr

    E-print Network

    Derevianko, S A; Sadeghpour, H R

    1999-01-01

    The photoionization cross section $\\sigma$, spin-polarization parameters $P$ and $Q$, and the angular-distribution asymmetry parameter $\\beta$ are calculated for the $7s$ state of francium for photon energies below 10 eV. Two distinct calculations are presented, one based on many-body perturbation theory and another based on the model potential method. Although predictions of the two calculations are similar, the detailed energy dependence of the photoionization parameters from the two calculations differ. From the theoretical p-wave phase shifts, we infer quantum defects for $p_{1/2}$ and $p_{3/2}$ Rydberg series, permitting us to calculate positions of experimentally unknown $p$ states in francium.

  17. Anomalous diffusion and griffiths effects near the many-body localization transition.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kartiek; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Müller, Markus; Demler, Eugene

    2015-04-24

    We explore the high-temperature dynamics of the disordered, one-dimensional XXZ model near the many-body localization (MBL) transition, focusing on the delocalized (i.e., "metallic") phase. In the vicinity of the transition, we find that this phase has the following properties: (i) local magnetization fluctuations relax subdiffusively; (ii) the ac conductivity vanishes near zero frequency as a power law; and (iii) the distribution of resistivities becomes increasingly broad at low frequencies, approaching a power law in the zero-frequency limit. We argue that these effects can be understood in a unified way if the metallic phase near the MBL transition is a quantum Griffiths phase. We establish scaling relations between the associated exponents, assuming a scaling form of the spin-diffusion propagator. A phenomenological classical resistor-capacitor model captures all the essential features. PMID:25955037

  18. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    E-print Network

    Rajesh Singh; Somdeb Ghose; R. Adhikari

    2015-07-13

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers - regions surrounding the particles where nonequilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients - are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between $N$ spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures.

  19. Visualizing electronic correlations in molecules: STM images from many-body ab-initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corni, Stefano; Toroz, Dimitrios; Rontani, Massimo

    2010-03-01

    Single molecular orbitals are nowadays imaged in real space by both scanning tunnelling (STM) and photoemission spectroscopies. The key quantity provided by these techniques is the density of states --an intrinsically many-body observable. For extended systems, its energy and momentum dependence signals intriguing phenomena like non-Fermi liquid behavior, electron pairing, Kondo effect, Fermi edge singularity. For isolated molecules, the space-resolved spectral density of states reduces to the wave function square modulus of the ``quasi-particle'' added to the system. The latter is sensitive to both correlation effects and changes of the electron number. Here we predict, on the basis of ab-initio many-body calculations, that the orbital images of certain planar conjugated molecules are significantly modified by electron correlation. We find differences in the nodal plane orientations of HOMO and LUMO correlated orbitals with respect to the Hartree-Fock results, as well as spectral weight rearrangements all over the molecule. These features may be detected experimentally, providing an accessible signature of correlation effects in simple molecules.

  20. Itinerant type many-body theories for photo-induced structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Keiichiro

    2004-09-01

    Itinerant type quantum many-body theories for photo-induced structural phase transitions (PSPTs) are reviewed in close connection with various recent experimental results related to this new optical phenomenon. There are two key concepts: the hidden multi-stability of the ground state, and the proliferations of optically excited states. Taking the ionic (I) rarr neutral (N) phase transition in the organic charge transfer (CT) crystal, TTF-CA, as a typical example for this type of transition, we, at first, theoretically show an adiabatic path which starts from CT excitons in the I-phase, but finally reaches an N-domain with a macroscopic size. In connection with this I-N transition, the concept of the initial condition sensitivity is also developed so as to clarify experimentally observed nonlinear characteristics of this material. In the next, using a more simplified model for the many-exciton system, we theoretically study the early time quantum dynamics of the exciton proliferation, which finally results in the formation of a domain with a large number of excitons. For this purpose, we derive a stepwise iterative equation to describe the exciton proliferation, and clarify the origin of the initial condition sensitivity. Possible differences between a photo-induced nonequilibrium phase and an equilibrium phase at high temperatures are also clarified from general and conceptional points of view, in connection with recent experiments on the photo-induced phase transition in an organo-metallic complex crystal. It will be shown that the photo-induced phase can make a new interaction appear as a broken symmetry only in this phase, even when this interaction is almost completely hidden in all the equilibrium phases, such as the ground state and other high-temperature phases. The relation between the photo-induced nonequilibrium phase and the hysteresis induced nonequilibrium one is also qualitatively discussed. We will be concerned with a macroscopic parity violation and a ferro- (or super-para-) electricity, induced by a photogenerated electron in the perovskite type quantum dielectric SrTiO3. The photogenerated electron in the 3d band of Ti is assumed to couple weakly, but quadratically, with soft-anharmonic T1u phonons, and strongly but linearly to the breathing (A1g) type high energy phonons. These two types of electron-phonon coupling result in two types of polarons, a super-para-electric (SPE) large polaron with a quasi-global parity violation, and an off-centre type self-trapped polaron with only a local parity violation. This SPE large polaron, being equal to a charged and conductive ferroelectric domain, greatly enhances both the quasi-static electric susceptibility and the electronic conductivity. We also briefly review recent successes to observe the PSPTs more directly by using x-ray measurements.

  1. Many-body critical Casimir interactions in colloidal suspensions

    E-print Network

    Hendrik Hobrecht; Alfred Hucht

    2015-03-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced Casimir interactions in colloidal suspensions, especially between colloids immersed in a binary liquid close to its critical demixing point. To simulate these systems, we present a highly efficient cluster Monte Carlo algorithm based on geometric symmetries of the Hamiltonian. Utilizing the principle of universality, the medium is represented by an Ising system while the colloids are areas of spins with fixed orientation. Our results for the Casimir interaction potential between two particles at the critical point perfectly agree with the exact predictions. However, we find that in finite systems the behavior strongly depends on whether the medium order parameter is conserved and zero, or is allowed to fluctuate. Finally we present first results for the three-body Casimir interaction potential.

  2. Accurate and Efficient Method for Many-Body van der Waals Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkatchenko, Alexandre; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Car, Roberto; Scheffler, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    An efficient method is developed for the microscopic description of the frequency-dependent polarizability of finite-gap molecules and solids. This is achieved by combining the Tkatchenko-Scheffler van der Waals (vdW) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 073005 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.073005] with the self-consistent screening equation of classical electrodynamics. This leads to a seamless description of polarization and depolarization for the polarizability tensor of molecules and solids. The screened long-range many-body vdW energy is obtained from the solution of the Schrödinger equation for a system of coupled oscillators. We show that the screening and the many-body vdW energy play a significant role even for rather small molecules, becoming crucial for an accurate treatment of conformational energies for biomolecules and binding of molecular crystals. The computational cost of the developed theory is negligible compared to the underlying electronic structure calculation.

  3. Excitonic effects in GeC hybrid: Many-body Green's function calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissi, L. B.; Ramadan, F. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Many-body effects on the electronic and optical absorption properties of a GeC sheet are studied by means of first principle many-body Green's function and Bethe-Salpeter equation formalism. The absence of soft modes in the phonon-spectrum indicates the stability of the system. The inclusion of quasiparticle corrections increases significantly the band gap. The local field effects induce significant change in the absorption spectra for the out-plane polarization rendering the GeC monolayer transparent below 7 eV. The excitonic effects are significant on the optical absorption properties. A detailed analysis of the spectrum shows a strong binding energy of 1.82 eV assigned to the lowest-energy bound excitons that is characterized by an effective mass of 1.68 m0 and a Bohr radius of 2 Å. The results of this study hold the promise for potential applications of the GeC hybrid in optoelectronics.

  4. Many-Body Effects on the Thermodynamics of Fluids, Mixtures, and Nanoconfined Fluids.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2015-11-10

    Using expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we show that taking into account the many-body interactions results in sharp changes in the grand-canonical partition functions of single-component systems, binary mixtures, and nanoconfined fluids. The many-body contribution, modeled with a 3-body Axilrod-Teller-Muto term, results in shifts toward higher chemical potentials of the phase transitions from low-density phases to high-density phases and accounts for deviations of more than, e.g., 20% of the value of the partition function for a single-component liquid. Using the statistical mechanics formalism, we analyze how this contribution has a strong impact on some properties (e.g., pressure, coexisting densities, and enthalpy) and a moderate impact on others (e.g., Gibbs or Helmholtz free energies). We also characterize the effect of the 3-body terms on adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamic properties, thereby providing a full picture of the effect of the 3-body contribution on the thermodynamics of nanoconfined fluids. PMID:26574329

  5. Many-body critical Casimir interactions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobrecht, Hendrik; Hucht, Alfred

    2015-10-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced Casimir interactions in colloidal suspensions, especially between colloids immersed in a binary liquid close to its critical demixing point. To simulate these systems, we present a highly efficient cluster Monte Carlo algorithm based on geometric symmetries of the Hamiltonian. Utilizing the principle of universality, the medium is represented by an Ising system while the colloids are areas of spins with fixed orientation. Our results for the Casimir interaction potential between two particles at the critical point in two dimensions perfectly agree with the exact predictions. However, we find that in finite systems the behavior strongly depends on whether the Z2 symmetry of the system is broken by the particles. We present Monte Carlo results for the three-body Casimir interaction potential and take a close look onto the case of one particle in the vicinity of two adjacent particles, which can be calculated from the two-particle interaction by a conformal mapping. These results emphasize the failure of the common decomposition approach for many-particle critical Casimir interactions.

  6. Entanglement in fermion systems and quantum metrology

    E-print Network

    F. Benatti; R. Floreanini; U. Marzolino

    2014-03-05

    Entanglement in fermion many-body systems is studied using a generalized definition of separability based on partitions of the set of observables, rather than on particle tensor products. In this way, the characterizing properties of non-separable fermion states can be explicitly analyzed, allowing a precise description of the geometric structure of the corresponding state space. These results have direct applications in fermion quantum metrology: sub-shot noise accuracy in parameter estimation can be obtained without the need of a preliminary state entangling operation.

  7. Entanglement in fermion systems and quantum metrology

    E-print Network

    Benatti, F; Marzolino, U

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement in fermion many-body systems is studied using a generalized definition of separability based on partitions of the set of observables, rather than on particle tensor products. In this way, the characterizing properties of non-separable fermion states can be explicitly analyzed, allowing a precise description of the geometric structure of the corresponding state space. These results have direct applications in fermion quantum metrology: sub-shot noise accuracy in parameter estimation can be obtained without the need of a preliminary state entangling operation.

  8. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition Description of Fermionic Many-Body Wavefunctions

    E-print Network

    Uemura, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    The configuration interaction (CI) is a versatile wavefunction theory for interacting fermions but it involves an extremely long CI series. Using a symmetric tensor decomposition (STD) method, we convert the CI series into a compact and numerically tractable form. The converted series encompasses the Hartree-Fock state in the first term and rapidly converges to the full-CI state, as numerically tested using small molecules. Provided that the length of the STD-CI series grows only moderately with the increasing complexity of the system, the new method will serve as one of the alternative variational methods to achieve full-CI with enhanced practicability.

  9. Many-body Hamiltonian with screening parameter and ionization energy

    E-print Network

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2008-07-29

    We prove the existence of a new Hamiltonian that can be used to study strongly correlated matter, which consists of the total energy at temperature equals zero (E_0) and the ionization energy (\\xi) as eigenvalues. We show that the existence of this total energy eigenvalue, E_0 \\pm \\xi, does not violate the Coulombian atomic system. Since there is no equivalent known Hamilton operator that corresponds quantitatively to \\xi, we employ the screened Coulomb potential operator, which is a function of this ionization energy to analytically calculate the screening parameter (\\sigma) of a neutral Helium atom in the ground state. In addition, we also show that the energy level splitting due to spin-orbit coupling is inversely proportional to \\xi eigenvalue.

  10. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  11. Solution to the many-body problem in one point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J. A.; Romaniello, Pina; Tandetzky, Falk; Mendoza, Bernardo S.; Brouder, Christian; Reining, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    In this work we determine the one-body Green's function as solution of a set of functional integro-differential equations, which relate the one-particle Green's function to its functional derivative with respect to an external potential. In the same spirit as Lani et al (2012 New J. Phys. 14 013056), we do this in a one-point model, where the equations become ordinary differential equations (DEs) and, hence, solvable with standard techniques. This allows us to analyze several aspects of these DEs as well as of standard methods for determining the one-body Green's function that are important for real systems. In particular: (i) we present a strategy to determine the physical solution among the many mathematical solutions; (ii) we assess the accuracy of an approximate DE related to the GW+cumulant method by comparing it to the exact physical solution and to standard approximations such as GW; (iii) we show that the solution of the approximate DE can be improved by combining it with a screened interaction in the random-phase approximation. (iv) We demonstrate that by iterating the GW Dyson equation one does not always converge to a GW solution and we discuss which iterative scheme is the most suitable to avoid such errors.

  12. Loschmidt echo and the many-body orthogonality catastrophe in a qubit-coupled Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Dóra, Balázs; Pollmann, Frank; Fortágh, József; Zaránd, Gergely

    2013-07-26

    We investigate the many-body generalization of the orthogonality catastrophe by studying the generalized Loschmidt echo of Luttinger liquids (LLs) after a global change of interaction. It decays exponentially with system size and exhibits universal behavior: the steady state exponent after quenching back and forth n times between 2 LLs (bang-bang protocol) is 2n times bigger than that of the adiabatic overlap and depends only on the initial and final LL parameters. These are corroborated numerically by matrix-product state based methods of the XXZ Heisenberg model. An experimental setup consisting of a hybrid system containing cold atoms and a flux qubit coupled to a Feshbach resonance is proposed to measure the Loschmidt echo using rf spectroscopy or Ramsey interferometry. PMID:23931387

  13. Periodic thermodynamics of isolated quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Achilleas; Das, Arnab; Moessner, Roderich

    2014-04-18

    The nature of the behavior of an isolated many-body quantum system periodically driven in time has been an open question since the beginning of quantum mechanics. After an initial transient period, such a system is known to synchronize with the driving; in contrast to the nondriven case, no fundamental principle has been proposed for constructing the resulting nonequilibrium state. Here, we analytically show that, for a class of integrable systems, the relevant ensemble is constructed by maximizing an appropriately defined entropy subject to constraints, which we explicitly identify. This result constitutes a generalization of the concepts of equilibrium statistical mechanics to a class of far-from-equilibrium systems, up to now mainly accessible using ad hoc methods. PMID:24785013

  14. Ab initio many-body calculations of nucleon scattering on 4 Petr Navratil1

    E-print Network

    Roth, Robert

    Ab initio many-body calculations of nucleon scattering on 4 He, 7 Li, 7 Be, 12 C and 16 O Petr Navr Darmstadt, Germany (Dated: September 22, 2010) We combine a recently developed ab initio many-body approach capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states, the ab initio NCSM

  15. Many-Body Approaches for Simulating Coherent Nonlinear Spectroscopies of Electronic and Vibrational Excitons

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Many-Body Approaches for Simulating Coherent Nonlinear Spectroscopies of Electronic and Vibrational, California 92697 Received September 19, 2003 Contents 1. Introduction 2073 2. The Nonlinear Optical Response. The Nonlinear Exciton Equations (NEE) 2085 6.1. Closing the Many-Body Hierarchy 2085 6.1.1. The Local Field

  16. Quantum entanglement in condensed matter systems

    E-print Network

    Nicolas Laflorencie

    2015-12-17

    This review focuses on the field of quantum entanglement applied to condensed matter physics systems with strong correlations, a domain which has rapidly grown over the last decade. By tracing out part of the degrees of freedom of correlated quantum systems, useful and non-trivial informations can be obtained through the study of the reduced density matrix, whose eigenvalue spectrum (the entanglement spectrum) and the associated R\\'enyi entropies are now well recognized to contains key features. In particular, the celebrated area law for the entanglement entropy of ground-states will be discussed from the perspective of its subleading corrections which encode universal details of various quantum states of matter, e.g. symmetry breaking states or topological order. Going beyond entropies, the study of the low-lying part of the entanglement spectrum also allows to diagnose topological properties or give a direct access to the excitation spectrum of the edges, and may also raise significant questions about the underlying entanglement Hamiltonian. All these powerful tools can be further applied to shed some light on disordered quantum systems where impurity/disorder can conspire with quantum fluctuations to induce non-trivial effects. Disordered quantum spin systems, the Kondo effect, or the many-body localization problem, which have all been successfully (re)visited through the prism of quantum entanglement, will be discussed in details. Finally, the issue of experimental access to entanglement measurement will be addressed, together with its most recent developments.

  17. Optical spectra from molecules to crystals: Insight from many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Draxl, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) often successfully reproduces excitation energies of finite systems, already in the adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA). Here we show for prototypical molecular materials, i.e., oligothiophenes, that ALDA largely fails, and we explain why this is so. By comparing TDDFT with an in-depth analysis based on many-body perturbation theory, we demonstrate that correlation effects have a crucial impact on the energies and character of the optical excitations, not only for molecules of increasing length and in a crystalline environment but even for isolated small molecules. We argue that only high-level methodologies, which explicitly include correlation effects, can reproduce optical spectra of molecular materials with equal accuracy from gas phase to crystal structures.

  18. Half-metallic ferromagnets: From band structure to many-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsnelson, M. I.; Irkhin, V. Yu.; Chioncel, L.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; de Groot, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    A review of new developments in theoretical and experimental electronic-structure investigations of half-metallic ferromagnets (HMFs) is presented. Being semiconductors for one spin projection and metals for another, these substances are promising magnetic materials for applications in spintronics (i.e., spin-dependent electronics). Classification of HMFs by the peculiarities of their electronic structure and chemical bonding is discussed. The effects of electron-magnon interaction in HMFs and their manifestations in magnetic, spectral, thermodynamic, and transport properties are considered. Special attention is paid to the appearance of nonquasiparticle states in the energy gap, which provide an instructive example of essentially many-body features in the electronic structure. State-of-the-art electronic calculations for correlated d -systems are discussed, and results for specific HMFs (Heusler alloys, zinc-blende structure compounds, CrO2 , and Fe3O4 ) are reviewed.

  19. Electronic excitations of bulk LiCl from many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Neng-Ping; Rohlfing, Michael

    2013-12-07

    We present the quasiparticle band structure and the optical excitation spectrum of bulk LiCl, using many-body perturbation theory. Density-functional theory is used to calculate the ground-state geometry of the system. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into consideration, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green function. The calculated band gap is 9.5 eV, which is in good agreement with the experimental result of 9.4 eV. And the calculated optical absorption spectrum, which contains an exciton peak at 8.8 eV and a resonant-exciton peak at 9.8 eV, is also in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Approaching many-body localization from disordered Luttinger liquids via the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Moore, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interplay of interactions and disorder in a one-dimensional fermion lattice coupled adiabatically to infinite reservoirs. We employ both the functional renormalization group (FRG) as well as matrix product state techniques, which serve as an accurate benchmark for small systems. Using the FRG, we compute the length- and temperature-dependence of the conductance averaged over 104 samples for lattices as large as 105 sites. We identify regimes in which non-Ohmic power law behavior can be observed and demonstrate that the corresponding exponents can be understood by adapting earlier predictions obtained perturbatively for disordered Luttinger liquids. In the presence of both disorder and isolated impurities, the conductance has a universal single-parameter scaling form. This lays the groundwork for an application of the functional renormalization group to the realm of many-body localization.

  1. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R.

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers—regions surrounding the particles where non-equilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients—are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between N spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures. In our simulation of 104 active colloidal particle in a harmonic trap, we find that the necessary and sufficient ingredients to obtain steady-state convective currents, the so-called ‘self-assembled pump’, are (a) one-body self-propulsion and (b) two-body rotation from the vorticity of the Stokeslet induced in the trap.

  2. The dimensionality reduction at surfaces as a playground for many-body and correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejeda, A.; Michel, E. G.; Mascaraque, A.

    2013-03-01

    Low-dimensional systems have always deserved attention due to the peculiarity of their physics, which is different from or even at odds with three-dimensional expectations. This is precisely the case for many-body effects, as electron-electron correlation or electron-phonon coupling are behind many intriguing problems in condensed matter physics. These interesting phenomena at low dimensions can be studied in one of the paradigms of two dimensionality—the surface of crystals. The maturity of today's surface science techniques allows us to perform thorough experimental studies that can be complemented by the current strength of state-of-the-art calculations. Surfaces are thus a natural two-dimensional playground for studying correlation and many-body effects, which is precisely the object of this special section. This special section presents a collection of eight invited articles, giving an overview of the current status of selected systems, promising techniques and theoretical approaches for studying many-body effects at surfaces and low-dimensional systems. The first article by Hofmann investigates electron-phonon coupling in quasi-free-standing graphene by decoupling graphene from two different substrates with different intercalating materials. The following article by Kirschner deals with the study of NiO films by electron pair emission, a technique particularly well-adapted for studying high electron correlation. Bovensiepen investigates electron-phonon coupling via the femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy technique. The next article by Malterre analyses the phase diagram of alkalis on Si(111):B and studies the role of many-body physics. Biermann proposes an extended Hubbard model for the series of C, Si, Sn and Pb adatoms on Si(111) and obtains the inter-electronic interaction parameters by first principles. Continuing with the theoretical studies, Bechstedt analyses the influence of on-site electron correlation in insulating antiferromagnetic surfaces. Ortega reports on the gap of molecular layers on metal systems, where the metal-organic interaction affects the organic gap through correlation effects. Finally, Cazalilla presents a study of the phase diagram of one-dimensional atoms or molecules displaying a Kondo-exchange interaction with the substrate. Acknowledgments The editors are grateful to all the invited contributors to this special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. We also thank the IOP Publishing staff for handling the administrative matters and the refereeing process. Correlation and many-body effects at surfaces contents The dimensionality reduction at surfaces as a playground for many-body and correlation effectsA Tejeda, E G Michel and A Mascaraque Electron-phonon coupling in quasi-free-standing grapheneJens Christian Johannsen, Søren Ulstrup, Marco Bianchi, Richard Hatch, Dandan Guan, Federico Mazzola, Liv Hornekær, Felix Fromm, Christian Raidel, Thomas Seyller and Philip Hofmann Exploring highly correlated materials via electron pair emission: the case of NiO/Ag(100)F O Schumann, L Behnke, C H Li and J Kirschner Coherent excitations and electron-phonon coupling in Ba/EuFe2As2 compounds investigated by femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopyI Avigo, R Cortés, L Rettig, S Thirupathaiah, H S Jeevan, P Gegenwart, T Wolf, M Ligges, M Wolf, J Fink and U Bovensiepen Understanding the insulating nature of alkali-metal/Si(111):B interfacesY Fagot-Revurat, C Tournier-Colletta, L Chaput, A Tejeda, L Cardenas, B Kierren, D Malterre, P Le Fèvre, F Bertran and A Taleb-Ibrahimi What about U on surfaces? Extended Hubbard models for adatom systems from first principlesPhilipp Hansmann, Loïg Vaugier, Hong Jiang and Silke Biermann Influence of on-site Coulomb interaction U on properties of MnO(001)2 × 1 and NiO(001)2 × 1 surfacesA Schrön, M Granovskij and F Bechstedt On the organic energy gap problemF Flores, E Abad, J I Martínez, B Pieczyrak and J Ortega Easy-axis ferromagnetic chain on a metallic surfaceMiguel A Cazalilla

  3. Many-body physics in the classical-field description of a degenerate Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T. M.; Davis, M. J.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2011-08-15

    The classical-field formalism has been widely applied in the calculation of normal correlation functions, and the characterization of condensation, in finite-temperature Bose gases. Here we discuss the extension of this method to the calculation of more general correlations, including the so-called anomalous correlations of the field, without recourse to symmetry-breaking assumptions. Our method is based on the introduction of U(1)-symmetric classical-field variables analogous to the modified quantum ladder operators of number-conserving approaches to the degenerate Bose gas, and allows us to rigorously quantify the anomalous and non-Gaussian character of the field fluctuations. We compare our results for anomalous correlation functions with the predictions of mean-field theories, and demonstrate that the nonlinear classical-field dynamics incorporate a full description of many-body processes which modify the effective mean-field potentials experienced by condensate and noncondensate atoms. We discuss the role of these processes in shaping the condensate mode, and thereby demonstrate the consistency of the Penrose-Onsager definition of the condensate orbital in the classical-field equilibrium. We consider the contribution of various noncondensate-field correlations to the overall suppression of density fluctuations and interactions in the field, and demonstrate the distinct roles of phase and density fluctuations in the transition of the field to the normal phase.

  4. Many-body Rabi oscillations of Rydberg excitation in small mesoscopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, J.; Côté, R.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate collective aspects of Rydberg excitations in ultracold mesoscopic samples. Strong interactions between Rydberg atoms influence the excitation process and impose correlations between excited atoms. The manifestations of the collective behavior of Rydberg excitations are many-body Rabi oscillations, spatial correlations between atoms, as well as fluctuations in the number of excited atoms. We study these phenomena in detail by numerically solving the many-body Schrödinger equation, using a “superatom” approach. We find that, under certain conditions, these many-body behaviors could be observed experimentally.

  5. Many-body effects in a semiconductor microcavity laser: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.H.; Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    Many-body effects are observed in the threshold properties of selectively oxidized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. These microcavity lasers represent the state-of-the-art in low threshold semiconductor injection lasers.

  6. Many-body effects in the spin-polarized electron transport through graphene nanoislands

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kaikai; Sheng, Weidong

    2014-02-07

    Spin-polarized electron transport through zigzag-edged graphene nanoislands is studied within the framework of the Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian. By including both short- and long-range electron-electron interactions, the electron conductance is calculated self-consistently for the hexagonal model on various substrates from which we are able to identify the effects of the many-body interactions in the electron transport. For the system in its lowest antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, the long-range interactions are shown to have negligible effect on the electron transport in the low-energy region in which the conductance is found quenched mainly by the short-range interactions. As the system is excited to its second AFM state, the short- and long-range interactions are found to have opposite effects on the electron transmission, i.e., the electron transmission is found to increase with either the suppression of the long-range interactions or the enhancement of the short-range interactions. When the system moves further into the ferromagnetic state, the conductance becomes spin dependent and its resonance is shown to exhibit a blue shift in an environment with stronger long-range interactions. The distinct impact of short- and long-range electron-electron interactions are attributed to their different effects on the spin polarization in the model system.

  7. Global-to-local incompatibility, entanglement monogamy, and ground-state dimerization: Theory and observability of quantum frustration in systems with competing interactions

    E-print Network

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2015-01-01

    Frustration in quantum many body systems is quantified by the degree of incompatibility between the local and global orders associated, respectively, to the ground states of the local interaction terms and the global ground state of the total many-body Hamiltonian. This universal measure is bounded from below by the ground-state bipartite block entanglement. For many-body Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body interaction terms, a further inequality relates quantum frustration to the pairwise entanglement between the constituents of the local interaction terms. This additional bound is a consequence of the limits imposed by monogamy on entanglement shareability. We investigate the behavior of local pair frustration in quantum spin models with competing interactions on different length scales and show that valence bond solids associated to exact ground-state dimerization correspond to a transition from generic frustration, i.e. geometric, common to classical and quantum systems alike, to genuine quantum frustr...

  8. Charge optimized many-body (COMB) potential for Al2O3 materials, interfaces, and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Kamal; Liang, Tao; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2015-08-01

    This work presents the development and applications of a new empirical, variable charge potential for Al2O3 systems within the charge optimized many-body (COMB) potential framework. The potential can describe the fundamental physical properties of Al2O3, including cohesive energy, elastic constants, defect formation energies, surface energies and phonon properties of ?-Al2O3 comparable to that obtained from experiments and first-principles calculations. The potential is further employed in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to validate and predict the properties of the Al (1?1?1)-Al2O3 (0?0?0?1) interface, tensile properties of Al nanowires, Al2O3 nanowires, Al2O3-covered Al nanowires, and defective Al2O3 nanowires. The results demonstrate that the potential is well-suited to model heterogeneous material systems involving Al and Al2O3. Most importantly, the parameters can be seamlessly coupled with COMB3 parameters for other materials to enable MD simulations of a wide range of heterogeneous material systems.

  9. Numerical Analysis of Coherent Many-Body Currents in a Single Atom Transistor

    E-print Network

    A. J. Daley; S. R. Clark; D. Jaksch; P. Zoller

    2005-06-29

    We study the dynamics of many atoms in the recently proposed Single Atom Transistor setup [A. Micheli, A. J. Daley, D. Jaksch, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 140408 (2004)] using recently developed numerical methods. In this setup, a localised spin 1/2 impurity is used to switch the transport of atoms in a 1D optical lattice: in one state the impurity is transparent to probe atoms, but in the other acts as a single atom mirror. We calculate time-dependent currents for bosons passing the impurity atom, and find interesting many body effects. These include substantially different transport properties for bosons in the strongly interacting (Tonks) regime when compared with fermions, and an unexpected decrease in the current when weakly interacting probe atoms are initially accelerated to a non-zero mean momentum. We also provide more insight into the application of our numerical methods to this system, and discuss open questions about the currents approached by the system on long timescales.

  10. Numerical analysis of coherent many-body currents in a single atom transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, A.J.; Zoller, P.; Clark, S.R.; Jaksch, D.

    2005-10-15

    We study the dynamics of many atoms in the recently proposed single-atom-transistor setup [A. Micheli, A. J. Daley, D. Jaksch, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 140408 (2004)] using recently developed numerical methods. In this setup, a localized spin-1/2 impurity is used to switch the transport of atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice: in one state the impurity is transparent to probe atoms, but in the other acts as a single-atom mirror. We calculate time-dependent currents for bosons passing the impurity atom, and find interesting many-body effects. These include substantially different transport properties for bosons in the strongly interacting (Tonks) regime when compared with fermions, and an unexpected decrease in the current when weakly interacting probe atoms are initially accelerated to a nonzero mean momentum. We also provide more insight into the application of our numerical methods to this system, and discuss open questions about the currents approached by the system on long time scales.

  11. The Hubbard dimer: a density functional case study of a many-body problem.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, D J; Ferrer, J; Smith, J C; Burke, K

    2015-10-01

    This review explains the relationship between density functional theory and strongly correlated models using the simplest possible example, the two-site Hubbard model. The relationship to traditional quantum chemistry is included. Even in this elementary example, where the exact ground-state energy and site occupations can be found analytically, there is much to be explained in terms of the underlying logic and aims of density functional theory. Although the usual solution is analytic, the density functional is given only implicitly. We overcome this difficulty using the Levy-Lieb construction to create a parametrization of the exact function with negligible errors. The symmetric case is most commonly studied, but we find a rich variation in behavior by including asymmetry, as strong correlation physics vies with charge-transfer effects. We explore the behavior of the gap and the many-body Green's function, demonstrating the 'failure' of the Kohn-Sham (KS) method to reproduce the fundamental gap. We perform benchmark calculations of the occupation and components of the KS potentials, the correlation kinetic energies, and the adiabatic connection. We test several approximate functionals (restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock and Bethe ansatz local density approximation) to show their successes and limitations. We also discuss and illustrate the concept of the derivative discontinuity. Useful appendices include analytic expressions for density functional energy components, several limits of the exact functional (weak- and strong-coupling, symmetric and asymmetric), various adiabatic connection results, proofs of exact conditions for this model, and the origin of the Hubbard model from a minimal basis model for stretched H2. PMID:26380948

  12. The Hubbard dimer: a density functional case study of a many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascal, D. J.; Ferrer, J.; Smith, J. C.; Burke, K.

    2015-10-01

    This review explains the relationship between density functional theory and strongly correlated models using the simplest possible example, the two-site Hubbard model. The relationship to traditional quantum chemistry is included. Even in this elementary example, where the exact ground-state energy and site occupations can be found analytically, there is much to be explained in terms of the underlying logic and aims of density functional theory. Although the usual solution is analytic, the density functional is given only implicitly. We overcome this difficulty using the Levy-Lieb construction to create a parametrization of the exact function with negligible errors. The symmetric case is most commonly studied, but we find a rich variation in behavior by including asymmetry, as strong correlation physics vies with charge-transfer effects. We explore the behavior of the gap and the many-body Green’s function, demonstrating the ‘failure’ of the Kohn-Sham (KS) method to reproduce the fundamental gap. We perform benchmark calculations of the occupation and components of the KS potentials, the correlation kinetic energies, and the adiabatic connection. We test several approximate functionals (restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock and Bethe ansatz local density approximation) to show their successes and limitations. We also discuss and illustrate the concept of the derivative discontinuity. Useful appendices include analytic expressions for density functional energy components, several limits of the exact functional (weak- and strong-coupling, symmetric and asymmetric), various adiabatic connection results, proofs of exact conditions for this model, and the origin of the Hubbard model from a minimal basis model for stretched H2.

  13. Many-body effects and ultraviolet renormalization in three-dimensional Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throckmorton, Robert E.; Hofmann, Johannes; Barnes, Edwin; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-09-01

    We develop a theory for electron-electron interaction-induced many-body effects in three-dimensional Weyl or Dirac semimetals, including interaction corrections to the polarizability, electron self-energy, and vertex function, up to second order in the effective fine-structure constant of the Dirac material. These results are used to derive the higher-order ultraviolet renormalization of the Fermi velocity, effective coupling, and quasiparticle residue, revealing that the corrections to the renormalization group flows of both the velocity and coupling counteract the leading-order tendencies of velocity enhancement and coupling suppression at low energies. This in turn leads to the emergence of a critical coupling above which the interaction strength grows with decreasing energy scale. In addition, we identify a range of coupling strengths below the critical point in which the Fermi velocity varies nonmonotonically as the low-energy, noninteracting fixed point is approached. Furthermore, we find that while the higher-order correction to the flow of the coupling is generally small compared to the leading order, the corresponding correction to the velocity flow carries an additional factor of the Dirac cone flavor number (the multiplicity of electron species, e.g. ground-state valley degeneracy arising from the band structure) relative to the leading-order result. Thus, for materials with a larger multiplicity, the regime of velocity nonmonotonicity is reached for modest values of the coupling strength. This is in stark contrast to an approach based on a large-N expansion or the random phase approximation (RPA), where higher-order corrections are strongly suppressed for larger values of the Dirac cone multiplicity. This suggests that perturbation theory in the coupling constant (i.e., the loop expansion) and the RPA/large-N expansion are complementary in the sense that they are applicable in different parameter regimes of the theory. We show how our results for the ultraviolet renormalization of quasiparticle properties can be tested experimentally through measurements of quantities such as the optical conductivity or dielectric function (with carrier density or temperature acting as the scale being varied to induce the running coupling). Although experiments typically access the finite-density regime, we show that our zero-density results still capture clear many-body signatures that should be visible at higher temperatures even in real systems with disorder and finite doping.

  14. Unphysical and physical solutions in many-body theories: from weak to strong correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian; Romaniello, Pina; Rigamonti, Santiago; Reining, Lucia; Berger, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Many-body theory is largely based on self-consistent equations that are constructed in terms of the physical quantity of interest itself, for example the density. Therefore, the calculation of important properties such as total energies or photoemission spectra requires the solution of nonlinear equations that have unphysical and physical solutions. In this work we show in which circumstances one runs into an unphysical solution, and we indicate how one can overcome this problem. Moreover, we solve the puzzle of when and why the interacting Green’s function does not unambiguously determine the underlying system, given in terms of its potential, or non-interacting Green’s function. Our results are general since they originate from the fundamental structure of the equations. The absorption spectrum of lithium fluoride is shown as one illustration, and observations in the literature for some widely used models are explained by our approach. Our findings apply to both the weak and strong-correlation regimes. For the strong-correlation regime we show that one cannot use the expressions that are obtained from standard perturbation theory, and we suggest a different approach that is exact in the limit of strong interaction.

  15. Maximizing kinetic energy transfer in one-dimensional many-body collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricardo, Bernard; Lee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The main problem discussed in this paper involves a simple one-dimensional two-body collision, in which the problem can be extended into a chain of one-dimensional many-body collisions. The result is quite interesting, as it provides us with a thorough mathematical understanding that will help in designing a chain system for maximum energy transfer for a range of collision types. In this paper, we will show that there is a way to improve the kinetic energy transfer between two masses, and the idea can be applied recursively. However, this method only works for a certain range of collision types, which is indicated by a range of coefficients of restitution. Although the concept of momentum, elastic and inelastic collision, as well as Newton’s laws, are taught in junior college physics, especially in Singapore schools, students in this level are not expected to be able to do this problem quantitatively, as it requires rigorous mathematics, including calculus. Nevertheless, this paper provides nice analytical steps that address some common misconceptions in students’ way of thinking about one-dimensional collisions.

  16. GW Many-Body Perturbation Theory for Electron-Phonon Coupling Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Carina

    2015-03-01

    Within many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and the GW approximation, we study the electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in carbon-based systems, taking as paradigmatic examples the fullerene molecule, graphene and diamond. It has been demonstrated by several groups that the strength of the electron-phonon coupling potential is in these cases significantly underestimated at the DFT-LDA level, while GW calculations offer an excellent agreement with experiments. Similar results have been obtained for superconducting bismuthates and transition-metal chloronitrides. However, the related computational costs of evaluating the EPC strength at the GW level are high and thus represent strong limitations to a widespread application. We therefore discuss the accuracy of two less demanding alternatives on the MBPT level, namely the static Coulomb-hole plus screened-exchange (COHSEX) approximation and further the constant screening approach. In the latter, variations of the screened Coulomb potential W upon small changes of the atomic positions along the vibrational eigenmodes are neglected. We show that this latter approximation is most reliable, whereas the static COHSEX ansatz leads to substantial errors. These findings open the way for combining the present MBPT approach with efficient linear-response theories. C.F. gratefully acknowledges the Materials Theory Group, ETH Zurich for travel funding and the French CNRS and CEA for PhD funding. Computing time has been provided by the French GENCI-IDRIS supercomputing center under Contract No. i2012096655.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Surfaces, Clusters, and the Many-Body Problem Using Semiempirical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streszewski, Marcin

    Hydrogen chemisorption, the magnetism of small metal clusters, and the many-body problem were studied with the use of the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The chemisorption of hydrogen on transition metals was studied within the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The results show that the chemisorption energy depends weakly on the initial magnetization of the substrate and adsorbate, in agreement with recent experimental work done by Ertl's group. The magnetism of small metallic clusters was studied using the exact diagonalization procedure. The calculations, done for 5-site clusters, show a new interesting phenomenon involving spin frustration. The results indicate other many-body effects like the resonating valence bond state and singlet and triplet pairing. The many-body calculations were performed using various decoupling procedures, Gutzwiller variational schemes, and the connected-moment expansion. The performance of these techniques was tested and compared to exact results for small Hubbard clusters.

  18. Destruction of interference by many-body interactions in cold atomic Bose gases

    E-print Network

    Shu Chen; Reinhold Egger

    2003-10-08

    We study the effects of many-body interactions on the interference in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for matter waves of ultracold Bose atoms. After switching off an axial trapping potential, the thermal initial wavepacket expands, and subsequently interference fringes may be observed in a circular 1D trap. These are computed for axial harmonic or $\\delta$-function traps, and for interaction strengths from the Thomas-Fermi regime to the Tonks-Girardeau limit. It is shown that many-body correlations in a realistic setup destroy interference to a large degree. Analytical expressions allowing to infer the observability of phase coherence and interference are provided.

  19. Many-body rate limit on photoassociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Matt; Phou, Pierre

    2010-09-15

    We briefly report on zero-temperature photoassociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate, focusing on the many-body rate limit for atom-molecule conversion. An upgraded model that explicitly includes spontaneous radiative decay leads to an unanticipated shift in the position of the photoassociation resonance, which affects whether the rate (constant) maximizes or saturates, as well as the limiting value itself. A simple analytical model agrees with numerical experiments, but only for high density. Finally, an explicit comparison with the two-body unitary limit, set by the size of the condensate, finds that the many-body rate limit is generally more strict.

  20. QED radiative corrections and many-body effects in atoms: the Uehling potential and shifts in alkali metals

    E-print Network

    Ginges, J S M

    2015-01-01

    We consider the largest (Uehling) contribution to the one-loop vacuum polarization correction to the binding energies in neutral alkali atoms, from Na through to the superheavy element E119. We use the relativistic Hartree-Fock method to demonstrate the importance of core relaxation effects. These effects are sizeable everywhere, though particularly important for orbitals with angular momentum quantum number l > 0. For d waves, the Uehling shift is enhanced by many orders of magnitude: for Cs the enhancement is more than four orders of magnitude and for the lighter alkali atoms it is even larger. We also study the effects of second- and higher-order many-body perturbation theory on the valence level shifts through inclusion of the correlation potential. The many-body enhancement mechanisms that operate in the case of the Uehling potential apply also to the case of the larger QED self-energy radiative corrections. The huge enhancement for d level shifts makes high-precision studies of transition frequencies in...

  1. Density functionals from many-body perturbation theory: The band gap for semiconductors and insulators

    E-print Network

    Marini, Andrea

    Density functionals from many-body perturbation theory: The band gap for semiconductors; accepted 28 February 2006; published online 21 April 2006 Theoretically the Kohn-Sham band gap differs from the exact quasiparticle energy gap by the derivative discontinuity of the exchange-correlation functional

  2. Many-body and model-potential calculations of low-energy photoionization parameters for francium

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Walter R.

    Many-body and model-potential calculations of low-energy photoionization parameters for francium A parameter are calculated for the 7s state of francium for photon energies below 10 eV. Two distinct unknown p states in francium. PACS number s : 31.15.Md, 32.80.Fb, 33.60. q I. INTRODUCTION Remarkable

  3. Many-Body Electronic Structure of Americium Metal Sergej Y. Savrasov,1

    E-print Network

    Savrasov, Sergej Y.

    Many-Body Electronic Structure of Americium Metal Sergej Y. Savrasov,1 Kristjan Haule,2 and Gabriel, and electron-phonon interaction of americium using a novel spectral density functional method. This approach detectors, Americium is the first transuranic actinide where 5f6 electrons become localized and form

  4. Electronic excitations: density-functional versus many-body Green's-function approaches

    E-print Network

    Wu, Zhigang

    Electronic excitations: density-functional versus many-body Green's-function approaches Giovanni, France (Published 7 June 2002) Electronic excitations lie at the origin of most of the commonly measured spectra. However, the first-principles computation of excited states requires a larger effort than ground

  5. Charge optimized many-body (COMB) potential for dynamical simulation of Ni–Al phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aakash; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Liang, Tao; Choudhary, Kamal; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2015-08-01

    An interatomic potential for the Ni–Al system is presented within the third-generation charge optimized many-body (COMB3) formalism. The potential has been optimized for Ni3Al, or the ?? phase in Ni-based superalloys. The formation energies predicted for other Ni–Al phases are in reasonable agreement with first-principles results. The potential further predicts good mechanical properties for Ni3Al, which includes the values of the complex stacking fault (CSF) and the anti-phase boundary (APB) energies for the (1?1?1) and (1?0?0) planes. It is also used to investigate dislocation propagation across the Ni3Al (1?1?0)–Ni (1?1?0) interface, and the results are consistent with simulation results reported in the literature. The potential is further used in combination with a recent COMB3 potential for Al2O3 to investigate the Ni3Al (1?1?1)–Al2O3 (0?0?01) interface, which has not been modeled previously at the classical atomistic level due to the lack of a reactive potential to describe both Ni3Al and Al2O3 as well as interactions between them. The calculated work of adhesion for this interface is predicted to be 1.85 J m?2, which is in agreement with available experimental data. The predicted interlayer distance is further consistent with the available first-principles results for Ni (1?1?1)–Al2O3 (0?0?0?1).

  6. Charge optimized many-body (COMB) potential for dynamical simulation of Ni-Al phases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aakash; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Liang, Tao; Choudhary, Kamal; Noordhoek, Mark J; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Phillpot, Simon R; Sinnott, Susan B

    2015-08-26

    An interatomic potential for the Ni-Al system is presented within the third-generation charge optimized many-body (COMB3) formalism. The potential has been optimized for Ni3Al, or the ?' phase in Ni-based superalloys. The formation energies predicted for other Ni-Al phases are in reasonable agreement with first-principles results. The potential further predicts good mechanical properties for Ni3Al, which includes the values of the complex stacking fault (CSF) and the anti-phase boundary (APB) energies for the (1?1?1) and (1?0?0) planes. It is also used to investigate dislocation propagation across the Ni3Al (1?1?0)-Ni (1?1?0) interface, and the results are consistent with simulation results reported in the literature. The potential is further used in combination with a recent COMB3 potential for Al2O3 to investigate the Ni3Al (1?1?1)-Al2O3 (0?0?01) interface, which has not been modeled previously at the classical atomistic level due to the lack of a reactive potential to describe both Ni3Al and Al2O3 as well as interactions between them. The calculated work of adhesion for this interface is predicted to be 1.85 J m(-2), which is in agreement with available experimental data. The predicted interlayer distance is further consistent with the available first-principles results for Ni (1?1?1)-Al2O3 (0?0?0?1). PMID:26234209

  7. Synthetic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2002-10-01

    So far proposed quantum computers use fragile and environmentally sensitive natural quantum systems. Here we explore the new notion that synthetic quantum systems suitable for quantum computation may be fabricated from smart nanostructures using topological excitations of a stochastic neural-type network that can mimic natural quantum systems. These developments are a technological application of process physics which is an information theory of reality in which space and quantum phenomena are emergent, and so indicates the deep origins of quantum phenomena. Analogous complex stochastic dynamical systems have recently been proposed within neurobiology to deal with the emergent complexity of biosystems, particularly the biodynamics of higher brain function. The reasons for analogous discoveries in fundamental physics and neurobiology are discussed.

  8. Quantum Mechanics + Open Systems

    E-print Network

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Quantum Mechanics + Open Systems = Thermodynamics ? Jochen Gemmer T¨ubingen, 09.02.2006 #12., World Scientific) #12;Fundamental Law or Emergent Description? Quantum Mechanics i t = (- 2 2m + V or Emergent Description? Quantum Mechanics i t = (- 2 2m + V ) "Heisenberg Cut" Classical Mechanics: m d2

  9. Correlated many-body calculation to study characteristics of Shannon information entropy for ultracold trapped interacting bosons

    E-print Network

    Sudip Kumar Haldar; Barnali Chakrabarti; Tapan Kumar Das; Anindya Biswas

    2013-08-13

    A correlated many-body calculation is presented to characterize the Shannon information entropy of trapped interacting bosons. We reformulate the one-body Shannon information entropy in terms of the one-body probability density. The minimum limit of the entropy uncertainty relation (EUR) is approached by making $N$ very small in our numerical work. We examine the effect of correlations in the calculation of information entropy. Comparison with the mean-field result shows that the correlated basis function is indeed required to characterize the important features of the information entropies. We also accurately calculate the point of critical instability of an attractive BEC, which is in close agreement with the experimental value. Next we calculate two-body entropies in position and momentum spaces and study quantum correlations in the attractive BEC.

  10. Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Heinz-Peter Breuer; Elsi-Mari Laine; Jyrki Piilo; Bassano Vacchini

    2015-05-06

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markov process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modelled by a dynamical semigroup with a generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence and correlations. Here, recent results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This article further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments on the detection, quantification and control of non-Markovian quantum dynamics are also discussed.

  11. Quantum control for open quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Vallette, Bruno

    with environments, such as the quantum error-correction code, decoherence-free subspaces, dynamical decoupling is concerned with only the system dynamics and the key quantity is the reduced system density matrix (t techniques, quantum Zeno effect, quantum feedback control, quantum optimal control theory ... · Here, I

  12. The hierarchy of multiple many-body interaction scales in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Meevasana, W.

    2010-05-03

    To date, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been successful in identifying energy scales of the many-body interactions in correlated materials, focused on binding energies of up to a few hundred meV below the Fermi energy. Here, at higher energy scale, we present improved experimental data from four families of high-T{sub c} superconductors over a wide doping range that reveal a hierarchy of many-body interaction scales focused on: the low energy anomaly ('kink') of 0.03-0.09eV, a high energy anomaly of 0.3-0.5eV, and an anomalous enhancement of the width of the LDA-based CuO{sub 2} band extending to energies of {approx} 2 eV. Besides their universal behavior over the families, we find that all of these three dispersion anomalies also show clear doping dependence over the doping range presented.

  13. Cosmological constraints to dark matter with two- and many-body decays

    E-print Network

    Blackadder, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of cosmological implications of generic dark matter decays. We consider two-body and many-body decaying scenarios. In the two-body case the massive particle has a possibly relativistic kick velocity and thus possesses a dynamical equation of state. This has implications to the expansion history of the universe. We use recent observational data from the cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae Type Ia to obtain constraints on the lifetime of the dark matter particle. We find that for an energy splitting where more than 40% of the dark matter particle energy is transferred to massless, relativistic particles in the two-body case, or more than 50% in the many-body case, lifetimes less than the age of the universe are excluded at more than 95% confidence. When the energy splitting falls to 10% the lifetime is constrained to be more than roughly half the age.

  14. A many-body term improves the accuracy of effective potentials based on protein coevolutionary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, A.; Tiana, G.

    2015-07-01

    The study of correlated mutations in alignments of homologous proteins proved to be successful not only in the prediction of their native conformation but also in the development of a two-body effective potential between pairs of amino acids. In the present work, we extend the effective potential, introducing a many-body term based on the same theoretical framework, making use of a principle of maximum entropy. The extended potential performs better than the two-body one in predicting the energetic effect of 308 mutations in 14 proteins (including membrane proteins). The average value of the parameters of the many-body term correlates with the degree of hydrophobicity of the corresponding residues, suggesting that this term partly reflects the effect of the solvent.

  15. Hierarchy of multiple many-body interaction scales in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Meevasana, W.; Zhou, X.J.; Sahrakorpi, S.; Lee, W.S.; Yang, W.L.; Tanaka, K.; Mannella, N.; Yoshida, T.; Lu, D.H.; Chen, Y.L.; He, R.H.; Lin, Hsin; Komiya, S.; Ando, Y.; Zhou, F.; Ti, W.X.; Xiong, J.W.; Zhao, Z.X.; Sasagawa, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Fujita, K.; Uchida, S.; Eisaki, H.; Fujimori, A.; Hussain, Z.; Markiewicz, R.S.; Bansil, A.; Nagaosa, N.; Zaanen, J.; Devereaux, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2006-12-21

    To date, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been successful in identifying energy scales of the many-body interactions in correlated materials, focused on binding energies of up to a few hundred meV below the Fermi energy. Here, at higher energy scale, we present improved experimental data from four families of high-T{sub c} superconductors over a wide doping range that reveal a hierarchy of many-body interaction scales focused on: the low energy anomaly ('kink') of 0.03-0.09eV, a high energy anomaly of 0.3-0.5eV, and an anomalous enhancement of the width of the LDA-based CuO{sub 2} band extending to energies of {approx} 2 eV. Besides their universal behavior over the families, we find that all of these three dispersion anomalies also show clear doping dependence over the doping range presented.

  16. Effective potential for many-body interactions in some properties of the HFD-like solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspour, Mohsen; Farmanbar, Alireza; Borzouie, Zahra

    2015-12-01

    We have determined the room-temperature equation of state for the HFD-like solids (such as Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, CO2, N2, and O2) using the two-body HFD-like potentials from molecular dynamics simulation at high pressures. A simple and accurate empirical many-body expression has also been used with the two-body potential for the HFD-like solids without requiring an expensive three-body calculation. The configurational energy and the exact equation of state using the new model have been obtained in good agreement with the experiment. Our predicted results of the elastic constants also indicated that our new effective (many-body corrected) potential improves the two-body values of solids Ar, Kr, and CO2 to get better agreement with the experiment.

  17. Probing many-body states of ultra-cold atoms via noise correlations

    E-print Network

    Ehud Altman; Eugene Demler; Mikhail D. Lukin

    2003-06-09

    We propose to utilize density-density correlations in the image of an expanding gas cloud to probe complex many body states of trapped ultra-cold atoms. In particular we show how this technique can be used to detect superfluidity of fermionic gases and reveal broken spin symmetries in Mott-states of atoms in optical lattices. The feasibility of the method is investigated by analysis of the relevant signal to noise ratio including experimental imperfections.

  18. Detecting many-body entanglement in noninteracting ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, G. C.; Bantegui, M. J.; Friedman, B. A.

    2011-01-15

    We explore the possibility of detecting many-body entanglement using time-of-flight (TOF) momentum correlations in ultracold atomic Fermi gases. In analogy to the vacuum correlations responsible for Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy, a partitioned atomic gas will exhibit particle-hole correlations responsible for entanglement entropy. The signature of these momentum correlations might be detected by a sensitive TOF-type experiment.

  19. Force and heat current formulas for many-body potentials in molecular dynamics simulations with applications to thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheyong; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Donadio, Davide; Harju, Ari

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions of interatomic force and heat current for many-body potentials such as the Tersoff, the Brenner, and the Stillinger-Weber potential used extensively in molecular dynamics simulations of covalently bonded materials. Although these potentials have a many-body nature, a pairwise force expression that follows Newton's third law can be found without referring to any partition of the potential. Based on this force formula, a stress applicable for periodic systems can be unambiguously defined. The force formula can then be used to derive the heat current formulas using a natural potential partitioning. Our heat current formulation is found to be equivalent to most of the seemingly different heat current formulas used in the literature, but to deviate from the stress-based formula derived from two-body potential. We validate our formulation numerically on various systems described by the Tersoff potential, namely three-dimensional silicon and diamond, two-dimensional graphene, and quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanotube. The effects of cell size and production time used in the simulation are examined.

  20. First-principles description of charge transfer in donor-acceptor compounds from self-consistent many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Fabio; Atalla, Viktor; Ren, Xinguo; Rubio, Angel; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    We investigate charge transfer in prototypical molecular donor-acceptor compounds using hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and the GW approximation at the perturbative level (G0W0) and at full self-consistency (sc-GW). For the systems considered here, no charge transfer should be expected at large intermolecular separation according to photoemission experiments and accurate quantum-chemistry calculations. The capability of hybrid exchange-correlation functionals of reproducing this feature depends critically on the fraction of exact exchange ?, as for small values of ? spurious fractional charge transfer is observed between the donor and the acceptor. G0W0 based on hybrid DFT yields the correct alignment of the frontier orbitals for all values of ?. However, G0W0 has no capacity to alter the ground-state properties of the system because of its perturbative nature. The electron density in donor-acceptor compounds thus remains incorrect for small ? values. In sc-GW, where the Green's function is obtained from the iterative solution of the Dyson equation, the electron density is updated and reflects the correct description of the level alignment at the GW level, demonstrating the importance of self-consistent many-body approaches for the description of ground- and excited-state properties in donor-acceptor systems.

  1. Quantum Clocks and the Origin of Time in Complex Systems

    E-print Network

    Scott Hitchcock

    1999-02-20

    The origin and nature of time in complex systems is explored using quantum (or 'Feynman') clocks and the signals produced by them. Networks of these clocks provide the basis for the evolution of complex systems. The general concept of 'time' is translated into the 'lifetimes' of these unstable configurations of matter. 'Temporal phase transitions' mark the emergence of classical properties such as irreversibility, entropy, and thermodynamic arrows of time. It is proposed that the creation of the universe can be modeled as a quantum clock. Keywords: the problem of time, the arrow of time, time asymmetry, the many-body problem, cellular networks, complexity, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, quantum cosmology, and instantons.

  2. Fourth-order diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms for solving quantum many-body problems 

    E-print Network

    Forbert, HA; Chin, Siu A.

    2001-01-01

    is at most first order in e . By using various clever tricks, this error can be reduced substantially in specific sible to simulate. Thus higher than second-order DMC algo- rithms cannot be based on obvious factorizations of the form ~10!. In this work...

  3. Short-time-evolved wave functions for solving quantum many-body problems 

    E-print Network

    Ciftja, O.; Chin, Siu A.

    2003-01-01

    particle and shadow moves was nearly 50%. In addition to the ground-state variational energy, we have also computed the radial distribution function g(r), and its Fourier transform, the structure factor S(k). These quantities are spherical averages... is the particle density. The structure factor S(k) is obtained from the average (1/N)^r 2krk&, where rk 5( j51 N exp(2ik?rj), a procedure which is only possible on a discrete set of k values allowed by the periodic boundary conditions. All simulations...

  4. Development of the many-body perturbation theory and calculations of atomic properties for optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dansha

    The relativistic many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations for matrix elements of divalent atoms and ions is extended to third-order. The one-particle and two-particle contributions are carefully examined and a complete angular reduction of the third-order amplitudes is carried out. Example calculations are performed on beryllium and magnesium isoelectronic sequences. Oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes are calculated for selected ions. Significant improvement in comparison with second-order MBPT results is observed. The relativistic all-order method is introduced for high-precision calculations of atomic properties in monovalent systems, where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Energies, reduced electric-dipole matrix elements and lifetimes are calculated and compared with available experiments for the low-lying excited np and nd states in Sr+, Ba+ and Ra+ atoms. Electric-quadrupole moments of the metastable nd3/2 and nd 5/2 states of Ca+, Sr+, and Ba+ are evaluated for the optical clock development applications. Third-order MBPT is used to evaluate the contributions from high partial waves and Breit interaction, and a semi-empirical scaling procedure is carried out to evaluate the remaining omitted correlation corrections. An extensive study of the uncertainties establishes the accuracy of our recommended values as 0.5 - 1% depending on the particular ion. Extra attention is paid to the 5 s-4d5/2 clock transition in 88 Sr+. The scalar polarizabilities of the 5s and 4d5/2 states and the tensor polarizability of the 4d5/2 state are calculated through the summation of individual possible dipole transition contributions. A complete analysis on the uncertainties of the static polarizabilities. The black-body radiation (BBR) shift is evaluated to be 0.250(9) Hz at room temperature, T = 300 K. The dynamic correction to the electric-dipole contribution and the multipolar corrections due to M1 and E2 transitions were estimated and found to be small at the present level of accuracy. CI + all-order method is used for the calculations of the atomic properties in the divalent systems. This method combines the all-order approach currently used in precision calculations of monovalent system with the configuration-interaction (CI) approach that is applicable for many-electron systems. Energies are calculated in different orders of approximations for several low-lying excited states in the divalent systems from Mg to Hg. The results are compared with experiments. The static and frequency-dependent polarizabilities are evaluated for the lowest nsns 1S0 and nsnp 3P0 states in Sr, Zn, Cd, and Hg atoms. Magic wavelengths are found for the 1 S0 -3 P 0 transitions in those systems by matching the ac Stark shifts of the upper and lower states. The preliminary magic wavelength for the Sr system is in 0.03% agreement with the recent high-precision experiment performed by Brusch et al. [PRL, 96, 103003(2006)]. Other preliminary calculations are performed for the electric-dipole transition matrix elements in Sr, Zn, Cd, and Hg atoms. Transition rates of the ns 2 1S0-nsnp 1P1 resonant line and the ns 2 1S0-nsnp 3P1 intercombination line are evaluated for these systems. Major contributions to the scattering rates are evaluated for the cases where atoms are trapped at their magic wavelengths with a shallow potential depth.

  5. Many-body interactions in liquid methanol and its liquid/vapor interface: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2003-11-01

    Many-body interactions in liquid methanol and its liquid/vapor interface are evaluated using classical molecular dynamics techniques. The methanol molecule carries a molecular polarizability to account for induction energies and forces. The computed dipole moment for the methanol molecule changed from 1.7 to 2.8 D, respectively, from the vapor to the liquid phases. This result indicated that there are significant many-body interactions in this complex molecular system. The computed average molecular dipole moment in liquid methanol at room temperature is in good agreement with experimental measurements. The computed average dipole moments of methanol molecules near the interface are close to their gas phase values, while methanol molecules far from the interface have dipole moments corresponding to their bulk values. The structural and thermodynamic properties of the liquid methanol as well as the surface tension of its liquid/vapor interface are in good agreement with the experiments, demonstrating the high quality of our potential model and simulation approaches. A constrained molecular dynamics technique was used to investigate the transport mechanism of a methanol molecule across the methanol liquid/vapor interface. The computed transfer free energy changed gradually as the methanol molecule approached the Gibbs dividing surface, and it crossed the interface with no substantial minimum free energy. The computed solvation free energy of the methanol molecule in liquid methanol estimated from the free energy profile (4.25 kcal/mol) is in good agreement with the corresponding experimental measurement (4.89 kcal/mol).

  6. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhengjun; Li, Yongming; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we first give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. This finding allows us to discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence. Further, we discuss in detail the relations among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system. We show that, the one-way quantum deficit is equal to the sum between quantum discord and the relative entropy of coherence of measured subsystem. PMID:26094795

  7. Thermalization in Quantum Systems: An Emergent Approach

    E-print Network

    Clifford Chafin

    2015-02-23

    The problems with an emergent approach to quantum statistical mechanics are discussed and shown to follow from some of the same sources as those of quantum measurement. A wavefunction of an N atom solid is described in the ground and excited eigenstates with explicit modifications for phonons. Using the particular subclass of wavefunctions that can correspond to classical solids we investigate the localization properties of atomic centers of mass motion and contrast it with more general linear combinations of phonon states. The effectively large mass of longer modes means that localization present in the ground state persists on excitation of the material by macroscopic coherent disturbances. The "thermalization" that arises then follows from the long term well defined motion of these localized peaks in their 3N dimensional harmonic wells in the same fashion as that of a classical solid in phase space. Thermal production of photons then create an internal radiation field and provides the first dynamical derivation of the Planck distribution from material motions. Significantly, this approach resolves a long standing paradox of thermalization of many body quantum systems from Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics alone.

  8. Quantum chaotic tunneling in graphene systems with electron-electron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Wang, Guanglei; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    An outstanding and fundamental problem in contemporary physics is to include and probe the many-body effect in the study of relativistic quantum manifestations of classical chaos. We address this problem using graphene systems described by the Hubbard Hamiltonian in the setting of resonant tunneling. Such a system consists of two symmetric potential wells separated by a potential barrier, and the geometric shape of the whole domain can be chosen to generate integrable or chaotic dynamics in the classical limit. Employing a standard mean-field approach to calculating a large number of eigenenergies and eigenstates, we uncover a class of localized states with near-zero tunneling in the integrable systems. These states are not the edge states typically seen in graphene systems, and as such they are the consequence of many-body interactions. The physical origin of the non-edge-state type of localized states can be understood by the one-dimensional relativistic quantum tunneling dynamics through the solutions of the Dirac equation with appropriate boundary conditions. We demonstrate that, when the geometry of the system is modified to one with chaos, the localized states are effectively removed, implying that in realistic situations where many-body interactions are present, classical chaos is capable of facilitating greatly quantum tunneling. This result, besides its fundamental importance, can be useful for the development of nanoscale devices such as graphene-based resonant-tunneling diodes.

  9. Aspects of symmetry, topology and anomalies in quantum matter

    E-print Network

    Wang, Juven Chun-Fan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the new physics and richness of quantum many-body system phenomena is one of the stimuli driving the condensed matter community forward. Importantly, the new insights and solutions for condensed matter theory ...

  10. Communication: Dominance of extreme statistics in a prototype many-body Brownian ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlfeld, Evan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-10-28

    Many forms of cell motility rely on Brownian ratchet mechanisms that involve multiple stochastic processes. We present a computational and theoretical study of the nonequilibrium statistical dynamics of such a many-body ratchet, in the specific form of a growing polymer gel that pushes a diffusing obstacle. We find that oft-neglected correlations among constituent filaments impact steady-state kinetics and significantly deplete the gel's density within molecular distances of its leading edge. These behaviors are captured quantitatively by a self-consistent theory for extreme fluctuations in filaments' spatial distribution.

  11. Self-Consistent RPA based on a Many-Body Vacuum

    E-print Network

    Mohsen Jemai; Peter Schuck

    2010-11-23

    Self-Consistent RPA is extended in a way so that it is compatable with a variational ansatz for the ground state wave function as a fermionic many-body vacuum. Employing the usual equation of motion technique, we arrive at extended RPA equations of the Self Consistent RPA structure. In principle the Pauli principle is, therefore, fully respected. However, the correlation functions entering the RPA matrix can only be obtained from a systematic expansion in powers of some combinations of RPA amplitudes. We demonstrate for a model case that this expansion may converge rapidly.

  12. Memory loss and Auger processes in a many-body theory of charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onufriev, A. V.; Marston, J. B.

    1996-05-01

    Charge transfer between hyperthermal alkali atoms and metallic scattering surfaces is an experimental and theoretical arena for many-body interactions. To model new facets, we use a generalized time-dependent Newns-Anderson Hamiltonian that includes electron spin, multiple atomic orbitals with image shifted levels, intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion, and resonant exchange. A variational electronic many-body wave function solves the dynamical problem. The wave function consists of sectors with zero and one particle-hole pair and goes beyond earlier work with the inclusion of amplitudes for a neutral atom plus an electron-hole pair. Higher-order sectors with more than one particle-hole pair are suppressed by powers of 1/N; hence the wave-function ansatz is equivalent to a 1/N expansion. The equations of motion are integrated numerically without further approximation. This solution shows improved loss of memory - the final charge state is independent of the initial one - in agreement with theoretical and experimental expectations. Understanding of this phenomenon is deepened through an analysis of entropy production. By studying the independent-particle approximation, and by examining the role played by different sectors of the Hilbert space in entropy production, we arrive at necessary and sufficient conditions for loss of memory to occur in the many-body solution. As further tests of the theory, we reproduce the experimentally observed peak in the excited neutral Li(2p) occupancy at intermediate work functions starting from different initial conditions. Next, we include Auger processes by adding two-body interaction terms to the many-body Hamiltonian. Several types of Auger processes are considered, and these are shown to affect the final-state occupancies at low work functions because phase space enlarges rapidly as the work function is lowered. Preliminary experimental evidence for an upturn in the Li(2p) occupancy at the lowest work functions thus may be explained by Auger transitions. Finally, we comment on the plausibility of observing a signature of the Kondo resonance in charge transfer experiments.

  13. Many-Body Expansion with Overlapping Fragments: Analysis of Two Ryan M. Richard and John M. Herbert*

    E-print Network

    Herbert, John

    Many-Body Expansion with Overlapping Fragments: Analysis of Two Approaches Ryan M. Richard and John that the approach that we have previously called the "generalized many-body expansion" (GMBE) [J. Chem. Phys. 137 "many overlapping body expansion" [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2669 (2012)]. A more detailed

  14. Many-body scattering by small bodies and applications J.Math. Phys., 48, N10, (2007), 103511.

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    509 Many-body scattering by small bodies and applications A.G.Ramm J.Math. Phys., 48, N10, (2007), 103511. 1 #12;Many-body wave scattering by small bodies and applications A. G. Ramm (Mathematics-body problem, wave scattering by small bodies, small particles, "smart" materials, negative refraction

  15. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  16. Computational spectroscopy using many-body perturbation theory: Large scale calculations without virtual orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Dario

    2013-03-01

    An accurate description of electronic excitations is essential to model and understand the properties of several materials of fundamental and technological interest. First principles, many-body techniques based on Green's functions are promising approaches that can provide an accurate description of excited state properties; however their applicability has long been hindered by their numerical complexity. In this talk we will summarize some recent methodological developments based on many-body perturbation theory for the efficient calculation of optical absorption spectra, photoemission spectra, and multiple exciton generation rates. Several applications to realistic materials will be presented, with emphasis on materials for solar energy applications; these include silicon nanowires and bulk tungsten oxide, that are promising photoelectrode materials in water splitting solar cells, molecules used in organic photovoltaics, and semiconductor nanoparticles with potential use in third generation photovoltaic cells based on multiple exciton generation. Work done in collaboration with Y. Ping, T. A. Pham, M. Voros, D. Lu, H.-V. Nguyen, S. Wippermann, A. Gali, G. T. Zimanyi, and G. Galli. *Present address Work supported by NSF-CHE-0802907.

  17. Experimental observation of spin-dependent electron many-body effects in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Horodyská, P.; N?mec, P. Novotný, T.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.

    2014-08-07

    In semiconductors, the spin degree of freedom is usually disregarded in the theoretical treatment of electron many-body effects such as band-gap renormalization and screening of the Coulomb enhancement factor. Nevertheless, as was observed experimentally in GaAs, not only the single-particle phase-space filling but also many-body effects are spin sensitive. In this paper, we report on time- and polarization-resolved differential transmission pump-probe measurements in CdTe, which has the same zincblende crystal structure but different material parameters compared to that of GaAs. We show experimentally that at room temperature in CdTe—unlike in GaAs—the pump-induced decrease of transmission due to the band-gap renormalization can even exceed the transmission increase due to the phase-space filling, which enables to measure directly the spin-sensitivity of the band-gap renormalization. We also observed that the influence of the band-gap renormalization is more prominent at low temperatures.

  18. Ab initio calculations of many-body interactions for compressed solid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunling; Liu, Fusheng; Cai, Lingcang; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Zhong, Mingmin

    2015-11-01

    An investigation on many-body effects of solid argon at high pressure was conducted based on a many-body expansion of interaction energy. The three- and four-body terms in the expansion were calculated using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and noniterative triple theory and incremental method, in which the configurations of argon trimers and tetramers were chosen as the same as those in the actual lattice. The four-body interactions in compressed solid argon were estimated for the first time, and the three-body interaction ab initio calculations were extended to a small distance. It shows that the four-body contribution is repulsive at high densities and effectively cancels the three-body lattice energy. The dimer potential plus three-body interaction can well reproduce the measurements of equation of state at pressure approximately lower than ˜60 GPa, when including the four-body effects extends the agreement up to the maximum experimental pressure of 114 GPa.

  19. Ab initio calculations of many-body interactions for compressed solid argon.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunling; Liu, Fusheng; Cai, Lingcang; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Zhong, Mingmin

    2015-11-01

    An investigation on many-body effects of solid argon at high pressure was conducted based on a many-body expansion of interaction energy. The three- and four-body terms in the expansion were calculated using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and noniterative triple theory and incremental method, in which the configurations of argon trimers and tetramers were chosen as the same as those in the actual lattice. The four-body interactions in compressed solid argon were estimated for the first time, and the three-body interaction ab initio calculations were extended to a small distance. It shows that the four-body contribution is repulsive at high densities and effectively cancels the three-body lattice energy. The dimer potential plus three-body interaction can well reproduce the measurements of equation of state at pressure approximately lower than ?60 GPa, when including the four-body effects extends the agreement up to the maximum experimental pressure of 114 GPa. PMID:26547175

  20. Protected quasilocality in quantum systems with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevolani, Lorenzo; Carleo, Giuseppe; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of quantum systems with long-range interactions. Two different models describing, respectively, interacting lattice bosons and spins are considered. Our study relies on a combined approach based on accurate many-body numerical calculations as well as on a quasiparticle microscopic theory. For sufficiently fast decaying long-range potentials, we find that the quantum speed limit set by the long-range Lieb-Robinson bounds is never attained and a purely ballistic behavior is found. For slowly decaying potentials, a radically different scenario is observed. In the bosonic case, a remarkable local spreading of correlations is still observed, despite the existence of infinitely fast traveling excitations in the system. This is in marked contrast to the spin case, where locality is broken. We finally provide a microscopic justification of the different regimes observed and of the origin of the protected locality in the bosonic model.

  1. Applications of density matrix in the fractional quantum mechanics

    E-print Network

    Jianping Dong

    2010-12-22

    The many-body space fractional quantum system is studied using the density matrix method. We give the new results of the Thomas-Fermi model, and obtain the quantum pressure of the free electron gas. We also show the validity of the Hohenberg-Kohn theory in the space fractional quantum mechanics and generalize the density functional theory to the fractional quantum mechanics.

  2. Adiabatic quenches of quantum critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Grandi, Claudia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade saw numerous advances in experimental techniques using cold atomic gases which allow for the highly controlled study of quantum systems and their time evolution. These results triggered a fervent search for an appropriate theoretical description of the dynamics of non-trivial many-body systems. The present work is devoted to this goal. We focus on the case of one-dimensional Bose gases with repulsive contact interactions. We study two non-equilibrium processes that are realized experimentally: (i) loading a one-dimensional Bose gas into a commensurate optical lattice, and (ii) coupling through tunneling of two identical one-dimensional Bose gases. Both setups can be theoretically described by a time-dependent sine-Gordon model. We analyze this model and consider different quenching protocols of the tuning parameter. We apply adiabatic perturbation theory to describe the scaling behavior of the quantities characterizing the dynamics: the probability of excitations, the number of defects produced during the quench, the excitation energy, and the diagonal entropy. For two specific values of the interaction strength, the hard-core limit, or Tonks-Girardeau regime, and the free bosonic limit, the problem can be solved exactly. We analyze those two exact solutions in detail, also considering their extension to the finite temperature case. Having analyzed the case of the sine-Gordon model, we extend the analysis to arbitrary systems in d-dimensions that are quenched near a quantum phase transition. We suggest a single framework to study both sudden and slow quenches. We show that the universal scaling of the observables can be connected to the singularities of some static quantities at the critical point. Such quantities are the fidelity susceptibility, in the case of a sudden quench, and generalization of it, in the case of a power-law quench. This connection between dynamics and critical behavior promises to provide insights into the time-evolution of a variety of other quantum systems.

  3. Persistent Homology and Many-Body Atomic Structure for Medium-Range Order in the Glass

    E-print Network

    Takenobu Nakamura; Yasuaki Hiraoka; Akihiko Hirata; Emerson G. Escolar; Yasumasa Nishiura

    2015-02-26

    Characterization of medium-range order in amorphous materials and its relation to short-range order is discussed. A new topological approach is presented here to extract a hierarchical structure of amorphous materials, which is robust against small perturbations and allows us to distinguish it from periodic or random configurations. The method is called the persistence diagram (PD) and it introduces scales into many-body atomic structures in order to characterize the size and shape. We first illustrate how perfect crystalline and random structures are represented in the PDs. Then, the medium-range order in the amorphous silica is characterized by using the PD. The PD approach reduces the size of the data tremendously to much smaller geometrical summaries and has a huge potential to be applied to broader areas including complex molecular liquid, granular materials, and metallic glasses.

  4. Communication: Stochastic evaluation of explicitly correlated second-order many-body perturbation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Center for Superfunctional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 ; Zhang, Jinmei; Valeev, Edward F.; Hirata, So; CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012

    2014-01-21

    A stochastic algorithm is proposed that can compute the basis-set-incompleteness correction to the second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) energy of a polyatomic molecule. It evaluates the sum of two-, three-, and four-electron integrals over an explicit function of electron-electron distances by a Monte Carlo (MC) integration at an operation cost per MC step increasing only quadratically with size. The method can reproduce the corrections to the MP2/cc-pVTZ energies of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 6} within a few mE{sub h} after several million MC steps. It circumvents the resolution-of-the-identity approximation to the nonfactorable three-electron integrals usually necessary in the conventional explicitly correlated (R12 or F12) methods.

  5. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2008-12-17

    We develop a new ab initio many-body approach capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei, by combining the resonating-group method with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters. This approach preserves translational symmetry and Pauli principle. We outline technical details and present phase shift results for neutron scattering on {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He and {sup 10}Be and proton scattering on {sup 3,4}He, using realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials. Our A = 4 scattering results are compared to earlier ab initio calculations. We find that the CD-Bonn NN potential in particular provides an excellent description of nucleon-{sup 4}He S-wave phase shifts. We demonstrate that a proper treatment of the coupling to the n-{sup 10}Be continuum is successful in explaining the parity-inverted ground state in {sup 11}Be.

  6. Out-of-equilibrium states and quasi-many-body localization in polar lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiero, L.; Menotti, C.; Recati, A.; Santos, L.

    2015-11-01

    The absence of energy dissipation leads to an intriguing out-of-equilibrium dynamics for ultracold polar gases in optical lattices, characterized by the formation of dynamically bound on-site and inter-site clusters of two or more particles, and by an effective blockade repulsion. These effects combined with the controlled preparation of initial states available in cold-gas experiments can be employed to create interesting out-of-equilibrium states. These include quasiequilibrated effectively repulsive 1D gases for attractive dipolar interactions and dynamically bound crystals. Furthermore, nonequilibrium polar lattice gases can offer a promising scenario for the study of quasi-many-body localization in the absence of quenched disorder. This fascinating out-of-equilibrium dynamics for ultracold polar gases in optical lattices may be accessible in on-going experiments.

  7. Equation of state for expanded fluid mercury: Variational theory with many-body interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Hikaru

    2007-04-01

    A variational associating fluid theory is proposed to describe equations of state for expanded fluid mercury. The theory is based on the soft-sphere variational theory, incorporating an ab initio diatomic potential and an attractive many-body potential; the latter is evaluated with quatnum chemical methods and expressed as a function of the local atomic coordination number and the nearest-neighbor distance. The resultant equation of state can reproduce the observed gas-liquid coexistence curve with good accuracy, without introducing phenomenological effective pair potentials. Various thermodynamic quantities such as pressure, isochoric thermal pressure coefficient, adiabatic sound velocity, and specific heat are calculated over a wide density-temperature range and compared with available experimental data.

  8. Tunable electronic and optical properties of monolayer silicane under tensile strain: a many-body study.

    PubMed

    Shu, Huabing; Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Yip, Joanne; Wang, Jinlan

    2014-08-14

    The electronic structure and optical response of silicane to strain are investigated by employing first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. The bandgap can be efficiently engineered in a broad range and an indirect to direct bandgap transition is observed under a strain of 2.74%; the semiconducting silicane can even be turned into a metal under a very large strain. The transitions derive from the persistent downward shift of the lowest conduction band at the ?-point upon an increasing strain. The quasi-particle bandgaps of silicane are sizable due to the weak dielectric screening and the low dimension; they are rapidly reduced as strain increases while the exciton bound energy is not that sensitive. Moreover, the optical absorption edge of the strained silicane significantly shifts towards a low photon energy region and falls into the visible light range, which might serve as a promising candidate for optoelectronic devices. PMID:25134590

  9. Many-body treatment of white dwarf and neutron stars on the brane

    SciTech Connect

    Azam, Mofazzal; Sami, M.

    2005-07-15

    Brane-world models suggest modification of Newton's law of gravity on the 3-brane at submillimeter scales. The brane-world induced corrections are in higher powers of inverse distance and appear as additional terms with the Newtonian potential. The average interparticle distance in white dwarf and neutron stars is 10{sup -10} cms and 10{sup -13} cms, respectively, and therefore, the effect of submillimeter corrections needs to be investigated. We show, by carrying out simple many-body calculations, that the mass and mass-radius relationship of the white dwarf and neutron stars are not effected by submillimeter corrections. However, our analysis shows that the correction terms in the effective theory give rise to force akin to surface tension in normal liquids.

  10. Ab-initio Calculations of Absorption Spectra of Semiconducting Nanowires Within Many Body Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Lu, D.; Rocca, D.; Galli, G.

    2012-01-20

    We present a study of the optical absorption spectra of thin silicon nanowires using many-body perturbation theory. We solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the static approximation using a technique that avoids explicit calculation of empty electronic states, as well as storage and inversion of the dielectric matrix. We provide a detailed assessment of the numerical accuracy of this technique, when using plane wave basis sets and periodically repeated supercells. Our calculations show that establishing numerical error bars of computed spectra is critical, in order to draw meaningful comparisons with experiments and between results obtained within different algorithms. We also discuss the influence of surface structure on the absorption spectra of nanowires with {approx_equal}1-nm diameter. Finally, we compare our calculations with those obtained within time-dependent density functional theory and find substantial differences, more pronounced than in the case of Si nanoparticles with the same diameter.

  11. Dynamics of quantum systems

    E-print Network

    I. Rotter

    2001-05-15

    A relation between the eigenvalues of an effective Hamilton operator and the poles of the $S$ matrix is derived which holds for isolated as well as for overlapping resonance states. The system may be a many-particle quantum system with two-body forces between the constituents or it may be a quantum billiard without any two-body forces. Avoided crossings of discrete states as well as of resonance states are traced back to the existence of branch points in the complex plane. Under certain conditions, these branch points appear as double poles of the $S$ matrix. They influence the dynamics of open as well as of closed quantum systems. The dynamics of the two-level system is studied in detail analytically as well as numerically.

  12. Fidelity spectrum and phase transitions of quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, P. D.; Vieira, V. R.; Paunkovic, N.

    2011-12-15

    Quantum fidelity between two density matrices F({rho}{sub 1},{rho}{sub 2}) is usually defined as the trace of the operator F={radical}({radical}({rho}{sub 1}){rho}{sub 2}{radical}({rho}{sub 1})). We study the logarithmic spectrum of this operator, which we denote by the fidelity spectrum, in the cases of the XX spin chain in a magnetic field, a magnetic impurity inserted in a conventional superconductor, and a bulk superconductor at finite temperature. When the density matrices are equal, {rho}{sub 1}={rho}{sub 2}, the fidelity spectrum reduces to the entanglement spectrum. We find that the fidelity spectrum can be a useful tool in giving a detailed characterization of the different phases of many-body quantum systems.

  13. Quantum degenerate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, Fiorenza de; Zanelli, Jorge

    2012-10-15

    A degenerate dynamical system is characterized by a symplectic structure whose rank is not constant throughout phase space. Its phase space is divided into causally disconnected, nonoverlapping regions in each of which the rank of the symplectic matrix is constant, and there are no classical orbits connecting two different regions. Here the question of whether this classical disconnectedness survives quantization is addressed. Our conclusion is that in irreducible degenerate systems-in which the degeneracy cannot be eliminated by redefining variables in the action-the disconnectedness is maintained in the quantum theory: there is no quantum tunnelling across degeneracy surfaces. This shows that the degeneracy surfaces are boundaries separating distinct physical systems, not only classically, but in the quantum realm as well. The relevance of this feature for gravitation and Chern-Simons theories in higher dimensions cannot be overstated.

  14. Many-body Green's function approach to attosecond nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy Upendra Harbola1 and Shaul Mukamel2

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Many-body Green's function approach to attosecond nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy Upendra Harbola1. INTRODUCTION With the advent of femtosecond to attosecond x-ray sources,1­6 time-resolved resonant core-level x

  15. Many-body effects in heavy fermion compounds [sic]. Final technical report for period September 1984 - January 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Riseborough, Peter S.

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical investigation of many-body effects in Cerium and Uranium Heavy Fermion and Mixed Valent Compounds and their experimental manifestations in thermodynamic, transport, and spectroscopic properties is discussed in this report.

  16. Many-body theory of the neutralization of strontium ions on gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamperin, M.; Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by experimental evidence for mixed-valence correlations affecting the neutralization of strontium ions on gold surfaces, we set up an Anderson-Newns model for the Sr:Au system and calculate the neutralization probability ? as a function of temperature. We employ quantum-kinetic equations for the projectile Green functions in the finite -U noncrossing approximation. Our results for ? agree reasonably well with the experimental data as far as the overall order of magnitude is concerned, showing in particular the correlation-induced enhancement of ? . The experimentally found nonmonotonous temperature dependence, however, could not be reproduced. Instead of an initially increasing and then decreasing ? , we find over the whole temperature range only a weak negative temperature dependence. It arises, however, clearly from a mixed-valence resonance in the projectile's spectral density and thus supports qualitatively the interpretation of the experimental data in terms of a mixed-valence scenario.

  17. Excitons and Davydov splitting in sexithiophene from first-principles many-body Green's function theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xia; Yin, Huabing; Liang, Dongmei; Ma, Yuchen

    2015-09-01

    Organic semiconductors have promising and broad applications in optoelectronics. Understanding their electronic excited states is important to help us control their spectroscopic properties and performance of devices. There have been a large amount of experimental investigations on spectroscopies of organic semiconductors, but theoretical calculation from first principles on this respect is still limited. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) and many-body Green's function theory, which includes the GW method and Bethe-Salpeter equation, to study the electronic excited-state properties and spectroscopies of one prototypical organic semiconductor, sexithiophene. The exciton energies of sexithiophene in both the gas and bulk crystalline phases are very sensitive to the exchange-correlation functionals used in DFT for ground-state structure relaxation. We investigated the influence of dynamical screening in the electron-hole interaction on exciton energies, which is found to be very pronounced for triplet excitons and has to be taken into account in first principles calculations. In the sexithiophene single crystal, the energy of the lowest triplet exciton is close to half the energy of the lowest singlet one. While lower-energy singlet and triplet excitons are intramolecular Frenkel excitons, higher-energy excitons are of intermolecular charge-transfer type. The calculated optical absorption spectra and Davydov splitting are in good agreement with experiments.

  18. Machine Learning Predictions of Molecular Properties: Accurate Many-Body Potentials and Nonlocality in Chemical Space

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. In addition, the same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies. PMID:26113956

  19. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.

  20. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstratemore »prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.« less

  1. Ab initio many-body calculations of nucleon-nucleus scattering

    E-print Network

    Sofia Quaglioni; Petr Navratil

    2009-01-08

    We develop a new ab initio many-body approach capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei, by combining the resonating-group method with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters. This approach preserves translational symmetry and Pauli principle. We outline technical details and present phase shift results for neutron scattering on 3H, 4He and 10Be and proton scattering on 3He and 4He, using realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials. Our A=4 scattering results are compared to earlier ab initio calculations. We find that the CD-Bonn NN potential in particular provides an excellent description of nucleon-4He S-wave phase shifts. On the contrary, the experimental nucleon-4He P-wave phase shifts are not well reproduced by any NN potential we use. We demonstrate that a proper treatment of the coupling to the n-10Be continuum is successful in explaining the parity-inverted ground state in 11Be.

  2. Controlling the gap of fullerene microcrystals by applying pressure: Role of many-body effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tiago, Murilo L; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2009-01-01

    We characterize the optical properties of C_60 fullerene microcrystals as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Calculations were done using first-principles many-body theories based on evaluating electronic energy levels in the GW approximation. We compute electronic excited states in the crystal by diagonalizing the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). Our results confirm the existence of bound excitons in the crystal. Both the electronic gap and optical gap decrease continuously and non-linearly as pressure of up to 6 GPa is applied. As a result, the absorption spectrum shows strong redshift. We also observe that "negative" pressure shows the opposite behavior: the gaps increase and the optical spectrum shifts toward the blue end of the spectrum. Negative pressure can be realized by adding cubane (C_8H_8) or other molecules with similar size to the interstitials of the microcrystal. For the moderate lattice distortions studied here, we have found that the optical properties of fullerene microcrystals with intercalated cubane are similar to the ones of an expanded undoped microcrystal. Based on these findings, we propose doped C_60 as active element in piezo-optical devices.

  3. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in Many-body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, this study highlights the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread. Correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions to model interaction with a solid wall. There, hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. Finally, the dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is correctly captured in simulations parameterized by the Bond number, proving the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows.

  4. Excitons and Davydov splitting in sexithiophene from first-principles many-body Green's function theory.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xia; Yin, Huabing; Liang, Dongmei; Ma, Yuchen

    2015-09-21

    Organic semiconductors have promising and broad applications in optoelectronics. Understanding their electronic excited states is important to help us control their spectroscopic properties and performance of devices. There have been a large amount of experimental investigations on spectroscopies of organic semiconductors, but theoretical calculation from first principles on this respect is still limited. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) and many-body Green's function theory, which includes the GW method and Bethe-Salpeter equation, to study the electronic excited-state properties and spectroscopies of one prototypical organic semiconductor, sexithiophene. The exciton energies of sexithiophene in both the gas and bulk crystalline phases are very sensitive to the exchange-correlation functionals used in DFT for ground-state structure relaxation. We investigated the influence of dynamical screening in the electron-hole interaction on exciton energies, which is found to be very pronounced for triplet excitons and has to be taken into account in first principles calculations. In the sexithiophene single crystal, the energy of the lowest triplet exciton is close to half the energy of the lowest singlet one. While lower-energy singlet and triplet excitons are intramolecular Frenkel excitons, higher-energy excitons are of intermolecular charge-transfer type. The calculated optical absorption spectra and Davydov splitting are in good agreement with experiments. PMID:26395713

  5. Effective many-body parameters for atoms in nonseparable Gaussian optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the properties of particles trapped in three-dimensional potentials formed from superimposed Gaussian beams, fully taking into account effects of potential anharmonicity and nonseparability. Although these effects are negligible in more conventional optical lattice experiments, they are essential for emerging ultracold-atom developments. We focus in particular on two potentials utilized in current ultracold-atom experiments: arrays of tightly focused optical tweezers and a one-dimensional optical lattice with transverse Gaussian confinement and highly excited transverse modes. Our main numerical tools are discrete variable representations (DVRs), which combine many favorable features of spectral and grid-based methods, such as the computational advantage of exponential convergence and the convenience of an analytical representation of Hamiltonian matrix elements. Optimizations, such as symmetry adaptations and variational methods built on top of DVR methods, are presented and their convergence properties discussed. We also present a quantitative analysis of the degree of nonseparability of eigenstates, borrowing ideas from the theory of matrix product states, leading to both conceptual and computational gains. Beyond developing numerical methodologies, we present results for construction of optimally localized Wannier functions and tunneling and interaction matrix elements in optical lattices and tweezers relevant for constructing effective models for many-body physics.

  6. Thermal conductivity and energetic recoils in UO2 using a many-body potential model.

    PubMed

    Qin, M J; Cooper, M W D; Kuo, E Y; Rushton, M J D; Grimes, R W; Lumpkin, G R; Middleburgh, S C

    2014-12-10

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on uranium dioxide (UO2) employing a recently developed many-body potential model. Thermal conductivities are computed for a defect free UO2 lattice and a radiation-damaged, defect containing lattice at 300 K, 1000 K and 1500 K. Defects significantly degrade the thermal conductivity of UO2 as does the presence of amorphous UO2, which has a largely temperature independent thermal conductivity of ?1.4 Wm(-1) K(-1). The model yields a pre-melting superionic transition temperature at 2600 K, very close to the experimental value and the mechanical melting temperature of 3600 K, slightly lower than those generated with other empirical potentials. The average threshold displacement energy was calculated to be 37 eV. Although the spatial extent of a 1 keV U cascade is very similar to those generated with other empirical potentials and the number of Frenkel pairs generated is close to that from the Basak potential, the vacancy and interstitial cluster distribution is different. PMID:25398161

  7. Thermal conductivity and energetic recoils in UO2 using a many-body potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M. J.; Cooper, M. W. D.; Kuo, E. Y.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Grimes, R. W.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Middleburgh, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on uranium dioxide (UO2) employing a recently developed many-body potential model. Thermal conductivities are computed for a defect free UO2 lattice and a radiation-damaged, defect containing lattice at 300 K, 1000 K and 1500 K. Defects significantly degrade the thermal conductivity of UO2 as does the presence of amorphous UO2, which has a largely temperature independent thermal conductivity of ˜1.4 Wm-1 K-1. The model yields a pre-melting superionic transition temperature at 2600 K, very close to the experimental value and the mechanical melting temperature of 3600 K, slightly lower than those generated with other empirical potentials. The average threshold displacement energy was calculated to be 37 eV. Although the spatial extent of a 1 keV U cascade is very similar to those generated with other empirical potentials and the number of Frenkel pairs generated is close to that from the Basak potential, the vacancy and interstitial cluster distribution is different.

  8. Scheme of thinking quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2009-11-01

    A general approach describing quantum decision procedures is developed. The approach can be applied to quantum information processing, quantum computing, creation of artificial quantum intelligence, as well as to analyzing decision processes of human decision makers. Our basic point is to consider an active quantum system possessing its own strategic state. Processing information by such a system is analogous to the cognitive processes associated to decision making by humans. The algebra of probability operators, associated with the possible options available to the decision maker, plays the role of the algebra of observables in quantum theory of measurements. A scheme is advanced for a practical realization of decision procedures by thinking quantum systems. Such thinking quantum systems can be realized by using spin lattices, systems of magnetic molecules, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices, ensembles of quantum dots, or multilevel atomic systems interacting with electromagnetic field.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials on multiple GPUs—The implementation, package and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qing; Li, Min; Zhou, Yulu; Cui, Jiechao; Cui, Zhenguo; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is an important research tool extensively applied in materials science. Running MD on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is an attractive new approach for accelerating MD simulations. Currently, GPU implementations of MD usually run in a one-host-process-one-GPU (OHPOG) scheme. This scheme may pose a limitation on the system size that an implementation can handle due to the small device memory relative to the host memory. In this paper, we present a one-host-process-multiple-GPU (OHPMG) implementation of MD with embedded-atom-model or semi-empirical tight-binding many-body potentials. Because more device memory is available in an OHPMG process, the system size that can be handled is increased to a few million or more atoms. In comparison with the serial CPU implementation, in which Newton's third law is applied to improve the computational efficiency, our OHPMG implementation has achieved a 28.9x-86.0x speedup in double precision, depending on the system size, the cut-off ranges and the number of GPUs. The implementation can also handle a group of small simulation boxes in one run by combining the small boxes into a large box. This approach greatly improves the GPU computing efficiency when a large number of MD simulations for small boxes are needed for statistical purposes.

  10. Multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing description of nuclear many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, C.; Pillet, N.; Le Bloas, J.; Berger, J.-F.

    2014-10-15

    In this work we discuss the multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method which aims to describe the structure of atomic nuclei. Based on a variational principle it is able to treat in a unified way all types of long-range correlations between nucleons, without introducing symmetry breaking. The formalism is presented along with some preliminary results obtained for a few sd-shell nuclei. In the presented applications, the D1S Gogny force has been used.

  11. Large deviations for cluster size distributions in a continuous classical many-body system

    E-print Network

    Sabine Jansen; Wolfgang König; Bernd Metzger

    2015-03-17

    An interesting problem in statistical physics is the condensation of classical particles in droplets or clusters when the pair-interaction is given by a stable Lennard-Jones-type potential. We study two aspects of this problem. We start by deriving a large deviations principle for the cluster size distribution for any inverse temperature $\\beta\\in (0,\\infty)$ and particle density $\\rho\\in(0,\\rho_{\\mathrm{cp}})$ in the thermodynamic limit. Here $\\rho_{\\mathrm{cp}}>0$ is the close packing density. While in general the rate function is an abstract object, our second main result is the $\\Gamma$-convergence of the rate function toward an explicit limiting rate function in the low-temperature dilute limit $\\beta\\to \\infty$, $\\rho\\downarrow0$ such that $-\\beta^{-1}\\log\\rho\\to\

  12. Damped collective motion of many body systems: A variational approach to the quantal decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Christian; Hofmann, Helmut

    2005-06-01

    We address the problem of collective motion across a barrier like encountered in fission. A formula for the quantal decay rate is derived which bases on a recently developed variational approach for functional integrals. This formula can be applied to low temperatures that have not been accessible within the former PSPA type approach. To account for damping of collective motion one particle Green functions are dressed with appropriate self-energies.

  13. Landau-Zener transitions in noisy environment and many-body systems 

    E-print Network

    Sun, Deqiang

    2010-01-16

    wavenumber. This diagram shows the Temperature Tpair when fermion pairs begin to form and Tc when fermion pairs become coherent and superfluid form. As the in- teraction strength increases, the Fermi liquid smoothly evolves into molecular Bose liquid...

  14. Biorthogonal quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas; Mezincescu, Luca

    2007-09-15

    Models of PT symmetric quantum mechanics provide examples of biorthogonal quantum systems. The latter incorporate all the structure of PT symmetric models, and allow for generalizations, especially in situations where the PT construction of the dual space fails. The formalism is illustrated by a few exact results for models of the form H=(p+{nu}){sup 2}+{sigma}{sub k>0}{mu}{sub k} exp(ikx). In some nontrivial cases, equivalent Hermitian theories are obtained and shown to be very simple: They are just free (chiral) particles. Field theory extensions are briefly considered.

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 85, 022504 (2012) Relativistic many-body calculation of energies, oscillator strengths, transition rates,

    E-print Network

    Safronova, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    , transition rates, and lifetimes in K-like scandium. K and K-like ions are excellent systems for tests of high theory. Ca+ ions have been used for a number of quantum-information processing experiments (see Refs. [3 memory owing to a very long lifetime of the 3d5/2 level. Quantum information can be encoded in the ground

  16. Many-body effects in valleytronics: direct measurement of valley lifetimes in single-layer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Mai, Cong; Barrette, Andrew; Yu, Yifei; Semenov, Yuriy G; Kim, Ki Wook; Cao, Linyou; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2014-01-01

    Single layer MoS2 is an ideal material for the emerging field of "valleytronics" in which charge carrier momentum can be finely controlled by optical excitation. This system is also known to exhibit strong many-body interactions as observed by tightly bound excitons and trions. Here we report direct measurements of valley relaxation dynamics in single layer MoS2, by using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results show that strong Coulomb interactions significantly impact valley population dynamics. Initial excitation by circularly polarized light creates electron-hole pairs within the K-valley. These excitons coherently couple to dark intervalley excitonic states, which facilitate fast electron valley depolarization. Hole valley relaxation is delayed up to about 10 ps due to nondegeneracy of the valence band spin states. Intervalley biexciton formation reveals the hole valley relaxation dynamics. We observe that biexcitons form with more than an order of magnitude larger binding energy compared to conventional semiconductors. These measurements provide significant insight into valley specific processes in 2D semiconductors. Hence they could be used to suggest routes to design semiconducting materials that enable control of valley polarization. PMID:24325650

  17. Accurate localized resolution of identity approach for linear-scaling hybrid density functionals and for many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihrig, Arvid Conrad; Wieferink, Jürgen; Zhang, Igor Ying; Ropo, Matti; Ren, Xinguo; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2015-09-01

    A key component in calculations of exchange and correlation energies is the Coulomb operator, which requires the evaluation of two-electron integrals. For localized basis sets, these four-center integrals are most efficiently evaluated with the resolution of identity (RI) technique, which expands basis-function products in an auxiliary basis. In this work we show the practical applicability of a localized RI-variant (‘RI-LVL’), which expands products of basis functions only in the subset of those auxiliary basis functions which are located at the same atoms as the basis functions. We demonstrate the accuracy of RI-LVL for Hartree-Fock calculations, for the PBE0 hybrid density functional, as well as for RPA and MP2 perturbation theory. Molecular test sets used include the S22 set of weakly interacting molecules, the G3 test set, as well as the G2-1 and BH76 test sets, and heavy elements including titanium dioxide, copper and gold clusters. Our RI-LVL implementation paves the way for linear-scaling RI-based hybrid functional calculations for large systems and for all-electron many-body perturbation theory with significantly reduced computational and memory cost.

  18. Quantum simulations of one dimensional quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Rolando D. Somma

    2015-03-21

    We present several quantum algorithms for the simulation of quantum systems in one spatial dimension. First, we provide a method to simulate the evolution of the quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) and compute scattering amplitudes using a discrete QHO. To achieve precision \\epsilon, it suffices to choose the dimension of the Hilbert space of the discrete system, N, proportional to N' and logarithmic in |t|/\\epsilon, where N' is the largest eigenvalue in the spectral decomposition of the initial state, and t is the evolution time. We then present a Trotter-Suzuki product formula to approximate the evolution. The number of terms in the product is subexponential, and the complexity of simulating the evolution on a quantum computer is O(|t| \\exp( \\gamma \\sqrt{\\log(N' |t|/\\epsilon)})), where \\gamma >0 is constant. Our results suggest a superpolynomial speedup. Next, we describe a quantum algorithm to prepare the ground state of the discrete QHO with complexity polynomial in \\log(1/\\epsilon) and \\log (N). Such a quantum algorithm may be of independent interest, as it gives a way to prepare states of Gaussian-like amplitudes. Other eigenstates can be prepared by evolving with a Hamiltonian that is a discrete version of the Jaynes-Cummings model, with complexity polynomial in \\log (N) and 1/\\epsilon. We then study a quantum system with a quartic potential and numerically show that the evolution operator can be approximated using the Trotter-Suzuki formula, where the number of terms scales as N^{q}, for q simulating a large class of one-dimensional quantum systems, and describe a quantum algorithm of complexity almost linear in N|t| and logarithmic in 1/\\epsilon. We discuss further applications of our results, in particular with regards to the fractional Fourier transform.

  19. Quantum Computing via The Bethe Ansatz

    E-print Network

    Yong Zhang

    2011-06-20

    We recognize quantum circuit model of computation as factorisable scattering model and propose that a quantum computer is associated with a quantum many-body system solved by the Bethe ansatz. As an typical example to support our perspectives on quantum computation, we study quantum computing in one-dimensional nonrelativistic system with delta-function interaction, where the two-body scattering matrix satisfies the factorisation equation (the quantum Yang--Baxter equation) and acts as a parametric two-body quantum gate. We conclude by comparing quantum computing via the factorisable scattering with topological quantum computing.

  20. Quantum coherence in multipartite systems

    E-print Network

    Yao Yao; Xing Xiao; Li Ge; C. P. Sun

    2015-06-05

    Within the unified framework of exploiting the relative entropy as a distance measure of quantum correlations, we make explicit the hierarchical structure of quantum coherence, quantum discord and quantum entanglement in multipartite systems. On this basis, we introduce a new measure of quantum coherence, the basis-free quantum coherence and prove that this quantity is exactly equivalent to quantum discord. Furthermore, since the original relative entropy of coherence is a basis-dependent quantity, we investigate the local and nonlocal unitary creation of quantum coherence, focusing on the two-qubit unitary gates. Intriguingly, our results demonstrate that nonlocal unitary gates do not necessarily outperform the local unitary gates. Finally, the additivity relationship of quantum coherence in tripartite systems is discussed in detail, where the strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy plays an essential role.

  1. Relativistic many-body investigation of hyperfine interactions in excited S states of alkali metals: Francium and potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Owusu, A.; Dougherty, R.W.; Gowri, G.; Das, T.P.; Andriessen, J.

    1997-07-01

    To enhance the current understanding of mechanisms contributing to magnetic hyperfine interactions in excited states of atomic systems, in particular, alkali-metal atom systems, the hyperfine fields in the excited 5{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{endash}8{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} states of potassium and 8{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{endash}12{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} states of francium atoms have been studied using the relativistic linked-cluster many-body perturbation procedure. The net theoretical values of the hyperfine fields for the excited states studied are in excellent agreement with available experimental data for both atoms. There is a significant decrease in importance of the correlation contribution in going from the ground state to the excited states, the correlation contributions as ratios of the direct contribution decreasing rapidly as one moves to the higher excited states. However, the contribution from the exchange core polarization (ECP) effect is nearly a constant fraction of the direct effect for all the excited states considered. Physical explanations are offered for the observed trends in the contributions from the different mechanisms. A comparison is made of the different contributing effects to the hyperfine fields in potassium and francium to those in the related system, rubidium, studied earlier. Extrapolating from our results to the highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms, referred to as the Rydberg states, it is concluded that in addition to the direct contribution from the excited valence electron to the hyperfine fields, a significant contribution is expected from the ECP effect arising from the influence of exchange interactions between electrons in the valence and core states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Spread of Correlations in Long-Range Interacting Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, P.; Tagliacozzo, L.

    2013-11-01

    The nonequilibrium response of a quantum many-body system defines its fundamental transport properties and how initially localized quantum information spreads. However, for long-range-interacting quantum systems little is known. We address this issue by analyzing a local quantum quench in the long-range Ising model in a transverse field, where interactions decay as a variable power law with distance ?r-?, ?>0. Using complementary numerical and analytical techniques, we identify three dynamical regimes: short-range-like with an emerging light cone for ?>2, weakly long range for 1

  3. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  4. Global-to-local incompatibility, monogamy of entanglement, and ground-state dimerization: Theory and observability of quantum frustration in systems with competing interactions

    E-print Network

    S. M. Giampaolo; B. C. Hiesmayr; F. Illuminati

    2015-10-07

    Frustration in quantum many body systems is quantified by the degree of incompatibility between the local and global orders associated, respectively, to the ground states of the local interaction terms and the global ground state of the total many-body Hamiltonian. This universal measure is bounded from below by the ground-state bipartite block entanglement. For many-body Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body interaction terms, a further inequality relates quantum frustration to the pairwise entanglement between the constituents of the local interaction terms. This additional bound is a consequence of the limits imposed by monogamy on entanglement shareability. We investigate the behavior of local pair frustration in quantum spin models with competing interactions on different length scales and show that valence bond solids associated to exact ground-state dimerization correspond to a transition from generic frustration, i.e. geometric, common to classical and quantum systems alike, to genuine quantum frustration, i.e. solely due to the non-commutativity of the different local interaction terms. We discuss how such frustration transitions separating genuinely quantum orders from classical-like ones are detected by observable quantities such as the static structure factor and the interferometric visibility.

  5. Global-to-local incompatibility, monogamy of entanglement, and ground-state dimerization: Theory and observability of quantum frustration in systems with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, S. M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Illuminati, F.

    2015-10-01

    Frustration in quantum many-body systems is quantified by the degree of incompatibility between the local and global orders associated, respectively, with the ground states of the local interaction terms and the global ground state of the total many-body Hamiltonian. This universal measure is bounded from below by the ground-state bipartite block entanglement. For many-body Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body interaction terms, a further inequality relates quantum frustration to the pairwise entanglement between the constituents of the local interaction terms. This additional bound is a consequence of the limits imposed by monogamy on entanglement shareability. We investigate the behavior of local pair frustration in quantum spin models with competing interactions on different length scales and show that valence bond solids associated with exact ground state dimerization correspond to a transition from generic frustration, i.e., geometric, common to classical and quantum systems alike, to genuine quantum frustration, i.e., solely due to the noncommutativity of the different local interaction terms. We discuss how such frustration transitions separating genuinely quantum orders from classical-like ones are detected by observable quantities such as the static structure factor and the interferometric visibility.

  6. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or ?-particle crystals in dense matter and of hole crystals in semiconductors. [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golubnychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel, and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006). [3] C. Henning, H. Baumgartner, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, V. Golubnychiy, M. Bonitz, and D. Block, Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006) and Phys. Rev. E (2007). [4] A. Filinov, M. Bonitz, and Yu. Lozovik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3851 (2001). [5] M. Bonitz, V. Filinov, P. Levashov, V. Fortov, and H. Fehske, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235006 (2005) and J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 4717 (2006). [6] Introduction to Computational Methods for Many-Body Systems, M. Bonitz and D. Semkat (eds.), Rinton Press, Princeton (2006)

  7. Linear response as a singular limit for a periodically driven closed quantum system

    E-print Network

    Angelo Russomanno; Alessandro Silva; Giuseppe E. Santoro

    2013-08-12

    We address the issue of the validity of linear response theory for a closed quantum system subject to a periodic external driving. Linear response theory (LRT) predicts energy absorption at frequencies of the external driving where the imaginary part of the appropriate response function is different from zero. Here we show that, for a fairly general non-linear many-body system on a lattice subject to an extensive perturbation, this approximation should be expected to be valid only up to a time $t^*$ depending on the strength of the driving, beyond which the true coherent Schr\\"odinger evolution departs from the linear response prediction and the system stops absorbing energy form the driving. We exemplify this phenomenon in detail with the example of a quantum Ising chain subject to a time-periodic modulation of the transverse field, by comparing an exact Floquet analysis with the standard results of LRT. In this context, we also show that if the perturbation is just local, the system is expected in the thermodynamic limit to keep absorbing energy, and LRT works at all times. We finally argue more generally the validity of the scenario presented for closed quantum many-body lattice systems with a bound on the energy-per-site spectrum, discussing the experimental relevance of our findings in the context of cold atoms in optical lattices and ultra-fast spectroscopy experiments.

  8. Equilibration of quantum chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quntao; Wu, Biao

    2013-12-01

    The quantum ergordic theorem for a large class of quantum systems was proved by von Neumann [Z. Phys. 57, 30 (1929)] and again by Reimann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 190403 (2008)] in a more practical and well-defined form. However, it is not clear whether the theorem applies to quantum chaotic systems. With a rigorous proof still elusive, we illustrate and verify this theorem for quantum chaotic systems with examples. Our numerical results show that a quantum chaotic system with an initial low-entropy state will dynamically relax to a high-entropy state and reach equilibrium. The quantum equilibrium state reached after dynamical relaxation bears a remarkable resemblance to the classical microcanonical ensemble. However, the fluctuations around equilibrium are distinct: The quantum fluctuations are exponential while the classical fluctuations are Gaussian. PMID:24483425

  9. Relativistic many-body calculations of electric-dipole transitions between n 2 states in B-like ions

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Walter R.

    . Contributions from negative-energy states are included in the second-order E1 matrix elements to ensure gauge negative-energy states are included in the second-order E1 matrix elements to ensure agreement be- tween in boronlike ions with nuclear charges ranging from Z 6 to 100. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory MBPT

  10. Many-body perturbation theory calculations on the electronic states of Li 2, LiNa and Na 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. W.; Jones, G. J. R.

    1981-07-01

    Quasi-degenerate many-body perturbation theory with a multi-configuration reference space is used to obtain potential curves for the ground and excited electronic states of Li 2, LiNa and Na 2. Correlation contributions are analyzed and the effect of potential curve crossing on laser action is discussed.

  11. CP-Violating Effect of the Th Nuclear Magnetic Quadrupole Moment: Accurate Many-Body Study of ThO

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    CP-Violating Effect of the Th Nuclear Magnetic Quadrupole Moment: Accurate Many-Body Study of ThO L) and parity (P)-violating effect in 229 ThO is induced by the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. We perform nuclear and molecular calculations to express this effect in terms of the strength constants of T, P

  12. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory: a unified framework based on the Martin-Schwinger hierarchy

    E-print Network

    Stefanucci, Gianluca

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory: a unified framework based that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;Equilibrium and nonequilibrium

  13. Quantum coherence in multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Xiao, Xing; Ge, Li; Sun, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    Within the unified framework of exploiting the relative entropy as a distance measure of quantum correlations, we make explicit the hierarchical structure of quantum coherence, quantum discord, and quantum entanglement in multipartite systems. On this basis, we define a basis-independent measure of quantum coherence and prove that it is exactly equivalent to quantum discord. Furthermore, since the original relative entropy of coherence is a basis-dependent quantity, we investigate the local and nonlocal unitary creation of quantum coherence, focusing on the two-qubit unitary gates. Intriguingly, our results demonstrate that nonlocal unitary gates do not necessarily outperform the local unitary gates. Finally, the additivity relationship of quantum coherence in tripartite systems is discussed in detail, where the strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy plays an essential role.

  14. DPS Quantum Key Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kyo

    Differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) is one scheme of quantum key distribution whose security is based on the quantum nature of lightwave. This protocol features simplicity, a high key creation rate, and robustness against photon-number-splitting attacks. We describe DPS-QKD in this paper, including its setup and operation, eavesdropping against DPS-QKD, system performance, and modified systems to improve the system performance.

  15. Scarring in open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wisniacki, Diego; Carlo, Gabriel G

    2008-04-01

    We study scarring phenomena in open quantum systems. We show numerical evidence that individual resonance eigenstates of an open quantum system present localization around unstable short periodic orbits in a similar way as their closed counterparts. The structure of eigenfunctions around these classical objects is not destroyed by the opening. This is exposed in a paradigmatic system of quantum chaos, the cat map. PMID:18517679

  16. A hybrid quantum system of ultracold atoms and trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Carlo; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Zipkes, Christoph; Koehl, Michael; AMOP Team

    2011-05-01

    In the last decades, trapped ions and ultracold atoms have emerged as exceptionally controllable experimental systems to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Even though they share some common grounds in experimental techniques, such as laser cooling, ion trapping and atom trapping have developed very much independently, and only little cross-pollination has been seen. In our experiment we study how cold atoms can be combined with single trapped ions to create a new hybrid quantum system with tailored properties. We have deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate and demonstrated independent control over the two components within the hybrid system. We have studied the fundamental interaction processes and observed sympathetic cooling of the single ion by the condensate. Additionally, we have characterized elastic and inelastic atom- ion collisions and measured the energy-dependent reaction rate constants. Our experiment paves the way for coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle, giving access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques.

  17. Control of open quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Boulant, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the development, investigation and experimental implementation via liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques of new methods for controlling open quantum systems. First, methods that improve ...

  18. Energy density matrix formalism for interacting quantum systems: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    We develop an energy density matrix that parallels the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) for many-body quantum systems. Just as the density matrix gives access to the number density and occupation numbers, the energy density matrix yields the energy density and orbital occupation energies. The eigenvectors of the matrix provide a natural orbital partitioning of the energy density while the eigenvalues comprise a single particle energy spectrum obeying a total energy sum rule. For mean-field systems the energy density matrix recovers the exact spectrum. When correlation becomes important, the occupation energies resemble quasiparticle energies in some respects. We explore the occupation energy spectrum for the finite 3D homogeneous electron gas in the metallic regime and an isolated oxygen atom with ground state quantum Monte Carlo techniques imple- mented in the QMCPACK simulation code. The occupation energy spectrum for the homogeneous electron gas can be described by an effective mass below the Fermi level. Above the Fermi level evanescent behavior in the occupation energies is observed in similar fashion to the occupation numbers of the 1RDM. A direct comparison with total energy differences demonstrates a quantita- tive connection between the occupation energies and electron addition and removal energies for the electron gas. For the oxygen atom, the association between the ground state occupation energies and particle addition and removal energies becomes only qualitative. The energy density matrix provides a new avenue for describing energetics with quantum Monte Carlo methods which have traditionally been limited to total energies.

  19. Classical ab initio van der Waals interactions from many-body dispersion and multipole machine learning models trained in chemical space

    E-print Network

    Bereau, Tristan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01

    Accurate predictions of van der Waals forces require faithful models of dispersion, permanent and induced multipole-moments, as well as penetration and repulsion. We introduce a universal combined physics- and data-driven model of dispersion and multipole-moment contributions, respectively. Atomic multipoles are estimated "on-the-fly" for any organic molecule in any conformation using a machine learning approach trained on quantum chemistry results for tens of thousands of atoms in varying chemical environments drawn from thousands of organic molecules. Globally neutral, cationic, and anionic molecular charge states can be treated with individual models. Dispersion interactions are included via recently-proposed classical many-body potentials. For nearly one thousand intermolecular dimers, this approximate van der Waals model is found to reach an accuracy similar to that of state-of-the-art force fields, while bypassing the need for parametrization. Estimates of cohesive energies for the benzene crystal confi...

  20. Non-Exponential Quantum Decay of a Many-Particle System

    E-print Network

    del Campo, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The exact quantum decay of a many-body system equivalent to a gas of particles obeying generalized exclusion statistics is presented. The survival probability of the initial state exhibits early on a quadratic dependence on time that turns into a power-law decay, during the course of the evolution. Its is shown that the particle number and the strength of interactions determine the power-law exponent in the latter regime, as recently conjectured. The non-exponential character of the decay is linked to the many-particle reconstruction of the initial state from the decaying products.

  1. Non-Exponential Quantum Decay of a Many-Particle System

    E-print Network

    Adolfo del Campo

    2015-04-07

    The exact quantum decay of a many-body system equivalent to a gas of particles obeying generalized exclusion statistics is presented. The survival probability of the initial state exhibits early on a quadratic dependence on time that turns into a power-law decay, during the course of the evolution. Its is shown that the particle number and the strength of interactions determine the power-law exponent in the latter regime, as recently conjectured. The non-exponential character of the decay is linked to the many-particle reconstruction of the initial state from the decaying products.

  2. Anion emission from water molecules colliding with positive ions: Identification of binary and many-body processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnel, J.-Y.; Juhász, Z.; Lattouf, E.; Tanis, J. A.; Huber, B. A.; Bene, E.; Kovács, S. T. S.; Herczku, P.; Méry, A.; Poully, J.-C.; Rangama, J.; Sulik, B.

    2015-06-01

    It is shown that negative ions are ejected from gas-phase water molecules when bombarded with positive ions at keV energies typical of solar-wind velocities. This finding is relevant for studies of planetary and cometary atmospheres, as well as for radiolysis and radiobiology. Emission of both H- and heavier (O- and O H- ) anions, with a larger yield for H-, was observed in 6.6 -keV 16O++H2O collisions. The experimental setup allowed separate identification of anions formed in collisions with many-body dynamics from those created in hard, binary collisions. Most of the anions are emitted with low kinetic energy due to many-body processes. Model calculations show that both nucleus-nucleus interactions and electronic excitations contribute to the observed large anion emission yield.

  3. Many-Body Effect of Antimicrobial Peptides: On the Correlation Between Lipid's Spontaneous Curvature and Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Hung, Wei-Chin; Chen, Fang-Yu; Huang, Huey W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the free energy for pore formation induced by antimicrobial peptides contains a term representing peptide-peptide interactions mediated by membrane thinning. This many-body effect gives rise to the cooperative concentration dependence of peptide activities. Here we performed oriented circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction experiments to study the lipid dependence of this many-body effect. In particular we studied the correlation between lipid's spontaneous curvature and peptide's threshold concentration for pore formation by adding phosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphocholine to phosphocholine bilayers. Previously it was argued that this correlation exhibited by magainin and melittin supported the toroidal model for the pores. Here we found similar correlations exhibited by melittin and alamethicin. We found that the main effect of varying the spontaneous curvature of lipid is to change the degree of membrane thinning, which in turn influences the threshold concentration for pore formation. We discuss how to interpret the lipid dependence of membrane thinning. PMID:16150963

  4. Anion emission from water molecules colliding with positive ions: Identification of binary and many-body processes

    E-print Network

    Chesnel, J -Y; Lattouf, E; Tanis, J A; Huber, B A; Bene, E; Kovács, S T S; Herczku, P; Méry, A; Poully, J -C; Rangama, J; Sulik, B

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that negative ions are ejected from gas-phase water molecules when bombarded with positive ions at keV energies typical of solar-wind velocities. This finding is relevant for studies of planetary and cometary atmospheres, as well as for radiolysis and radiobiology. Emission of both H- and heavier (O- and OH-) anions, with a larger yield for H-, was observed in 6.6-keV 16O+ + H2O collisions. The ex-perimental setup allowed separate identification of anions formed in collisions with many-body dynamics from those created in hard, binary collisions. Most of the ani-ons are emitted with low kinetic energy due to many-body processes. Model calcu-lations show that both nucleus-nucleus interactions and electronic excitations con-tribute to the observed large anion emission yield.

  5. How do ovarian follicles interact? A many-body problem with unusual symmetry and symmetry-breaking properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Lacker, H.; Percus, Allon

    1991-06-01

    The assumption that hormonal feedback regulates ovarian follicle growth is used to formulate a many-body problem in which interactions are spatially independent. This mechanism of interaction is shown to be sufficient to account for the regulation of ovulation number. A method is also developed to test if this assumption is consistent with the observed spatial distribution of follicles in the Rhesus monkey ovary.

  6. Quantum information science as an approach to complex quantum systems

    E-print Network

    Michael A. Nielsen

    2002-08-13

    What makes quantum information science a science? These notes explore the idea that quantum information science may offer a powerful approach to the study of complex quantum systems. We discuss how to quantify complexity in quantum systems, and argue that there are two qualitatively different types of complex quantum system. We also explore ways of understanding complex quantum dynamics by quantifying the strength of a quantum dynamical operation as a physical resource. This is the text for a talk at the ``Sixth International Conference on Quantum Communication, Measurement and Computing'', held at MIT, July 2002. Viewgraphs for the talk may be found at http://www.qinfo.org/talks/.

  7. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  8. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-31

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  9. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  10. Symmetric periodic orbits of the many-body problem. Resonance and parade of planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkhai, V. N.

    The motion of a mechanical system consisting of n+1 material points attracting one another according to Newton`s law is investigated. A reversible system of differential equations is derived for the motion of n points relative to the "main body". A small parameter is introduced. When this parameter is equated to zero, each of the n points is attracted by the "main body" only, and the generating system splits into n two-body problems. Two types of generating periodic orbits, symmetric about the fixed set M of an automorphism, are considered: (1) with both eccentricities and inclinations equal to zero; (2) with inclinations equal to zero. It is shown that such orbits can be continued to non-zero values of the small parameter, as a result of which the system has periodic solutions of the first and second kinds. All these orbits are resonant: the mean motions of the bodies relate to one another as integers. In addition, at times that are multiples of the half-period the bodies are situated along a straight line, thus forming a "parade of planets". The results also apply to a "Sun-planet-satellite" type system. In the general theoretical part of the paper two methods are proposed for solving the problem of extending symmetric periodic motions to non-zero parameter values, and an upper bound is estimated for the domain of continuability.

  11. Quantum Chaos and Quantum Computers D. L. Shepelyansky*

    E-print Network

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    will be the origin of future human power? Even thirty or twenty years ago the standard answer would be: nuclear. The obtained results are related to the recent studies of quantum chaos in such many-body systems as nuclei in the paper. 1. Introduction On the border between two Millennia it is natural to ask the question, what

  12. Superadiabatic Forces in Brownian Many-Body Dynamics Andrea Fortini,1

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Matthias

    evolution of the one-body density of Brownian particles. Within this approach one makes the assumption qualitative features of the density evolution. Recent applications include the study of active colloidal,7,15], the theory is qualitatively wrong for either strongly confined systems or high density states around

  13. Nonradiating normal modes in a classical many-body model of matter radiation interaction

    E-print Network

    A. Carati; L. Galgani

    2003-12-11

    We consider a classical model of matter--radiation interaction, in which the matter is represented by a system of infinitely many dipoles on a one--dimensional lattice, and the system is dealt with in the so--called dipole (i.e. linearized) approximation. We prove that there exist normal--mode solutions of the complete system, so that in particular the dipoles, though performing accelerated motions, do not radiate energy away. This comes about in virtue of an exact compensation which we prove to occur, for each dipole, between the ``radiation reaction force'' and a part of the retarded forces due to all the other dipoles. This fact corresponds to a certain identity which we name after Oseen, since it occurs that this researcher did actually propose it, already in the year 1916. We finally make a connection with a paper of Wheeler and Feynman on the foundations of electrodynamics. It turns out indeed that the Oseen identity, which we prove here in a particular model, is in fact a weak form of a general identity that such authors were assuming as an independent postulate.

  14. Decoherence in infinite quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Philippe; Hellmich, Mario

    2012-09-01

    We review and discuss a notion of decoherence formulated in the algebraic framework of quantum physics. Besides presenting some sufficient conditions for the appearance of decoherence in the case of Markovian time evolutions we provide an overview over possible decoherence scenarios. The framework for decoherence we establish is sufficiently general to accommodate quantum systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom.

  15. Quantum models of classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hájí?ek, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum statistical methods that are commonly used for the derivation of classical thermodynamic properties are extended to classical mechanical properties. The usual assumption that every real motion of a classical mechanical system is represented by a sharp trajectory is not testable and is replaced by a class of fuzzy models, the so-called maximum entropy (ME) packets. The fuzzier are the compared classical and quantum ME packets, the better seems to be the match between their dynamical trajectories. Classical and quantum models of a stiff rod will be constructed to illustrate the resulting unified quantum theory of thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  16. Valence photodetachment of Li{sup -} and Na{sup -} using relativistic many-body techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, J.; Pradhan, G. B.; Radojevic, V.; Manson, S. T.; Deshmukh, P. C.

    2011-05-15

    The multiconfiguration Tamm-Dancoff technique (MCTD) is applied to study photodetachment of negative ions of lithium and sodium. A cusplike structure is found in the photodetachment cross section just below the first detachment-plus-excitation threshold of Li{sup -} (Li 2p), and of Na{sup -} (Na 3p), in qualitative agreement with existing theoretical and experimental results. The current work emphasizes the importance of correlation in the form of configuration interaction in the photodetachment process and demonstrates the utility of MCTD in dealing with highly correlated systems.

  17. Quantum Spin Dynamics of Mode-Squeezed Luttinger Liquids in Two-Component Atomic Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Widera, Artur; Trotzky, Stefan; Cheinet, Patrick; Foelling, Simon; Gerbier, Fabrice; Bloch, Immanuel; Gritsev, Vladimir; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Demler, Eugene

    2008-04-11

    We report on the observation of many-body spin dynamics of interacting, one-dimensional (1D) ultracold bosonic gases with two spin states. By controlling the nonlinear atomic interactions close to a Feshbach resonance we are able to induce a phase diffusive many-body spin dynamics of the relative phase between the two components. We monitor this dynamical evolution by Ramsey interferometry, supplemented by a novel, many-body echo technique, which unveils the role of quantum fluctuations in 1D. We find that the time evolution of the system is well described by a Luttinger liquid initially prepared in a multimode squeezed state. Our approach allows us to probe the nonequilibrium evolution of one-dimensional many-body quantum systems.

  18. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    E-print Network

    H. Nam; M. Stoitsov; W. Nazarewicz; A. Bulgac; G. Hagen; M. Kortelainen; P. Maris; J. C. Pei; K. J. Roche; N. Schunck; I. Thompson; J. P. Vary; S. M. Wild

    2012-05-01

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multidisciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadership-class computational resources.

  19. Many-body physics of Rydberg dark-state polaritons in the strongly interacting regime

    E-print Network

    Matthias Moos; Michael Hoening; Razmik Unanyan; Michael Fleischhauer

    2015-06-23

    Coupling light to Rydberg states of atoms under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) leads to the formation of strongly interacting quasi-particles, termed Rydberg polaritons. We derive a one-dimensional model describing the time evolution of these polaritons under paraxial propagation conditions, which we verify by numerical two-excitation simulations. We determine conditions allowing for a description by an effective Hamiltonian of a single-species polariton, and calculate ground-state correlations by use of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). Under typical stationary slow-light EIT conditions it is difficult to reach the strongly interacting regime where the interaction energy dominates the kinetic energy. We show that by employing time dependence of the control field the regime of strong interactions can be reached where the polaritons attain quasi crystalline order. We analyze the dynamics and resulting correlations for a translational invariant system in terms of a time-dependent Luttinger liquid theory and exact few-particle simulations and address the effects of nonadiabatic corrections and initial excitations.

  20. Many-body effects on the x-ray spectra of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathy, Sashi Sekhar

    1982-01-01

    The effects of band structure, of a solid surface, of temperature, and of disorder on the many-electron x-ray spectra of metals are evaluated in a change-of-mean-field approximation using a one-dimensional nearest-neighbor tight-binding model of a metal. The x-ray spectral shapes are determined by both the band structure and the final-state interactions. The effect of the band being non-free-electron-like is not felt at the x-ray threshold, but away from it such effects are noticeable. When the core hole is created at the surface, the spectra at the edge exhibit a Nozieres-de Dominicis-type singularity with the appropriate surface phase-shifts. At energies away from the edge, the one-particle effects are prominent with the x-ray emission and absorption spectra closely reflecting the local one-electron density of states. The recoil spectrum of a Fermi sea at a non-zero temperature has less asymmetry than the zero-temperature case. It was found that at ordinary temperatures the reduction of the asymmetry due to the thermal distribution of one-electron states is not very significant. Finally, using a one-dimensional Anderson model, the effect of lattice disorder on the x-ray absorption spectra is studied for the first time. There are two effects: (1) the strong infrared divergence peak is gradually quenched as disorder is increased, and (2) the threshold is broadened because the threshold energies for absorption at different sites in the crystal depend on the varying local lattice environment. It is proposed that the x-ray spectra may be useful as a tool for studying the degree of electron localization in disordered many-electron systems.