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Sample records for quantum non-local complex

  1. Origin of Dynamical Quantum Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachon, Cesar E.; Pachon, Leonardo A.

    2014-03-01

    Non-locality is one of the hallmarks of quantum mechanics and is responsible for paradigmatic features such as entanglement and the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Non-locality comes in two ``flavours'': a kinematic non-locality- arising from the structure of the Hilbert space- and a dynamical non-locality- arising from the quantum equations of motion-. Kinematic non-locality is unable to induce any change in the probability distributions, so that the ``action-at-a-distance'' cannot manifest. Conversely, dynamical non-locality does create explicit changes in probability, though in a ``causality-preserving'' manner. The origin of non-locality of quantum measurements and its relations to the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics, such as the uncertainty principle, have been only recently elucidated. Here we trace the origin of dynamical non-locality to the superposition principle. This relation allows us to establish and identify how the uncertainty and the superposition principles determine the non-local character of the outcome of a quantum measurement. Being based on group theoretical and path integral formulations, our formulation admits immediate generalizations and extensions to to, e.g., quantum field theory. This work was supported by the Departamento Administrativo de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion -COLCIENCIAS- of Colombia under the grant number 111556934912.

  2. The philosophical implications of quantum non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Paul Christopher

    2000-07-01

    The overarching metaphysics encompassing almost all of science incorporates notions readily recognizable as basic intuitions, such as the separability of nature into parts, and a causal architecture necessitating that influences going from one place to another transit every point in between. Astonishingly, developments in quantum mechanics have all but proven this metaphysics false. An overview of Bell's Theorem sets the stage for a discussion of the philosophical significance of quantum non-locality. An account of the overarching metaphysics of Western science explicates why the violation of the Bell Inequalities is so astonishing, drawing particular attention to the historical and metaphysical issues surrounding action-at-a-distance, and the demands for causal continuity and a finite propagation speed for causal influences. The Chapter Three exegesis of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) argument contends that a modified version of their ``reality criterion'' side-steps the impression that the argument only goes through under an overly strong realist position, but the truly surprising story underlying the EPR correlations-unforeseen by Einstein and Bohr-comes in the next chapter's examination of Jon P. Jarrett's analysis of non-locality into two composite conditions associated with Einstein's underlying metaphysical principles. This in turn leads to a deeper analysis of the philosophical basis for Einstein's resistance to quantum mechanics. Having seen that a range of ordinary causal and common- cause explanations for the EPR correlations are excluded or burdened with untoward implications, Chapter Seven proposes an information-theoretic analysis of the holistic connection exhibited in quantum phenomena, helping us to better understand in what way constraints on relational holism are responsible for the world appearing to be causally classical. These constraints lead to ``local locality'': the apparent manifestation of a local causal structure when the domain is

  3. A scalable quantum architecture using efficient non-local gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennen, Gavin

    2003-03-01

    Many protocols for quantum information processing use a control sequence or circuit of interactions between qubits and control fields wherein arbitrary qubits can be made to interact with one another. The primary problem with many ``physically scalable" architectures is that the qubits are restricted to nearest neighbor interactions and quantum wires between distant qubits do not exist. Because of errors, nearest neighbor interactions often present difficulty with scalability. We describe a protocol that efficiently performs non-local gates between elements of separated static logical qubits using a bus of dynamic qubits as a refreshable entanglement resource. Imperfect resource preparation due to error propagation from noisy gates and measurement errors can purified within the bus channel. Because of the inherent parallelism of entanglement swapping, communication latency within the quantum computer can be significantly reduced.

  4. Non-local classical optical correlation and implementing analogy of quantum teleportation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifan; Song, Xinbing; Qin, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiong; Yang, Zhenwei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    This study reports an experimental realization of non-local classical optical correlation from the Bell's measurement used in tests of quantum non-locality. Based on such a classical Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen optical correlation, a classical analogy has been implemented to the true meaning of quantum teleportation. In the experimental teleportation protocol, the initial teleported information can be unknown to anyone and the information transfer can happen over arbitrary distances. The obtained results give novel insight into quantum physics and may open a new field of applications in quantum information. PMID:25779977

  5. Non-local classical optical correlation and implementing analogy of quantum teleportation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Song, Xinbing; Qin, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiong; Yang, Zhenwei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    This study reports an experimental realization of non-local classical optical correlation from the Bell's measurement used in tests of quantum non-locality. Based on such a classical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen optical correlation, a classical analogy has been implemented to the true meaning of quantum teleportation. In the experimental teleportation protocol, the initial teleported information can be unknown to anyone and the information transfer can happen over arbitrary distances. The obtained results give novel insight into quantum physics and may open a new field of applications in quantum information. PMID:25779977

  6. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  7. Novel non-local effects in three-terminal hybrid devices with quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałek, G.; Domański, T.; Bułka, B. R.; Wysokiński, K. I.

    2015-09-01

    We predict non-local effect in the three-terminal hybrid device consisting of the quantum dot (QD) tunnel coupled to two normal and one superconducting reservoirs. It manifests itself as the negative non-local resistance and results from the competition between the ballistic electron transfer (ET) and the crossed Andreev scattering (CAR). The effect is robust both in the linear and non-linear regimes. In the latter case the screening of charges and the long-range interactions play significant role. We show that sign change of the non-local conductance depends on the subgap Shiba/Andreev states, and it takes place even in absence of the Coulomb interactions. The effect is large and can be experimentally verified using the four probe setup. Since the induced non-local voltage changes sign and magnitude upon varying the gate potential and/or coupling of the quantum dot to the superconducting lead, such measurement could hence provide a controlled and precise method to determine the positions of the Shiba/Andreev states. Our predictions ought to be contrasted with non-local effects observed hitherto in the three-terminal planar junctions where the residual negative non-local conductance has been observed at large voltages, related to the Thouless energy of quasiparticles tunneling through the superconducting slab.

  8. Novel non-local effects in three-terminal hybrid devices with quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Michałek, G.; Domański, T.; Bułka, B.R.; Wysokiński, K.I.

    2015-01-01

    We predict non-local effect in the three-terminal hybrid device consisting of the quantum dot (QD) tunnel coupled to two normal and one superconducting reservoirs. It manifests itself as the negative non-local resistance and results from the competition between the ballistic electron transfer (ET) and the crossed Andreev scattering (CAR). The effect is robust both in the linear and non-linear regimes. In the latter case the screening of charges and the long-range interactions play significant role. We show that sign change of the non-local conductance depends on the subgap Shiba/Andreev states, and it takes place even in absence of the Coulomb interactions. The effect is large and can be experimentally verified using the four probe setup. Since the induced non-local voltage changes sign and magnitude upon varying the gate potential and/or coupling of the quantum dot to the superconducting lead, such measurement could hence provide a controlled and precise method to determine the positions of the Shiba/Andreev states. Our predictions ought to be contrasted with non-local effects observed hitherto in the three-terminal planar junctions where the residual negative non-local conductance has been observed at large voltages, related to the Thouless energy of quasiparticles tunneling through the superconducting slab. PMID:26415683

  9. Probing the non-locality of Majorana fermions via quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Yu, Ting; Lin, Hai-Qing; You, J. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Majorana fermions (MFs) are exotic particles that are their own anti-particles. Recently, the search for the MFs occurring as quasi-particle excitations in solid-state systems has attracted widespread interest, because of their fundamental importance in fundamental physics and potential applications in topological quantum computation based on solid-state devices. Here we study the quantum correlations between two spatially separate quantum dots induced by a pair of MFs emerging at the two ends of a semiconductor nanowire, in order to develop a new method for probing the MFs. We find that without the tunnel coupling between these paired MFs, quantum entanglement cannot be induced from an unentangled (i.e., product) state, but quantum discord is observed due to the intrinsic nonlocal correlations of the paired MFs. This finding reveals that quantum discord can indeed demonstrate the intrinsic non-locality of the MFs formed in the nanowire. Also, quantum discord can be employed to discriminate the MFs from the regular fermions. Furthermore, we propose an experimental setup to measure the onset of quantum discord due to the nonlocal correlations. Our approach provides a new, and experimentally accessible, method to study the Majorana bound states by probing their intrinsic non-locality signature.

  10. The origin of quantum non-locality and a new approach to generation of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Simon

    2010-02-01

    According to our work [1], the peculiarity of quantum mechanics behavior stems from interactive holography feedbacks. This organization naturally captures the features of quantum non-separability and wave-particle duality; sliced holographic processing immediately elucidates the inscrutability of quantum entanglement. Traditional physics is an approximation to the holistic picture of the Universe, yet non-locality does not come out as a small correction to contact interactions. Challenging relativity, a battery of suggested tests could reveal the absolute positioning of the underlying holographic mechanism. In view of A. Einstein, if quantum entanglement ``is correct, it signifies the end of physics as a science''. So, the counter-arguments against the surmised operational potentials of non-locality are irrelevant. It is meaningless to oppose the consequences of what you could not believe to exist in the first place. Remarkably, the holographic infrastructure shows exciting prospects for concentrating and producing energy. The following hypothetical possibilities will be discussed: (1) nuclear fusion fixation with teleportation of D+D-reaction; (2) ball lightning creation through entanglement of SHF; (3) motility of ``artificial muscle''. [1] S.Y. Berkovich, ``A comprehensive explanation of quantum mechanics, the keyword is interactive holography'', http://www.cs.gwu.edu/research/reports detail.php?trnumber=TR-GWU-CS-09-001 )

  11. Non-locality and locality in the stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohm, D.; Hiley, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    We review the stochastic interpretation of the quantum theory and show that, like the causal interpretation it necessarily involves non-locality. We compare and contrast our approach with that of Nelson. We then extend the stochastic interpretation to the Pauli equation. This lays the ground for a further extension to the Dirac equation and therefore enables us to discuss this interpretation in a relativistic context. We find that a co consistent treatment of non-locality can be given and that it is indeed possible further to regard this non-locality as a limiting case of a purely local theory in which the transmission of what we have called active information is not restricted to the speed of light. In this case both quantum theory and relativity come out as very good statistical approximations. However, because this basically local theory implies that these latter are not exactly valid, it is possible to propose tests that could in principle distinguish such a theory from the current theories.

  12. Quantum non-locality in a two-slit interferometer for short-lived particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2001-12-01

    We describe a new test of quantum nonlocality, using an interferometer for short-lived particles. The separation is large compared with the particle lifetimes. This interferometer is realized by vector meson production in distant heavy ion collisions. The mesons decay before waves from the two sources (ions) can overlap, so interference is only possible among the decay products. The post-decay wave function must retain amplitudes for all possible decays. The decay products are spatially separated, necessitating a non-local wave function. The interference is measurable by summing the product momenta. Alternately, the products positions could be observed, allowing new tests of the EPR paradox.

  13. From Einstein's theorem to Bell's theorem: a history of quantum non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, H. M.

    2006-04-01

    In this Einstein Year of Physics it seems appropriate to look at an important aspect of Einstein's work that is often down-played: his contribution to the debate on the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Contrary to physics ‘folklore’, Bohr had no defence against Einstein's 1935 attack (the EPR paper) on the claimed completeness of orthodox quantum mechanics. I suggest that Einstein's argument, as stated most clearly in 1946, could justly be called Einstein's reality locality completeness theorem, since it proves that one of these three must be false. Einstein's instinct was that completeness of orthodox quantum mechanics was the falsehood, but he failed in his quest to find a more complete theory that respected reality and locality. Einstein's theorem, and possibly Einstein's failure, inspired John Bell in 1964 to prove his reality locality theorem. This strengthened Einstein's theorem (but showed the futility of his quest) by demonstrating that either reality or locality is a falsehood. This revealed the full non-locality of the quantum world for the first time.

  14. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  15. Exploring the renormalization of quantum discord and Bell non-locality in the one-dimensional transverse Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-cheng; Shi, Jia-dong; Ding, Zhi-yong; Ye, Liu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of external magnet field g on the relationship among the quantum discord, Bell non-locality and quantum phase transition by employing quantum renormalization-group (QRG) method in the one-dimensional transverse Ising model is investigated. In our model, external magnet field g can influence the phase diagrams. The results have shown that both the two quantum correlation measures can develop two saturated values, which are associated with two distinct phases: long-ranged ordered Ising phase and the paramagnetic phase with the number of QRG iterations increasing. Additionally, quantum non-locality always existent in the long-ranged ordered Ising phase no matter whatever the value of g is and what times QRG steps are carried out and we conclude that the quantum non-locality always exists not only suitable for the two sites of block, but for nearest-neighbor blocks in the long-ranged ordered Ising phase. However, the block-block correlation in the paramagnetic phase is not strong enough to violate the Bell-CHSH inequality as the size of system becomes large. Furthermore, when the system violates the CHSH inequality, i.e., satisfies quantum non-locality, it needs to be entangled. On the other way, if the system obeys the CHSH inequality, it may be entangled or not. To gain further insight, the non-analytic and scaling behavior of QD and Bell non-locality have also been analyzed in detail and this phenomenon indicates that the behavior of the correlation can perfectly help one to observe the quantum critical properties of the model.

  16. Non-local correlation and quantum discord in two atoms in the non-degenerate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.

    2012-12-15

    By using geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN), quantum correlation is investigated for two atoms in the non-degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model. It is shown that there is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. The evolvement period of quantum correlation gets shorter with the increase in the dipole-dipole parameter. It is found that there exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also quantum nonlocality without quantum discord. Also, the MIN and GQD are raised rather than entanglement, and also with weak initial entanglement, there are MIN and entanglement in a interval of death quantum discord. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) are used to investigate the correlations of two two-level atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also without discord. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak initial entanglement leads to MIN and entanglement in intervals of death discord.

  17. Correlation energy as a measure of non-locality: Quantum entanglement of helium-like systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, R. O.; López-Rosa, S.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    In this work we discuss the essential quantum origin of correlation energy as measured through the wave function regardless of any extrinsic Hamiltonian. The ambiguous physical meaning of correlation energy is clarified by identifying the non-dynamical correlations inherent in the system state of Slater rank different than one with the quantum phenomenon of nonlocality. This is achieved by relating correlation energy to entanglement as measured through the von Neumann and the linear entropies. Indeed, for helium-like systems with varying Z we observe one-to-one correspondence between entanglement and correlation energy. We present numerical evidence of the linear relation between the correlation energy E\\textit{corr} and the quantum entanglement for various members of the helium isoelectronic series by use of highly correlated wave functions of configuration-interaction type.

  18. Horizons and non-local time evolution of quantum mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    According to general relativity, trapping surfaces and horizons are classical causal structures that arise in systems with sharply defined energy and corresponding gravitational radius. The latter concept can be extended to a quantum mechanical matter state simply by means of the spectral decomposition, which allows one to define an associated "horizon wave-function". Since this auxiliary wave-function contains crucial information about the causal structure of space-time, a new proposal is formulated for the time evolution of quantum systems in order to account for the fundamental classical property that outer observers cannot receive signals from inside a horizon. The simple case of a massive free particle at rest is used throughout the paper as a toy model to illustrate the main ideas.

  19. Morphogenetic fields in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer: Non-local control of complex patterning

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Establishment of shape during embryonic development, and the maintenance of shape against injury or tumorigenesis, requires constant coordination of cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the host organism. Molecular cell biology and genetics have made great strides in understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell function. However, generalized rational control of shape is still largely beyond our current capabilities. Significant instructive signals function at long range to provide positional information and other cues to regulate organism-wide systems properties like anatomical polarity and size control. Is complex morphogenesis best understood as the emergent property of local cell interactions, or as the outcome of a computational process that is guided by a physically-encoded map or template of the final goal state? Here I review recent data and molecular mechanisms relevant to morphogenetic fields: large-scale systems of physical properties that have been proposed to store patterning information during embryogenesis, regenerative repair, and cancer suppression that ultimately controls anatomy. Placing special emphasis on the role of endogenous bioelectric signals as an important component of the morphogenetic field, I speculate on novel approaches for the computational modeling and control of these fields with applications to synthetic biology, regenerative medicine, and evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:22542702

  20. Quantum Complexity in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Carbon has a unique position among elements in the periodic table. It produces an allotrope, graphene, a mechanically robust two dimensional semimetal. The multifarious properties that graphene exhibits has few parallels among elemental metals. From simplicity, namely carbon atoms connected by pure sp2 bonds, a wealth of novel quantum properties emerge. In classical complex systems such as a spin glass or a finance market, several competing agents or elements are responsible for unanticipated and difficult to predict emergent properties. The complex (sic) structure of quantum mechanics is responsbile for an unanticipated set of emergent properties in graphene. We call this quantum complexity. In fact, most quantum systems, phenomena and modern quantum field theory could be viewed as examples of quantum complexity. After giving a brief introduction to the quantum complexity we focus on our own work, which indicates the breadth in the type of quantum phenomena that graphene could support. We review our theoretical suggestions of, (i) spin-1 collective mode in netural graphene, (ii) relativistic type of phenomena in crossed electric and magnetic fields, (iii) room temperature superconductivity in doped graphene and (iv) composite Fermi sea in neutral graphene in uniform magnetic field and (v) two-channel Kondo effect. Except for the relativistic type of phenomena, the rest depend in a fundamental way on a weak electron correlation that exists in the broad two-dimensional band of graphene.

  1. Exploring the renormalization of quantum discord and Bell non-locality in the one-dimensional transverse Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-cheng; Shi, Jia-dong; Ding, Zhi-yong; Ye, Liu

    2016-05-01

    Quantum coherence is an important physical resource in quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this paper, we firstly obtain an uncertainty-like expression relating two coherences contained in corresponding local bipartite quantum system. This uncertainty-like inequality shows that the larger the coherence of one subsystem, the less coherence contained in other subsystems. Further, we discuss in detail the uncertainty-like relation among three single-partite quantum systems. We show that the coherence contained in pure tripartite quantum system is greater than the sum of the coherence of all local subsystems.

  2. Experimental linear-optics simulation of multipartite non-locality in the ground state of a quantum Ising ring

    PubMed Central

    Orieux, Adeline; Boutari, Joelle; Barbieri, Marco; Paternostro, Mauro; Mataloni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Critical phenomena involve structural changes in the correlations of its constituents. Such changes can be reproduced and characterized in quantum simulators able to tackle medium-to-large-size systems. We demonstrate these concepts by engineering the ground state of a three-spin Ising ring by using a pair of entangled photons. The effect of a simulated magnetic field, leading to a critical modification of the correlations within the ring, is analysed by studying two- and three-spin entanglement. In particular, we connect the violation of a multipartite Bell inequality with the amount of tripartite entanglement in our ring. PMID:25418153

  3. Quantum Kolmogorov complexity and bounded quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2011-04-15

    The effect of bounded quantum memory in a primitive information protocol has been examined using the quantum Kolmogorov complexity as a measure of information. We employed a toy two-party protocol in which Bob, by using a bounded quantum memory and an unbounded classical memory, estimates a message that was encoded in qubits by Alice in one of the bases X or Z. Our theorem gave a nontrivial effect of the memory boundedness. In addition, a generalization of the uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory has been obtained.

  4. Quantum walks on simplicial complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, Kaname; Ogurisu, Osamu; Segawa, Etsuo

    2016-05-01

    We construct a new type of quantum walks on simplicial complexes as a natural extension of the well-known Szegedy walk on graphs. One can numerically observe that our proposing quantum walks possess linear spreading and localization as in the case of the Grover walk on lattices. Moreover, our numerical simulation suggests that localization of our quantum walks reflects not only topological but also geometric structures. On the other hand, our proposing quantum walk contains an intrinsic problem concerning exhibition of non-trivial behavior, which is not seen in typical quantum walks such as Grover walks on graphs.

  5. Generalized conservation laws in non-local field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegeles, Alexander; Oriti, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    We propose a geometrical treatment of symmetries in non-local field theories, where the non-locality is due to a lack of identification of field arguments in the action. We show that the existence of a symmetry of the action leads to a generalized conservation law, in which the usual conserved current acquires an additional non-local correction term, obtaining a generalization of the standard Noether theorem. We illustrate the general formalism by discussing the specific physical example of complex scalar field theory of the type describing the hydrodynamic approximation of Bose-Einstein condensates. We expect our analysis and results to be of particular interest for the group field theory formulation of quantum gravity.

  6. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  7. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2009-09-01

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  8. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-12

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  9. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-11

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  10. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology with complex Ashtekar variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Achour, Jibril; Grain, Julien; Noui, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We construct and study loop quantum cosmology (LQC) when the Barbero-Immirzi parameter takes the complex value γ =+/- i. We refer to this new approach to quantum cosmology as complex LQC. This formulation is obtained via an analytic continuation of the Hamiltonian constraint (with no inverse volume corrections) from real γ to γ =+/- i, in the simple case of a flat FLRW Universe coupled to a massless scalar field with no cosmological constant. For this, we first compute the non-local curvature operator (defined by the trace of the holonomy of the connection around a fundamental plaquette) evaluated in an arbitrary spin j representation, and find a new close formula for its expression. This allows us to define explicitly a one parameter family of regularizations of the Hamiltonian constraint in LQC, parametrized by the spin j. It is immediate to see that any spin j regularization leads to a bouncing scenario. Then, motivated in particular by previous results on black hole thermodynamics, we perform the analytic continuation of the Hamiltonian constraint to values of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter given by γ =+/- i and to spins j=\\frac{1}{2}(-1+is) where s is real. Even if the area spectrum then becomes continuous, we show that the complex LQC defined in this way does also replace the initial big-bang singularity by a big-bounce. In addition to this, the maximal density and the minimal volume of the Universe are obviously independent of γ . Furthermore, the dynamics before and after the bounce is not symmetrical anymore, which makes a clear distinction between these two phases of the evolution of the Universe.

  12. Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Sanz, Angel S.; Miret-Artes, Salvador; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 250401], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

  13. Noncommutative complex structures on quantum homogeneous spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Buachalla, Réamonn

    2016-01-01

    A new framework for noncommutative complex geometry on quantum homogeneous spaces is introduced. The main ingredients used are covariant differential calculi and Takeuchi's categorical equivalence for quantum homogeneous spaces. A number of basic results are established, producing a simple set of necessary and sufficient conditions for noncommutative complex structures to exist. Throughout, the framework is applied to the quantum projective spaces endowed with the Heckenberger-Kolb calculus.

  14. Community Detection in Quantum Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccin, Mauro; Migdał, Piotr; Johnson, Tomi H.; Bergholm, Ville; Biamonte, Jacob D.

    2014-10-01

    Determining community structure is a central topic in the study of complex networks, be it technological, social, biological or chemical, static or in interacting systems. In this paper, we extend the concept of community detection from classical to quantum systems—a crucial missing component of a theory of complex networks based on quantum mechanics. We demonstrate that certain quantum mechanical effects cannot be captured using current classical complex network tools and provide new methods that overcome these problems. Our approaches are based on defining closeness measures between nodes, and then maximizing modularity with hierarchical clustering. Our closeness functions are based on quantum transport probability and state fidelity, two important quantities in quantum information theory. To illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in detecting community structure in quantum systems, we provide several examples, including a naturally occurring light-harvesting complex, LHCII. The prediction of our simplest algorithm, semiclassical in nature, mostly agrees with a proposed partitioning for the LHCII found in quantum chemistry literature, whereas our fully quantum treatment of the problem uncovers a new, consistent, and appropriately quantum community structure.

  15. Quantum navigation and ranking in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  16. Quantum Navigation and Ranking in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  17. Quantum vortices within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-06-21

    Quantum vortices are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. A quantum vortex forms around a node in the wave function in the complex space, and the quantized circulation integral originates from the discontinuity in the real part of the complex action. Although the quantum momentum field displays hyperbolic flow around a node, the corresponding Polya vector field displays circular flow. It is shown that the Polya vector field of the quantum momentum function is parallel to contours of the probability density. A nonstationary state constructed from eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator is used to illustrate the formation of a transient excited state quantum vortex, and the coupled harmonic oscillator is used to illustrate quantization of the circulation integral in the multidimensional complex space. This study not only analyzes the formation of quantum vortices but also demonstrates the local structures for the quantum momentum field and for the Polya vector field near a node of the wave function. PMID:18570490

  18. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  19. Relativistic three-partite non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, Hooman; Montakhab, Afshin

    2016-05-01

    Bell-like inequalities have been used in order to distinguish non-local quantum pure states by various authors. The behavior of such inequalities under Lorentz transformation (LT) has been a source of debate and controversies in the past. In this paper, we consider the two most commonly studied three-particle pure states, that of W and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states which exhibit distinctly different types of entanglement. We discuss the various types of three-particle inequalities used in previous studies and point to their corresponding shortcomings and strengths. Our main result is that if one uses Czachor’s relativistic spin operator and Svetlichny’s inequality as the main measure of non-locality and uses the same angles in the rest frame (S) as well as the moving frame (S‧), then maximally violated inequality in S will decrease in the moving frame, and will eventually lead to lack of non-locality (i.e. satisfaction of inequality) in the v→c limit. This is shown for both the GHZ and W states and in two different configurations which are commonly studied (Cases 1 and 2). Our results are in line with a more familiar case of two particle case. We also show that the satisfaction of Svetlichny’s inequality in the v→c limit is independent of initial particles’ velocity. Our study shows that whenever we use Czachor’s relativistic spin operator, results draws a clear picture of three-particle non-locality making its general properties consistent with previous studies on two-particle systems regardless of the W state or the GHZ state is involved. Throughout the paper, we also address the results of using Pauli’s operator in investigating the behavior of |Sv| under LT for both of the GHZ and W states and two cases (Cases 1 and 2). Our investigation shows that the violation of |Sv| in moving frame depends on the particle’s energy in the lab frame, which is in agreement with some previous works on two and three-particle systems. Our work may

  20. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  1. Quantum electrodynamics with complex fermion mass

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, B.J.H. . School of Physics); Wu, D.D. . School of Physics Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ . Inst. of High Energy Physics Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1991-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a complex fermion mass -- that is, a fermion mass with a chiral phase -- is restudied, together with its chirally rotated version. We show how fake electric dipole moment can be obtained and how to avoid it. 10 refs.

  2. Quantum Google in a Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Paparo, Giuseppe Davide; Müller, Markus; Comellas, Francesc; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of the recently proposed Quantum PageRank algorithm, in large complex networks. We find that the algorithm is able to univocally reveal the underlying topology of the network and to identify and order the most relevant nodes. Furthermore, it is capable to clearly highlight the structure of secondary hubs and to resolve the degeneracy in importance of the low lying part of the list of rankings. The quantum algorithm displays an increased stability with respect to a variation of the damping parameter, present in the Google algorithm, and a more clearly pronounced power-law behaviour in the distribution of importance, as compared to the classical algorithm. We test the performance and confirm the listed features by applying it to real world examples from the WWW. Finally, we raise and partially address whether the increased sensitivity of the quantum algorithm persists under coordinated attacks in scale-free and random networks. PMID:24091980

  3. Liouville quantum gravity on complex tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, François; Rhodes, Rémi; Vargas, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we construct Liouville Quantum Field Theory (LQFT) on the toroidal topology in the spirit of the 1981 seminal work by Polyakov [Phys. Lett. B 103, 207 (1981)]. Our approach follows the construction carried out by the authors together with Kupiainen in the case of the Riemann sphere ["Liouville quantum gravity on the Riemann sphere," e-print arXiv:1410.7318]. The difference is here that the moduli space for complex tori is non-trivial. Modular properties of LQFT are thus investigated. This allows us to integrate the LQFT on complex tori over the moduli space, to compute the law of the random Liouville modulus, therefore recovering (and extending) formulae obtained by physicists, and make conjectures about the relationship with random planar maps of genus one, eventually weighted by a conformal field theory and conformally embedded onto the torus.

  4. Superrenormalizable quantum gravity with complex ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Shapiro, Ilya L.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest and briefly review a new sort of superrenormalizable models of higher derivative quantum gravity. The higher derivative terms in the action can be introduced in such a way that all the unphysical massive states have complex poles. According to the literature on Lee-Wick quantization, in this case the theory can be formulated as unitary, since all massive ghosts-like degrees of freedom are unstable.

  5. Complex quantum trajectories for barrier scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Bradley Allen

    We have directed much attention towards developing quantum trajectory methods which can accurately predict the transmission probabilities for a variety of quantum mechanical barrier scattering processes. One promising method involves solving the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Derivative Propagation Method (DPM). We present this method, termed complex valued DPM (CVDPM(n)). CVDPM(n) has been successfully employed in the Lagrangian frame to accurately compute transmission probabilities on 'thick' one dimensional Eckart and Gaussian potential surfaces. CVDPM(n) is able to reproduce accurate results with a much lower order of approximation than is required by real valued quantum trajectory methods, from initial wave packet energies ranging from the tunneling case (Eo = 0) to high energy cases (twice the barrier height). We successfully extended CVDPM(n) to two-dimensional problems (one translational degree of freedom representing an Eckart or Gaussian barrier coupled to a vibrational degree of freedom) in the Lagrangian framework with great success. CVDPM helps to explain why barrier scattering from "thick" barriers is a much more well posed problem than barrier scattering from "thin" barriers. Though results in these two cases are in very good agreement with grid methods, the search for an appropriate set of initial conditions (termed an 'isochrone) from which to launch the trajectories leads to a time-consuming search problem that is reminiscent of the root-searching problem from semi-classical dynamics. In order to circumvent the isochrone problem, we present CVDPM(n) equations of motion which are derived and implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian frame for a metastable potential as well as the Eckart and Gaussian surfaces. In this way, the isochrone problem can be circumvented but at the cost of introducing other computational difficulties. In order to understand why CVDPM may give better transmission probabilities than real valued

  6. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.-C.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems.

  7. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems. PMID:19045012

  8. On Local Boundary CFT and Non-Local CFT on the Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehren, Karl-Henning

    The holographic relation between local boundary conformal quantum field theories (BCFT) and their non-local boundary restrictions is reviewed, and non-vacuum BCFT's, whose existence was conjectured previously, are constructed. (Based on joint work [18] with R. Longo.)

  9. Measurement and Information Extraction in Complex Dynamics Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Montangero, Simone

    Quantum Information processing has several di.erent applications: some of them can be performed controlling only few qubits simultaneously (e.g. quantum teleportation or quantum cryptography) [1]. Usually, the transmission of large amount of information is performed repeating several times the scheme implemented for few qubits. However, to exploit the advantages of quantum computation, the simultaneous control of many qubits is unavoidable [2]. This situation increases the experimental di.culties of quantum computing: maintaining quantum coherence in a large quantum system is a di.cult task. Indeed a quantum computer is a many-body complex system and decoherence, due to the interaction with the external world, will eventually corrupt any quantum computation. Moreover, internal static imperfections can lead to quantum chaos in the quantum register thus destroying computer operability [3]. Indeed, as it has been shown in [4], a critical imperfection strength exists above which the quantum register thermalizes and quantum computation becomes impossible. We showed such e.ects on a quantum computer performing an e.cient algorithm to simulate complex quantum dynamics [5,6].

  10. Complex flows in granular and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Mark Richard

    In this thesis we investigate three problems involving complex flows in granular and quantum systems. (a) We first study the dynamics of granular particles in a split-bottom shear cell experiment. We utilize network theory to quantify the dynamics of the granular system at the mesoscopic scale. We find an apparent phase transition in the formation of a giant component of broken links as a function of applied shear. These results are compared to a numerical model where breakages are based on the amount of local stretching in the granular pile. (b) Moving to quantum mechanical systems, we study revival and echo phenomena in systems of anharmonically confined atoms, and find a novel phenomena we call the "pre-revival echo". We study the effect of size and symmetry of the perturbations on the various echoes and revivals, and form a perturbative model to describe the phenomena. We then model the effect of interactions using the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation and study interactions' effect on the revivals. (c) Lastly, we continue to study the effect of interactions on particles in weakly anharmonic traps. We numerically observe a "dynamical localization" phenomena in the presence of both anharmonicity and interactions. States may remain localized or become spread out in the potential depending on the strength and sign of the anharmonicity and interactions. We formulate a model for this phenomena in terms of a classical phase space.

  11. Focus on coherent control of complex quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Birgitta; Milburn, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    The rapid growth of quantum information sciences over the past few decades has fueled a corresponding rise in high profile applications in fields such as metrology, sensors, spintronics, and attosecond dynamics, in addition to quantum information processing. Realizing this potential of today’s quantum science and the novel technologies based on this requires a high degree of coherent control of quantum systems. While early efforts in systematizing methods for high fidelity quantum control focused on isolated or closed quantum systems, recent advances in experimental design, measurement and monitoring, have stimulated both need and interest in the control of complex or large scale quantum systems that may also be coupled to an interactive environment or reservoir. This focus issue brings together new theoretical and experimental work addressing the formulation and implementation of quantum control for a broad range of applications in quantum science and technology today.

  12. Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Harry; Czekaj, Łukasz; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Markiewicz, Marcin; Speelman, Florian; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2016-03-22

    We obtain a general connection between a large quantum advantage in communication complexity and Bell nonlocality. We show that given any protocol offering a sufficiently large quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics that violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs. PMID:26957600

  13. Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Harry; Czekaj, Łukasz; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Markiewicz, Marcin; Speelman, Florian; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2016-03-01

    We obtain a general connection between a large quantum advantage in communication complexity and Bell nonlocality. We show that given any protocol offering a sufficiently large quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics that violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs.

  14. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  15. Reducing computational complexity of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Titas; Das, Tamoghna; Sadhukhan, Debasis; Pal, Amit Kumar; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-12-01

    We address the issue of reducing the resource required to compute information-theoretic quantum correlation measures such as quantum discord and quantum work deficit in two qubits and higher-dimensional systems. We show that determination of the quantum correlation measure is possible even if we utilize a restricted set of local measurements. We find that the determination allows us to obtain a closed form of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for several classes of states, with a low error. We show that the computational error caused by the constraint over the complete set of local measurements reduces fast with an increase in the size of the restricted set, implying usefulness of constrained optimization, especially with the increase of dimensions. We perform quantitative analysis to investigate how the error scales with the system size, taking into account a set of plausible constructions of the constrained set. Carrying out a comparative study, we show that the resource required to optimize quantum work deficit is usually higher than that required for quantum discord. We also demonstrate that minimization of quantum discord and quantum work deficit is easier in the case of two-qubit mixed states of fixed ranks and with positive partial transpose in comparison to the corresponding states having nonpositive partial transpose. Applying the methodology to quantum spin models, we show that the constrained optimization can be used with advantage in analyzing such systems in quantum information-theoretic language. For bound entangled states, we show that the error is significantly low when the measurements correspond to the spin observables along the three Cartesian coordinates, and thereby we obtain expressions of quantum discord and quantum work deficit for these bound entangled states.

  16. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections

    PubMed Central

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once ‘observed’ as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be ‘purified’ into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

  17. Apparatus independence in proofs of non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntzenius, Frank

    1992-12-01

    In standard proofs of non-locality in quantum mechanics assumptions regarding the statistical independence of the states of the measuring apparatuses are made. Recently, proofs by A. Elby [1], and by R. Clifton, M. Redhead, and J. Butterfield [2,3] have been put forward in which it is claimed that such assumptions are not needed. In this paper I argue that Elby's proof and the first proof of Clifton, Redhead, and Butterfield are fallacious, and that their second proof, though valid, does make assumptions regarding the statistical independence of apparatus states. I further argue that any valid proof must make assumptions regarding the probabilities of apparatus states.

  18. Consistent theory for causal non-locality beyond the Born's rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Wonmin

    2014-02-01

    According to the theory of relativity and causality, a special type of correlation beyond quantum mechanics is possible in principle under the name of a non-local box. The concept has been introduced from the principle of non-locality, which satisfies relativistic causality. In this paper, we show that a correlation leading to the non-local box can be derived consistently if we release one of major axioms in quantum mechanics, Born's rule. This allows us to obtain a theory that in one end of the spectrum agrees with the classical probability and in the other end agrees with the theory of non-local causality. At the same time, we argue that the correlation lies in a space with special mathematical constraints such that a physical realization of the correlation through a probability measure is not possible in one direction of its limit, but is possible in the other limit.

  19. Minimized state complexity of quantum-encoded cryptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-05-01

    The predictive information required for proper trajectory sampling of a stochastic process can be more efficiently transmitted via a quantum channel than a classical one. This recent discovery allows quantum information processing to drastically reduce the memory necessary to simulate complex classical stochastic processes. It also points to a new perspective on the intrinsic complexity that nature must employ in generating the processes we observe. The quantum advantage increases with codeword length: the length of process sequences used in constructing the quantum communication scheme. In analogy with the classical complexity measure, statistical complexity, we use this reduced communication cost as an entropic measure of state complexity in the quantum representation. Previously difficult to compute, the quantum advantage is expressed here in closed form using spectral decomposition. This allows for efficient numerical computation of the quantum-reduced state complexity at all encoding lengths, including infinite. Additionally, it makes clear how finite-codeword reduction in state complexity is controlled by the classical process's cryptic order, and it allows asymptotic analysis of infinite-cryptic-order processes.

  20. Quantum dot-tetrapyrrole complexes as photodynamic therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Irina; Visheratina, Anastasia; Kuznetsova, Vera; Orlova, Anna; Maslov, Vladimir; Fedorov, Anatoly; Baranov, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Photophysical properties of complexes of semiconductor quantum dots with conventional photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (tetrapyrroles) were investigated. A luminescent study of complexes in aqueous solutions was performed using spectral- and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. It was found that increasing the photosensitizer relative concentration in complexes resulted in sharp drop of the nonradiative energy transfer efficiency and the quantum yield of the photosensitizer photoluminescence. This fact indicates that additional channels of nonradiative energy dissipation may take place in the complexes. Using complexes of Al(OH)-sulphophthalocyanine with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in the aqueous solution as an typical example, we have demonstrated that new channels of the energy dissipation may arise due to aggregation of the photosensitizer molecules upon formation of the complexes with quantum dots. We also demonstrated that use of methods of complex formation preventing aggregation of photosensitizers allows to conserve the high energy transfer efficiency and quantum yield of the acceptor photoluminescence in complexes in wide range of the photosensitizer concentrations. We believe that our study allows obtaining new information about the physical mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in quantum dots-tetrapyrrole complexes perspective for photodynamic therapy.

  1. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  2. Measuring non-local Lagrangian peak bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Chan, Kwan Chuen; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2014-06-01

    We investigate non-local Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We begin by writing down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the non-local ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we develop a one-point cross-correlation technique to measure bias factors associated with χ2-distributed quantities. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before we apply it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order non-local contributions -2χ _{10}(k_1\\cdot k_2) and χ _{01}[3(k_1\\cdot k_2)^2-k_1^2 k_2^2], where k_1, k_2 are wave modes. We can reproduce our measurement of χ10 if we allow for an offset between the Lagrangian halo centre-of-mass and the peak position. The sign and magnitude of χ10 is consistent with Lagrangian haloes sitting near linear density maxima. The resulting contribution to the halo bias can safely be ignored for M = 1013 M⊙ h-1, but could become relevant at larger halo masses. For the second non-local bias χ01 however, we measure a much larger magnitude than predicted by our model. We speculate that some of this discrepancy might originate from non-local Lagrangian contributions induced by non-spherical collapse.

  3. Non-local MRI denoising using random sampling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinrong; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a random sampling non-local mean (SNLM) algorithm to eliminate noise in 3D MRI datasets. Non-local means (NLM) algorithms have been implemented efficiently for MRI denoising, but are always limited by high computational complexity. Compared to conventional methods, which raster through the entire search window when computing similarity weights, the proposed SNLM algorithm randomly selects a small subset of voxels which dramatically decreases the computational burden, together with competitive denoising result. Moreover, structure tensor which encapsulates high-order information was introduced as an optimal sampling pattern for further improvement. Numerical experiments demonstrated that the proposed SNLM method can get a good balance between denoising quality and computation efficiency. At a relative sampling ratio (i.e. ξ=0.05), SNLM can remove noise as effectively as full NLM, meanwhile the running time can be reduced to 1/20 of NLM's. PMID:27114338

  4. Complex Rotation Quantum Dynamic Neural Networks (CRQDNN) using Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN): Applications to time series prediction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yiqian; Shi, Junyou; Wang, Zili

    2015-11-01

    Quantum Neural Networks (QNN) models have attracted great attention since it innovates a new neural computing manner based on quantum entanglement. However, the existing QNN models are mainly based on the real quantum operations, and the potential of quantum entanglement is not fully exploited. In this paper, we proposes a novel quantum neuron model called Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN) that realizes a deep quantum entanglement. Also, a novel hybrid networks model Complex Rotation Quantum Dynamic Neural Networks (CRQDNN) is proposed based on Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN). CRQDNN is a three layer model with both CQN and classical neurons. An infinite impulse response (IIR) filter is embedded in the Networks model to enable the memory function to process time series inputs. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is used for fast parameter learning. The networks model is developed to conduct time series predictions. Two application studies are done in this paper, including the chaotic time series prediction and electronic remaining useful life (RUL) prediction. PMID:26277609

  5. Switching non-local vector median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method that removes random-valued impulse noise superimposed on a natural color image. In impulse noise removal, it is essential to employ a switching-type filtering method, as used in the well-known switching median filter, to preserve the detail of an original image with good quality. In color image filtering, it is generally preferable to deal with the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) components of each pixel of a color image as elements of a vectorized signal, as in the well-known vector median filter, rather than as component-wise signals to prevent a color shift after filtering. By taking these fundamentals into consideration, we propose a switching-type vector median filter with non-local processing that mainly consists of a noise detector and a noise removal filter. Concretely, we propose a noise detector that proactively detects noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the isolation tendencies of pixels of interest not in an input image but in difference images between RGB components. Furthermore, as the noise removal filter, we propose an extended version of the non-local median filter, we proposed previously for grayscale image processing, named the non-local vector median filter, which is designed for color image processing. The proposed method realizes a superior balance between the preservation of detail and impulse noise removal by proactive noise detection and non-local switching vector median filtering, respectively. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural color images.

  6. Complex Wavelet Transform of the Two-mode Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Zhou, Jun; Yuan, Hao; He, Rui; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2016-08-01

    By employing the bipartite entangled state representation and the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators, the classical complex wavelet transform of a complex signal function can be recast to a matrix element of the squeezing-displacing operator U 2( μ, σ) between the mother wavelet vector < ψ| and the two-mode quantum state vector | f> to be transformed. < ψ| U 2( μ, σ)| f> can be considered as the spectrum for analyzing the two-mode quantum state | f>. In this way, for some typical two-mode quantum states, such as two-mode coherent state and two-mode Fock state, we derive the complex wavelet transform spectrum and carry out the numerical calculation. This kind of wavelet-transform spectrum can be used to recognize quantum states.

  7. Quantum Game of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Aaron; Carr, Lincoln; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate the emergence of complexity in quantum systems, we present a quantum game of life, inspired by Conway's classic game of life. Through Matrix Product State (MPS) calculations, we simulate the evolution of quantum systems, dictated by a Hamiltonian that defines the rules of our quantum game. We analyze the system through a number of measures which elicit the emergence of complexity in terms of spatial organization, system dynamics, and non-local mutual information within the network. Funded by NSF

  8. Identifying the quantum correlations in light-harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bradler, Kamil; Wilde, Mark M.; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Uskov, Dmitry B.

    2010-12-15

    One of the major efforts in the quantum biological program is to subject biological systems to standard tests or measures of quantumness. These tests and measures should elucidate whether nontrivial quantum effects may be present in biological systems. Two such measures of quantum correlations are the quantum discord and the relative entropy of entanglement. Here, we show that the relative entropy of entanglement admits a simple analytic form when dynamics and accessible degrees of freedom are restricted to a zero- and single-excitation subspace. We also simulate and calculate the amount of quantum discord that is present in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex during the transfer of an excitation from a chlorosome antenna to a reaction center. We find that the single-excitation quantum discord and single-excitation relative entropy of entanglement are equal for all of our numerical simulations, but a proof of their general equality for this setting evades us for now. Also, some of our simulations demonstrate that the relative entropy of entanglement without the single-excitation restriction is much lower than the quantum discord. The first picosecond of dynamics is the relevant time scale for the transfer of the excitation, according to some sources in the literature. Our simulation results indicate that quantum correlations contribute a significant fraction of the total correlation during this first picosecond in many cases, at both cryogenic and physiological temperatures.

  9. Retro-causation, Minimum Contradictions and Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafatos, Menas; Nassikas, Athanassios A.

    2011-11-01

    Retro-causation has been experimentally verified by Bem and proposed by Kafatos in the form of space-time non-locality in the quantum framework. Every theory includes, beyond its specific axioms, the principles of logical communication (logical language), through which it is defined. This communication obeys the Aristotelian logic (Classical Logic), the Leibniz Sufficient Reason Principle, and a hidden axiom, which basically states that there is anterior-posterior relationship everywhere in communication. By means of a theorem discussed here, it can be proved that the communication mentioned implies contradictory statements, which can only be transcended through silence, i.e. the absence of any statements. Moreover, the breaking of silence is meaningful through the claim for minimum contradictions, which implies the existence of both a logical and an illogical dimension; contradictions refer to causality, implying its opposite, namely retro-causation, and the anterior posterior axiom, implying space-time non-locality. The purpose of this paper is to outline a framework accounting for retro-causation, through both purely theoretical and reality based points of view.

  10. Thermal Quantum Correlations in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Kouhestani, H.

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the ancient biological processes, playing crucial role converting solar energy to cellular usable currency. Environmental factors and external perturbations has forced nature to choose systems with the highest efficiency and performance. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have proved the presence of quantum properties in biological systems. Energy transfer systems like Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex shows quantum entanglement between sites of Bacteriophylla molecules in protein environment and presence of decoherence. Complex biological systems implement more truthful mechanisms beside chemical-quantum correlations to assure system's efficiency. In this study we investigate thermal quantum correlations in FMO protein of the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria by quantum discord measure. The results confirmed existence of remarkable quantum correlations of of BChla pigments in room temperature. This results approve involvement of quantum correlation mechanisms for information storage and retention in living organisms that could be useful for further evolutionary studies. Inspired idea of this study is potentially interesting to practice by the same procedure in genetic data transfer mechanisms.

  11. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  12. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing.

    PubMed

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  13. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  14. Switching non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method for removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on grayscale images. Generally, it is well known that switching-type median filters are effective for impulse noise removal. In this paper, we propose a more sophisticated switching-type impulse noise removal method in terms of detail-preserving performance. Specifically, the noise detector of the proposed method finds out noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the difference between the value of a pixel of interest (POI) and the median of its neighboring pixel values, and on the POI's isolation tendency from the surrounding pixels. Furthermore, the removal of the detected noise is performed by the newly proposed median filter based on non-local processing, which has superior detail-preservation capability compared to the conventional median filter. The effectiveness and the validity of the proposed method are verified by some experiments using natural grayscale images.

  15. Limited-path-length entanglement percolation in quantum complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuquet, Martí; Calsamiglia, John

    2011-03-01

    We study entanglement distribution in quantum complex networks where nodes are connected by bipartite entangled states. These networks are characterized by a complex structure, which dramatically affects how information is transmitted through them. For pure quantum state links, quantum networks exhibit a remarkable feature absent in classical networks: it is possible to effectively rewire the network by performing local operations on the nodes. We propose a family of such quantum operations that decrease the entanglement percolation threshold of the network and increase the size of the giant connected component. We provide analytic results for complex networks with an arbitrary (uncorrelated) degree distribution. These results are in good agreement with numerical simulations, which also show enhancement in correlated and real-world networks. The proposed quantum preprocessing strategies are not robust in the presence of noise. However, even when the links consist of (noisy) mixed-state links, one can send quantum information through a connecting path with a fidelity that decreases with the path length. In this noisy scenario, complex networks offer a clear advantage over regular lattices, namely, the fact that two arbitrary nodes can be connected through a relatively small number of steps, known as the small-world effect. We calculate the probability that two arbitrary nodes in the network can successfully communicate with a fidelity above a given threshold. This amounts to working out the classical problem of percolation with a limited path length. We find that this probability can be significant even for paths limited to few connections and that the results for standard (unlimited) percolation are soon recovered if the path length exceeds by a finite amount the average path length, which in complex networks generally scales logarithmically with the size of the network.

  16. Non-locality Sudden Death in Tripartite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Gregg; Ann, Kevin

    2009-03-10

    Bell non-locality sudden death is the disappearance of non-local properties in finite times under local phase noise, which decoheres states only in the infinite-time limit. We consider the relationship between decoherence, disentanglement, and Bell non-locality sudden death in bipartite and tripartite systems in specific large classes of state preparation.

  17. Applications of fidelity measures to complex quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-06-13

    We revisit fidelity as a measure for the stability and the complexity of the quantum motion of single-and many-body systems. Within the context of cold atoms, we present an overview of applications of two fidelities, which we call static and dynamical fidelity, respectively. The static fidelity applies to quantum problems which can be diagonalized since it is defined via the eigenfunctions. In particular, we show that the static fidelity is a highly effective practical detector of avoided crossings characterizing the complexity of the systems and their evolutions. The dynamical fidelity is defined via the time-dependent wave functions. Focusing on the quantum kicked rotor system, we highlight a few practical applications of fidelity measurements in order to better understand the large variety of dynamical regimes of this paradigm of a low-dimensional system with mixed regular-chaotic phase space. PMID:27140967

  18. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  20. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  1. Probing non local order parameters in highly correlated Bose insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    Ground states of integer spin chains are known since the late 80's to sustain highly non local order described by infinite string operators of the spins. Such states defy the usual Landau theory description and can be considered simple prototypes of topological order. Recently we showed that spinless Bose insulators with nearest neighbor or longer range repulsion in one dimension can exhibit similar string order in terms of the boson density [1]. The tunability of cold atomic systems would allow much more flexibility in probing the non local order than spin systems do. For example the bosons can be tuned across a quantum phase transition between the exotic insulator, which we term Haldane insulator, and the usual Mott insulator. Investigating how the transition responds to external perturbations lends direct access to properties of the string order parameter. I will demonstrate this with several new results obtained from a field theoretic description of the phases and confirmed by numerical calculations using DMRG. Particularly revealing of the unusual character of the string order is the prediction that any external perturbation, which breaks the lattice inversion symmetry, would eliminate the distinction between the Haldane and Mott phases and allow a fully gapped adiabatic connection between them. This is remarkable given that neither phase involves spontaneous breaking of lattice inversion symmetry. We also predict that inter-chain tunneling destroys the direct phase transition between the two insulators by establishing an intermediate superfluid phase. Finally I will discuss how the new phases and phase transitions may be realized and probed in actual experiments with ultra cold atoms or polar molecules. [1] E. G. Dalla Torre, E. Berg and E. Altman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 260401 (2006)

  2. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, L F; Schreppler, S; Kohler, J; Spethmann, N; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2016-07-15

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation. PMID:27472106

  3. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  4. Quantum ferroelectricity in charge-transfer complex crystals.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Minami, Nao; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transition achieved by fine tuning the continuous phase transition down to zero kelvin is a challenge for solid state science. Critical phenomena distinct from the effects of thermal fluctuations can materialize when the electronic, structural or magnetic long-range order is perturbed by quantum fluctuations between degenerate ground states. Here we have developed chemically pure tetrahalo-p-benzoquinones of n iodine and 4-n bromine substituents (QBr4-nIn, n=0-4) to search for ferroelectric charge-transfer complexes with tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Among them, TTF-QBr2I2 exhibits a ferroelectric neutral-ionic phase transition, which is continuously controlled over a wide temperature range from near-zero kelvin to room temperature under hydrostatic pressure. Quantum critical behaviour is accompanied by a much larger permittivity than those of other neutral-ionic transition compounds, such as well-known ferroelectric complex of TTF-QCl4 and quantum antiferroelectric of dimethyl-TTF-QBr4. By contrast, TTF-QBr3I complex, another member of this compound family, shows complete suppression of the ferroelectric spin-Peierls-type phase transition. PMID:26076656

  5. Quantum ferroelectricity in charge-transfer complex crystals

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Minami, Nao; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transition achieved by fine tuning the continuous phase transition down to zero kelvin is a challenge for solid state science. Critical phenomena distinct from the effects of thermal fluctuations can materialize when the electronic, structural or magnetic long-range order is perturbed by quantum fluctuations between degenerate ground states. Here we have developed chemically pure tetrahalo-p-benzoquinones of n iodine and 4–n bromine substituents (QBr4–nIn, n=0–4) to search for ferroelectric charge-transfer complexes with tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Among them, TTF–QBr2I2 exhibits a ferroelectric neutral–ionic phase transition, which is continuously controlled over a wide temperature range from near-zero kelvin to room temperature under hydrostatic pressure. Quantum critical behaviour is accompanied by a much larger permittivity than those of other neutral–ionic transition compounds, such as well-known ferroelectric complex of TTF–QCl4 and quantum antiferroelectric of dimethyl–TTF–QBr4. By contrast, TTF–QBr3I complex, another member of this compound family, shows complete suppression of the ferroelectric spin-Peierls-type phase transition. PMID:26076656

  6. Quantum trajectories in complex phase space: multidimensional barrier transmission.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Robert E; Rowland, Brad A

    2007-07-28

    The quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the action function is approximately solved by propagating individual Lagrangian quantum trajectories in complex-valued phase space. Equations of motion for these trajectories are derived through use of the derivative propagation method (DPM), which leads to a hierarchy of coupled differential equations for the action function and its spatial derivatives along each trajectory. In this study, complex-valued classical trajectories (second order DPM), along which is transported quantum phase information, are used to study low energy barrier transmission for a model two-dimensional system involving either an Eckart or Gaussian barrier along the reaction coordinate coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The arrival time for trajectories to reach the transmitted (product) region is studied. Trajectories launched from an "equal arrival time surface," defined as an isochrone, all reach the real-valued subspace in the transmitted region at the same time. The Rutherford-type diffraction of trajectories around poles in the complex extended Eckart potential energy surface is described. For thin barriers, these poles are close to the real axis and present problems for computing the transmitted density. In contrast, for the Gaussian barrier or the thick Eckart barrier where the poles are further from the real axis, smooth transmitted densities are obtained. Results obtained using higher-order quantum trajectories (third order DPM) are described for both thick and thin barriers, and some issues that arise for thin barriers are examined. PMID:17672677

  7. On the complexity of search for keys in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The trace distance is used as a security criterion in proofs of security of keys in quantum cryptography. Some authors doubted that this criterion can be reduced to criteria used in classical cryptography. The following question has been answered in this work. Let a quantum cryptography system provide an ɛ-secure key such that ½‖ρ XE - ρ U ⊗ ρ E ‖1 < ɛ, which will be repeatedly used in classical encryption algorithms. To what extent does the ɛ-secure key reduce the number of search steps (guesswork) as compared to the use of ideal keys? A direct relation has been demonstrated between the complexity of the complete consideration of keys, which is one of the main security criteria in classical systems, and the trace distance used in quantum cryptography. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of search steps for the determination of the actual key have been presented.

  8. Quantum Non-Locality and the Mathematical Representation of Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fano, Vincenzo

    2006-06-01

    Four possible solutions of the Kantian problem "how the mathematisation of experience is possible?" are presented: Platonism, critical materialism, operationism and empiricism. Then the experimental violation of Bell's inequality is discussed. To avoid the proof of Bell's inequality, it is possible to deny different conditions, but experiments support only the refutation of factorizability as a whole. It is argued that this implies a confirmation of the empiricist's point of view.

  9. Quantum Reality, Complex Numbers, and the Meteorological Butterfly Effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, T. N.

    2005-04-01

    Meteorology is a wonderfully interdisciplinary subject. But can nonlinear thinking about predictability of weather and climate contribute usefully to issues in fundamental physics? Although this might seem extremely unlikely at first sight, an attempt is made to answer the question positively. The long-standing conceptual problems of quantum theory are outlined, focusing on indeterminacy and nonlocal causality, problems that led Einstein to reject quantum mechanics as a fundamental theory of physics (a glossary of some of the key terms used in this paper is given in the sidebar). These conceptual problems are considered in the light of both low-order chaos and the more radical (and less well known) paradigm of the finite-time predictability horizon associated with the self-similar upscale cascade of uncertainty in a turbulent fluid. The analysis of these dynamical systems calls into doubt one of the key pieces of logic used in quantum nonlocality theorems: that of counterfactual reasoning. By considering an idealization of the upscale cascade (which provides a novel representation of complex numbers and quaternions), a case is made for reinterpreting the quantum wave function as a set of intricately encoded binary sequences. In this reinterpretation, it is argued that the quantum world has no need for dice-playing deities, undead cats, multiple universes, or “spooky action at a distance.”


  10. Embracing Chaos and Complexity: A Quantum Change for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Resnicow, Kenneth; Page, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Public health research and practice have been guided by a cognitive, rational paradigm where inputs produce linear, predictable changes in outputs. However, the conceptual and statistical assumptions underlying this paradigm may be flawed. In particular, this perspective does not adequately account for nonlinear and quantum influences on human behavior. We propose that health behavior change is better understood through the lens of chaos theory and complex adaptive systems. Key relevant principles include that behavior change (1) is often a quantum event; (2) can resemble a chaotic process that is sensitive to initial conditions, highly variable, and difficult to predict; and (3) occurs within a complex adaptive system with multiple components, where results are often greater than the sum of their parts. PMID:18556599

  11. ACCELERATED MRI USING ITERATIVE NON-LOCAL SHRINKAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Yasir Q.; Ongie, Gregory; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast iterative non-local shrinkage algorithm to recover MRI data from undersampled Fourier measurements. This approach is enabled by the reformulation of current non-local schemes as an alternating algorithm to minimize a global criterion. The proposed algorithm alternates between a non-local shrinkage step and a quadratic subproblem. The resulting algorithm is observed to be considerably faster than current alternating non-local algorithms. We use efficient continuation strategies to minimize local minima issues. The comparisons of the proposed scheme with state-of-the-art regularization schemes show a considerable reduction in alias artifacts and preservation of edges. PMID:25570265

  12. What can quantum optics say about computational complexity theory?

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Lund, Austin P; Ralph, Timothy C

    2015-02-13

    Considering the problem of sampling from the output photon-counting probability distribution of a linear-optical network for input Gaussian states, we obtain results that are of interest from both quantum theory and the computational complexity theory point of view. We derive a general formula for calculating the output probabilities, and by considering input thermal states, we show that the output probabilities are proportional to permanents of positive-semidefinite Hermitian matrices. It is believed that approximating permanents of complex matrices in general is a #P-hard problem. However, we show that these permanents can be approximated with an algorithm in the BPP^{NP} complexity class, as there exists an efficient classical algorithm for sampling from the output probability distribution. We further consider input squeezed-vacuum states and discuss the complexity of sampling from the probability distribution at the output. PMID:25723196

  13. Black supernovae and black holes in non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Malafarina, Daniele; Modesto, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    In a previous paper, we studied the interior solution of a collapsing body in a non-local theory of gravity super-renormalizable at the quantum level. We found that the classical singularity is replaced by a bounce, after which the body starts expanding. A black hole, strictly speaking, never forms. The gravitational collapse does not create an event horizon but only an apparent one for a finite time. In this paper, we solve the equations of motion assuming that the exterior solution is static. With such an assumption, we are able to reconstruct the solution in the whole spacetime, namely in both the exterior and interior regions. Now the gravitational collapse creates an event horizon in a finite comoving time, but the central singularity is approached in an infinite time. We argue that these black holes should be unstable, providing a link between the scenarios with and without black holes. Indeed, we find a non catastrophic ghost-instability of the metric in the exterior region. Interestingly, under certain conditions, the lifetime of our black holes exactly scales as the Hawking evaporation time.

  14. Rooted-tree network for optimal non-local gate implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Nilesh; Saha, Debashis; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    A general quantum network for implementing non-local control-unitary gates, between remote parties at minimal entanglement cost, is shown to be a rooted-tree structure. Starting from a five-party scenario, we demonstrate the local implementation of simultaneous class of control-unitary(Hermitian) and multiparty control-unitary gates in an arbitrary n-party network. Previously, established networks are turned out to be special cases of this general construct.

  15. Computational complexity of nonequilibrium steady states of quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzolino, Ugo; Prosen, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We study nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) of spin chains with boundary Markovian dissipation from the computational complexity point of view. We focus on X X chains whose NESS are matrix product operators, i.e., with coefficients of a tensor operator basis described by transition amplitudes in an auxiliary space. Encoding quantum algorithms in the auxiliary space, we show that estimating expectations of operators, being local in the sense that each acts on disjoint sets of few spins covering all the system, provides the answers of problems at least as hard as, and believed by many computer scientists to be much harder than, those solved by quantum computers. We draw conclusions on the hardness of the above estimations.

  16. Non-Markovian Complexity in the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Heng-Na; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min; Feng, Da Hsuan; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The quantum-to-classical transition is due to environment-induced decoherence, and it depicts how classical dynamics emerges from quantum systems. Previously, the quantum-to-classical transition has mainly been described with memory-less (Markovian) quantum processes. Here we study the complexity of the quantum-to-classical transition through general non-Markovian memory processes. That is, the influence of various reservoirs results in a given initial quantum state evolving into one of the following four scenarios: thermal state, thermal-like state, quantum steady state, or oscillating quantum nonstationary state. In the latter two scenarios, the system maintains partial or full quantum coherence due to the strong non-Markovian memory effect, so that in these cases, the quantum-to-classical transition never occurs. This unexpected new feature provides a new avenue for the development of future quantum technologies because the remaining quantum oscillations in steady states are decoherence-free. PMID:26303002

  17. Non-Markovian Complexity in the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Heng-Na; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min; Feng, Da Hsuan; Nori, Franco

    2015-08-01

    The quantum-to-classical transition is due to environment-induced decoherence, and it depicts how classical dynamics emerges from quantum systems. Previously, the quantum-to-classical transition has mainly been described with memory-less (Markovian) quantum processes. Here we study the complexity of the quantum-to-classical transition through general non-Markovian memory processes. That is, the influence of various reservoirs results in a given initial quantum state evolving into one of the following four scenarios: thermal state, thermal-like state, quantum steady state, or oscillating quantum nonstationary state. In the latter two scenarios, the system maintains partial or full quantum coherence due to the strong non-Markovian memory effect, so that in these cases, the quantum-to-classical transition never occurs. This unexpected new feature provides a new avenue for the development of future quantum technologies because the remaining quantum oscillations in steady states are decoherence-free.

  18. Upper bounds on quantum uncertainty products and complexity measures

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Angel; Sanchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesus S.

    2011-10-15

    The position-momentum Shannon and Renyi uncertainty products of general quantum systems are shown to be bounded not only from below (through the known uncertainty relations), but also from above in terms of the Heisenberg-Kennard product . Moreover, the Cramer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and Lopez-Ruiz, Mancini, and Calbet shape measures of complexity (whose lower bounds have been recently found) are also bounded from above. The improvement of these bounds for systems subject to spherically symmetric potentials is also explicitly given. Finally, applications to hydrogenic and oscillator-like systems are done.

  19. Upper bounds on quantum uncertainty products and complexity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Ángel; Sánchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesús S.

    2011-10-01

    The position-momentum Shannon and Rényi uncertainty products of general quantum systems are shown to be bounded not only from below (through the known uncertainty relations), but also from above in terms of the Heisenberg-Kennard product . Moreover, the Cramér-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and López-Ruiz, Mancini, and Calbet shape measures of complexity (whose lower bounds have been recently found) are also bounded from above. The improvement of these bounds for systems subject to spherically symmetric potentials is also explicitly given. Finally, applications to hydrogenic and oscillator-like systems are done.

  20. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric {phi}-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K{sub S} {yields} K{sub L} regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric {phi}-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  1. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric [phi]-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K[sub S] [yields] K[sub L] regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric [phi]-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  2. Effect of the interface resistance in non-local Hanle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Villamor, Estitxu; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix

    2015-06-14

    We use lateral spin valves with varying interface resistance to measure non-local Hanle effect in order to extract the spin-diffusion length of the non-magnetic channel. A general expression that describes spin injection and transport, taking into account the influence of the interface resistance, is used to fit our results. Whereas the fitted spin-diffusion length value is in agreement with the one obtained from standard non-local measurements in the case of a finite interface resistance, in the case of transparent contacts a clear disagreement is observed. The use of a corrected expression, recently proposed to account for the anisotropy of the spin absorption at the ferromagnetic electrodes, still yields a deviation of the fitted spin-diffusion length which increases for shorter channel distances. This deviation shows how sensitive the non-local Hanle fittings are, evidencing the complexity of obtaining spin transport information from such type of measurements.

  3. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  4. Electron Transfer Reactions in Colloidal Quantum Dot-Ligand Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris-Cohen, Adam Joshua

    This thesis describes a quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of colloidal II-VI quantum dot (QD)-ligand complexes and transient absorption experiments analyzing the rates of electron transfer reactions in these complexes functionalized with redox active ligands. Chemical analysis reveals that phosphonate impurities in the surfactants used to synthesize CdSe QDs are the dominant ligands on the surface of the QDs, and these phosphonate impurities cause size-dependent Cd-enrichment of the QD surface. A study of the adsorption equilibrium of solution-phase CdS quantum dots and acid-derivatized viologen ligands (V2+) reveals that the structure of the surfaces of the QDs depends on the concentration of the QDs. A new model based on the Langmuir isotherm that treats both the number of adsorbed ligands per QD and the number of available binding sites per QD as binomially-distributed quantities is described. Transient absorption spectroscopy of solution-phase mixtures of colloidal CdS QDs and V2+ indicates electron transfer occurs from the conduction band of the QD to the LUMO of V2+. The rate constant for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is independent of the number of methylene groups in the alkyl chain on the acid-derivatized viologen. The insensitivity of the electron transfer rate constant to the length of the functional groups on the viologen suggests a van der Waals (vdW) pathway for PET, where the electron bypasses the alkylcarboxylate and tunnels through the orbitals of the QD and of the bipyridinium core. The rate of PET from colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to oxo-centered triruthenium clusters (Ru 3O) depends on the structure of the chemical headgroup by which the Ru3O clusters adsorb to the QDs. Complexes comprising QDs and Ru 3O clusters adsorbed through a pyridine-4-carboxylic acid ligand have a PET rate constant of (4.9 ± 0.9)×109 s -1 whereas complexes comprising QDs and Ru3O clusters adsorbed through a 4-mercaptopyridine ligand have an

  5. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  6. Non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Sebastiani, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity. We implement mimetic gravity in the framework of non-local F(R)-theories of gravity. Given some specific class of models and using a potential on the mimetic field, we investigate some scenarios related to the early-time universe, namely the inflation and the cosmological bounce, which bring to Einstein's gravity with cold dark matter at the late-time.

  7. Universality at Breakdown of Quantum Transport on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Kulvelis, Nikolaj; Dolgushev, Maxim; Mülken, Oliver

    2015-09-18

    We consider single-particle quantum transport on parametrized complex networks. Based on general arguments regarding the spectrum of the corresponding Hamiltonian, we derive bounds for a measure of the global transport efficiency defined by the time-averaged return probability. For treelike networks, we show analytically that a transition from efficient to inefficient transport occurs depending on the (average) functionality of the nodes of the network. In the infinite system size limit, this transition can be characterized by an exponent which is universal for all treelike networks. Our findings are corroborated by analytic results for specific deterministic networks, dendrimers and Vicsek fractals, and by Monte Carlo simulations of iteratively built scale-free trees. PMID:26430977

  8. Universality at Breakdown of Quantum Transport on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulvelis, Nikolaj; Dolgushev, Maxim; Mülken, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    We consider single-particle quantum transport on parametrized complex networks. Based on general arguments regarding the spectrum of the corresponding Hamiltonian, we derive bounds for a measure of the global transport efficiency defined by the time-averaged return probability. For treelike networks, we show analytically that a transition from efficient to inefficient transport occurs depending on the (average) functionality of the nodes of the network. In the infinite system size limit, this transition can be characterized by an exponent which is universal for all treelike networks. Our findings are corroborated by analytic results for specific deterministic networks, dendrimers and Vicsek fractals, and by Monte Carlo simulations of iteratively built scale-free trees.

  9. Complex Quantum Network Manifolds in Dimension d > 2 are Scale-Free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    In quantum gravity, several approaches have been proposed until now for the quantum description of discrete geometries. These theoretical frameworks include loop quantum gravity, causal dynamical triangulations, causal sets, quantum graphity, and energetic spin networks. Most of these approaches describe discrete spaces as homogeneous network manifolds. Here we define Complex Quantum Network Manifolds (CQNM) describing the evolution of quantum network states, and constructed from growing simplicial complexes of dimension . We show that in d = 2 CQNM are homogeneous networks while for d > 2 they are scale-free i.e. they are characterized by large inhomogeneities of degrees like most complex networks. From the self-organized evolution of CQNM quantum statistics emerge spontaneously. Here we define the generalized degrees associated with the -faces of the -dimensional CQNMs, and we show that the statistics of these generalized degrees can either follow Fermi-Dirac, Boltzmann or Bose-Einstein distributions depending on the dimension of the -faces.

  10. The Complexity of Relating Quantum Channels to Master Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Eisert, Jens; Wolf, Michael M.

    2012-03-01

    Completely positive, trace preserving (CPT) maps and Lindblad master equations are both widely used to describe the dynamics of open quantum systems. The connection between these two descriptions is a classic topic in mathematical physics. One direction was solved by the now famous result due to Lindblad, Kossakowski, Gorini and Sudarshan, who gave a complete characterisation of the master equations that generate completely positive semi-groups. However, the other direction has remained open: given a CPT map, is there a Lindblad master equation that generates it (and if so, can we find its form)? This is sometimes known as the Markovianity problem. Physically, it is asking how one can deduce underlying physical processes from experimental observations. We give a complexity theoretic answer to this problem: it is NP-hard. We also give an explicit algorithm that reduces the problem to integer semi-definite programming, a well-known NP problem. Together, these results imply that resolving the question of which CPT maps can be generated by master equations is tantamount to solving P = NP: any efficiently computable criterion for Markovianity would imply P = NP; whereas a proof that P = NP would imply that our algorithm already gives an efficiently computable criterion. Thus, unless P does equal NP, there cannot exist any simple criterion for determining when a CPT map has a master equation description. However, we also show that if the system dimension is fixed (relevant for current quantum process tomography experiments), then our algorithm scales efficiently in the required precision, allowing an underlying Lindblad master equation to be determined efficiently from even a single snapshot in this case. Our work also leads to similar complexity-theoretic answers to a related long-standing open problem in probability theory.

  11. Quantum Dynamical Behaviour in Complex Systems - A Semiclassical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ananth, Nandini

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in Chemical Dynamics is describing the behavior of complex systems accurately. Classical MD simulations have evolved to a point where calculations involving thousands of atoms are routinely carried out. Capturing coherence, tunneling and other such quantum effects for these systems, however, has proven considerably harder. Semiclassical methods such as the Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) provide a practical way to include quantum effects while still utilizing only classical trajectory information. For smaller systems, this method has been proven to be most effective, encouraging the hope that it can be extended to deal with a large number of degrees of freedom. Several variations upon the original idea of the SCIVR have been developed to help make these larger calculations more tractable; these range from the simplest, classical limit form, the Linearized IVR (LSC-IVR) to the quantum limit form, the Exact Forward-Backward version (EFB-IVR). In this thesis a method to tune between these limits is described which allows us to choose exactly which degrees of freedom we wish to treat in a more quantum mechanical fashion and to what extent. This formulation is called the Tuning IVR (TIVR). We further describe methodology being developed to evaluate the prefactor term that appears in the IVR formalism. The regular prefactor is composed of the Monodromy matrices (jacobians of the transformation from initial to finial coordinates and momenta) which are time evolved using the Hessian. Standard MD simulations require the potential surfaces and their gradients, but very rarely is there any information on the second derivative. We would like to be able to carry out the SC-IVR calculation without this information too. With this in mind a finite difference scheme to obtain the Hessian on-the-fly is proposed. Wealso apply the IVR formalism to a few problems of current interest. A method to obtain energy eigenvalues accurately for complex

  12. Quantum trajectories in complex space: one-dimensional stationary scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-04-21

    One-dimensional time-independent scattering problems are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The equation for the local approximate quantum trajectories near the stagnation point of the quantum momentum function is derived, and the first derivative of the quantum momentum function is related to the local structure of quantum trajectories. Exact complex quantum trajectories are determined for two examples by numerically integrating the equations of motion. For the soft potential step, some particles penetrate into the nonclassical region, and then turn back to the reflection region. For the barrier scattering problem, quantum trajectories may spiral into the attractors or from the repellers in the barrier region. Although the classical potentials extended to complex space show different pole structures for each problem, the quantum potentials present the same second-order pole structure in the reflection region. This paper not only analyzes complex quantum trajectories and the total potentials for these examples but also demonstrates general properties and similar structures of the complex quantum trajectories and the quantum potentials for one-dimensional time-independent scattering problems. PMID:18433189

  13. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  14. Jammed Clusters and Non-locality in Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharel, Prashidha; Rognon, Pierre

    We investigate the micro-mechanisms underpinning dense granular flow behaviour from a series of DEM simulations of pure shear flows of dry grains. We observe the development of transient clusters of jammed particles within the flow. Typical size of such clusters is found to scale with the inertial number with a power law that is similar to the scaling of shear-rate profile relaxation lengths observed previously. Based on the simple argument that transient clusters of size l exist in the dense flow regime, the formulation of steady state condition for non-homogeneous shear flow results in a general non-local relation, which is similar in form to the non-local relation conjectured for soft glassy flows. These findings suggest the formation of jammed clusters to be the key micro-mechanism underpinning non-local behaviour in dense granular flows. Particles and Grains Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

  15. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  16. A theory of non-local linear drift wave transport

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Anderson, J.; Weyssow, B.

    2011-06-15

    Transport events in turbulent tokamak plasmas often exhibit non-local or non-diffusive action at a distance features that so far have eluded a conclusive theoretical description. In this paper a theory of non-local transport is investigated through a Fokker-Planck equation with fractional velocity derivatives. A dispersion relation for density gradient driven linear drift modes is derived including the effects of the fractional velocity derivative in the Fokker-Planck equation. It is found that a small deviation (a few percent) from the Maxwellian distribution function alters the dispersion relation such that the growth rates are substantially increased and thereby may cause enhanced levels of transport.

  17. Dynamics of Crowd Behaviors: From Complex Plane to Quantum Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    The following sections are included: * Complex Plane Dynamics of Crowds and Groups * Introduction * Complex-Valued Dynamics of Crowd and Group Behaviors * Kähler Geometry of Crowd and Group Dynamics * Computer Simulations of Crowds and Croups Dynamics * Braids of Agents' Behaviors in the Complex Plane * Hilbert-Space Control of Crowds and Groups Dynamics * Quantum Random Fields: A Unique Framework for Simulation, Optimization, Control and Learning * Introduction * Adaptive Quantum Oscillator * Optimization and Learning on Banach and Hilbert Spaces * Appendix * Complex-Valued Image Processing * Linear Integral Equations * Riemann-Liouville Fractional Calculus * Rigorous Geometric Quantization * Supervised Machine-Learning Methods * First-Order Logic and Quantum Random Fields

  18. Quantum walks on complex networks with connection instabilities and community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomokos, Dimitris I.

    2011-05-15

    A continuous-time quantum walk is investigated on complex networks with the characteristic property of community structure, which is shared by most real-world networks. Motivated by the prospect of viable quantum networks, I focus on the effects of network instabilities in the form of broken links, and examine the response of the quantum walk to such failures. It is shown that the reconfiguration of the quantum walk is determined by the community structure of the network. In this context, quantum walks based on the adjacency and Laplacian matrices of the network are compared, and their responses to link failures is analyzed.

  19. Non-local rheology for dense granular flows in avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzet, Adrien; Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno

    A local constitutive relation was proposed to describe dense granular flows (GDR MiDi, EPJE 2004). It provides a rather good prediction of the flowing regime but does not foresee the existence of a ``creep regime'' as observed by Komatsu et al. (PRL 2001). In the context of a 2D shear cell, a relaxation length for the velocity profile was measured (Bouzid et al., PRL 2013) which confirmed the existence of a flow below the standard Coulomb yield threshold. A correction for the local rheology was proposed. To test further this non-local constitutive relation, we built an inclined narrow channel within which we monitor the flow from the side. We managed to observe the ``creep regime'' over five orders of magnitude in velocity and fit the velocity profiles in the depth with an asymptotic solution of the non-local equation. However, the boundary condition at the free surface needs to be selected in order to calibrate the non-local rheology over the whole range of stresses in the system. In this perspective, we complement the experimental results with 2D simulations of hard and frictional discs on an inclined plane in which we introduce a surface friction force proportional to the effective pressure in the granular. We analyze these results in the light of the non-local rheology.

  20. Two flavor superconductivity in non-local models

    SciTech Connect

    Duhau, R.; Grunfeld, A.G.; Scoccola, N.N.

    2004-12-02

    In the present work we study a relativistic quark model at finite temperature and density with non-local quark-antiquark and quark-quark interactions with SU(2) flavour and SU(3) color symmetries. After proper bosonization, we analyze the structure of the corresponding phase diagram and discuss the competition between the chiral and 2SC phases.

  1. Simulation of low-pressure inductively coupled plasmas: Non-local effects and pulsed power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthi, Badri

    For modeling of low-pressure Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) discharges, a number of approaches have been proposed with varying degree of complexity. A self-consistent 1-D model was developed in this work to study the effects of non-local electron conductivity on power absorption and plasma density profiles in a planar inductively coupled argon discharge at low pressures (< 10 mTorr). The self-consistent kinetic description of the discharge included three modules: (1) an EEDF module to compute a non-Maxwellian EEDF, (2) a non-local electron conductivity module which predicted current distribution in the plasma as an integral over the electric field and solved Maxwell's equations to find the self-consistent electric field as well as the non-local power deposition profile and (3) a Heavy Species Transport (HST) module which solved for the ion and metastable atom density and velocity. Results from the full model were then compared with those obtained by using a local conductivity model (Ohm's law) for the RF current. For 10 mTorr, the EEDF was found to be almost Maxwellian with electron temperature ˜ 3 V. As a result, the plasma density profiles obtained from the local and non-local cases were almost identical for the same total power. Interestingly, a similar result was obtained even for a pressure of 1 mTorr where the EEDF was non-Maxwellian. This suggests that as far as species density and flux are concerned, local conductivity models, with lesser computational expense, can be employed even in the non-local regime. Comparisons between simulation and experiment for RF field and current density showed better agreement for non-local model compared with local model. A two-dimensional (r,z) continuum model was then developed to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of a pulsed power (square-wave modulated) discharge in argon (electropositive) and chlorine (electronegative) sustained in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with a planar coil. The self

  2. Quantum Transport on Disordered and Noisy Networks: An Interplay of Structural Complexity and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Schlawin, Frank; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We discuss recent research on quantum transport in complex materials, from photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes to photonic circuits. We identify finite, disordered networks as the underlying backbone and as a versatile framework to gain insight into the specific potential of nontrivial quantum dynamical effects to characterize and control transport on complex structures. We discriminate authentic quantum properties from classical aspects of complexity and briefly address the impact of interactions, nonlinearities, and noise. We stress the relevance of what we call the nonasymptotic realm, physical situations in which neither the relevant time- and length-scales, the number of degrees of freedom, or constituents tend to very small or very large values, nor do global symmetries or disorder fully govern the dynamics. Although largely uncharted territory, we argue that novel, intriguing and nontrivial questions for experimental and theoretical work emerge, with the prospect of a unified understanding of complex quantum transport phenomena in diverse physical settings.

  3. Non-Locality Versus Locality:. the Epistemological Background of the Einstein Bohr Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzeszkowski, Horst-Heino V.; Wahsner, Renate

    2000-08-01

    In its core, the non-locality-locality debate is a discussion about the concept of the physical reality. The difference between the measurement bases of classical and quantum mechanics is often interpreted as a loss of reality arising in quantum mechanics. In this paper it is shown that this apparent loss occurs only if one believes that everyday experience determines the Euclidean space, instead of considering this space, both in classical and quantum mechanics, as a theoretical construction needed for measurement and representing one part of a dualistic space conception. From this point of view, Einstein's program of a unified field theory can be interpreted as the attempt to find a physical theory that is less dualistic. However, if one regards this dualism as resulting from the requirements of measurements, one can hope for a weakening of the dualism but not expect to remove it completely. Further, it follows from the requirements of measurements that the Heisenberg cut cannot be arbitrarily far moved towards the observer. Epistemological discussions on quantum mechanics yield two insights: (i) To acquire physical knowledge, means of cognition are always necessary, and measurement provides this means. (ii) The space of measurement and the space of the representation of physical dynamics must be distinguished conceptually; both coincide factually in classical physics, but not so in quantum mechanics.

  4. Cosmological perturbations in non-local higher-derivative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Craps, Ben; Jonckheere, Tim De; Koshelev, Alexey S. E-mail: Tim.De.Jonckheere@vub.ac.be

    2014-11-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in a non-local higher-derivative model of gravity introduced by Biswas, Mazumdar and Siegel. We extend previous work, which had focused on classical scalar perturbations around a cosine hyperbolic bounce solution, in three ways. First, we point out the existence of a Starobinsky solution in this model, which is more attractive from a phenomenological point of view (even though it has no bounce). Second, we study classical vector and tensor pertuxsxrbations. Third, we show how to quantize scalar and tensor perturbations in a de Sitter phase (for choices of parameters such that the model is ghost-free). Our results show that the model is well-behaved at this level, and are very similar to corresponding results in local f(R) models. In particular, for the Starobinsky solution of non-local higher-derivative gravity, we find the same tensor-to-scalar ratio as for the conventional Starobinsky model.

  5. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Boris V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the ‘acoustic CF’ could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  6. Contourlet based seismic reflection data non-local noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Gao, Jinghuai

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a non-local, transform domain noise suppression framework to improve the quality of seismic reflection data. The original non-local means (NLM) algorithm measures similarities in the data domain and we generalize it in the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) domain. NSCT gives a multiscale, multiresolution and anisotropy representation of the noisy input. The redundancy information in NSCT subbands can be utilized to enhance the structures in the original seismic data. Like the wavelet transform, NSCT coefficients in each subband follow the generalized Gaussian distribution and the parameters can be estimated using appropriate techniques. These parameters are used to construct our proposed NSCT domain filtering algorithm. Applications for synthetic and real seismic data of the proposed algorithm demonstrate its effectiveness on seismic data random noise suppression.

  7. Deinterlacing algorithm with an advanced non-local means filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Jeon, Gwanggil; Jeong, Jechang

    2012-04-01

    The authors introduce an efficient intra-field deinterlacing algorithm using an advanced non-local means filter. The non-local means (NLM) method has received considerable attention due to its high performance and simplicity. The NLM method adaptively obtains the missing pixel by the weighted average of the gray values of all pixels within the image, and then automatically eliminates unrelated neighborhoods from the weighted average. However, spatial location distance is another important issue for the deinterlacing method. Therefore we introduce an advanced NLM (ANLM) filter while consider neighborhood similarity and patch distance. Moreover, the search region of the conventional NLM is the whole image, while, the ANLM can just utilize the limited search region and achieve good performance and high efficiency. When compared with existing deinterlacing algorithms, the proposed algorithm improves the peak signal-to-noise-ratio while maintaining high efficiency.

  8. Ultracold Molecules in Crystals of Light: A Highly Tunable System for Exploring Novel Materials, Quantum Dynamics, and Quantum Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln; Maeda, Kenji; Wall, Michael L.

    2015-03-01

    Ultracold molecules trapped in optical lattices present a new regime of physical chemistry and a new state of matter: complex dipolar matter. Such systems open up the prospect of tunable quantum complexity. We present models for the quantum many-body statics and dynamics of present experiments on polar bi-alkali dimer molecules. We are developing Hamiltonians and simulations for upcoming experiments on dimers beyond the alkali metals, including biologically and chemically important naturally occurring free radicals like the hydroxyl free radical (OH), as well as symmetric top polyatomic molecules like methyl fluoride (CH3F). These systems offer surprising opportunities in modeling and design of new materials. For example, symmetric top polyatomics can be used to study quantum molecular magnets and quantum liquid crystals. We use matrix-product-state (MPS) algorithms, supplemented by exact diagonalization, variational, perturbative, and other approaches. MPS algorithms not only produce experimentally measurable quantum phase diagrams but also explore the dynamical interplay between internal and external degrees of freedom inherent in complex dipolar matter. We maintain open source code (openTEBD and openMPS) available freely and used widely. Funded by NSF and AFOSR.

  9. Non-local crime density estimation incorporating housing information

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, J. T.; Mohler, G. O.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Brantingham, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Given a discrete sample of event locations, we wish to produce a probability density that models the relative probability of events occurring in a spatial domain. Standard density estimation techniques do not incorporate priors informed by spatial data. Such methods can result in assigning significant positive probability to locations where events cannot realistically occur. In particular, when modelling residential burglaries, standard density estimation can predict residential burglaries occurring where there are no residences. Incorporating the spatial data can inform the valid region for the density. When modelling very few events, additional priors can help to correctly fill in the gaps. Learning and enforcing correlation between spatial data and event data can yield better estimates from fewer events. We propose a non-local version of maximum penalized likelihood estimation based on the H1 Sobolev seminorm regularizer that computes non-local weights from spatial data to obtain more spatially accurate density estimates. We evaluate this method in application to a residential burglary dataset from San Fernando Valley with the non-local weights informed by housing data or a satellite image. PMID:25288817

  10. Dynamical symmetries in Kondo tunneling through complex quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, T; Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2002-10-01

    Kondo tunneling reveals hidden SO(n) dynamical symmetries of evenly occupied quantum dots. As is exemplified for an experimentally realizable triple quantum dot in parallel geometry, the possible values n=3,4,5,7 can be easily tuned by gate voltages. Following construction of the corresponding o(n) algebras, scaling equations are derived and Kondo temperatures are calculated. The symmetry group for a magnetic field induced anisotropic Kondo tunneling is SU(2) or SO(4). PMID:12366008

  11. Lower Bounds on Quantum Query Complexity for Read-Once Formulas with XOR and MUX Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Hideaki; Takimoto, Eiji

    We introduce a complexity measure r for the class F of read-once formulas over the basis {AND, OR, NOT, XOR, MUX} and show that for any Boolean formula F in the class F, r(F) is a lower bound on the quantum query complexity of the Boolean function that F represents. We also show that for any Boolean function f represented by a formula in F, the deterministic query complexity of f is only quadratically larger than the quantum query complexity of f. Thus, the paper gives further evidence for the conjecture that there is an only quadratic gap for all functions.

  12. Quantum picturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Why did it take us 50 years since the birth of the quantum mechanical formalism to discover that unknown quantum states cannot be cloned? Yet, the proof of the 'no-cloning theorem' is easy, and its consequences and potential for applications are immense. Similarly, why did it take us 60 years to discover the conceptually intriguing and easily derivable physical phenomenon of 'quantum teleportation'? We claim that the quantum mechanical formalism doesn't support our intuition, nor does it elucidate the key concepts that govern the behaviour of the entities that are subject to the laws of quantum physics. The arrays of complex numbers are kin to the arrays of 0s and 1s of the early days of computer programming practice. Using a technical term from computer science, the quantum mechanical formalism is 'low-level'. In this review we present steps towards a diagrammatic 'high-level' alternative for the Hilbert space formalism, one which appeals to our intuition. The diagrammatic language as it currently stands allows for intuitive reasoning about interacting quantum systems, and trivialises many otherwise involved and tedious computations. It clearly exposes limitations such as the no-cloning theorem, and phenomena such as quantum teleportation. As a logic, it supports 'automation': it enables a (classical) computer to reason about interacting quantum systems, prove theorems, and design protocols. It allows for a wider variety of underlying theories, and can be easily modified, having the potential to provide the required step-stone towards a deeper conceptual understanding of quantum theory, as well as its unification with other physical theories. Specific applications discussed here are purely diagrammatic proofs of several quantum computational schemes, as well as an analysis of the structural origin of quantum non-locality. The underlying mathematical foundation of this high-level diagrammatic formalism relies on so-called monoidal categories, a product of a fairly

  13. Cosmological observations in non-local F( R) cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, H.; Tayebi, F.; Milani, F.; Enayati, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this article in a generalization of our previous work (Farajollahi and Milani in Mod. Phys. Lett. A 25:2349-2362, 2010), we investigate the dynamics of the non-local F( R) gravity after casting it into local form. The non-singular bouncing behavior and quintom model of dark energy are achieved without involving negative kinetic energy fields. Two cosmological tests are performed to constrain the model parameters. In case of phantom crossing the distance modulus predicted by the model best-fits the observational data. In comparison with the CPL parametrization for drift velocity, the model in some redshift intervals is in good agreement with the data.

  14. Complex Quantum Network Manifolds in Dimension d > 2 are Scale-Free.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In quantum gravity, several approaches have been proposed until now for the quantum description of discrete geometries. These theoretical frameworks include loop quantum gravity, causal dynamical triangulations, causal sets, quantum graphity, and energetic spin networks. Most of these approaches describe discrete spaces as homogeneous network manifolds. Here we define Complex Quantum Network Manifolds (CQNM) describing the evolution of quantum network states, and constructed from growing simplicial complexes of dimension d. We show that in d = 2 CQNM are homogeneous networks while for d > 2 they are scale-free i.e. they are characterized by large inhomogeneities of degrees like most complex networks. From the self-organized evolution of CQNM quantum statistics emerge spontaneously. Here we define the generalized degrees associated with the δ-faces of the d-dimensional CQNMs, and we show that the statistics of these generalized degrees can either follow Fermi-Dirac, Boltzmann or Bose-Einstein distributions depending on the dimension of the δ-faces. PMID:26356079

  15. Complex Quantum Network Manifolds in Dimension d > 2 are Scale-Free

    PubMed Central

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In quantum gravity, several approaches have been proposed until now for the quantum description of discrete geometries. These theoretical frameworks include loop quantum gravity, causal dynamical triangulations, causal sets, quantum graphity, and energetic spin networks. Most of these approaches describe discrete spaces as homogeneous network manifolds. Here we define Complex Quantum Network Manifolds (CQNM) describing the evolution of quantum network states, and constructed from growing simplicial complexes of dimension . We show that in d = 2 CQNM are homogeneous networks while for d > 2 they are scale-free i.e. they are characterized by large inhomogeneities of degrees like most complex networks. From the self-organized evolution of CQNM quantum statistics emerge spontaneously. Here we define the generalized degrees associated with the -faces of the -dimensional CQNMs, and we show that the statistics of these generalized degrees can either follow Fermi-Dirac, Boltzmann or Bose-Einstein distributions depending on the dimension of the -faces. PMID:26356079

  16. Exploring the complexity of quantum control optimization trajectories.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Arun; Shir, Ofer M; Donovan, Ashley; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-01-01

    The control of quantum system dynamics is generally performed by seeking a suitable applied field. The physical objective as a functional of the field forms the quantum control landscape, whose topology, under certain conditions, has been shown to contain no critical point suboptimal traps, thereby enabling effective searches for fields that give the global maximum of the objective. This paper addresses the structure of the landscape as a complement to topological critical point features. Recent work showed that landscape structure is highly favorable for optimization of state-to-state transition probabilities, in that gradient-based control trajectories to the global maximum value are nearly straight paths. The landscape structure is codified in the metric R ≥ 1.0, defined as the ratio of the length of the control trajectory to the Euclidean distance between the initial and optimal controls. A value of R = 1 would indicate an exactly straight trajectory to the optimal observable value. This paper extends the state-to-state transition probability results to the quantum ensemble and unitary transformation control landscapes. Again, nearly straight trajectories predominate, and we demonstrate that R can take values approaching 1.0 with high precision. However, the interplay of optimization trajectories with critical saddle submanifolds is found to influence landscape structure. A fundamental relationship necessary for perfectly straight gradient-based control trajectories is derived, wherein the gradient on the quantum control landscape must be an eigenfunction of the Hessian. This relation is an indicator of landscape structure and may provide a means to identify physical conditions when control trajectories can achieve perfect linearity. The collective favorable landscape topology and structure provide a foundation to understand why optimal quantum control can be readily achieved. PMID:25377547

  17. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: Application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics.

  18. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics. PMID:24628169

  19. Gold Nanocluster and Quantum Dot Complex in Protein for Biofriendly White-Light-Emitting Material.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Satyapriya; Pramanik, Sabyasachi; Khandelia, Rumi; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2016-01-27

    We report the synthesis of a biofriendly highly luminescent white-light-emitting nanocomposite. The composite consisted of Au nanoclusters and ZnQ2 complex (on the surface of ZnS quantum dots) embedded in protein. The combination of red, green, and blue luminescence from clusters, complex, and protein, respectively, led to white light generation. PMID:26741861

  20. Quantum coherent energy transfer over varying pathways in single light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, Richard; Brinks, Daan; Nieder, Jana B; Cogdell, Richard J; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-06-21

    The initial steps of photosynthesis comprise the absorption of sunlight by pigment-protein antenna complexes followed by rapid and highly efficient funneling of excitation energy to a reaction center. In these transport processes, signatures of unexpectedly long-lived coherences have emerged in two-dimensional ensemble spectra of various light-harvesting complexes. Here, we demonstrate ultrafast quantum coherent energy transfer within individual antenna complexes of a purple bacterium under physiological conditions. We find that quantum coherences between electronically coupled energy eigenstates persist at least 400 femtoseconds and that distinct energy-transfer pathways that change with time can be identified in each complex. Our data suggest that long-lived quantum coherence renders energy transfer in photosynthetic systems robust in the presence of disorder, which is a prerequisite for efficient light harvesting. PMID:23788794

  1. Screening of Cosmological Constant in Non-Local Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Li; Sasaki, Misao

    We consider a model of non-local gravity with a large bare cosmological constant, Λ, and study its cosmological solutions. The model is characterized by a function f(ψ) = f0eαψ, where ψ = □-1R and α is a real dimensionless parameter. In the absence of matter, we find an expanding universe solution a ∝ tn with n < 1, that is, a universe with decelerated expansion without any fine-tuning of the parameter. Thus the effect of the cosmological constant is effectively shielded in this solution. It has been known that solutions in non-local gravity often suffer from the existence of ghost modes. In the present case, we find the solution is ghost-free if α > αcr ≈ 0.17. This is quite a weak condition. We argue that the solution is stable against the inclusion of matter fields. Thus our solution opens up new possibilities for solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  2. Kondo physics in non-local metallic spin transport devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, L.; Erickson, M. J.; Spivak, D.; Ambaye, H.; Goyette, R. J.; Lauter, V.; Crowell, P. A.; Leighton, C.

    2014-05-01

    The non-local spin-valve is pivotal in spintronics, enabling separation of charge and spin currents, disruptive potential applications and the study of pressing problems in the physics of spin injection and relaxation. Primary among these problems is the perplexing non-monotonicity in the temperature-dependent spin accumulation in non-local ferromagnetic/non-magnetic metal structures, where the spin signal decreases at low temperatures. Here we show that this effect is strongly correlated with the ability of the ferromagnetic to form dilute local magnetic moments in the NM. This we achieve by studying a significantly expanded range of ferromagnetic/non-magnetic combinations. We argue that local moments, formed by ferromagnetic/non-magnetic interdiffusion, suppress the injected spin polarization and diffusion length via a manifestation of the Kondo effect, thus explaining all observations. We further show that this suppression can be completely quenched, even at interfaces that are highly susceptible to the effect, by insertion of a thin non-moment-supporting interlayer.

  3. Kondo physics in non-local metallic spin transport devices.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, L; Erickson, M J; Spivak, D; Ambaye, H; Goyette, R J; Lauter, V; Crowell, P A; Leighton, C

    2014-01-01

    The non-local spin-valve is pivotal in spintronics, enabling separation of charge and spin currents, disruptive potential applications and the study of pressing problems in the physics of spin injection and relaxation. Primary among these problems is the perplexing non-monotonicity in the temperature-dependent spin accumulation in non-local ferromagnetic/non-magnetic metal structures, where the spin signal decreases at low temperatures. Here we show that this effect is strongly correlated with the ability of the ferromagnetic to form dilute local magnetic moments in the NM. This we achieve by studying a significantly expanded range of ferromagnetic/non-magnetic combinations. We argue that local moments, formed by ferromagnetic/non-magnetic interdiffusion, suppress the injected spin polarization and diffusion length via a manifestation of the Kondo effect, thus explaining all observations. We further show that this suppression can be completely quenched, even at interfaces that are highly susceptible to the effect, by insertion of a thin non-moment-supporting interlayer. PMID:24873934

  4. A Comprehensive Strategy to Boost the Quantum Yield of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Júnior, Severino A.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2013-08-01

    Lanthanide luminescence has many important applications in anion sensing, protein recognition, nanosized phosphorescent devices, optoelectronic devices, immunoassays, etc. Luminescent europium complexes, in particular, act as light conversion molecular devices by absorbing ultraviolet (UV) light and by emitting light in the red visible spectral region. The quantum yield of luminescence is defined as the ratio of the number of photons emitted over the number of UV photons absorbed. The higher the quantum yield of luminescence, the higher the sensitivity of the application. Here we advance a conjecture that allows the design of europium complexes with higher values of quantum yields by simply increasing the diversity of good ligands coordinated to the lanthanide ion. Indeed, for the studied cases, the percent boost obtained on the quantum yield proved to be strong: of up to 81%, accompanied by faster radiative rate constants, since the emission becomes less forbidden.

  5. A Comprehensive Strategy to Boost the Quantum Yield of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Júnior, Severino A.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide luminescence has many important applications in anion sensing, protein recognition, nanosized phosphorescent devices, optoelectronic devices, immunoassays, etc. Luminescent europium complexes, in particular, act as light conversion molecular devices by absorbing ultraviolet (UV) light and by emitting light in the red visible spectral region. The quantum yield of luminescence is defined as the ratio of the number of photons emitted over the number of UV photons absorbed. The higher the quantum yield of luminescence, the higher the sensitivity of the application. Here we advance a conjecture that allows the design of europium complexes with higher values of quantum yields by simply increasing the diversity of good ligands coordinated to the lanthanide ion. Indeed, for the studied cases, the percent boost obtained on the quantum yield proved to be strong: of up to 81%, accompanied by faster radiative rate constants, since the emission becomes less forbidden. PMID:23928866

  6. New insights on emergence from the perspective of weak values and dynamical non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we will examine new fundamental aspects of "emergence" and "information" using novel approaches to quantum mechanics which originated from the group around Aharonov. The two-state vector formalism provides a complete description of pre- and post-selected quantum systems and has uncovered a host of new quantum phenomena which were previously hidden. The most important feature is that any weak coupling to a pre- and post-selected system is effectively a coupling to a "weak value" which is given by a simple expression depending on the two-state vector. In particular, weak values, are the outcomes of so called "weak measurements" which have recently become a very powerful tool for ultra-sensitive measurements. Using weak values, we will show how to separate a particle from its properties, not unlike the Cheshire cat story: "Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin," thought Alice; "but a grin without a cat! It's the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!" Next, we address the question whether the physics on different scales "emerges" from quantum mechanics or whether the laws of physics at those scales are fundamental. We show that the classical limit of quantum mechanics is a far more complicated issue; it is in fact dramatically more involved and it requires a complete revision of all our intuitions. The revised intuitions can then serve as a guide to finding novel quantum effects. Next we show that novel experimental aspects of contextuality can be demonstrated with weak measurements and these suggest new restrictions on hidden variable approaches. Next we emphasize that the most important implication of the Aharonov-Bohm effect is the existence of non-local interactions which do not violate causality. Finally, we review some generalizations of quantum mechanics and their implications for "emergence" and "information." First, we review an alternative approach to quantum evolution in which each moment of time is viewed as a new "universe

  7. FRET efficiency in surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annas, Kirill I.; Gromova, Yuliya A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced dissociation of surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dye 1-(2- pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was investigated. It was shown that the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes in the complexes photodissociation rate, which depends on resonance condition between electronic levels of donor (quantum dots) and acceptor (azo-dye) and donor photoluminescent quantum yield. It has allowed to estimate energy transfer efficiency in the complexes and disclosed a new nonradiative channel that has minor contribution in the deactivation of excited states of quantum dots in the complexes.

  8. Non-local mind from the perspective of social cognition

    PubMed Central

    Chatel-Goldman, Jonas; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Jutten, Christian; Congedo, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Two main conceptual approaches have been employed to study the mechanisms of social cognition, whether one considers isolated or interacting minds. Using neuro-imaging of subjects in isolation, the former approach has provided knowledge on the neural underpinning of a variety of social processes. However, it has been argued that considering one brain alone cannot account for all mechanisms subtending online social interaction. This challenge has been tackled recently by using neuro-imaging of multiple interacting subjects in more ecological settings. The present short review aims at offering a comprehensive view on various advances done in the last decade. We provide a taxonomy of existing research in neuroscience of social interaction, situating them in the frame of general organization principles of social cognition. Finally, we discuss the putative enabling role of emerging non-local social mechanisms—such as interpersonal brain and body coupling—in processes underlying our ability to create a shared world. PMID:23565084

  9. Non-local mind from the perspective of social cognition.

    PubMed

    Chatel-Goldman, Jonas; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Jutten, Christian; Congedo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Two main conceptual approaches have been employed to study the mechanisms of social cognition, whether one considers isolated or interacting minds. Using neuro-imaging of subjects in isolation, the former approach has provided knowledge on the neural underpinning of a variety of social processes. However, it has been argued that considering one brain alone cannot account for all mechanisms subtending online social interaction. This challenge has been tackled recently by using neuro-imaging of multiple interacting subjects in more ecological settings. The present short review aims at offering a comprehensive view on various advances done in the last decade. We provide a taxonomy of existing research in neuroscience of social interaction, situating them in the frame of general organization principles of social cognition. Finally, we discuss the putative enabling role of emerging non-local social mechanisms-such as interpersonal brain and body coupling-in processes underlying our ability to create a shared world. PMID:23565084

  10. Dynamical quenching with non-local α and downward pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Hubbard, A. Käpylä, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    In light of new results, the one-dimensional mean-field dynamo model of Brandenburg & Käpylä (2007) with dynamical quenching and a nonlocal Babcock-Leighton \\alpha effect is re-examined for the solar dynamo. We extend the one-dimensional model to include the effects of turbulent downward pumping (Kitchatinov & Olemskoy 2011), and to combine dynamical quenching with shear. We use both the conventional dynamical quenching model of Kleeorin & Ruzmaikin (1982) and the alternate one of Hubbard & Brandenburg (2011), and confirm that with varying levels of non-locality in the \\alpha effect, and possibly shear as well, the saturation field strength can be independent of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  11. Inflationary magnetogenesis and non-local actions: the conformal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal El-Menoufi, Basem

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the possibility of successful magnetogenesis during inflation by employing the one-loop effective action of massless QED. The action is strictly non-local and results from the long distance fluctuations of massless charged particles present at the inflationary scale. Most importantly, it encodes the conformal anomaly of QED which is crucial to avoid the vacuum preservation in classical electromagnetism. In particular, we find a blue spectrum for the magnetic field with spectral index nB simeq 2 - αe where αe depends on both the number of e-folds during inflation as well as the coefficient of the one-loop beta function. In particular, the sign of the beta function has important bearing on the final result. A low reheating temperature is required for the present day magnetic field to be consistent with the lower bound inferred on the field in the intergalactic medium.

  12. The Physics of Life and Quantum Complex Matter: A Case of Cross-Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, Nicola; Bianconi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the science of complexity, from the Big Bang to the coming of humankind, from chemistry and biology to geosciences and medicine, and from materials engineering to energy sciences, is leading to a shift of paradigm in the physical sciences. The focus is on the understanding of the non-equilibrium process in fine tuned systems. Quantum complex materials such as high temperature superconductors and living matter are both non-equilibrium and fine tuned systems. These topics have been subbjects of scientific discussion in the Rome Symposium on the “Quantum Physics of Living Matter”. PMID:26791661

  13. Quantum chemical study of the O 3-HONO complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohi, Hossein; Ashuri, Masomeh

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase hydrogen-bonded isomers of the O 3-HONO complex have been investigated by means of DFT(B3LYP), MP2, MP4(SDTQ), CCSD(T) and QCISD(T) methods in conjunction with the 6-311++G(2d,2p), 6-311++G(df,pd), AUG-cc-pVDZ and AUG-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Ten isomers were found for the O 3-HONO complex. The O⋯H and O⋯O interactions are predicted that participate in the formation of non-planar ring structure of the most stable isomer. The AIM calculations reveal that the O⋯H interaction in the most stable complex is stronger than others. In addition, both O⋯H and O⋯O interactions in O 3-HONO complexes are electrostatic in nature.

  14. Simple algorithm for computing the communication complexity of quantum communication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Montina, A.; Wolf, S.

    2016-04-01

    A two-party quantum communication process with classical inputs and outcomes can be simulated by replacing the quantum channel with a classical one. The minimal amount of classical communication required to reproduce the statistics of the quantum process is called its communication complexity. In the case of many instances simulated in parallel, the minimal communication cost per instance is called the asymptotic communication complexity. Previously, we reduced the computation of the asymptotic communication complexity to a convex minimization problem. In most cases, the objective function does not have an explicit analytic form, as the function is defined as the maximum over an infinite set of convex functions. Therefore, the overall problem takes the form of a minimax problem and cannot directly be solved by standard optimization methods. In this paper, we introduce a simple algorithm to compute the asymptotic communication complexity. For some special cases with an analytic objective function one can employ available convex-optimization libraries. In the tested cases our method turned out to be notably faster. Finally, using our method we obtain 1.238 bits as a lower bound on the asymptotic communication complexity of a noiseless quantum channel with the capacity of 1 qubit. This improves the previous bound of 1.208 bits.

  15. Measuring quantum effects in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes with multipartite entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Cathal

    This thesis is a compilation of studies on delocalization measures, entanglement, and the role of quantum coherence in electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting complexes. The first two chapters after the introduction provide foundational knowledge of quantum information and light-harvesting, respectively. Chapter 2 introduces concepts from quantum information such as purity, bipartite entanglement and criteria for its measurement. The peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2, isolated from the anoxygenic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, is employed as model system of interest. This light-harvesting complex, along with a description of the process of light-harvesting, the presence of quantum coherence, and the different models used to simulate EET, are described in chapter 3. In combination these two chapters lay the foundation for chapter 4, a critical assessment of the current measures of delocalization employed in EET studies, their relationship, and overall effectiveness. The conclusion is that entanglement based measures are most effective at measuring quantum effects, and that they can be related to more conventional delocalization measures such as the inverse participation ratio (IPR) by taking into account the entropy of the system under study. All the measures within this chapter are known as bipartite measures, and only measure the strength of correlation between two sites. The fifth chapter presents the core of this thesis. Following a brief introduction to the concept of multipartite entanglement, the development of multipartite delocalization measures that give high-resolution information on quantum coherence in light-harvesting complexes is detailed. In contrast to other measures, these analytical measures can detect many body correlations in large systems undergoing decoherence. We determine that, much like the bipartite entanglement based measures of chapter 4, these measures are also a function of system entropy, and have a

  16. Matrix De Rham Complex and Quantum A-infinity algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikov, S.

    2014-04-01

    I establish the relation of the non-commutative BV-formalism with super-invariant matrix integration. In particular, the non-commutative BV-equation, defining the quantum A ∞-algebras, introduced in Barannikov (Modular operads and non-commutative Batalin-Vilkovisky geometry. IMRN, vol. 2007, rnm075. Max Planck Institute for Mathematics 2006-48, 2007), is represented via de Rham differential acting on the supermatrix spaces related with Bernstein-Leites simple associative algebras with odd trace q( N), and gl( N| N). I also show that the matrix Lagrangians from Barannikov (Noncommutative Batalin-Vilkovisky geometry and matrix integrals. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, 2006) are represented by equivariantly closed differential forms.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan-based polyelectrolyte complexes, doped by quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuzova, N. V.; Gerasimova, M. A.; Slabko, V. V.; Slyusareva, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Doping of polymer particles by a fluorophores results in the sensitization within the visible spectral region becoming very promising materials for sensor applications. Colloids of biocompatible chitosan-based polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) doped with quantum dots (QD) of CdTe and CdSe/ZnS (with sizes of 2.0-2.4 nm) were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential measurements, absorption and luminescence (including time-resolved) spectroscopy. The influence of ionic strength (0.02-1.5 M) on absorption and photoluminescence properties of encapsulated into PEC and unencapsulated quantum dots was investigated. The stability of the emission intensity of the encapsulated quantum dots has been shown to be strongly dependent on concentration of quantum dots.

  18. Benchmark Measurements of the Ionization Balance of Non-Local-Thermodynamic-Equilibrium Gold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Fournier, K. B.; Foord, M. E.; Froula, D. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Young, B. K. F.

    2007-11-09

    We present a series of benchmark measurements of the ionization balance of well-characterized gold plasmas with and without external radiation fields at electron densities near 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and electron temperatures spanning the range 0.8 to 2.4 keV. We have analyzed time- and space-resolved M-shell gold emission spectra using a sophisticated collisional-radiative model with hybrid level structure, finding average ion charges ranging from 42 to 50. At the lower temperatures, the spectra exhibit significant sensitivity to external radiation fields and include emission features from complex N-shell ions. The measured spectra and inferred provide a stringent test for non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium models of complex high-Z ions.

  19. Non-local damage rheology and size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V.

    2011-12-01

    We study scaling relations controlling the onset of transiently-accelerating fracturing and transition to dynamic rupture propagation in a non-local damage rheology model. The size effect is caused principally by growth of a fracture process zone, involving stress redistribution and energy release associated with a large fracture. This implies that rupture nucleation and transition to dynamic propagation are inherently scale-dependent processes. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and local damage mechanics are formulated in terms of dimensionless strain components and thus do not allow introducing any space scaling, except linear relations between fracture length and displacements. Generalization of Weibull theory provides scaling relations between stress and crack length at the onset of failure. A powerful extension of the LEFM formulation is the displacement-weakening model which postulates that yielding is complete when the crack wall displacement exceeds some critical value or slip-weakening distance Dc at which a transition to kinetic friction is complete. Scaling relations controlling the transition to dynamic rupture propagation in slip-weakening formulation are widely accepted in earthquake physics. Strong micro-crack interaction in a process zone may be accounted for by adopting either integral or gradient type non-local damage models. We formulate a gradient-type model with free energy depending on the scalar damage parameter and its spatial derivative. The damage-gradient term leads to structural stresses in the constitutive stress-strain relations and a damage diffusion term in the kinetic equation for damage evolution. The damage diffusion eliminates the singular localization predicted by local models. The finite width of the localization zone provides a fundamental length scale that allows numerical simulations with the model to achieve the continuum limit. A diffusive term in the damage evolution gives rise to additional damage diffusive time

  20. Average-Case Complexity Versus Approximate Simulation of Commuting Quantum Computations.

    PubMed

    Bremner, Michael J; Montanaro, Ashley; Shepherd, Dan J

    2016-08-19

    We use the class of commuting quantum computations known as IQP (instantaneous quantum polynomial time) to strengthen the conjecture that quantum computers are hard to simulate classically. We show that, if either of two plausible average-case hardness conjectures holds, then IQP computations are hard to simulate classically up to constant additive error. One conjecture relates to the hardness of estimating the complex-temperature partition function for random instances of the Ising model; the other concerns approximating the number of zeroes of random low-degree polynomials. We observe that both conjectures can be shown to be valid in the setting of worst-case complexity. We arrive at these conjectures by deriving spin-based generalizations of the boson sampling problem that avoid the so-called permanent anticoncentration conjecture. PMID:27588839

  1. Surface complexation reaction for phase transfer of hydrophobic quantum dot from nonpolar to polar medium.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Satyapriya; Roy, Shilaj; Pramanik, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reaction between oleate-capped Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S quantum dots (Qdots) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) led to formation of a surface complex, which was accompanied by transfer of hydrophobic Qdots from nonpolar (hexane) to polar (water) medium with high efficiency. The stability of the complex on the surface was achieved via involvement of dangling sulfide bonds. Moreover, the transferred hydrophilic Qdots--herein called as quantum dot complex (QDC)--exhibited new and superior optical properties in comparison to bare inorganic complexes with retention of the dimension and core structure of the Qdots. Finally, the new and superior optical properties of water-soluble QDC make them potentially useful for biological--in addition to light emitting device (LED)--applications. PMID:25133937

  2. Complex trajectories sans isochrones: quantum barrier scattering with rectilinear constant velocity trajectories.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Brad A; Wyatt, Robert E

    2007-10-28

    One of the major obstacles in employing complex-valued trajectory methods for quantum barrier scattering calculations is the search for isochrones. In this study, complex-valued derivative propagation method trajectories in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian frame are employed to solve the complex Hamilton-Jacobi equation for quantum barrier scattering problems employing constant velocity trajectories moving along rectilinear paths whose initial points can be in the complex plane or even along the real axis. It is shown that this effectively removes the need for isochrones for barrier transmission problems. Model problems tested include the Eckart, Gaussian, and metastable quadratic+cubic potentials over a variety of wave packet energies. For comparison, the "exact" solution is computed from the time-dependent Schrodinger equation via pseudospectral methods. PMID:17979316

  3. Solution of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering in the presence of complex potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Jan

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present a method to compute solutions of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering problems in the presence of a complex potential. We show how the elastic and absorption cross sections can be obtained from the numerical solution of these equations in the asymptotic region at large radial distances.

  4. Towards a Social Theory of School Administrative Practice in a Complex, Chaotic, Quantum World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavis, Allan K.

    Educational administration, like many other social sciences, has traditionally followed the rubrics of classical science with its emphasis on prediction and control and attempts to understand the whole by understanding in ever finer detail how the parts fit together. However, the "new" science (especially quantum mechanics, complexity, and chaos…

  5. Persistence criteria for populations with non-local dispersion.

    PubMed

    Berestycki, Henri; Coville, Jérôme; Vo, Hoang-Hung

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we analyse the non-local model: [Formula: see text]where J is a positive continuous dispersal kernel and f(x, u) is a heterogeneous KPP type non-linearity describing the growth rate of the population. The ecological niche of the population is assumed to be bounded (i.e. outside a compact set, the environment is assumed to be lethal for the population). For compactly supported dispersal kernels J, we derive an optimal persistence criteria. We prove that a positive stationary solution exists if and only if the generalised principal eigenvalue [Formula: see text] of the linear problem [Formula: see text]is negative. [Formula: see text] is a spectral quantity that we defined in the spirit of the generalised first eigenvalue of an elliptic operator. In addition, for any continuous non-negative initial data that is bounded or integrable, we establish the long time behaviour of the solution u(t, x). We also analyse the impact of the size of the support of the dispersal kernel on the persistence criteria. We exhibit situations where the dispersal strategy has "no impact" on the persistence of the species and other ones where the slowest dispersal strategy is not any more an "Ecological Stable Strategy". We also discuss persistence criteria for fat-tailed kernels. PMID:26162491

  6. NABS: non-local automatic brain hemisphere segmentation.

    PubMed

    Romero, José E; Manjón, José V; Tohka, Jussi; Coupé, Pierrick; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an automatic method to segment the five main brain sub-regions (i.e. left/right hemispheres, left/right cerebellum and brainstem) from magnetic resonance images. The proposed method uses a library of pre-labeled brain images in a stereotactic space in combination with a non-local label fusion scheme for segmentation. The main novelty of the proposed method is the use of a multi-label block-wise label fusion strategy specifically designed to deal with the classification of main brain sub-volumes that process only specific parts of the brain images significantly reducing the computational burden. The proposed method has been quantitatively evaluated against manual segmentations. The evaluation showed that the proposed method was faster while producing more accurate segmentations than a current state-of-the-art method. We also present evidences suggesting that the proposed method was more robust against brain pathologies than the compared method. Finally, we demonstrate the clinical value of our method compared to the state-of-the-art approach in terms of the asymmetry quantification in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25660644

  7. Cosmological evolution of generalized non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ya-Bo; Li, Song; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Bo-Hai; Chai, Yun-Tian; Shu, Shuang

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of generalized non-local gravity (GNLG) model which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term m2n‑2 R□‑nR to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Concretely, we not only study the gravitational equation for the GNLG model by introducing auxiliary scalar fields, but also analyse the classical stability and examine the cosmological consequences of the model for different exponent n. We find that the half of the scalar fields are always ghost-like and the exponent n must be taken even number for a stable GNLG model. Meanwhile, the model spontaneously generates three dominant phases of the evolution of the universe, and the equation of state parameters turn out to be phantom-like. Furthermore, we clarify in another way that exponent n should be even numbers by the spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian gauge. It is worth stressing that the results given by us can include ones in refs. [28, 34] as the special case of n=2.

  8. Generalized non-local means filtering for image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolui, Sudipto; Salgado Patarroyo, Iván. C.; Michailovich, Oleg V.

    2014-02-01

    Non-local means (NLM) filtering has been shown to outperform alternative denoising methodologies under the model of additive white Gaussian noise contamination. Recently, several theoretical frameworks have been developed to extend this class of algorithms to more general types of noise statistics. However, many of these frameworks are specifically designed for a single noise contamination model, and are far from optimal across varying noise statistics. The NLM filtering techniques rely on the definition of a similarity measure, which quantifies the similarity of two neighbourhoods along with their respective centroids. The key to the unification of the NLM filter for different noise statistics lies in the definition of a universal similarity measure which is guaranteed to provide favourable performance irrespective of the statistics of the noise. Accordingly, the main contribution of this work is to provide a rigorous statistical framework to derive such a universal similarity measure, while highlighting some of its theoretical and practical favourable characteristics. Additionally, the closed form expressions of the proposed similarity measure are provided for a number of important noise scenarios and the practical utility of the proposed similarity measure is demonstrated through numerical experiments.

  9. Quantum mechanics of excitation transport in photosynthetic complexes: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Levi, Federico; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco; Mintert, Florian

    2015-07-01

    For a long time microscopic physical descriptions of biological processes have been based on quantum mechanical concepts and tools, and routinely employed by chemical physicists and quantum chemists. However, the last ten years have witnessed new developments on these studies from a different perspective, rooted in the framework of quantum information theory. The process that more, than others, has been subject of intense research is the transfer of excitation energy in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, a consequence of the unexpected experimental discovery of oscillating signals in such highly noisy systems. The fundamental interdisciplinary nature of this research makes it extremely fascinating, but can also constitute an obstacle to its advance. Here in this review our objective is to provide an essential summary of the progress made in the theoretical description of excitation energy dynamics in photosynthetic systems from a quantum mechanical perspective, with the goal of unifying the language employed by the different communities. This is initially realized through a stepwise presentation of the fundamental building blocks used to model excitation transfer, including protein dynamics and the theory of open quantum system. Afterwards, we shall review how these models have evolved as a consequence of experimental discoveries; this will lead us to present the numerical techniques that have been introduced to quantitatively describe photo-absorbed energy dynamics. Finally, we shall discuss which mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unusual coherent nature of excitation transport and what insights have been gathered so far on the potential functional role of such quantum features. PMID:26194028

  10. Quantum mechanics of excitation transport in photosynthetic complexes: a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Federico; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco; Mintert, Florian

    2015-07-01

    For a long time microscopic physical descriptions of biological processes have been based on quantum mechanical concepts and tools, and routinely employed by chemical physicists and quantum chemists. However, the last ten years have witnessed new developments on these studies from a different perspective, rooted in the framework of quantum information theory. The process that more, than others, has been subject of intense research is the transfer of excitation energy in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, a consequence of the unexpected experimental discovery of oscillating signals in such highly noisy systems. The fundamental interdisciplinary nature of this research makes it extremely fascinating, but can also constitute an obstacle to its advance. Here in this review our objective is to provide an essential summary of the progress made in the theoretical description of excitation energy dynamics in photosynthetic systems from a quantum mechanical perspective, with the goal of unifying the language employed by the different communities. This is initially realized through a stepwise presentation of the fundamental building blocks used to model excitation transfer, including protein dynamics and the theory of open quantum system. Afterwards, we shall review how these models have evolved as a consequence of experimental discoveries; this will lead us to present the numerical techniques that have been introduced to quantitatively describe photo-absorbed energy dynamics. Finally, we shall discuss which mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unusual coherent nature of excitation transport and what insights have been gathered so far on the potential functional role of such quantum features.

  11. What the complex joint probabilities observed in weak measurements can tell us about quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2014-12-04

    Quantummechanics does not permit joint measurements of non-commuting observables. However, it is possible to measure the weak value of a projection operator, followed by the precise measurement of a different property. The results can be interpreted as complex joint probabilities of the two non-commuting measurement outcomes. Significantly, it is possible to predict the outcome of completely different measurements by combining the joint probabilities of the initial state with complex conditional probabilities relating the new measurement to the possible combinations of measurement outcomes used in the characterization of the quantum state. We can therefore conclude that the complex conditional probabilities observed in weak measurements describe fundamental state-independent relations between non-commuting properties that represent the most fundamental form of universal laws in quantum physics.

  12. What the complex joint probabilities observed in weak measurements can tell us about quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2014-12-01

    Quantummechanics does not permit joint measurements of non-commuting observables. However, it is possible to measure the weak value of a projection operator, followed by the precise measurement of a different property. The results can be interpreted as complex joint probabilities of the two non-commuting measurement outcomes. Significantly, it is possible to predict the outcome of completely different measurements by combining the joint probabilities of the initial state with complex conditional probabilities relating the new measurement to the possible combinations of measurement outcomes used in the characterization of the quantum state. We can therefore conclude that the complex conditional probabilities observed in weak measurements describe fundamental state-independent relations between non-commuting properties that represent the most fundamental form of universal laws in quantum physics.

  13. Measuring the complex admittance of a nearly isolated graphene quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Miao-Lei; Wei, Da; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2014-08-18

    We measured the radio-frequency reflection spectrum of an on-chip reflection line resonator coupled to a graphene double quantum dot (DQD), which was etched almost isolated from the reservoir and reached the low tunnel rate region. The charge stability diagram of DQD was investigated via dispersive phase and magnitude shift of the resonator with a high quality factor. Its complex admittance and low tunnel rate to the reservoir was also determined from the reflected signal of the on-chip resonator. Our method may provide a non-invasive and sensitive way of charge state readout in isolated quantum dots.

  14. A fast non-local image denoising algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauwe, A.; Goossens, B.; Luong, H. Q.; Philips, W.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we propose several improvements to the original non-local means algorithm introduced by Buades et al. which obtains state-of-the-art denoising results. The strength of this algorithm is to exploit the repetitive character of the image in order to denoise the image unlike conventional denoising algorithms, which typically operate in a local neighbourhood. Due to the enormous amount of weight computations, the original algorithm has a high computational cost. An improvement of image quality towards the original algorithm is to ignore the contributions from dissimilar windows. Even though their weights are very small at first sight, the new estimated pixel value can be severely biased due to the many small contributions. This bad influence of dissimilar windows can be eliminated by setting their corresponding weights to zero. Using the preclassification based on the first three statistical moments, only contributions from similar neighborhoods are computed. To decide whether a window is similar or dissimilar, we will derive thresholds for images corrupted with additive white Gaussian noise. Our accelerated approach is further optimized by taking advantage of the symmetry in the weights, which roughly halves the computation time, and by using a lookup table to speed up the weight computations. Compared to the original algorithm, our proposed method produces images with increased PSNR and better visual performance in less computation time. Our proposed method even outperforms state-of-the-art wavelet denoising techniques in both visual quality and PSNR values for images containing a lot of repetitive structures such as textures: the denoised images are much sharper and contain less artifacts. The proposed optimizations can also be applied in other image processing tasks which employ the concept of repetitive structures such as intra-frame super-resolution or detection of digital image forgery.

  15. Virtual brain states and non-locality of the ERP.

    PubMed

    Germine, Mark

    2004-01-01

    It has been previously proposed that conscious process involves the collapse of quantum, dynamical brain states through conscious observation. It has been further proposed that the brain process has an active role in selecting the status of uncertain stimuli. On the basis of these proposals it was predicted that event-related potentials (ERPs) would differ under unobserved versus pre-observed conditions. This has been found to be the case. Here we describe our most recent data, which shows that the difference between the pre-observed (inactive) and unobserved (active) conditions in ERPs is replicable, and seems to involve a selective process of matching stimulus and virtual brain state under the two conditions. Maximization of entropy by congruence of stimulus and brain potential through a quantum entropy operator is the proposed physical mechanism for this finding. The prefrontal lobe inhibition of perseverative brain states under the active condition is proposed to be the neurological mechanism of the findings. PMID:15050120

  16. Higher-order local and non-local correlations for 1D strongly interacting Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandani, EJKP; Römer, Rudolf A.; Tan, Shina; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The correlation function is an important quantity in the physics of ultracold quantum gases because it provides information about the quantum many-body wave function beyond the simple density profile. In this paper we first study the M-body local correlation functions, g M , of the one-dimensional (1D) strongly repulsive Bose gas within the Lieb–Liniger model using the analytical method proposed by Gangardt and Shlyapnikov (2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 010401; 2003 New J. Phys. 5 79). In the strong repulsion regime the 1D Bose gas at low temperatures is equivalent to a gas of ideal particles obeying the non-mutual generalized exclusion statistics with a statistical parameter α =1-2/γ , i.e. the quasimomenta of N strongly interacting bosons map to the momenta of N free fermions via {k}i≈ α {k}iF with i=1,\\ldots ,N. Here γ is the dimensionless interaction strength within the Lieb–Liniger model. We rigorously prove that such a statistical parameter α solely determines the sub-leading order contribution to the M-body local correlation function of the gas at strong but finite interaction strengths. We explicitly calculate the correlation functions g M in terms of γ and α at zero, low, and intermediate temperatures. For M = 2 and 3 our results reproduce the known expressions for g 2 and g 3 with sub-leading terms (see for instance (Vadim et al 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 051604(R); Kormos et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 210404; Wang et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 043634). We also express the leading order of the short distance non-local correlation functions < {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}1)\\cdots {{{\\Psi }}}\\dagger ({x}M){{\\Psi }}({y}M)\\cdots {{\\Psi }}({y}1)> of the strongly repulsive Bose gas in terms of the wave function of M bosons at zero collision energy and zero total momentum. Here {{\\Psi }}(x) is the boson annihilation operator. These general formulas of the higher-order local and non-local correlation functions of the 1D Bose gas provide new insights into the

  17. Quantum Effects in Cosmochemistry: Complexation Energy and Van Der Waals Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Wilson, T. L.

    2007-01-01

    The subject of quantum effects in cosmochemistry was recently addressed with the goal of understanding how they contribute to Q-phase noble gas abundances found in meteorites. It was the pursuit of the Q-phase carrier of noble gases and their anomalous abundances that ultimately led to the identification, isolation, and discovery of presolar grains. In spite of its importance, Q-phase investigations have led a number of authors to reach conclusions that do not seem to be supported by quantum chemistry. In view of the subject's fundamental significance, additional study is called for. Two quantum properties of Q-phase candidates known as endohedral carbon-cage clathrates such as fullerenes will be addressed here. These are complexation energy and instability induced by Pauli blocking (exclusion principle).

  18. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  19. Quantum theory of the complex dielectric constant of free carriers in polar semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.

    1982-09-01

    The optical constants and reflectivity of a semiconductor are known as functions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric constant. The imaginary part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 2/ is proportional to the optical conductivity, which has recently been calculated from the quantum density matrix equation of motion. The expression obtained for e/sub 2/ reduces to the Drude result, as obtained from the quasi-classical Boltzmann transport equation, in the limit of low frequencies and elastic scattering mechanisms, and to the quantum result found using time dependent perturbation theory in the limit of high frequencies. This paper derives the real part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 1/ for a III-V or II-VI semiconductor with the band structure of the Kane theory, using the quantum density matrix method. The relation of e/sub 1/ to the second order perturbation energy of the system is shown, and the reflectivity is a minimum when the second order perturbation energy vanishes. The quantum calculation for e/sub 1/ gives approximately the same result as the Drude theory, except near the fundamental absorption edge, and reduces to the Drude result at low frequencies. Using the complex dielectric constant, the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index, the skin depth, and surface impedance, and the reflectivity are found. The plasma resonance is examined. The surface impedance and the skin depth are shown to reduce to the usual classical result in the limit that e/sub 1/ = 0 and w tau << 1, where w is the angular frequency of the applied field and tau is the electron scattering time.

  20. Quantum coherence enabled determination of the energy landscape in light-harvesting complex II.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Tessa R; Ginsberg, Naomi S; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R

    2009-12-24

    The near-unity efficiency of energy transfer in photosynthesis makes photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes a promising avenue for developing new renewable energy technologies. Knowledge of the energy landscape of these complexes is essential in understanding their function, but its experimental determination has proven elusive. Here, the observation of quantum coherence using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is employed to directly measure the 14 lowest electronic energy levels in light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the most abundant antenna complex in plants containing approximately 50% of the world's chlorophyll. We observe that the electronically excited states are relatively evenly distributed, highlighting an important design principle of photosynthetic complexes that explains the observed ultrafast intracomplex energy transfer in LHCII. PMID:20014871

  1. Interactions between Redox Complexes and Semiconductor Quantum Dots Coupled via a Peptide Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Grimes, Amy F.; English, Doug S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have a large fraction of their atoms arrayed on their surfaces and are capped with bifunctional ligands, which make their photoluminescence highly sensitive to potential charge transfer to, or from, the surrounding environment. In this report, we used peptides as bridges between CdSe-ZnS QDs and metal complexes to promote charge transfer between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that quenching of the QD emission is highly dependent on the relative position of the oxidation levels of QDs and metal complex used; it also traces the number of metal complexes brought in close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. In addition, partial bleaching of the absorption was measured for the QD-metal complex assemblies. These proximity driven interactions were further used to construct sensing assemblies to detect proteolytic enzyme activity. PMID:19049466

  2. Perfect state transfers by selective quantum interferences within complex spin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Mishkovsky, Mor; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Pastawski, Horacio M.; Frydman, Lucio

    2010-06-01

    We present a method that implements directional, perfect state transfers within a branched spin network by exploiting quantum interferences in the time domain. This method provides a tool for isolating subsystems from a large and complex one. Directionality is achieved by interrupting the spin-spin coupled evolution with periods of free Zeeman evolutions, whose timing is tuned to be commensurate with the relative phases accrued by specific spin pairs. This leads to a resonant transfer between the chosen qubits and to a detuning of all remaining pathways in the network, using only global manipulations. Since the transfer is perfect when the selected pathway is mediated by two or three spins, distant state transfers over complex networks can be achieved by successive recouplings among specific pairs or triads of spins. These effects are illustrated with a quantum simulator involving C13 NMR on leucine’s backbone; a six-spin network.

  3. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4739845. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], 10.1063/1.459170, and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  4. Entropy and complexity analysis of Dirac-delta-like quantum potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvrie, P. A.; Angulo, J. C.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    The Dirac-delta-like quantum-mechanical potentials are frequently used to describe and interpret numerous phenomena in many scientific fields including atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter and quantum computation. The entropy and complexity properties of potentials with one and two Dirac-delta functions are here analytically calculated and numerically discussed in both position and momentum spaces. We have studied the information-theoretic lengths of Fisher, Rényi and Shannon types as well as the Cramér-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC shape complexities of the lowest-lying stationary states of one-delta and twin-delta. They allow us to grasp and quantify different facets of the spreading of the charge and momentum of the system far beyond the celebrated standard deviation.

  5. Quantum entanglement and the communication complexity of the inner product function

    SciTech Connect

    Cleve, R.; Dam, W. van |; Nielsen, M. |; Tapp, A.

    1998-08-01

    The authors consider the communication complexity of the binary inner product function in a variation of the two-party scenario where the parties have an a priori supply of particles in an entangled quantum state. They prove linear lower bounds for both exact protocols, as well as for protocols that determine the answer with bounded-error probability. The proofs employ a novel kind of quantum reduction from multibit communication problems to the problem of computing the inner product. The communication required for the former problem can then be bounded by an application of Holevo`s theorem. They also give a specific example of a probabilistic scenario where entanglement reduces the communication complexity of the inner product function by one bit.

  6. Quantum localization/delocalization of muonium in the glycine-K+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Takehiro; Honda, Tomohiro; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-01

    Previous electronic structure studies have revealed that the glycine-K+ complex has a low-barrier intramolecular proton-transfer pathway between zwitterionic and neutral forms. We have theoretically calculated quantum molecular structures of this complex including the proton-transfer process using a path-integral molecular dynamics technique on an interpolated potential energy surface developed at the B3LYP level of theory. When the transferring proton is substituted by muon, it was found that the muonium atom showed a broad distribution around the proton(muon)-transfer transition state region between the neutral and zwitterionic structures due to extreme nuclear quantum effects of a very light particle although the distribution peak is slightly deviated from the transition state. The present study demonstrates that Mu can be employed to probe transition-state regions of potential energy surfaces of proton-transfer chemical reactions.

  7. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  8. Quantum-confined emission and fluorescence blinking of individual exciton complexes in CdSe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Franz, Dennis; Reich, Aina; Strelow, Christian; Wang, Zhe; Kornowski, Andreas; Kipp, Tobias; Mews, Alf

    2014-11-12

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures combine electron mobility in length direction with the possibility of tailoring the physical properties by confinement effects in radial direction. Here we show that thin CdSe quantum nanowires exhibit low-temperature fluorescence spectra with a specific universal structure of several sharp lines. The structure strongly resembles the pattern of bulk spectra but show a diameter-dependent shift due to confinement effects. Also the fluorescence shows a pronounced complex blinking behavior with very different blinking dynamics of different emission lines in one and the same spectrum. Time- and space-resolved optical spectroscopy are combined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the very same quantum nanowires to establish a detailed structure-property relationship. Extensive numerical simulations strongly suggest that excitonic complexes involving donor and acceptor sites are the origin of the feature-rich spectra. PMID:25343231

  9. Proof of Monogamy of non-local correlations in three and four qubit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Santosh Shelly; Sharma, Naresh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we used the process of selective construction of invariants to obtain physically meaningful polynomial invariants for three and four qubit pure states. In this article, we report the exact relations between the concurrence of a two qubit reduced state and corresponding three or four qubit pure state invariants. Firstly, we obtain an analytical expression for concurrence of a given mixed state of two qubits in terms of determinants of negativity fonts in the three or four qubit pure state. For three qubits, a comparison with three tangle and squared negativity expressed in terms of determinants of negativity fonts leads to three relations. These three conditions satisfied by the two-way and three-way correlations sum together and lead to well known CKW inequality. When a qubit pair is part of a four qubit pure state, it may be entangled to the rest of the system through two-way, three-way and four-way correlations. Monogamy equalities, satisfied by two-way, three-way and four-way non-local quantum correlatios are presented for states belonging to classes of four qubit pure states with distinct entanglement types. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from CNPq and Capes Brazil.

  10. Equivalent dynamical complexity in a many-body quantum and collective human system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Ashkenazi, Josef; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Quiroga, Luis

    2011-03-01

    Proponents of Complexity Science believe that the huge variety of emergent phenomena observed throughout nature, are generated by relatively few microscopic mechanisms. Skeptics however point to the lack of concrete examples in which a single mechanistic model manages to capture relevant macroscopic and microscopic properties for two or more distinct systems operating across radically different length and time scales. Here we show how a single complexity model built around cluster coalescence and fragmentation, can cross the fundamental divide between many-body quantum physics and social science. It simultaneously (i) explains a mysterious recent finding of Fratini et al. concerning quantum many-body effects in cuprate superconductors (i.e. scale of 10-9 - 10-4 meters and 10-12 - 10-6 seconds), (ii) explains the apparent universality of the casualty distributions in distinct human insurgencies and terrorism (i.e. scale of 103 - 106 meters and 104 - 108 seconds), (iii) shows consistency with various established empirical facts for financial markets, neurons and human gangs and (iv) makes microscopic sense for each application. Our findings also suggest that a potentially productive shift can be made in Complexity research toward the identification of equivalent many-body dynamics in both classical and quantum regimes.

  11. Feasibility study of dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using non-local denoising algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the ability of denoising algorithms to reduce the radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) examinations. Clinical use of DBT is normally performed in "combo-mode", in which, in addition to DBT projections, a 2D mammogram is taken with the standard radiation dose. As a result, patients have been exposed to radiation doses higher than used in digital mammography. Thus, efforts to reduce the radiation dose in DBT examinations are of great interest. However, a decrease in dose leads to an increased quantum noise level, and related decrease in image quality. This work is aimed at addressing this problem by the use of denoising techniques, which could allow for dose reduction while keeping the image quality acceptable. We have studied two "state of the art" denoising techniques for filtering the quantum noise due to the reduced dose in DBT projections: Non-local Means (NLM) and Block-matching 3D (BM3D). We acquired DBT projections at different dose levels of an anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with inserted simulated microcalcifications. Then, we found the optimal filtering parameters where the denoising algorithms are capable of recovering the quality from the DBT images acquired with the standard radiation dose. Results using objective image quality assessment metrics showed that BM3D algorithm achieved better noise adjustment (mean difference in peak signal to noise ratio < 0.1dB) and less blurring (mean difference in image sharpness ~ 6%) than the NLM for the projections acquired with lower radiation doses.

  12. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time.

  13. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-15

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time. .

  14. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. I. Conservative systems with time-independent Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Hans; Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2015-09-15

    The sensitivity of the evolution of quantum uncertainties to the choice of the initial conditions is shown via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation leading to a reformulation of quantum dynamics. This sensitivity is demonstrated for systems with exact analytic solutions with the form of Gaussian wave packets. In particular, one-dimensional conservative systems with at most quadratic Hamiltonians are studied.

  15. Complex-valued derivative propagation method with approximate Bohmian trajectories for quantum barrier scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2015-08-01

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action is approximately solved by propagating individual Bohmian trajectories in real space. Equations of motion for the complex action and its spatial derivatives are derived through use of the derivative propagation method. We transform these equations into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. Setting higher-order derivatives equal to zero, we obtain a truncated system of equations of motion describing the rate of change in the complex action and its spatial derivatives transported along approximate Bohmian trajectories. A set of test trajectories is propagated to determine appropriate initial positions for transmitted trajectories. Computational results for transmitted wave packets and transmission probabilities are presented and analyzed for a one-dimensional Eckart barrier and a two-dimensional system involving either a thick or thin Eckart barrier along the reaction coordinate coupled to a harmonic oscillator.

  16. Mn(II/III) complexes as promising redox mediators in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Haring, Andrew J; Pomatto, Michelle E; Thornton, Miranda R; Morris, Amanda J

    2014-09-10

    The advancement of quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) technology depends on optimizing directional charge transfer between light absorbing quantum dots, TiO2, and a redox mediator. The nature of the redox mediator plays a pivotal role in determining the photocurrent and photovoltage from the solar cell. Kinetically, reduction of oxidized quantum dots by the redox mediator should be rapid and faster than the back electron transfer between TiO2 and oxidized quantum dots to maintain photocurrent. Thermodynamically, the reduction potential of the redox mediator should be sufficiently positive to provide high photovoltages. To satisfy both criteria and enhance power conversion efficiencies, we introduced charge transfer spin-crossover Mn(II/III) complexes as promising redox mediator alternatives in QDSSCs. High photovoltages ∼ 1 V were achieved by a series of Mn poly(pyrazolyl)borates, with reduction potentials ∼ 0.51 V vs Ag/AgCl. Back electron transfer (recombination) rates were slower than Co(bpy)3, where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, evidenced by electron lifetimes up to 4 orders of magnitude longer. This is indicative of a large barrier to electron transport imposed by spin-crossover in these complexes. Low solubility prevented the redox mediators from sustaining high photocurrent due to mass transport limits. However, with high fill factors (∼ 0.6) and photovoltages, they demonstrate competitive efficiencies with Co(bpy)3 redox mediator at the same concentration. More positive reduction potentials and slower recombination rates compared to current redox mediators establish the viability of Mn poly(pyrazolyl)borates as promising redox mediators. By capitalizing on these characteristics, efficient Mn(II/III)-based QDSSCs can be achieved with more soluble Mn-complexes. PMID:25137595

  17. Direct evidence of memory retrieval as a source of difficulty in non-local dependencies in language.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Evelina; Woodbury, Rebecca; Gibson, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Linguistic dependencies between non-adjacent words have been shown to cause comprehension difficulty, compared with local dependencies. According to one class of sentence comprehension accounts, non-local dependencies are difficult because they require the retrieval of the first dependent from memory when the second dependent is encountered. According to these memory-based accounts, making the first dependent accessible at the time when the second dependent is encountered should help alleviate the difficulty associated with the processing of non-local dependencies. In a dual-task paradigm, participants read sentences that did or did not contain a non-local dependency (i.e., object- and subject-extracted cleft constructions) while simultaneously remembering a word. The memory task was aimed at making the word held in memory accessible throughout the sentence. In an object-extracted cleft (e.g., It was Ellen whom John consulted…), the object (Ellen) must be retrieved from memory when consulted is encountered. In the critical manipulation, the memory word was identical to the verb's object (ELLEN). In these conditions, the extraction effect was reduced in the comprehension accuracy data and eliminated in the reading time data. These results add to the body of evidence supporting memory-based accounts of syntactic complexity. PMID:23362990

  18. A Laplace operator and harmonics on the quantum complex vector space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorgov, N. Z.; Klimyk, A. U.

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this article is to study the q-Laplace operator and q-harmonic polynomials on the quantum complex vector space generated by elements zi,wi, i=1,2,…,n, on which the quantum group GLq(n) [or Uq(n)] acts. The q-harmonic polynomials are defined as solutions of the equation Δqp=0, where p is a polynomial in zi,wi, i=1,2,…,n, and the q-Laplace operator Δq is determined in terms of q-derivatives. The q-Laplace operator Δq commutes with the action of GLq(n). The projector Hm,m':Am,m'→Hm,m' is constructed, where Am,m' and Hm,m' are the spaces of homogeneous (of degree m in zi and of degree m' in wi) polynomials and homogeneous q-harmonic polynomials, respectively. By using these projectors, a q-analog of the classical zonal spherical and associated spherical harmonics are constructed. They constitute an orthogonal basis of Hm,m'. A q-analog of separation of variables is given. The quantum algebra Uq(gln), acting on Hm,m', determines an irreducible representation of Uq(gln). This action is explicitly constructed. The results of the article lead to the dual pair (Uq(sl2),Uq(gln)) of quantum algebras.

  19. Complexity measure and quantum shape-phase transitions in the two-dimensional limit of the vibron model.

    PubMed

    Romera, Elvira; Calixto, Manuel; Nagy, Ágnes

    2014-07-01

    We obtain a characterization of quantum shape-phase transitions in the terms of complexity measures in the two-dimensional limit of the vibron model based on the spectrum generating algebra U(3). Complexity measures (in terms of the Rényi entropies) have been calculated for different values of the control parameter for the ground state of this model giving sharp signatures of the quantum shape-phase transition from linear to bent molecules. PMID:24948526

  20. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  1. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. I. The diabatic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-01

    We extend a recently developed quantum trajectory method [Y. Goldfarb, I. Degani, and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 231103 (2006)], 10.1063/1.2400851 to treat non-adiabatic transitions. Each trajectory evolves on a single surface according to Newton's laws with complex positions and momenta. The transfer of amplitude between surfaces stems naturally from the equations of motion, without the need for surface hopping. In this paper we derive the equations of motion and show results in the diabatic representation, which is rarely used in trajectory methods for calculating non-adiabatic dynamics. We apply our method to the first two benchmark models introduced by Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], 10.1063/1.459170. Besides giving the probability branching ratios between the surfaces, the method also allows the reconstruction of the time-dependent wavepacket. Our results are in quantitative agreement with converged quantum mechanical calculations.

  2. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. I. The diabatic representation.

    PubMed

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J

    2012-12-14

    We extend a recently developed quantum trajectory method [Y. Goldfarb, I. Degani, and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 231103 (2006)] to treat non-adiabatic transitions. Each trajectory evolves on a single surface according to Newton's laws with complex positions and momenta. The transfer of amplitude between surfaces stems naturally from the equations of motion, without the need for surface hopping. In this paper we derive the equations of motion and show results in the diabatic representation, which is rarely used in trajectory methods for calculating non-adiabatic dynamics. We apply our method to the first two benchmark models introduced by Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)]. Besides giving the probability branching ratios between the surfaces, the method also allows the reconstruction of the time-dependent wavepacket. Our results are in quantitative agreement with converged quantum mechanical calculations. PMID:23249054

  3. Barrier scattering with complex-valued quantum trajectories: Taxonomy and analysis of isochrones

    SciTech Connect

    David, Julianne K.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2008-03-07

    To facilitate the search for isochrones when using complex-valued trajectory methods for quantum barrier scattering calculations, the structure and shape of isochrones in the complex plane were studied. Isochrone segments were categorized based on their distinguishing features, which are shared by each situation studied: High and low energy wave packets, scattering from both thick and thin Gaussian and Eckart barriers of varying height. The characteristic shape of the isochrone is a trifurcated system: Trajectories that transmit the barrier are launched from the lower branch (T), while the middle and upper branches form the segments for reflected trajectories (F and B). In addition, a model is presented for the curved section of the lower branch (from which transmitted trajectories are launched), and important features of the complex extension of the initial wave packet are identified.

  4. Energy Transfer Assays Using Quantum Dot-Gold Nanoparticle Complexes: Optimizing Oligonucleotide Assay Configuration Using Monovalently Conjugated Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-07-28

    The energy transfer between quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) represents a popular transduction scheme in analytical assays that use nanomaterials. The impact of the spatial arrangement of the two types of nanoparticles on analytical performance has now been evaluated using a nucleic acid strand displacement assay. The first spatial arrangement (configuration 1) involved the assembly of a number of monovalently functionalized QD-oligonucleotide conjugates around a single central AuNP that was functionalized with complementary oligonucleotide sequences. The assembly of these complexes, and subsequent disassembly via target oligonucleotide-mediated displacement, were used to evaluate energy transfer efficiencies. Furthermore, the inner filter effect of AuNPs on the fluorescence intensity of the QD was studied. AuNPs of three different diameters (6, 13, and 30 nm) were used in these studies. Configuration 2 was based on the placement of monovalently functionalized AuNP-oligonucleotide conjugates around a single QD that was functionalized with a complementary oligonucleotide. The optimal assay configuration, established by evaluating energy transfer efficiencies and inner filter effects, was obtained by arranging at most 15 QDs around the 13 nm AuNP (configuration 1). These assays provided a 2.5-fold change in fluorescence intensity in the presence of target oligonucleotides. To obtain the same response with configuration 2 required the placement of three 6 nm AuNPs around the QD. This resulted in configuration 2 having a 5-fold lower fluorescence intensity when compared to configuration 1. The use of low-cost detection systems (digital camera) further emphasized the higher analytical performance of configuration 1. Response curves obtained using these detection systems demonstrated that configuration 1 had a 10-fold higher sensitivity when compared to configuration 2. This study provides an important framework for the development of sensitive assays

  5. Spectroscopic studies of plasmon coupling between photosynthetic complexes and metallic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Maria; Krajnik, Bartosz; Kowalska, Dorota; Lin, Guanhua; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    Metallic quantum dots, or nanoparticles, have found an increasing number of applications not only in nanotechnology and nanoscience, but also in neighboring disciplines, such as chemistry and biology. Among the variety of ways to exploit the unique properties of metallic nanostructures is the notion that plasmonic effects associated with the movement of free carriers in metallic nanoparticles may enhance photosynthetic function in naturally evolved organisms. We report on optical microscopy and spectroscopy studies of three hybrid nanostructures composed of spherical gold nanoparticles and peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP), a light-harvesting complex from algae. In the case of a bioconjugated structure we find efficient, concentration dependent quenching due to non-radiative energy transfer. In contrast, for the PCP complexes deposited directly on Au nanoparticles, the emission is increased as a result of the strong increase of the fluorescence quantum yield. Finally, for a structure with controlled separation between metallic nanoparticles and the light-harvesting complexes the emission features non-monotonic behavior with maximum enhancement of about 6, which is due to a combination of fluorescence and absorption rate increases. In this way we demonstrate how the design of plasmonic hybrid nanostructures determines the optical response, which is important for engineering novel systems for photovoltaics and sensor applications, for instance.

  6. Using metal complex-labeled peptides for charge transfer-based biosensing with semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-02-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical and photonic properties and are highly sensitive to charge transfer in their surrounding environment. In this study we used synthetic peptides as physical bridges between CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and some of the most common redox-active metal complexes to understand the charge transfer interactions between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that QD emission underwent quenching that was highly dependent on the choice of metal complex used. We also found that quenching traces the valence or number of metal complexes brought into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. Monitoring of the QD absorption bleaching in the presence of the metal complex provided insight into the charge transfer mechanism. The data suggest that two distinct charge transfer mechanisms can take place. One directly to the QD core states for neutral capping ligands and a second to surface states for negatively charged capping ligands. A basic understanding of the proximity driven charge-transfer and quenching interactions allowed us to construct proteolytic enzyme sensing assemblies with the QD-peptide-metal complex conjugates.

  7. High-order harmonics in a quantum dot and metallic nanorod complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Xing

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and metallic nanorod (MNR) complex driven by a moderate intensity (<10(12)  W/cm(2)) frequency-chirped Gaussian few-cycle pulse. Our numerical results indicate that the cutoff energy of the HHG can be controlled by optimizing the shape of the MNR and surface-to-surface distance between the SQD and the MNR. We also show that the extreme ultraviolet supercontinuum harmonics (25 eV maximal photon energy) and isolated ultrashort pulses (2.67-4.36 fs FWHM) are achievable. PMID:26512479

  8. When do perturbative approaches accurately capture the dynamics of complex quantum systems?

    PubMed Central

    Fruchtman, Amir; Lambert, Neill; Gauger, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of higher-dimensional quantum systems embedded in a complex environment remains a significant theoretical challenge. While several approaches yielding numerically converged solutions exist, these are computationally expensive and often provide only limited physical insight. Here we address the question: when do more intuitive and simpler-to-compute second-order perturbative approaches provide adequate accuracy? We develop a simple analytical criterion and verify its validity for the case of the much-studied FMO dynamics as well as the canonical spin-boson model. PMID:27335176

  9. PREFACE: DICE 2008 - From Quantum Mechanics through Complexity to Spacetime: the role of emergent dynamical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    These proceedings present the Invited Lectures and Contributed Papers of the Fourth International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2008, held at Castello Pasquini, Castiglioncello (Tuscany), 22-26 September 2008. We deliver these proceedings as a means to document to the interested public, to the wider scientific community, and to the participants themselves the stimulating exchange of ideas at this conference. The steadily growing number of participants, among them acclaimed scientists in their respective fields, show its increasing attraction and a fruitful concept, based on bringing leading researchers together and in contact with a mix of advanced students and scholars. Thus, this series of meetings successfully continued from the beginning with DICE 2002, (Decoherence and Entropy in Complex Systems ed H-T Elze Lecture Notes in Physics 633 (Berlin: Springer, 2004)) followed by DICE 2004 (Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2004 ed H-T Elze Braz. Journ. Phys. 35, 2A & 2B (2005) pp 205-529 free access at: www.sbfisica.org.br/bjp) and by DICE 2006, (Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2006 eds H-T Elze, L Diósi and G Vitiello Journal of Physics: Conference Series 67 (2007); free access at: http://www.iop.org/EJ/toc/1742-6596/67/1) uniting about one hundred participants from more than twenty different countries worldwide this time. It has been a great honour and inspiration for all of us to have Professor Sir Roger Penrose from the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford with us, who presented the lecture ``Black holes, quantum theory and cosmology'' (included in this volume). Discussions under the wider theme ``From Quantum Mechanics through Complexity to Spacetime: the role of emergent dynamical structures'' took place in the very pleasant and inspiring atmosphere of Castello

  10. Stability of Complex Biomolecular Structures: van der Waals, Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity, and Nuclear Quantum Effects.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Fang, Wei; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-11-01

    Biomolecules are complex systems stabilized by a delicate balance of weak interactions, making it important to assess all energetic contributions in an accurate manner. However, it is a priori unclear which contributions make more of an impact. Here, we examine stacked polyglutamine (polyQ) strands, a peptide repeat often found in amyloid aggregates. We investigate the role of hydrogen bond (HB) cooperativity, van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions, and quantum contributions to free energies, including anharmonicities through density functional theory and ab initio path integral simulations. Of these various factors, we find that the largest impact on structural stabilization comes from vdW interactions. HB cooperativity is the second largest contribution as the size of the stacked chain grows. Competing nuclear quantum effects make the net quantum contribution small but very sensitive to anharmonicities, vdW, and the number of HBs. Our results suggest that a reliable treatment of these systems can only be attained by considering all of these components. PMID:26722963

  11. Including Quantum Effects in the Dynamics of Complex (i.e., Large)Molecular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H.

    2006-04-27

    The development in the 1950's and 60's of crossed molecular beam methods for studying chemical reactions at the single-collision molecular level stimulated the need and desire for theoretical methods to describe these and other dynamical processes in molecular systems. Chemical dynamics theory has made great strides in the ensuing decades, so that methods are now available for treating the quantum dynamics of small molecular systems essentially completely. For the large molecular systems that are of so much interest nowadays (e.g. chemical reactions in solution, in clusters, in nano-structures, in biological systems, etc.), however, the only generally available theoretical approach is classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Much effort is currently being devoted to the development of approaches for describing the quantum dynamics of these complex systems. This paper reviews some of these approaches, especially the use of semiclassical approximations for adding quantum effects to classical MD simulations, also showing some new versions that should make these semiclassical approaches even more practical and accurate.

  12. Design of 4-electrode optical device for application of vector electric fields to self-assembled quantum dot complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xinran; Doty, Matthew

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) are of great interest as components of optoelectronic devices that can operate at the quantum limit. The charge configuration, interdot coupling, and symmetry of complexes containing multiple QDs can all be tuned with applied electric fields, but the magnitude and angle of the electric field required to control each of these parameters depend on the orientation of the QD complex. We present a 4-electrode device compatible with optical excitation and emission that allows application of electric fields with arbitrary magnitudes and angles relative to isolated QD complexes. We demonstrate the electric field tunability of this device with numerical simulations.

  13. The non-local bootstrap--estimation of uncertainty in diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Yap, Pew-Thian; An, Hongyu; Chen, Yasheng; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI is a noninvasive imaging modality that allows for the estimation and visualization of white matter connectivity patterns in the human brain. However, due to the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) nature of diffusion data, deriving useful statistics from the data is adversely affected by different sources of measurement noise. This is aggravated by the fact that the sampling distribution of the statistic of interest is often complex and unknown. In situations as such, the bootstrap, due to its distribution-independent nature, is an appealing tool for the estimation of the variability of almost any statistic, without relying on complicated theoretical calculations, but purely on computer simulation. In this work, we present new bootstrap strategies for variability estimation of diffusion statistics in association with noise. In contrast to the residual bootstrap, which relies on a predetermined data model, or the repetition bootstrap, which requires repeated signal measurements, our approach, called the non-local bootstrap (NLB), is non-parametric and obviates the need for time-consuming multiple acquisitions. The key assumption of NLB is that local image structures recur in the image. We exploit this self-similarity via a multivariate non-parametric kernel regression framework for bootstrap estimation of uncertainty. Evaluation of NLB using a set of high-resolution diffusion-weighted images, with lower than usual SNR due to the small voxel size, indicates that NLB is markedly more robust to noise and results in more accurate inferences. PMID:24683985

  14. Quantum chemical studies of the pyrrole-water and pyridine-water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoprawiro, Muhamad A.; Bacskay, George B.

    An ab initio quantum chemical study of the hydrogen bonded binary complexes pyrrole-water and pyridine-water is reported. The calculations were performed largely at the MP2 level of theory using basis sets of double-zeta-plus polarization functions quality and focus on properties of the complexes such as molecular geometries, energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, dipole moments and 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants. Where possible, the results of the calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, the interaction potentials are studied in some detail, specifically with regard to basis set superposition and its effect on geometries, intermolecular vibrational frequencies and binding energies. The nature of interaction, i.e., the importance of electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, polarization, charge transfer and dispersion contributions to the hydrogen bond energies, as obtained in constrained spatial orbital variation analyses, is also discussed.

  15. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel D.

    In a very general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems, the infinite volume limit of the complex-time evolution of a local observable is an entire analytic function of the time variable and obeys a locality principle. This result has recently been used to prove a number of important results in statistical mechanics. In dimensions greater than one, although it has not been expected that the infinite volume limit of the complex-time evolution of a general local observable will be entire analytic, nothing rigorous has been established concerning the breakdown of analyticity or the nature of the singularities, if they exist. In this work we begin by presenting a possible approach to proving locality bounds for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of quantum spin systems in any dimension. Then we specifically apply this approach to the one-dimensional case, and establish entire analyticity of the dynamics as a corollary. In dimensions greater than one, ideas related to the much studied Eden growth process suggest that a similar locality result will also hold. In particular, we establish an upper bound on the expected perimeter of lattice animals grown according to an Eden growth process, and note that a similar upper bound on a closely related average perimeter would lead to a locality result in the plane. Finally, and perhaps unexpectedly, we demonstrate through a specific construction that such a locality result does not hold in general and that the infinite volume limit of the complex-time dynamics can blow up a finite distance along the imaginary-time axis.

  16. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, James D; Halada, Gary P; Jha, Prashant; Phillips, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI), U(V), U(IV), U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG), and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO) with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V)- and U(IV)-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI) and U(IV) rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules) are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids. PMID:19689800

  17. Non-local ocean mixing model and a new plume model for deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    Turbulent fluxes can be represented by a diffusivity tensor, the symmetric part of which describes " turbulent diffusion" while the anti-symmetric part describes " advection". Diffusion is a local process in the sense that it depends only on the local gradients of the mean fields while advection is non-local for it is represented by an integral over all length scales (all eddies) that can "fit" from say the bottom of the physical domain to the z where the fluxes are computed. In the ocean, there are two main regimes where non-local transport is important. One regime is where storms release a sudden burst of mechanical energy to the ocean surface that is then transported downward by energetic eddies that deepen the mixed layer. Even relatively simple non-local models yield results considerably more realistic than those of local models. The second regime is deep convection (DC) caused by loss of surface buoyancy, the description of which is required for a reliable assessment of water masses formation. At present, there is no reliable model for either of these non-local regimes individually or much less a formalism capable of accounting for both regimes simultaneously. The goal of this paper is to present a formalism that provides the expressions for the non-local fluxes for momentum, heat and salinity encompassing both cases. Since the resulting number of dynamic equations involves is however large, we work out two sub-models, one when only shear must be treated non-locally (e.g., when storms release mechanical energy) and one when only buoyancy is to be treated non-locally (the DC case). We employ the Reynolds Stress formalism in which non-locality is represented by the third-order moments which in turn depend on the fourth-order moments for which we employ a new model that has been tested against LES data, aircraft data and a full PBL simulation. For the DC case, we rewrite the non-local model in terms of Plumes since thus far the only non-local model used to treat

  18. Non-local dynamics governing the self-induced motion of a planar vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    While the Hasimoto planar vortex filament is one of the few exact solutions to the local induction approximation (LIA) approximating the self-induced motion of a vortex filament, it is natural to wonder whether such a vortex filament solution would exist for the non-local Biot-Savart dynamics exactly governing the filament motion, and if so, whether the non-local effects would drastically modify the solution properties. Both helical vortex filaments and vortex rings are known to exist under both the LIA and non-local Biot-Savart dynamics; however, the planar filament is a bit more complicated. In the present paper, we demonstrate that a planar vortex filament solution does exist for the non-local Biot-Savart formulation, provided that a specific non-linear integral equation (governing the spatial structure of such a filament) has a non-trivial solution. By using the Poincaré-Lindstedt method, we are able to obtain an accurate analytical approximation to the solution of this integral equation under physically reasonable assumptions. To obtain these solutions, we approximate local effects near the singularity of the integral equation using the LIA and non-local effects using the Biot-Savart formulation. Mathematically, the results constitute an analytical solution to an interesting nonlinear singular integro-differential equation in space and time variables. Physically, these results show that planar vortex filaments exist and maintain their forms under the non-local Biot-Savart formulation, as one would hope. Due to the regularization approach utilized, we are able to compare the structure of the planar filaments obtained under both LIA and Biot-Savart formulations in a rather straightforward manner, in order to determine the role of the non-locality on the structure of the planar filament.

  19. Non-local bias contribution to third-order galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Hoffmann, K.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-10-01

    We study halo clustering bias with second- and third-order statistics of halo and matter density fields in the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge simulation. We verify that two-point correlations deliver reliable estimates of the linear bias parameters at large scales, while estimations from the variance can be significantly affected by non-linear and possibly non-local contributions to the bias function. Combining three-point auto- and cross-correlations we find, for the first time in configuration space, evidence for the presence of such non-local contributions. These contributions are consistent with predicted second-order non-local effects on the bias functions originating from the dark matter tidal field. Samples of massive haloes show indications of bias (local or non-local) beyond second order. Ignoring non-local bias causes 20-30 and 5-10 per cent overestimation of the linear bias from three-point auto- and cross-correlations, respectively. We study two third-order bias estimators that are not affected by second-order non-local contributions. One is a combination of three-point auto- and cross-correlations. The other is a combination of third-order one- and two-point cumulants. Both methods deliver accurate estimations of the linear bias. Ignoring non-local bias causes higher values of the second-order bias from three-point correlations. Our results demonstrate that third-order statistics can be employed for breaking the growth-bias degeneracy.

  20. Droplet etching of deep nanoholes for filling with self-aligned complex quantum structures.

    PubMed

    Küster, Achim; Heyn, Christian; Ungeheuer, Arne; Juska, Gediminas; Tommaso Moroni, Stefano; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Strain-free epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) are fabricated by a combination of Al local droplet etching (LDE) of nanoholes in AlGaAs surfaces and subsequent hole filling with GaAs. The whole process is performed in a conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber. Autocorrelation measurements establish single-photon emission from LDE QDs with a very small correlation function g ((2))(0)≃ 0.01 of the exciton emission. Here, we focus on the influence of the initial hole depth on the QD optical properties with the goal to create deep holes suited for filling with more complex nanostructures like quantum dot molecules (QDM). The depth of droplet etched nanoholes is controlled by the droplet material coverage and the process temperature, where a higher coverage or temperature yields deeper holes. The requirements of high quantum dot uniformity and narrow luminescence linewidth, which are often found in applications, set limits to the process temperature. At high temperatures, the hole depths become inhomogeneous and the linewidth rapidly increases beyond 640 °C. With the present process technique, we identify an upper limit of 40-nm hole depth if the linewidth has to remain below 100 μeV. Furthermore, we study the exciton fine-structure splitting which is increased from 4.6 μeV in 15-nm-deep to 7.9 μeV in 35-nm-deep holes. As an example for the functionalization of deep nanoholes, self-aligned vertically stacked GaAs QD pairs are fabricated by filling of holes with 35 nm depth. Exciton peaks from stacked dots show linewidths below 100 μeV which is close to that from single QDs. PMID:27255902

  1. Droplet etching of deep nanoholes for filling with self-aligned complex quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küster, Achim; Heyn, Christian; Ungeheuer, Arne; Juska, Gediminas; Tommaso Moroni, Stefano; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Strain-free epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) are fabricated by a combination of Al local droplet etching (LDE) of nanoholes in AlGaAs surfaces and subsequent hole filling with GaAs. The whole process is performed in a conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber. Autocorrelation measurements establish single-photon emission from LDE QDs with a very small correlation function g (2)(0)≃ 0.01 of the exciton emission. Here, we focus on the influence of the initial hole depth on the QD optical properties with the goal to create deep holes suited for filling with more complex nanostructures like quantum dot molecules (QDM). The depth of droplet etched nanoholes is controlled by the droplet material coverage and the process temperature, where a higher coverage or temperature yields deeper holes. The requirements of high quantum dot uniformity and narrow luminescence linewidth, which are often found in applications, set limits to the process temperature. At high temperatures, the hole depths become inhomogeneous and the linewidth rapidly increases beyond 640 °C. With the present process technique, we identify an upper limit of 40-nm hole depth if the linewidth has to remain below 100 μeV. Furthermore, we study the exciton fine-structure splitting which is increased from 4.6 μeV in 15-nm-deep to 7.9 μeV in 35-nm-deep holes. As an example for the functionalization of deep nanoholes, self-aligned vertically stacked GaAs QD pairs are fabricated by filling of holes with 35 nm depth. Exciton peaks from stacked dots show linewidths below 100 μeV which is close to that from single QDs.

  2. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  3. Ultrafast coherent studies of excitons and excitonic complexes in doped and undoped gallium arsenide quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Alexander Anthony

    2003-10-01

    This thesis reports a systematic study of near-band edge linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped and undoped semiconductor multiple quantum well samples, aimed at quantifying and separating the numerous contributions to the overall material response from photon excitation. Information obtained from both linear absorption and nonlinear, degenerate four-wave-mixing experiments is compared with elaborate numerical simulations. Accurate measures of 1S--2S binding energies and dephasing rates as a function of temperature from 5 to 40 K is established. The biexciton binding energy and dephasing rate over the temperature range 5 to 40 K is measured and, by comparison with theories reported in the literature, it is found that localization effects have a significant influence on the biexciton binding energy in 5 nm quantum wells. The first systematic attempt to quantitatively account for the continuum contribution to nonlinear response by fitting a series of spectra obtained at various input laser pulse detunings was conducted. Unique evidence for coherent beating between multi-exciton/free electron complexes in lightly doped material was also found.

  4. Toward extending photosynthetic biosignatures: quantum dynamics calculation of light harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    For detecting life from reflectance spectra on extrasolar planets, several indicators called surface biosignatures have been proposed. One of them is the vegetation red edge (VRE) which derives from surface vegetation. VRE is observed in 700-750 nm on the Earth, but there is no guarantee that exovegetation show the red edge in this wavelength. Therefore it is necessary to check the validity of current standards of VRE as the signatures. In facts, M stars (cooler than Sun) will be the main targets in future missions, it is significantly important to know on the fundamental mechanisms in photosynthetic organism such as purple bacteria which absorb longer wavelength radiation. We investigated light absorptions and excitation energy transfers (EETs) in light harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2s) by using quantum dynamics simulations. In LH2, effective EET is accomplished by corporative electronic excitation of the pigments. In our theoretical model, a dipole-dipole approximation was used for the electronic interactions between pigment excitations. Quantum dynamics simulations were performed according to Liouville equation to examine the EET process. The calculated oscillator strength and the transfer time between LH2 were good agreement with the experimental values. As the system size increases, the absorption bands shifted longer and the transfer velocities became larger. When two pigments in a LHC were exchanged to another pigments with lower excitation energy, faster and intensive light collection were observed.

  5. Characterization of citrate capped gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajat; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and several other bioflavonoids possess antioxidant property. These biomolecules can reduce the diabetic complications, but metabolize very easily in the body. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a flavonoid may further increase its efficacy. Gold nanoparticle is used by different groups as vehicle for drug delivery, as it is least toxic to human body. Prior to search for the enhanced efficacy, the gold nanoparticle-flavonoid complex should be prepared and well characterized. In this article, we report the interaction of gold nanoparticle with quercetin. The interaction is confirmed by different biophysical techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and cross checked by quantum chemical calculations. These studies indicate that gold clusters are covered by citrate groups, which are hydrogen bonded to the quercetin molecules in the complex. We have also provided evidences how capping is important in stabilizing the gold nanoparticle and further enhances its interaction with other molecules, such as drugs. Our finding also suggests that gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex can pass through the membranes of human red blood cells.

  6. Energy-scales convergence for optimal and robust quantum transport in photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohseni, M.; Shabani, A.; Lloyd, S.; Rabitz, H.

    2014-01-21

    Underlying physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to estimate energy transfer efficiency of such complex excitonic systems. We observe that the dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex leads to optimal and robust energy transport due to a convergence of energy scales among all important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimum and stable with respect to important parameters of environmental interactions including reorganization energy λ, bath frequency cutoff γ, temperature T, and bath spatial correlations. We identify the ratio of k{sub B}λT/ℏγ⁢g as a single key parameter governing quantum transport efficiency, where g is the average excitonic energy gap.

  7. Non-local total variation method for despeckling of ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianbin; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuming

    2014-03-01

    Despeckling of ultrasound images, as a very active topic research in medical image processing, plays an important or even indispensable role in subsequent ultrasound image processing. The non-local total variation (NLTV) method has been widely applied to denoising images corrupted by Gaussian noise, but it cannot provide satisfactory restoration results for ultrasound images corrupted by speckle noise. To address this problem, a novel non-local total variation despeckling method is proposed for speckle reduction. In the proposed method, the non-local gradient is computed on the images restored by the optimized Bayesian non-local means (OBNLM) method and it is introduced into the total variation method to suppress speckle in ultrasound images. Comparisons of the restoration performance are made among the proposed method and such state-of-the-art despeckling methods as the squeeze box filter (SBF), the non-local means (NLM) method and the OBNLM method. The quantitative comparisons based on synthetic speckled images show that the proposed method can provide higher Peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structure similarity (SSIM) than compared despeckling methods. The subjective visual comparisons based on synthetic and real ultrasound images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other compared algorithms in that it can achieve better performance of noise reduction, artifact avoidance, edge and texture preservation.

  8. Probing degradation in complex engineering silicones by 1H multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S C; Giuliani, J; Herberg, J L

    2007-09-05

    Static {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MQ NMR) has recently been shown to provide detailed insight into the network structure of pristine silicon based polymer systems. The MQ NMR method characterizes the residual dipolar couplings of the silicon chains that depend on the average molecular weight between physical or chemical constraints. Recently, we have employed MQ NMR methods to characterize the changes in network structure in a series of complex silicone materials subject to numerous degradation mechanisms, including thermal, radiative, and desiccative. For thermal degradation, MQ NMR shows that a combination of crosslinking due to post-curing reactions as well as random chain scissioning reactions occurs. For radiative degradation, the primary mechanisms are via crosslinking both in the network and at the interface between the polymer and the inorganic filler. For samples stored in highly desiccating environments, MQ NMR shows that the average segmental dynamics are slowed due to increased interactions between the filler and the network polymer chains.

  9. Quantum spin fluctuations in quasi-one-dimensional chlorine-bridged platinum complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Donohoe, Robert J.; Wang, Wen Z.; Bishop, Alan R.; Gammel, Jan T.

    1997-12-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of spin dynamic process in the quasi-one-dimensional chlorine- bridged platinum complex, [PtII(en)2][PtIV(en)2Cl2](ClO4)4, where en equals ethylenediamine, C2N2H8. The process manifests itself in collapsing of the hyperfine and superhyperfine structures in the electron spin resonance spectrum and non-statistical distribution of spectral weight of the Pt isotopes. More surprisingly, it is activated only at temperatures below 6 K. We interpret the phenomenon in terms of quantum tunneling of the electronic spin in a strong electron-electron and electron-phonon coupling regime. This is modeled using a non-adiabatic many-body approach, in which polarons and solitons represent local spin-Peierls regions in a strongly disproportional charge- density-wave background and display intriguing spin-charge separation in the form of pinned charge and tunneling spin fluctuations.

  10. Teleportation - Travel in the Quantum and Relativistic Realms and Bejond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2007-01-01

    This book, which is devoted to the description and discussion of several methods leading to teleportation, is divided into three main parts: a) foundations of quantum non-locality, quantum particle teleportation and quantum computing; b) foundations of quantum-relativistic teleportation, warp drive propulsion methods and search for extraterrestrial visitation; c) experiments in "psychic teleportation" and problems related to quantum consciousness studies.

  11. Pion-to-Photon Transition Distribution Amplitudes in the Non-Local Chiral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Praszałowicz, M.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the non-local chiral quark model to study vector and axial pion-to-photon transition amplitudes that are needed as a nonperturbative input to estimate the cross-section of pion annihilation into the real and virtual photon. We use a simple form of the non-locality that allows to perform all calculations in the Minkowski space and guaranties polynomiality of the TDAs. We note only residual dependence on the precise form of the cut-off function, however vector TDA that is symmetric in skewedness parameter in the local quark model is no longer symmetric in the non-local case. We calculate also the transition form-factors and compare them with existing experimental parametrizations.

  12. Purely non-local Hamiltonian formalism, Kohno connections and ∨-systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arsie, Alessandro; Lorenzoni, Paolo

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we extend purely non-local Hamiltonian formalism to a class of Riemannian F-manifolds, without assumptions on the semisimplicity of the product ○ or on the flatness of the connection ∇. In the flat case, we show that the recurrence relations for the principal hierarchy can be re-interpreted using a local and purely non-local Hamiltonian operators and in this case they split into two Lenard-Magri chains, one involving the even terms, the other involving the odd terms. Furthermore, we give an elementary proof that the Kohno property and the ∨-system condition are equivalent under suitable assumptions and we show how to associate a purely non-local Hamiltonian structure to any ∨-system, including degenerate ones.

  13. A Non-Local Low-Rank Approach to Enforce Integrability.

    PubMed

    Badri, Hicham; Yahia, Hussein

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new approach to enforce integrability using recent advances in non-local methods. Our formulation consists in a sparse gradient data-fitting term to handle outliers together with a gradient-domain non-local low-rank prior. This regularization has two main advantages: 1) the low-rank prior ensures similarity between non-local gradient patches, which helps recovering high-quality clean patches from severe outliers corruption and 2) the low-rank prior efficiently reduces dense noise as it has been shown in recent image restoration works. We propose an efficient solver for the resulting optimization formulation using alternate minimization. Experiments show that the new method leads to an important improvement compared with previous optimization methods and is able to efficiently handle both outliers and dense noise mixed together. PMID:27214898

  14. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  15. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  16. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  17. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  18. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  19. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  20. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance. PMID:26254660

  1. Emergence of quantum mechanics from a sub-quantum statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    A research program within the scope of theories on "Emergent Quantum Mechanics" is presented, which has gained some momentum in recent years. Via the modeling of a quantum system as a non-equilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy from the zero-point vacuum, the quantum is considered as an emergent system. We implement a specific "bouncer-walker" model in the context of an assumed sub-quantum statistical physics, in analogy to the results of experiments by Couder and Fort on a classical wave-particle duality. We can thus give an explanation of various quantum mechanical features and results on the basis of a "21st century classical physics", such as the appearance of Planck's constant, the Schrödinger equation, etc. An essential result is given by the proof that averaged particle trajectories' behaviors correspond to a specific type of anomalous diffusion termed "ballistic" diffusion on a sub-quantum level. It is further demonstrated both analytically and with the aid of computer simulations that our model provides explanations for various quantum effects such as double-slit or n-slit interference. We show the averaged trajectories emerging from our model to be identical to Bohmian trajectories, albeit without the need to invoke complex wavefunctions or any other quantum mechanical tool. Finally, the model provides new insights into the origins of entanglement, and, in particular, into the phenomenon of a "systemic" non-locality.

  2. PREFACE: DICE 2008 - From Quantum Mechanics through Complexity to Spacetime: the role of emergent dynamical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    These proceedings present the Invited Lectures and Contributed Papers of the Fourth International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2008, held at Castello Pasquini, Castiglioncello (Tuscany), 22-26 September 2008. We deliver these proceedings as a means to document to the interested public, to the wider scientific community, and to the participants themselves the stimulating exchange of ideas at this conference. The steadily growing number of participants, among them acclaimed scientists in their respective fields, show its increasing attraction and a fruitful concept, based on bringing leading researchers together and in contact with a mix of advanced students and scholars. Thus, this series of meetings successfully continued from the beginning with DICE 2002, (Decoherence and Entropy in Complex Systems ed H-T Elze Lecture Notes in Physics 633 (Berlin: Springer, 2004)) followed by DICE 2004 (Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2004 ed H-T Elze Braz. Journ. Phys. 35, 2A & 2B (2005) pp 205-529 free access at: www.sbfisica.org.br/bjp) and by DICE 2006, (Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2006 eds H-T Elze, L Diósi and G Vitiello Journal of Physics: Conference Series 67 (2007); free access at: http://www.iop.org/EJ/toc/1742-6596/67/1) uniting about one hundred participants from more than twenty different countries worldwide this time. It has been a great honour and inspiration for all of us to have Professor Sir Roger Penrose from the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford with us, who presented the lecture ``Black holes, quantum theory and cosmology'' (included in this volume). Discussions under the wider theme ``From Quantum Mechanics through Complexity to Spacetime: the role of emergent dynamical structures'' took place in the very pleasant and inspiring atmosphere of Castello

  3. Hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of HIV-1 Integrase/Inhibitor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Pianwanit, Somsak; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Ebalunode, Jerry O.; Briggs, James M.; Kokpol, Sirirat

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is an attractive target for development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome chemotherapy. In this study, conventional and coupled quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of HIV-1 IN complexed with 5CITEP (IN-5CITEP) were carried out. In addition to differences in the bound position of 5CITEP, significant differences at the two levels of theory were observed in the metal coordination geometry and the areas involving residues 116–119 and 140–166. In the conventional MD simulation, the coordination of Mg2+ was found to be a near-perfect octahedral geometry whereas a distorted octahedral complex was observed in QM/MM. All of the above reasons lead to a different pattern of protein-ligand salt link formation that was not observed in the classical MD simulation. Furthermore to provide a theoretical understanding of inhibition mechanisms of 5CITEP and its derivative (DKA), hybrid QM/MM MD simulations of the two complexes (IN-5CITEP and IN-DKA) have been performed. The results reveal that areas involving residues 60–68, 116–119, and 140–149 were substantially different among the two systems. The two systems show similar pattern of metal coordination geometry, i.e., a distorted octahedron. In IN-DKA, both OD1 and OD2 of Asp-64 coordinate the Mg2+ in a monodentate fashion whereas only OD1 is chelated to the metal as observed in IN-5CITEP. The high potency of DKA as compared to 5CITEP is supported by a strong salt link formed between its carboxylate moiety and the ammonium group of Lys-159. Detailed comparisons between HIV-1 IN complexed with DKA and with 5CITEP provide information about ligand structure effects on protein-ligand interactions in particular with the Lys-159. This is useful for the design of new selective HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:17693479

  4. Quantization of non-local field theory and string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Hiroyuki

    1989-02-01

    The interaction vertex in covariant string field theory (SFT) is non-local in the time coordinate and the conventional canonical quantization is inapplicable to it. As an approach to quantizing this system we apply Hayashi's theory of the Hamilton formalism for field theories with non-local interactions. We find that the resulting one-loop amplitudes in covariant closed SFT coincide with those in the light-cone gauge SFT. I would like to thank T. Kugo, H. Kunitomo, M.M. Nojiri, K. Ogawa and K. Suehiro for valuable discussions, and especially Professor S. Tanaka for directing my attention to Hayashi's theory.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in SFT inspired non-local scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Alexey S.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.

    2012-10-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in models with a single non-local scalar field originating from the string field theory description of the rolling tachyon dynamics. We construct the equation for the energy density perturbations of the non-local scalar field and explicitly prove that for the free field it is identical to a system of local cosmological perturbation equations in a particular model with multiple (maybe infinitely many) local free scalar fields. We also show that vector and tensor perturbations are absent in this set-up.

  6. Quantum chemical study on surface complex structures of phosphate on gibbsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, Carina V.; Castellani, Norberto J.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum mechanics calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) were used to identify phosphate surface complexes on gibbsite at low and high pH. The different phosphate species were represented using the Al6(OH)18(H2O)6 cluster model considering four different geometries: monodentate mononuclear (Pmm), monodentate binuclear (Pmb), bidentate mononuclear (Pbm) and bidentate binuclear (Pbb). The corresponding adsorption reactions were modelled via ligand exchange between phosphate species and surface functional groups (hydroxyls and protonated hydroxyls at high and low pH, respectively). The theoretical results indicate that phosphate surface complexes are thermodynamically more favored at acid pH, in agreement with experimental evidences. The first step in these reactions, i.e., the generation of required aluminum vacant sites, was predicted to be particularly favorable when singly coordinated aquo groups are released. Stretching and bending vibrational frequencies associated with the different surface structures were calculated at both pH conditions. The corresponding values at low pH were found to be shifted to higher frequencies with respect to those ones at high pH. ATR-FTIR studies were also carried out. The resulting spectra are dominated by a strong band within the 800-840 cm-1 interval due to P-OH stretching modes. The corresponding peak appearing around 820 cm-1 at high pH is shifted to lower frequencies with respect to the position at low pH, a tendency well predicted by DFT calculations.

  7. Quantum chemical study on surface complex structures of phosphate on gibbsite.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina V; Castellani, Norberto J; Ferullo, Ricardo M

    2015-08-01

    Quantum mechanics calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) were used to identify phosphate surface complexes on gibbsite at low and high pH. The different phosphate species were represented using the Al₆(OH)₁₈(H₂O)₆ cluster model considering four different geometries: monodentate mononuclear (Pmm), monodentate binuclear (Pmb), bidentate mononuclear (Pbm) and bidentate binuclear (Pbb). The corresponding adsorption reactions were modelled via ligand exchange between phosphate species and surface functional groups (hydroxyls and protonated hydroxyls at high and low pH, respectively). The theoretical results indicate that phosphate surface complexes are thermodynamically more favored at acid pH, in agreement with experimental evidences. The first step in these reactions, i.e., the generation of required aluminum vacant sites, was predicted to be particularly favorable when singly coordinated aquo groups are released. Stretching and bending vibrational frequencies associated with the different surface structures were calculated at both pH conditions. The corresponding values at low pH were found to be shifted to higher frequencies with respect to those ones at high pH. ATR-FTIR studies were also carried out. The resulting spectra are dominated by a strong band within the 800-840 cm(-1) interval due to P-OH stretching modes. The corresponding peak appearing around 820 cm(-1) at high pH is shifted to lower frequencies with respect to the position at low pH, a tendency well predicted by DFT calculations. PMID:25841151

  8. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  9. A NEW COMBINED LOCAL AND NON-LOCAL PBL MODEL FOR METEOROLOGY AND AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new version of the Asymmetric Convective Model (ACM) has been developed to describe sub-grid vertical turbulent transport in both meteorology models and air quality models. The new version (ACM2) combines the non-local convective mixing of the original ACM with local eddy diff...

  10. Neutral currents probed by non-local transport in graphene with 5 d metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yilin; Cai, Xinghan; Xiao, Shudong; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael

    Adsorption of adatoms on graphene has been theoretically proposed as an effective means to enhance spin-orbit coupling in graphene. Here we use the non-local measurement geometry to detect neutral currents (spin, valley, energy) through their Hall and inverse Hall effects. Single-layer graphene devices are probed in-situ in ultra-high vacuum while depositing 5 d heavy metal atoms (Ir, Au) at a temperature of 7 K. Surprisingly, we detect a non-local signal in pristine devices as well as metal-atom modified devices, with a consistent dependence of the signal on length and gate voltage for several devices. Changes in the non-local signal upon deposition of 5 d metal atoms appear governed by charge carrier mobility (reduced with increasing metal atom concentration) and are difficult to understand with spin Hall/inverse spin Hall effects alone due to increased spin-orbit coupling in graphene. We will discuss other possible origins of the non-local signal. This work was supported by the U.S. ONR MURI. MSF was supported by an ARC Laureate Fellowship.