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Sample records for quantum scattering theory

  1. Quantum theory of Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.; Gregori, G.

    2014-12-01

    The general theory of the scattering of electromagnetic radiation in atomic plasmas and metals, in the non-relativistic regime, in which account is taken of the Kramers-Heisenberg polarization terms in the Hamiltonian, is described from a quantum mechanical viewpoint. As well as deriving the general formula for the double differential Thomson scattering cross section in an isotropic finite temperature multi-component system, this work also considers closely related phenomena such as absorption, refraction, Raman scattering, resonant (Rayleigh) scattering and Bragg scattering, and derives many essential relationships between these quantities. In particular, the work introduces the concept of scattering strength and the strength-density field which replaces the normal particle density field in the standard treatment of scattering by a collection of similar particles and it is the decomposition of the strength-density correlation function into more familiar-looking components that leads to the final result. Comparisons are made with previous work, in particular that of Chihara [1].

  2. Scattering asymptotic conditions in Euclidean relativistic quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Gordon J.; Polyzou, W. N.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the formulation of the scattering asymptotic condition as a strong limit in Euclidean quantum theories satisfying the Osterwalder-Schrader axioms. When used with the invariance principle this provides a constructive method to compute scattering observables directly in the Euclidean formulation of the theory, without an explicit analytic continuation.

  3. A modified Lax-Phillips scattering theory for quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The Lax-Phillips scattering theory is an appealing abstract framework for the analysis of scattering resonances. Quantum mechanical adaptations of the theory have been proposed. However, since these quantum adaptations essentially retain the original structure of the theory, assuming the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces for the evolution and requiring the spectrum of the generator of evolution to be unbounded from below, their range of applications is rather limited. In this paper, it is shown that if we replace the assumption regarding the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces by the assumption of the existence of Lyapunov operators for the quantum evolution (the existence of which has been proved for certain classes of quantum mechanical scattering problems), then it is possible to construct a structure analogous to the Lax-Phillips structure for scattering problems for which the spectrum of the generator of evolution is bounded from below.

  4. A modified Lax-Phillips scattering theory for quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.

    2015-07-15

    The Lax-Phillips scattering theory is an appealing abstract framework for the analysis of scattering resonances. Quantum mechanical adaptations of the theory have been proposed. However, since these quantum adaptations essentially retain the original structure of the theory, assuming the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces for the evolution and requiring the spectrum of the generator of evolution to be unbounded from below, their range of applications is rather limited. In this paper, it is shown that if we replace the assumption regarding the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces by the assumption of the existence of Lyapunov operators for the quantum evolution (the existence of which has been proved for certain classes of quantum mechanical scattering problems), then it is possible to construct a structure analogous to the Lax-Phillips structure for scattering problems for which the spectrum of the generator of evolution is bounded from below.

  5. Scattering theory of nonlinear thermoelectricity in quantum coherent conductors.

    PubMed

    Meair, Jonathan; Jacquod, Philippe

    2013-02-27

    We construct a scattering theory of weakly nonlinear thermoelectric transport through sub-micron scale conductors. The theory incorporates the leading nonlinear contributions in temperature and voltage biases to the charge and heat currents. Because of the finite capacitances of sub-micron scale conducting circuits, fundamental conservation laws such as gauge invariance and current conservation require special care to be preserved. We do this by extending the approach of Christen and Büttiker (1996 Europhys. Lett. 35 523) to coupled charge and heat transport. In this way we write relations connecting nonlinear transport coefficients in a manner similar to Mott's relation between the linear thermopower and the linear conductance. We derive sum rules that nonlinear transport coefficients must satisfy to preserve gauge invariance and current conservation. We illustrate our theory by calculating the efficiency of heat engines and the coefficient of performance of thermoelectric refrigerators based on quantum point contacts and resonant tunneling barriers. We identify, in particular, rectification effects that increase device performance. PMID:23343784

  6. Modern integral equation techniques for quantum reactive scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, S.M.

    1993-11-01

    Rigorous calculations of cross sections and rate constants for elementary gas phase chemical reactions are performed for comparison with experiment, to ensure that our picture of the chemical reaction is complete. We focus on the H/D+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}/DH + H reaction, and use the time independent integral equation technique in quantum reactive scattering theory. We examine the sensitivity of H+H{sub 2} state resolved integral cross sections {sigma}{sub v{prime}j{prime},vj}(E) for the transitions (v = 0,j = 0) to (v{prime} = 1,j{prime} = 1,3), to the difference between the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and double many body expansion (DMBE) ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES). This sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the origin of a large discrepancy between experimental cross sections with sharply peaked energy dependence and theoretical ones with smooth energy dependence. We find that the LSTH and DMBE PESs give virtually identical cross sections, which lends credence to the theoretical energy dependence.

  7. Modern Integral Equation Techniques for Quantum Reactive Scattering Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Scott Michael

    Rigorous calculations of cross sections and rate constants for elementary gas phase chemical reactions are performed for comparison with experiment, to ensure that our picture of the chemical reaction is complete. We focus on the H/D + H_2 to H _2/DH + H reaction, and use the time independent integral equation technique in quantum reactive scattering theory. We examine the sensitivity of H + H_2 state resolved integral cross sections sigma_{v^' j^ ',vj}(E) for the transitions (v = 0, j = 0) to (v^' = 1,j^ ' = 1,3), to the difference between the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and double many body expansion (DMBE) ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES). This sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the origin of a large discrepancy between experimental cross sections with sharply peaked energy dependence and theoretical ones with smooth energy dependence. We find that the LSTH and DMBE PESs give virtually identical cross sections, which lends credence to the theoretical energy dependence. To facilitate quantum calculations on more complex reactive systems, we develop a new method to compute the energy Green's function with absorbing boundary conditions (ABC), for use in calculating the cumulative reaction probability. The method is an iterative technique to compute the inverse of a non-Hermitian matrix which is based on Fourier transforming time dependent dynamics, and which requires very little core memory. The Hamiltonian is evaluated in a sinc-function based discrete variable representation (DVR) which we argue may often be superior to the fast Fourier transform method for reactive scattering. We apply the resulting power series Green's function to the benchmark collinear H + H_2 system over the energy range 3.37 to 1.27 eV. The convergence of the power series is stable at all energies, and is accelerated by the use of a stronger absorbing potential. The practicality of computing the ABC-DVR Green's function in a polynomial of the Hamiltonian is

  8. Time Delay for Dispersive Systems in Quantum Scattering Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedra de Aldecoa, Rafael

    We consider time delay and symmetrized time delay (defined in terms of sojourn times) for quantum scattering pairs {H0 = h(P), H}, where h(P) is a dispersive operator of hypoelliptic-type. For instance, h(P) can be one of the usual elliptic operators such as the Schrödinger operator h(P) = P2 or the square-root Klein-Gordon operator h(P) = √ {1 + P2}. We show under general conditions that the symmetrized time delay exists for all smooth even localization functions. It is equal to the Eisenbud-Wigner time delay plus a contribution due to the non-radial component of the localization function. If the scattering operator S commutes with some function of the velocity operator ∇h(P), then the time delay also exists and is equal to the symmetrized time delay. As an illustration of our results, we consider the case of a one-dimensional Friedrichs Hamiltonian perturbed by a finite rank potential. Our study puts into evidence an integral formula relating the operator of differentiation with respect to the kinetic energy h(P) to the time evolution of localization operators.

  9. Fermion-fermion scattering in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-02-20

    We propose an analog-digital quantum simulation of fermion-fermion scattering mediated by a continuum of bosonic modes within a circuit quantum electrodynamics scenario. This quantum technology naturally provides strong coupling of superconducting qubits with a continuum of electromagnetic modes in an open transmission line. In this way, we propose qubits to efficiently simulate fermionic modes via digital techniques, while we consider the continuum complexity of an open transmission line to simulate the continuum complexity of bosonic modes in quantum field theories. Therefore, we believe that the complexity-simulating-complexity concept should become a leading paradigm in any effort towards scalable quantum simulations. PMID:25763944

  10. Quantum Theory of (H,H{Sub 2}) Scattering: Approximate Treatments of Reactive Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tang, K. T.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    A quantum mechanical study is made of reactive scattering in the (H, H{sub 2}) system. The problem is formulated in terms of a form of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) suitable for collisions in which all particles have finite mass. For certain incident energies, differential and total cross sections, as well as other attributes of the reactive collisions, (e.g. reaction configuration), are determined. Two limiting models in the DWBA formulation are compared; in one, the molecule is unperturbed by the incoming atom and in the other, the molecule adiabatically follows the incoming atom. For thermal incident energies and semi-empirical interaction potential employed, the adiabatic model seems to be more appropriate. Since the DWBA method is too complicated for a general study of the (H, H{sub 2}) reaction, a much simpler approximation method, the “linear model” is developed. This model is very different in concept from treatments in which the three atoms are constrained to move on a line throughout the collision. The present model includes the full three-dimensional aspect of the collision and it is only the evaluation of the transition matrix element itself that is simplified. It is found that the linear model, when appropriately normalized, gives results in good agreement with that of the DWBA method. By application of this model, the energy dependence, rotational state of dependence and other properties of the total and differential reactions cross sections are determined. These results of the quantum mechanical treatment are compared with the classical calculation for the same potential surface. The most important result is that, in agreement with the classical treatment, the differential cross sections are strongly backward peaked at low energies and shifts in the forward direction as the energy increases. Finally, the implications of the present calculations for a theory of chemical kinetics are discussed.

  11. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  12. A semiclassical method in the theory of light scattering by semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, I. G.; Korovin, L. I. Pavlov, S. T.

    2008-06-15

    A semiclassical method is proposed for the theoretical description of elastic light scattering by arbitrary semiconductor quantum dots under conditions of size quantization. This method involves retarded potentials and allows one to dispense with boundary conditions for electric and magnetic fields. Exact results for the Umov-Poynting vector at large distances from quantum dots in the case of monochromatic and pulsed irradiation and formulas for differential scattering cross sections are obtained.

  13. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies. PMID:26618533

  14. Theory of phonon inelastic atom--surface scattering. I. Quantum mechanical treatment of collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Poe, R.T.

    1985-08-01

    We present a systematic formulation of the atom--surface scattering dynamics which includes the vibrational states of the atoms in the solid (phonons). The properties of the total scattering wave function of the system, a representation of the interaction potential matrix, and the characteristics of the independent physical solutions are all derived from the translational invariance of the full Hamiltonian. The scattering equations in the integral forms as well as the related Green functions were also obtained. The configurational representations of the Green functions, in particular, are quite different from those of the conventional scattering theory where the collision partners are spatially localized. Various versions of the integral expression of scattering, transition, and reactance matrices were also obtained. They are useful for introducing approximation schemes. From the present formulation, some specific theoretical schemes which are more realistic compared to those that have been employed so far and at the same time capable of yielding effective ab initio computation are derived in the following paper. The time reversal invariance and the microscopic reversibility of the atom--surface scattering were discussed. The relations between the in and outgoing scattering wave functions which are satisfied in the atom--surface system and important in the transition matrix methods were presented. The phonon annihilation and creation, and the adsorption and desorption of the atom are related through the time reversal invariance, and thus the microscopic reversibility can be tested by the experiment.

  15. Hybrid theory and calculation of e-N2 scattering. [quantum mechanics - nuclei (nuclear physics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.; Temkin, A.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering was developed which was a synthesis of close coupling and adiabatic-nuclei theories. The theory is shown to be a close coupling theory with respect to vibrational degrees of freedom but is a adiabatic-nuclei theory with respect to rotation. It can be applied to any number of partial waves required, and the remaining ones can be calculated purely in one or the other approximation. A theoretical criterion based on fixed-nuclei calculations and not on experiment can be given as to which partial waves and energy domains require the various approximations. The theory allows all cross sections (i.e., pure rotational, vibrational, simultaneous vibration-rotation, differential and total) to be calculated. Explicit formulae for all the cross sections are presented.

  16. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm. PMID:22654052

  17. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  18. Inelastic Scattering of Identical Molecules within Framework of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory: Application to Rotational Excitations in H2 + H2.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical foundation is laid out for description of permutation symmetry in the inelastic scattering processes that involve collisions of two identical molecules, within the framework of the mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT). In this approach, the rotational (and vibrational) states of two molecules are treated quantum-mechanically, whereas their translational motion (responsible for scattering) is treated classically. This theory is applied to H2 + H2 system, and the state-to-state transition cross sections are compared versus those obtained from the full-quantum calculations and experimental results from the literature. Good agreement is found in all cases. It is also found that results of MQCT, where the Coriolis coupling is included classically, are somewhat closer to exact full-quantum results than results of the other approximate quantum methods, where those coupling terms are neglected. These new developments allow applications of MQCT to a broad variety of molecular systems and processes. PMID:27187769

  19. Introducing Scattering Theory with a Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, John R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a new method of presenting the scattering theory, including classical explanation of cross sections, quantum mechanical expressions for phase shifts, and use of a computer to solve problems. (CC)

  20. Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Molecule-Molecule Inelastic Scattering: Derivations of Equations and Application to N2 + H2 System.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-12-17

    The mixed quantum classical theory, MQCT, for inelastic scattering of two molecules is developed, in which the internal (rotational, vibrational) motion of both collision partners is treated with quantum mechanics, and the molecule-molecule scattering (translational motion) is described by classical trajectories. The resultant MQCT formalism includes a system of coupled differential equations for quantum probability amplitudes, and the classical equations of motion in the mean-field potential. Numerical tests of this theory are carried out for several most important rotational state-to-state transitions in the N2 + H2 system, in a broad range of collision energies. Besides scattering resonances (at low collision energies) excellent agreement with full-quantum results is obtained, including the excitation thresholds, the maxima of cross sections, and even some smaller features, such as slight oscillations of energy dependencies. Most importantly, at higher energies the results of MQCT are nearly identical to the full quantum results, which makes this approach a good alternative to the full-quantum calculations that become computationally expensive at higher collision energies and for heavier collision partners. Extensions of this theory to include vibrational transitions or general asymmetric-top rotor (polyatomic) molecules are relatively straightforward. PMID:26323089

  1. Electromagnetic scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, J. F.; Farrell, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering theory is discussed with emphasis on the general stochastic variational principle (SVP) and its applications. The stochastic version of the Schwinger-type variational principle is presented, and explicit expressions for its integrals are considered. Results are summarized for scalar wave scattering from a classic rough-surface model and for vector wave scattering from a random dielectric-body model. Also considered are the selection of trial functions and the variational improvement of the Kirchhoff short-wave approximation appropriate to large size-parameters. Other applications of vector field theory discussed include a general vision theory and the analysis of hydromagnetism induced by ocean motion across the geomagnetic field. Levitational force-torque in the magnetic suspension of the disturbance compensation system (DISCOS), now deployed in NOVA satellites, is also analyzed using the developed theory.

  2. Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A theory based on the premise that, on the microscopic scale, physical quantities have discrete, rather than a continuous range of, values. The theory was devised in the early part of the twentieth century to account for certain phenomena that could not be explained by classical physics. In 1900, the German physicist, Max Planck (1858-1947), was able precisely to describe the previously unexplaine...

  3. Quantum rainbow scattering at tunable velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strebel, M.; Müller, T.-O.; Ruff, B.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic scattering cross sections are measured for lithium atoms colliding with rare-gas atoms and SF6 molecules at tunable relative velocities down to ˜50 m/s. Our scattering apparatus combines a velocity-tunable molecular beam with a magneto-optic trap which provides an ultracold cloud of lithium atoms as a scattering target. Comparison with theory reveals the quantum nature of the collision dynamics in the studied regime, including rainbows as well as orbiting resonances.

  4. Quantum theory of phase correlations in optical frequency combs generated by stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunbai; Raymer, M. G.; Wang, Y. Y.; Benabid, F.

    2010-11-15

    We explore theoretically the phase correlation between multiple generated sidebands in a Raman optical frequency comb under conditions of spontaneous initiation from quantum zero-point noise. We show that there is a near-deterministic correlation between sideband phases in each laser shot which may lead to synthesis of attosecond pulse trains.

  5. Suppression of Impurity Back Scattering in Double Quantum Wires: Theory Beyond the Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Danhong; Lyo, S.K.

    1999-08-09

    The effect of higher-order corrections to the Born approximation is studied for the previously obtained giant conductance enhancement in tunnel-coupled double quantum wires in a parallel magnetic field. The relative correction is found to be significant and depends on various effects such as the magnetic field, electron and impurity densities, impurity positions, symmetric and asymmetric doping profiles, and center barrier thickness.

  6. Experimental confirmation of neoclassical Compton scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V. V.; Yakunin, S. N.; Despotuli, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    Incoherent X-ray scattering spectra of diamond and silicon crystals recorded on the BESSY-2 electron storage ring have been analyzed. All spectral features are described well in terms of the neoclassical scattering theory without consideration for the hypotheses accepted in quantum electrodynamics. It is noted that the accepted tabular data on the intensity ratio between the Compton and Rayleigh spectral components may significantly differ from the experimental values. It is concluded that the development of the general theory (considering coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and Bragg diffraction) must be continued.

  7. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly. PMID:26799915

  8. Quantum Theory and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Ted

    2009-07-01

    List of participants; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. The function of the colloquium - editorial; 2. The conceptual problem of quantum theory from the experimentalist's point of view O. R. Frisch; Part II. Niels Bohr and Complementarity: The Place of the Classical Language: 3. The Copenhagen interpretation C. F. von Weizsäcker; 4. On Bohr's views concerning the quantum theory D. Bohm; Part III. The Measurement Problem: 5. Quantal observation in statistical interpretation H. J. Groenewold; 6. Macroscopic physics, quantum mechanics and quantum theory of measurement G. M. Prosperi; 7. Comment on the Daneri-Loinger-Prosperi quantum theory of measurement Jeffrey Bub; 8. The phenomenology of observation and explanation in quantum theory J. H. M. Whiteman; 9. Measurement theory and complex systems M. A. Garstens; Part IV. New Directions within Quantum Theory: What does the Quantum Theoretical Formalism Really Tell Us?: 10. On the role of hidden variables in the fundamental structure of physics D. Bohm; 11. Beyond what? Discussion: space-time order within existing quantum theory C. W. Kilmister; 12. Definability and measurability in quantum theory Yakir Aharonov and Aage Petersen; 13. The bootstrap idea and the foundations of quantum theory Geoffrey F. Chew; Part V. A Fresh Start?: 14. Angular momentum: an approach to combinatorial space-time Roger Penrose; 15. A note on discreteness, phase space and cohomology theory B. J. Hiley; 16. Cohomology of observations R. H. Atkin; 17. The origin of half-integral spin in a discrete physical space Ted Bastin; Part VI. Philosophical Papers: 18. The unity of physics C. F. von Weizsäcker; 19. A philosophical obstacle to the rise of new theories in microphysics Mario Bunge; 20. The incompleteness of quantum mechanics or the emperor's missing clothes H. R. Post; 21. How does a particle get from A to B?; Ted Bastin; 22. Informational generalization of entropy in physics Jerome Rothstein; 23. Can life explain quantum mechanics? H. H

  9. Scattering processes in lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, V.; Krzywicki, A.

    1980-06-01

    Scattering between gauge invariant lattice excitations is studied in the framework of a 2+1 dimensional lattice theory with U(1) gauge symmetry. We put the theory in a form analogous to theories of conventional large quantum systems (spin waves in a solid, for example) and we calculate explicitly the cross section for boxiton scattering. The general strategy we have developed goes beyond the simple example of compact QED. Laboratoire associé au CNRS. Postal address: LPTHE, Bâtiment 211, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, France.

  10. Ponderomotive potential and backward Raman scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.

    2014-03-15

    The backward Raman scattering is studied in dense quantum plasmas. The coefficients in the backward Raman scattering is found to be underestimated (overestimated) in the classical theory if the excited Langmuir wave has low-wave vector (high-wave vector). The second-order quantum perturbation theory shows that the second harmonic of the ponderomotive potential arises naturally even in a single particle motion contrary to the classical prediction.

  11. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  12. Quaternionic quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.L.

    1985-08-19

    We show that a quaternionic quantum field theory can be formulated when the numbers of bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom are equal and the fermions, as well as the bosons, obey a second-order wave equation. The theory is initially defined in terms of a quaternion-imaginary Lagrangian using the Feynman sum over histories. A Schroedinger equation can be derived from the functional integral, which identifies the quaternion-imaginary quantum Hamiltonian. Conversely, the transformation theory based on this Hamiltonian can be used to rederive the functional-integral formulation.

  13. The Method of Unitary Clothing Transformations in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory: Recent Applications for the Description of Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering and Deuteron Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A.

    2013-12-01

    The clothing procedure, put forward in quantum field theory by Greenberg and Schweber, is applied for the description of nucleon-nucleon ( N- N) scattering below the pion production threshold and deuteron properties. We consider pseudoscalar ( π and η), vector ( ρ and ω) and scalar ( δ and σ) meson fields interacting with N and ones via the Yukawa-type couplings to introduce trial interactions between "bare" particles. The subsequent unitary clothing transformations (UCTs) are found to express the total Hamiltonian through new interaction operators that refer to particles with physical (observable) properties, the so-called clothed particles. The corresponding analytic expressions in momentum space are compared with the separate meson contributions to the one-boson-exchange potentials in the meson theory of nuclear forces. We will also show a worked example where the UCTs method is used in the framework of a gauge-independent field-theoretical treatment of electromagnetic interactions of deuterons (bound systems).

  14. Scattering theory for arbitrary potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A.S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A.T.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.

    2005-09-15

    The fundamental quantities of potential scattering theory are generalized to accommodate long-range interactions. Definitions for the scattering amplitude and wave operators valid for arbitrary interactions including potentials with a Coulomb tail are presented. It is shown that for the Coulomb potential the generalized amplitude gives the physical on-shell amplitude without recourse to a renormalization procedure.

  15. Supersymmetric Quantum Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2005-03-01

    We consider some supersymmetric multiplets in a purely quantum framework. A crucial point is to ensure the positivity of the scalar product in the Hilbert space of the quantum system. For the vector multiplet we obtain some discrepancies with respect to the literature in the expression of the super-propagator and we prove that the model is consistent only for positive mass. The gauge structure is constructed purely deductive and leads to the necessity of introducing scalar ghost superfields, in analogy to the usual gauge theories. Then we consider a supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory based on a vector multiplet containing supersymmetric partners of spin 3/2 for the vector fields. As an application we consider the supersymmetric electroweak theory. The resulting self-couplings of the gauge bosons agree with the standard model up to a divergence.

  16. Consistent Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  17. No Drama Quantum Theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmeteli, Andrey

    2013-03-01

    Is it possible to offer a ``no drama'' quantum theory? Something as simple (in principle) as classical electrodynamics - a theory described by a system of partial differential equations (PDE) in 3+1 dimensions, but reproducing unitary evolution of a quantum field theory in the Fock space? The following results suggest an affirmative answer: 1. The scalar field can be algebraically eliminated from scalar electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of the electromagnetic field (EMF). 2. After introduction of a complex 4-potential (producing the same EMF as the standard real 4-potential), the spinor field can be algebraically eliminated from spinor electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of EMF. 3. The resulting theories for EMF can be embedded into quantum field theories. Another fundamental result: in a general case, the Dirac equation is equivalent to a 4th order PDE for just one component, which can be made real by a gauge transform. Issues related to the Bell theorem are discussed. A. Akhmeteli, Int'l Journal of Quantum Information, Vol. 9, Suppl., 17-26 (2011) A. Akhmeteli, Journal of Mathematical Physics, Vol. 52, 082303 (2011) A. Akhmeteli, quant-ph/1111.4630 A. Akhmeteli, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser., Vol. 361, 012037 (2012)

  18. No Drama Quantum Theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmeteli, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    Is it possible to offer a ``no drama'' quantum theory? Something as simple (in principle) as classical electrodynamics - a theory described by a system of partial differential equations (PDE) in 3+1 dimensions, but reproducing unitary evolution of a quantum field theory in the configuration space? The following results suggest an affirmative answer: 1. The scalar field can be algebraically eliminated from scalar electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of the electromagnetic field (EMF). 2. After introduction of a complex 4-potential (producing the same EMF as the standard real 4-potential), the spinor field can be algebraically eliminated from spinor electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of EMF. 3. The resulting theories for EMF can be embedded into quantum field theories. Another fundamental result: in a general case, the Dirac equation is equivalent to a 4th order PDE for just one component, which can be made real by a gauge transform. Issues related to the Bell theorem are discussed. A. Akhmeteli, Int'l Journal of Quantum Information, Vol. 9, Suppl., 17-26 (2011) A. Akhmeteli, Journal of Mathematical Physics, Vol. 52, 082303 (2011) A. Akhmeteli, quant-ph/1108.1588

  19. Quantum set theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.

    1984-01-01

    The work of von Neumann tells us that the logic of quantum mechanics is not Boolenan. This suggests the formulation of a quantum theory of sets based on quantum logic much as modern set theory is based on Boolean logic. In the first part of this dissertation such a quantum set theory is developed. In the second part, quantum set theory is proposed as a universal language for physics. A quantum topology and the beginnings of a quantum geometry are developed in this language. Finally, a toy model is studied. It gives indications of possible lines for progress in this program.

  20. Quantum theory of friction

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Cresser, James D.

    2005-08-15

    We present a Markovian quantum theory of friction. Our approach is based on the idea that collisions between a Brownian particle and single molecules of the surrounding medium constitute, as far as the particle is concerned, instantaneous simultaneous measurements of its position and momentum.

  1. No Drama Quantum Theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmeteli, Andrey

    2012-05-01

    Is it possible to offer a "no drama" quantum theory? Something as simple (in principle) as classical electrodynamics - a theory described by a system of partial differential equations in 3+1 dimensions, but reproducing unitary evolution of a quantum field theory in the configuration space? The following results suggest an affirmative answer: 1. The scalar field can be algebraically eliminated from scalar electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of the electromagnetic field. 2. After introduction of a complex 4-potential (producing the same electromagnetic field as the standard real 4-potential), the spinor field can be algebraically eliminated from spinor electrodynamics; the resulting equations describe independent evolution of the electromagnetic field. 3. The resulting theories for the electromagnetic field can be embedded into quantum field theories. Another fundamental result: in a general case, the Dirac equation is equivalent to a 4th order partial differential equations for just one component, which can be made real by a gauge transform. Issues related to the Bell theorem are discussed.

  2. The Quantum Underground: Early quantum theory textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Clayton

    2011-04-01

    Quantum theory had its beginnings in 1900, when Max Planck derived his famous formula for the energy density of black-body radiation. But the early quantum theory textbooks we remember today--for example, those of Arnold Summerfeld (1919), Fritz Reiche (1921), and a shorter Report by James Jeans (1914), did not appear until some years later, and all were written by physicists who were themselves active participants in early quantum theory. Surprisingly, not all early texts fit this pattern. Reiche himself had written a review article on quantum theory for general readers in Die Naturwissenschaften in 1913, long before his research had shifted to quantum topics. And a year later, textbooks by Hermann Sieveking and Sigfried Valentiner treated quantum theory for students and non-specialists, although neither was active in quantum theoretical research. A third and better known author, Owen Richardson, also treated quantum theory in a 1914 book on electromagnetism. I will describe these early and little-known treatments of quantum theory, all of which were written by physicists whose primary research and professional interests lay elsewhere.

  3. Mixed quantum/classical theory for inelastic scattering of asymmetric-top-rotor + atom in the body-fixed reference frame and application to the H2O + He system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Alexander; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-09-01

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for inelastic molecule-atom scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is extended to treat a general case of an asymmetric-top-rotor molecule in the body-fixed reference frame. This complements a similar theory formulated in the space-fixed reference-frame [M. Ivanov, M.-L. Dubernet, and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 134301 (2014)]. Here, the goal was to develop an approximate computationally affordable treatment of the rotationally inelastic scattering and apply it to H2O + He. We found that MQCT is somewhat less accurate at lower scattering energies. For example, below E = 1000 cm-1 the typical errors in the values of inelastic scattering cross sections are on the order of 10%. However, at higher scattering energies MQCT method appears to be rather accurate. Thus, at scattering energies above 2000 cm-1 the errors are consistently in the range of 1%-2%, which is basically our convergence criterion with respect to the number of trajectories. At these conditions our MQCT method remains computationally affordable. We found that computational cost of the fully-coupled MQCT calculations scales as n2, where n is the number of channels. This is more favorable than the full-quantum inelastic scattering calculations that scale as n3. Our conclusion is that for complex systems (heavy collision partners with many internal states) and at higher scattering energies MQCT may offer significant computational advantages.

  4. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Ever since Feynman's original proposal for quantum computers, one of the primary applications envisioned has been efficient simulation of other quantum systems. In fact, it has been conjectured that quantum computers would be universal simulators, which can simulate all physical systems using computational resources that scale polynomially with the system's number of degrees of freedom. Quantum field theories have posed a challenge in that the set of degrees of freedom is formally infinite. We show how quantum computers, if built, could nevertheless efficiently simulate certain quantum field theories at bounded energy scales. Our algorithm includes a new state preparation technique which we believe may find additional applications in quantum algorithms. Joint work with Keith Lee and John Preskill.

  5. Informational derivation of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, Giulio; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2011-07-01

    We derive quantum theory from purely informational principles. Five elementary axioms—causality, perfect distinguishability, ideal compression, local distinguishability, and pure conditioning—define a broad class of theories of information processing that can be regarded as standard. One postulate—purification—singles out quantum theory within this class.

  6. Scattering through a straight quantum waveguide with combined boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briet, Ph. Soccorsi, E.; Dittrich, J.

    2014-11-15

    Scattering through a straight two-dimensional quantum waveguide R×(0,d) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on (R{sub −}{sup *}×(y=0))∪(R{sub +}{sup *}×(y=d)) and Neumann boundary condition on (R{sub −}{sup *}×(y=d))∪(R{sub +}{sup *}×(y=0)) is considered using stationary scattering theory. The existence of a matching conditions solution at x = 0 is proved. The use of stationary scattering theory is justified showing its relation to the wave packets motion. As an illustration, the matching conditions are also solved numerically and the transition probabilities are shown.

  7. Effective methods for quantum theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    Whenever a full theory is unavailable, effective frameworks serve as powerful tools for examining physical phenomena below some energy scale. However, standard quantum field theory techniques are not always applicable in various exotic, yet physically relevant, systems. This thesis presents a new effective method for quantum theories, which is particularly tailored towards background independent theories such as gravity. Our main motivation is to utilize these techniques to extract the semi-classical dynamics from canonical quantum gravity theories. Application to field theoretic toy models of loop quantum gravity and non-associative quantum mechanics is elaborated in detail. We also extend this framework to fully constrained systems, as is required for gravity, and discuss several consequences for quantum gravity.

  8. Quantum Mechanical Scattering in Nanoscale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianfrancesco, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A.; Boucher, C. R.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate quantum scattering using the finite element method. Unlike textbook treatments employing asymptotic boundary conditions (BCs), we use modified BCs, which permits computation close to the near-field region and reduces the Cauchy BCs to Dirichlet BCs, greatly simplifying the analysis. Scattering from any finite quantum mechanical potential can be modeled, including scattering in a finite waveguide geometry and in the open domain. Being numerical, our analysis goes beyond the Born Approximation, and the finite element approach allows us to transcend geometric constraints. Results of the formulation will be presented with several case studies, including spin dependent scattering, demonstrating the high accuracy and flexibility attained in this approach.

  9. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonic quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.

  10. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The year 1982 is often credited as the year that theoretical quantum computing was started with a keynote speech by Richard Feynman, who proposed a universal quantum simulator, the idea being that if you had such a machine you could in principle "imitate any quantum system, including the physical world." With that in mind, we present an algorithm for a continuous-variable quantum computing architecture which gives an exponential speedup over the best-known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonic quantum field theory, a problem that is believed to be hard using a classical computer. Building on this, we give an experimental implementation based on continuous-variable states that is feasible with today's technology.

  11. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonicmore » quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.« less

  12. Integrable structures in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negro, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    This review was born as notes for a lecture given at the Young Researchers Integrability School (YRIS) school on integrability in Durham, in the summer of 2015. It deals with a beautiful method, developed in the mid-nineties by Bazhanov, Lukyanov and Zamolodchikov and, as such, called BLZ. This method can be interpreted as a field theory version of the quantum inverse scattering, also known as the algebraic Bethe ansatz. Starting with the case of conformal field theories (CFTs) we show how to build the field theory analogues of commuting transfer T matrices and Baxter Q-operators of integrable lattice models. These objects contain the complete information of the integrable structure of the theory, viz. the integrals of motion, and can be used, as we will show, to derive the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and nonlinear integral equations. This same method can be easily extended to the description of integrable structures of certain particular massive deformations of CFTs; these, in turn, can be described as quantum group reductions of the quantum sine-Gordon model and it is an easy step to include this last theory in the framework of BLZ approach. Finally we show an interesting and surprising connection of the BLZ structures with classical objects emerging from the study of classical integrable models via the inverse scattering transform method. This connection goes under the name of ODE/IM correspondence and we will present it for the specific case of quantum sine-Gordon model only.

  13. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej; Exner, Pavel

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of the Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale-invariant (or Fueloep-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  14. Aspects of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Wigner, E. P.

    2010-03-01

    Preface; List of contributors; Bibliography of P. A. M. Dirac; 1. Dirac in Cambridge R. J. Eden and J. C. Polkinghorne; 2. Travels with Dirac in the Rockies J. H. Van Vleck; 3. 'The golden age of theoretical physics': P. A. M. Dirac's scientific work from 1924 to 1933 Jagdish Mehra; 4. Foundation of quantum field theory Res Jost; 5. The early history of the theory of electron: 1897-1947 A. Pais; 6. The Dirac equation A. S. Wightman; 7. Fermi-Dirac statistics Rudolph Peierls; 8. Indefinite metric in state space W. Heisenberg; 9. On bras and kets J. M. Jauch; 10. The Poisson bracket C. Lanczos; 11. La 'fonction' et les noyaux L. Schwartz; 12. On the Dirac magnetic poles Edoardo Amadli and Nicola Cabibbo; 13. The fundamental constants and their time variation Freeman J. Dyson; 14. On the time-energy uncertainty relation Eugene P. Wigner; 15. The path-integral quantisation of gravity Abdus Salam and J. Strathdee; Index; Plates.

  15. Quantum theory of measurements as quantum decision theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2015-03-01

    Theory of quantum measurements is often classified as decision theory. An event in decision theory corresponds to the measurement of an observable. This analogy looks clear for operationally testable simple events. However, the situation is essentially more complicated in the case of composite events. The most difficult point is the relation between decisions under uncertainty and measurements under uncertainty. We suggest a unified language for describing the processes of quantum decision making and quantum measurements. The notion of quantum measurements under uncertainty is introduced. We show that the correct mathematical foundation for the theory of measurements under uncertainty, as well as for quantum decision theory dealing with uncertain events, requires the use of positive operator-valued measure that is a generalization of projection-valued measure. The latter is appropriate for operationally testable events, while the former is necessary for characterizing operationally uncertain events. In both decision making and quantum measurements, one has to distinguish composite nonentangled events from composite entangled events. Quantum probability can be essentially different from classical probability only for entangled events. The necessary condition for the appearance of an interference term in the quantum probability is the occurrence of entangled prospects and the existence of an entangled strategic state of a decision maker or of an entangled statistical state of a measuring device.

  16. Mixed quantum/classical theory for inelastic scattering of asymmetric-top-rotor + atom in the body-fixed reference frame and application to the H{sub 2}O + He system

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Alexander; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-09-21

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for inelastic molecule-atom scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is extended to treat a general case of an asymmetric-top-rotor molecule in the body-fixed reference frame. This complements a similar theory formulated in the space-fixed reference-frame [M. Ivanov, M.-L. Dubernet, and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 134301 (2014)]. Here, the goal was to develop an approximate computationally affordable treatment of the rotationally inelastic scattering and apply it to H{sub 2}O + He. We found that MQCT is somewhat less accurate at lower scattering energies. For example, below E = 1000 cm{sup −1} the typical errors in the values of inelastic scattering cross sections are on the order of 10%. However, at higher scattering energies MQCT method appears to be rather accurate. Thus, at scattering energies above 2000 cm{sup −1} the errors are consistently in the range of 1%–2%, which is basically our convergence criterion with respect to the number of trajectories. At these conditions our MQCT method remains computationally affordable. We found that computational cost of the fully-coupled MQCT calculations scales as n{sup 2}, where n is the number of channels. This is more favorable than the full-quantum inelastic scattering calculations that scale as n{sup 3}. Our conclusion is that for complex systems (heavy collision partners with many internal states) and at higher scattering energies MQCT may offer significant computational advantages.

  17. Association of scattering matrices in quantum networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, F.A.G.; Macêdo, A.M.S.

    2013-06-15

    Algorithms based on operations that associate scattering matrices in series or in parallel (analogous to impedance association in a classical circuit) are developed here. We exemplify their application by calculating the total scattering matrix of several types of quantum networks, such as star graphs and a chain of chaotic quantum dots, obtaining results with good agreement with the literature. Through a computational-time analysis we compare the efficiency of two algorithms for the simulation of a chain of chaotic quantum dots based on series association operations of (i) two-by-two centers and (ii) three-by-three ones. Empirical results point out that the algorithm (ii) is more efficient than (i) for small number of open scattering channels. A direct counting of floating point operations justifies quantitatively the superiority of the algorithm (i) for large number of open scattering channels.

  18. Quasi-soliton scattering in quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretto, Davide; Vljim, Rogier; Ganahl, Martin; Brockmann, Michael; Haque, Masud; Evertz, Hans-Gerd; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    The quantum scattering of magnon bound states in the anisotropic Heisenberg spin chain is shown to display features similar to the scattering of solitons in classical exactly solvable models. Localized colliding Gaussian wave packets of bound magnons are constructed from string solutions of the Bethe equations and subsequently evolved in time, relying on an algebraic Bethe ansatz based framework for the computation of local expectation values in real space-time. The local magnetization profile shows the trajectories of colliding wave packets of bound magnons, which obtain a spatial displacement upon scattering. Analytic predictions on the displacements for various values of anisotropy and string lengths are derived from scattering theory and Bethe ansatz phase shifts, matching time evolution fits on the displacements. The TEBD algorithm allows for the study of scattering displacements from spin-block states, showing similar displacement scattering features.

  19. Studies in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polmar, S. K.

    The theoretical physics group at Washington University has been devoted to the solution of problems in theoretical and mathematical physics. All of the personnel on this task have a similar approach to their research in that they apply sophisticated analytical and numerical techniques to problems primarily in quantum field theory. Specifically, this group has worked on quantum chromodynamics, classical Yang-Mills fields, chiral symmetry breaking condensates, lattice field theory, strong-coupling approximations, perturbation theory in large order, nonlinear waves, 1/N expansions, quantum solitons, phase transitions, nuclear potentials, and early universe calculations.

  20. Unification of quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyesinghe, Anura

    We present the unification of many previously disparate results in noisy quantum Shannon theory and the unification of all of noiseless quantum Shannon theory. More specifically we deal here with bipartite, unidirectional, and memoryless quantum Shannon theory. We find all the optimal protocols and quantify the relationship between the resources used, both for the one-shot and for the ensemble case, for what is arguably the most fundamental task in quantum information theory: sharing entangled states between a sender and a receiver. We find that all of these protocols are derived from our one-shot superdense coding protocol and relate nicely to each other. We then move on to noisy quantum information theory and give a simple, direct proof of the "mother" protocol, or rather her generalization to the Fully Quantum Slepian-Wolf protocol (FQSW). FQSW simultaneously accomplishes two goals: quantum communication-assisted entanglement distillation, and state transfer from the sender to the receiver. As a result, in addition to her other "children," the mother protocol generates the state merging primitive of Horodecki, Oppenheim, and Winter as well as a new class of distributed compression protocols for correlated quantum sources, which are optimal for sources described by separable density operators. Moreover, the mother protocol described here is easily transformed into the so-called "father" protocol, demonstrating that the division of single-sender/single-receiver protocols into two families was unnecessary: all protocols in the family are children of the mother.

  1. Quantum Ergodicity for Quantum Graphs without Back-Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammall, Matthew; Winn, B.

    2016-06-01

    We give an estimate of the quantum variance for $d$-regular graphs quantised with boundary scattering matrices that prohibit back-scattering. For families of graphs that are expanders, with few short cycles, our estimate leads to quantum ergodicity for these families of graphs. Our proof is based on a uniform control of an associated random walk on the bonds of the graph. We show that recent constructions of Ramanujan graphs, and asymptotically almost surely, random $d$-regular graphs, satisfy the necessary conditions to conclude that quantum ergodicity holds.

  2. Quantum Theory is an Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo M.; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the general framework of operational probabilistic theories (OPT), along with the six axioms from which quantum theory can be derived. We argue that the OPT framework along with a relaxed version of five of the axioms, define a general information theory. We close the paper with considerations about the role of the observer in an OPT, and the interpretation of the von Neumann postulate and the Schrödinger-cat paradox.

  3. Elementary Concepts of Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance and difficulties of teaching basic quantum theory. Presents a discussion of wave-particle duality, indeterminacy, the nature of a quantized state of a system, and the exclusion principle. (MLH)

  4. Quantum Field Theory in (0 + 1) Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    We show that many of the key ideas of quantum field theory can be illustrated simply and straightforwardly by using toy models in (0 + 1) dimensions. Because quantum field theory in (0 + 1) dimensions is equivalent to quantum mechanics, these models allow us to use techniques from quantum mechanics to gain insight into quantum field theory. In…

  5. Theory of Light Emission from Quantum Noise in Plasmonic Contacts: Above-Threshold Emission from Higher-Order Electron-Plasmon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for the description of light emission from plasmonic contacts based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. Our theory establishes a fundamental link between the finite-frequency quantum noise and ac conductance of the contact and the light emission. Calculating the quantum noise to higher orders in the electron-plasmon interaction, we identify a plasmon-induced electron-electron interaction as the source of experimentally observed above-threshold light emission from biased STM contacts. Our findings provide important insight into the effect of interactions on the light emission from atomic-scale contacts.

  6. The pilot-wave perspective on quantum scattering and tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2013-04-01

    The de Broglie-Bohm "pilot-wave" theory replaces the paradoxical wave-particle duality of ordinary quantum theory with a more mundane and literal kind of duality: each individual photon or electron comprises a quantum wave (evolving in accordance with the usual quantum mechanical wave equation) and a particle that, under the influence of the wave, traces out a definite trajectory. The definite particle trajectory allows the theory to account for the results of experiments without the usual recourse to additional dynamical axioms about measurements. Instead, one need simply assume that particle detectors click when particles arrive at them. This alternative understanding of quantum phenomena is illustrated here for two elementary textbook examples of one-dimensional scattering and tunneling. We introduce a novel approach to reconcile standard textbook calculations (made using unphysical plane-wave states) with the need to treat such phenomena in terms of normalizable wave packets. This approach allows for a simple but illuminating analysis of the pilot-wave theory's particle trajectories and an explicit demonstration of the equivalence of the pilot-wave theory predictions with those of ordinary quantum theory.

  7. Quantum Dots: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  8. Colloquium: Theory of quantum corrals and quantum mirages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Gregory A.; Heller, Eric J.

    2003-07-01

    Quantum corrals are two-dimensional structures built atom by atom on an atomically clean metallic surface using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). These two-dimensional structures “corral” electrons in the surface states of noble metals, leading to standing-wave patterns in the electron density inside the quantum corral. The authors review the physics of quantum corrals and relate the signal of the STM to the scattering properties of substrate electrons from atomic impurities supported on the surface. The theory includes the effects of incoherent surface-state electron scattering at the impurities and quantitively describes nearly all of the current STM data on quantum corrals, including the recent quantum mirage experiments with Kondo effect. The physics underlying the recent mirage experiments is discussed, as are some of the outstanding questions regarding the Kondo effect from impurities in nanoscale structures on metallic surfaces. The authors also summarize recent work on variations of “quantum” corrals: Optical corrals and acoustical corrals.

  9. Quantum reactive scattering on innovative computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifici, Leonardo; Nalli, Danilo; Laganà, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    The possibility of implementing quantum reactive scattering programs on cheap platforms, originally used for graphic purposes only, has been investigated using a NVIDIA GPU. After a conversion of the code considered from Fortran to C and its deep restructuring for exploiting the GPU key features, significant speedups have been obtained for RWAVEPR, a time dependent quantum reactive scattering code propagating in time a complex wavepacket. As benchmark calculations those concerned with the evaluation of the reactive probabilities of the Cl+H2 and the N+N2 reactions have been considered.

  10. QUANTUM MODE-COUPLING THEORY: Formulation and Applications to Normal and Supercooled Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Eran; Reichman, David R.

    2005-05-01

    We review our recent efforts to formulate and study a mode-coupling approach to real-time dynamic fluctuations in quantum liquids. Comparison is made between the theory and recent neutron scattering experiments performed on liquid ortho-deuterium and para-hydrogen. We discuss extensions of the theory to supercooled and glassy states where quantum fluctuations compete with thermal fluctuations. Experimental scenarios for quantum glassy liquids are briefly discussed.

  11. Quantum Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

    PubMed

    Roncadelli, Marco; Schulman, L S

    2007-10-26

    Quantum canonical transformations have attracted interest since the beginning of quantum theory. Based on their classical analogues, one would expect them to provide a powerful quantum tool. However, the difficulty of solving a nonlinear operator partial differential equation such as the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) has hindered progress along this otherwise promising avenue. We overcome this difficulty. We show that solutions to the QHJE can be constructed by a simple prescription starting from the propagator of the associated Schrödinger equation. Our result opens the possibility of practical use of quantum Hamilton-Jacobi theory. As an application, we develop a surprising relation between operator ordering and the density of paths around a semiclassical trajectory. PMID:17995307

  12. Quantum spectral dimension in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Modesto, Leonardo; Nardelli, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    We reinterpret the spectral dimension of spacetimes as the scaling of an effective self-energy transition amplitude in quantum field theory (QFT), when the system is probed at a given resolution. This picture has four main advantages: (a) it dispenses with the usual interpretation (unsatisfactory in covariant approaches) where, instead of a transition amplitude, one has a probability density solving a nonrelativistic diffusion equation in an abstract diffusion time; (b) it solves the problem of negative probabilities known for higher-order and nonlocal dispersion relations in classical and quantum gravity; (c) it clarifies the concept of quantum spectral dimension as opposed to the classical one. We then consider a class of logarithmic dispersion relations associated with quantum particles and show that the spectral dimension dS of spacetime as felt by these quantum probes can deviate from its classical value, equal to the topological dimension D. In particular, in the presence of higher momentum powers it changes with the scale, dropping from D in the infrared (IR) to a value dSUV ≤ D in the ultraviolet (UV). We apply this general result to Stelle theory of renormalizable gravity, which attains the universal value dSUV = 2 for any dimension D.

  13. Multiphoton-scattering theory and generalized master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tao; Chang, Darrick E.; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    We develop a scattering theory to investigate the multiphoton transmission in a one-dimensional waveguide in the presence of quantum emitters. It is based on a path integral formalism, uses displacement transformations, and does not require the Markov approximation. We obtain the full time evolution of the global system, including the emitters and the photonic field. Our theory allows us to compute the transition amplitude between arbitrary initial and final states, as well as the S matrix of the asymptotic in and out states. For the case of few incident photons in the waveguide, we also rederive a generalized master equation in the Markov limit. We compare the predictions of the developed scattering theory and that with the Markov approximation. We illustrate our methods with five examples of few-photon scattering: (i) by a two-level emitter, (ii) in the Jaynes-Cummings model; (iii) by an array of two-level emitters; (iv) by a two-level emitter in the half-end waveguide; and (v) by an array of atoms coupled to Rydberg levels. In the first two, we show the application of the scattering theory in the photon scattering by a single emitter, and examine the correctness of our theory with the well-known results. In the third example, we analyze the condition of the Markov approximation for the photon scattering in the array of emitters. In the fourth one, we show how a quantum emitter can generate entanglement of outgoing photons. Finally, we highlight the interplay between the phenomenon of electromagnetic-induced transparency and the Rydberg interaction, and show how this results in a rich variety of possibilities in the quantum statistics of the scattering photons.

  14. Metric quantum field theory: A preliminary look

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    Spacetime coordinates are involved in uncertainty relations; spacetime itself appears to exhibit curvature. Could the continua associated with field variables exhibit curvature This question, as well as the ideas that (a) difficulties with quantum theories of gravitation may be due to their formulation in an incorrect analogy with other quantum field theories, (b) spacetime variables should not be any more basic than others for describing physical phenomena, and (c) if field continua do not exhibit curvature, the reasons would be of interest, motivated the formulation of a theory of variable curvature and torsion in the electromagnetic four-potential's reciprocal space. Curvature and torsion equation completely analogous to those for a gauge theory of gravitation (the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory) are assumed for this continuum. The interaction-Hamiltonian density of this theory, to a first approximation, implies that in addition to the Maxwell-Dirac field interaction of ordinary quantum electrodynamics, there should also be an interaction between Dirac-field vector and pseudovector currents unmediated by photons, as well as other interactions involving two or three Dirac-field currents interacting with the Maxwell field at single spacetime events. Calculations expressing Bhabha-scattering cross sections for incident beams with parallel spins differ from those of unmodified quantum electrodynamics by terms of first order in the gravitational constant of the theory, but the corresponding cross section for unpolarized incident beams differs from that of the unmodified theory only by terms of higher order in that constant. Undesirable features of the present theory include its nonrenormalizability, the obscurity of the meaning of its inverse field operator, and its being based on electrodynamics rather than electroweak dynamics.

  15. Asymptotic neutron scattering laws for anomalously diffusing quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, Gerald R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a model-free approach to the analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering intensities from anomalously diffusing quantum particles. All quantities are inferred from the asymptotic form of their time-dependent mean square displacements which grow ∝tα, with 0 ≤ α < 2. Confined diffusion (α = 0) is here explicitly included. We discuss in particular the intermediate scattering function for long times and the Fourier spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function for small frequencies. Quantum effects enter in both cases through the general symmetry properties of quantum time correlation functions. It is shown that the fractional diffusion constant can be expressed by a Green-Kubo type relation involving the real part of the velocity autocorrelation function. The theory is exact in the diffusive regime and at moderate momentum transfers.

  16. Asymptotic neutron scattering laws for anomalously diffusing quantum particles.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R

    2016-07-28

    The paper deals with a model-free approach to the analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering intensities from anomalously diffusing quantum particles. All quantities are inferred from the asymptotic form of their time-dependent mean square displacements which grow ∝t(α), with 0 ≤ α < 2. Confined diffusion (α = 0) is here explicitly included. We discuss in particular the intermediate scattering function for long times and the Fourier spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function for small frequencies. Quantum effects enter in both cases through the general symmetry properties of quantum time correlation functions. It is shown that the fractional diffusion constant can be expressed by a Green-Kubo type relation involving the real part of the velocity autocorrelation function. The theory is exact in the diffusive regime and at moderate momentum transfers. PMID:27475344

  17. (Studies in quantum field theory)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the period 4/1/89--3/31/90 the theoretical physics group supported by Department of Energy Contract No. AC02-78ER04915.A015 and consisting of Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Senior Research Associate Visser has made progress in many areas of theoretical and mathematical physics. Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Research Associate Visser are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including OCD; studies of the early universe and inflation, and quantum gravity.

  18. PT-symmetric quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.

    2015-07-01

    The average quantum physicist on the street would say that a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian must be Dirac Hermitian (invariant under combined matrix transposition and complex conjugation) in order to guarantee that the energy eigenvalues are real and that time evolution is unitary. However, the Hamiltonian H = p2 + ix3, which is obviously not Dirac Hermitian, has a positive real discrete spectrum and generates unitary time evolution, and thus it defines a fully consistent and physical quantum theory. Evidently, the axiom of Dirac Hermiticity is too restrictive. While H = p2 + ix3 is not Dirac Hermitian, it is PT symmetric; that is, invariant under combined parity P (space reflection) and time reversal T. The quantum mechanics defined by a PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is a complex generalization of ordinary quantum mechanics. When quantum mechanics is extended into the complex domain, new kinds of theories having strange and remarkable properties emerge. In the past few years, some of these properties have been verified in laboratory experiments. A particularly interesting PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is H = p2 - x4, which contains an upside-down potential. This potential is discussed in detail, and it is explained in intuitive as well as in rigorous terms why the energy levels of this potential are real, positive, and discrete. Applications of PT-symmetry in quantum field theory are also discussed.

  19. Quantum diffraction grating: A possible new description of nuclear elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, H.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of discontinuous functions and their representations in the form of Legendre polynomial series in quantum nuclear scattering theory is presented briefly. The problem is quite old yet not adequately explained in numerous Quantum Theory textbooks and sometimes not correctly understood by physicists. Introduction of the generalized functions into the quantum scattering theory clarifies the problem and allows to propose new interpretations of nuclear elastic scattering phenomenon. The derived new forms of the full elastic scattering amplitudes and possibility of splitting them suggest existence of dynamical quantum diffraction grating around the nuclei. Particularly important fact is that this grating existing in the space around the nucleus makes considerable contribution to the experimental elastic differential cross-section. All these might be quite important in analyses of nuclear elastic scattering data and so require to be stated in a more detailed and clear way.

  20. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  1. Recoverability in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark

    The fact that the quantum relative entropy is non-increasing with respect to quantum physical evolutions lies at the core of many optimality theorems in quantum information theory and has applications in other areas of physics. In this work, we establish improvements of this entropy inequality in the form of physically meaningful remainder terms. One of the main results can be summarized informally as follows: if the decrease in quantum relative entropy between two quantum states after a quantum physical evolution is relatively small, then it is possible to perform a recovery operation, such that one can perfectly recover one state while approximately recovering the other. This can be interpreted as quantifying how well one can reverse a quantum physical evolution. Our proof method is elementary, relying on the method of complex interpolation, basic linear algebra, and the recently introduced Renyi generalization of a relative entropy difference. The theorem has a number of applications in quantum information theory, which have to do with providing physically meaningful improvements to many known entropy inequalities. This is based on arXiv:1505.04661, now accepted for publication in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. I acknowledge support from startup funds from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU, the NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397, and the DARPA Quiness Program through US Army Research Office award W31P4Q-12-1-0019.

  2. Propensity, Probability, and Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, Leslie E.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum mechanics and probability theory share one peculiarity. Both have well established mathematical formalisms, yet both are subject to controversy about the meaning and interpretation of their basic concepts. Since probability plays a fundamental role in QM, the conceptual problems of one theory can affect the other. We first classify the interpretations of probability into three major classes: (a) inferential probability, (b) ensemble probability, and (c) propensity. Class (a) is the basis of inductive logic; (b) deals with the frequencies of events in repeatable experiments; (c) describes a form of causality that is weaker than determinism. An important, but neglected, paper by P. Humphreys demonstrated that propensity must differ mathematically, as well as conceptually, from probability, but he did not develop a theory of propensity. Such a theory is developed in this paper. Propensity theory shares many, but not all, of the axioms of probability theory. As a consequence, propensity supports the Law of Large Numbers from probability theory, but does not support Bayes theorem. Although there are particular problems within QM to which any of the classes of probability may be applied, it is argued that the intrinsic quantum probabilities (calculated from a state vector or density matrix) are most naturally interpreted as quantum propensities. This does not alter the familiar statistical interpretation of QM. But the interpretation of quantum states as representing knowledge is untenable. Examples show that a density matrix fails to represent knowledge.

  3. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory. PMID:20208939

  4. Construction of relativistic quantum theory: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1986-06-01

    We construct the particulate states of quantum physics using a recursive computer program that incorporates non-determinism by means of locally arbitrary choices. Quantum numbers and coupling constants arise from the construction via the unique 4-level combinatorial hierarchy. The construction defines indivisible quantum events with the requisite supraluminal correlations, yet does not allow supraluminal communication. Measurement criteria incorporate c, h-bar and m/sub p/ or (not ''and'') G, connected to laboratory events via finite particle number scattering theory and the counter paradigm. The resulting theory is discrete throughout, contains no infinities, and, as far as we have developed it, is in agreement with quantum mechanical and cosmological fact.

  5. Quantum and semiclassical theories of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1995-09-01

    A rigorous quantum mechanical theory (and a semiclassical approximation thereto) is described for calculating chemical reaction rates ``directly``, i.e., without having to solve the complete state-to-state reactive scattering problem. The approach has many vestiges of transition state theory, for which it may be thought of as the rigorous generalization.

  6. Unstable states in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksa, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    Various approaches to the problem of describing unstable particles are reviewed. Fundamental problems that arise in quantum field description of these particles and the ways of their solution are considered. Among them, there is an approach related to the notion of the smeared (continuous) mass, which originates from the finite lifetime of unstable particles. The quantum field model of unstable particles with smeared mass, which is built upon two basic axiomatic elements, is considered in detail. The basic processes with unstable particles (decay and scattering) are considered within the framework of the model and the formalism for describing physical characteristics of those processes is developed. The model is successfully applied to describing the processes of pair and triple boson production at the linear collider, top quark pair production, and certain hadronic decays. Based on this model, the factorization method is developed, which allows a description of complicated and multistep scattering and decay processes with unstable particles to be considerably simplified.

  7. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfelder, R.

    2014-03-15

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  8. Finite quantum gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  9. Generalized Quantum Theory and Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroun, Michael Anthony

    This dissertation is divided into two main topics. The first is the generalization of quantum dynamics when the Schrodinger partial differential equation is not defined even in the weak mathematical sense because the potential function itself is a distribution in the spatial variable, the same variable that is used to define the kinetic energy operator, i.e. the Laplace operator. The procedure is an extension and broadening of the distributional calculus and offers spectral results as an alternative to the only other two known methods to date, namely a) the functional calculi; and b) non-standard analysis. Furthermore, the generalizations of quantum dynamics presented within give a resolution to the time asymmetry paradox created by multi-particle quantum mechanics due to the time evolution still being unitary. A consequence is the randomization of phases needed for the fundamental justification Pauli master equation. The second topic is foundations of the quantum theory of fields. The title is phrased as ``foundations'' to emphasize that there is no claim of uniqueness but rather a proposal is put forth, which is markedly different than that of constructive or axiomatic field theory. In particular, the space of fields is defined as a space of generalized functions with involutive symmetry maps (the CPT invariance) that affect the topology of the field space. The space of quantum fields is then endowed the Frechet property and interactions change the topology in such a way as to cause some field spaces to be incompatible with others. This is seen in the consequences of the Haag theorem. Various examples and discussions are given that elucidate a new view of the quantum theory of fields and its (lack of) mathematical structure.

  10. Revisiting Bohr's semiclassical quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2006-10-12

    Bohr's atomic theory is widely viewed as remarkable, both for its accuracy in predicting the observed optical transitions of one-electron atoms and for its failure to fully correspond with current electronic structure theory. What is not generally appreciated is that Bohr's original semiclassical conception differed significantly from the Bohr-Sommerfeld theory and offers an alternative semiclassical approximation scheme with remarkable attributes. More specifically, Bohr's original method did not impose action quantization constraints but rather obtained these as predictions by simply matching photon and classical orbital frequencies. In other words, the hydrogen atom was treated entirely classically and orbital quantized emerged directly from the Planck-Einstein photon quantization condition, E = h nu. Here, we revisit this early history of quantum theory and demonstrate the application of Bohr's original strategy to the three quintessential quantum systems: an electron in a box, an electron in a ring, and a dipolar harmonic oscillator. The usual energy-level spectra, and optical selection rules, emerge by solving an algebraic (quadratic) equation, rather than a Bohr-Sommerfeld integral (or Schroedinger) equation. However, the new predictions include a frozen (zero-kinetic-energy) state which in some (but not all) cases lies below the usual zero-point energy. In addition to raising provocative questions concerning the origin of quantum-chemical phenomena, the results may prove to be of pedagogical value in introducing students to quantum mechanics. PMID:17020371

  11. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  12. Topics in electromagnetic, acoustic, and potential scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuntaplook, Umaporn

    With recent renewed interest in the classical topics of both acoustic and electromagnetic aspects for nano-technology, transformation optics, fiber optics, metamaterials with negative refractive indices, cloaking and invisibility, the topic of time-independent scattering theory in quantum mechanics is becoming a useful field to re-examine in the above contexts. One of the key areas of electromagnetic theory scattering of plane electromagnetic waves --- is based on the properties of the refractive indices in the various media. It transpires that the refractive index of a medium and the potential in quantum scattering theory are intimately related. In many cases, understanding such scattering in radially symmetric media is sufficient to gain insight into scattering in more complex media. Meeting the challenge of variable refractive indices and possibly complicated boundary conditions therefore requires accurate and efficient numerical methods, and where possible, analytic solutions to the radial equations from the governing scalar and vector wave equations (in acoustics and electromagnetic theory, respectively). Until relatively recently, researchers assumed a constant refractive index throughout the medium of interest. However, the most interesting and increasingly useful cases are those with non-constant refractive index profiles. In the majority of this dissertation the focus is on media with piecewise constant refractive indices in radially symmetric media. The method discussed is based on the solution of Maxwell's equations for scattering of plane electromagnetic waves from a dielectric (or "transparent") sphere in terms of the related Helmholtz equation. The main body of the dissertation (Chapters 2 and 3) is concerned with scattering from (i) a uniform spherical inhomogeneity embedded in an external medium with different properties, and (ii) a piecewise-uniform central inhomogeneity in the external medium. The latter results contain a natural generalization of

  13. Massive supersymmetric quantum gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.; Gut, M.; Scharf, G.

    2005-08-01

    We continue the study of the supersymmetric vector multiplet in a purely quantum framework. We obtain some new results which make the connection with the standard literature. First we construct the one-particle physical Hilbert space taking into account the (quantum) gauge structure of the model. Then we impose the condition of positivity for the scalar product only on the physical Hilbert space. Finally we obtain a full supersymmetric coupling which is gauge invariant in the supersymmetric sense in the first order of perturbation theory. By integrating out the Grassmann variables we get an interacting Lagrangian for a massive Yang-Mills theory related to ordinary gauge theory; however the number of ghost fields is doubled so we do not obtain the same ghost couplings as in the standard model Lagrangian.

  14. Theory of waves incoherently scattered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P.

    1974-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves impinging upon a plasma at frequencies larger than the plasma frequency, suffer weak scattering. The scattering arises from the existence of electron density fluctuations. The received signal corresponds to a particular spatial Fourier component of the fluctuations, the wave vector of which is a function of the wavelength of the radiowave. Wavelengths short with respect to the Debye length of the medium relate to fluctuations due to non-interacting Maxwellian electrons, while larger wavelengths relate to fluctuations due to collective Coulomb interactions. In the latter case, the scattered signal exhibits a spectral distribution which is characteristic of the main properties of the electron and ion gases and, therefore, provides a powerful diagnosis of the state of the ionosphere.

  15. Theory of Light Scattering in Axion Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    Taking account of the axion term in the Maxwell Lagrangian, we present a rigorous theory of light scattering in piecewise-constant axion fields. In particular, we focus on axionic substances with confined and/or curved geometries, and the scattering matrices of an axionic slab, cylinder, and sphere are derived analytically. The axion term generates a surface current with off-diagonal optical conductivity, giving rise to a new type of photospin--orbit interaction. As a result, various novel light-scattering phenomena can take place. We demonstrate enhanced Faraday rotation, parity-violating light scattering, and strong perturbation of dipole radiation.

  16. Siegert pseudostate formulation of scattering theory: General three-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, Lev O.; Batishchev, Pavel A.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2016-04-01

    This paper generalizes the Siegert pseudostate (SPS) formulation of scattering theory to arbitrary finite-range potentials without any symmetry in the three-dimensional (3D) case. The orthogonality and completeness properties of 3D SPSs are established. The SPS expansions for scattering states, outgoing-wave Green's function, scattering matrix, and scattering amplitude, that is, all major objects of scattering theory, are derived. The theory is illustrated by calculations for several model potentials. The results enable one to apply 3D SPSs as a purely discrete basis capable of representing both discrete and continuous spectra in solving various stationary and time-dependent quantum-mechanical problems.

  17. Haag's theorem in noncommutative quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Antipin, K. V.; Mnatsakanova, M. N.; Vernov, Yu. S.

    2013-08-15

    Haag's theorem was extended to the general case of noncommutative quantum field theory when time does not commute with spatial variables. It was proven that if S matrix is equal to unity in one of two theories related by unitary transformation, then the corresponding one in the other theory is equal to unity as well. In fact, this result is valid in any SO(1, 1)-invariant quantum field theory, an important example of which is noncommutative quantum field theory.

  18. Theory of quantum kagome ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Hermele, Michael

    Some pyrochlore oxides realize novel dipolar-octupolar (DO) doublets on the sites of the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. With magnetic field along the (111) direction, such systems can approximately be described as decoupled layers of a S =1/2 XYZ model on Kagome planes, with perpendicular magnetic field. A recent quantum Monte Carlo study found a zero temperature disordered phase in this model, dubbed quantum kagome ice, and proposed that it is a type of Z2 quantum spin liquid (J. Carrasquilla, Z. Hao and R. G. Melko, Nat. Comm., 6, 7421). We will describe an effective theory for this putative Z2 spin liquid, and present results on its symmetry fractionalization and resulting properties that may be tested in future numerical simulations. the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES) under Award # DE-SC0014415.

  19. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiban, Radu; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2011-11-01

    This issue aims to serve as an introduction to our current understanding of the structure of scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, an area which has seen particularly rapid advances in recent years following decades of steady progress. The articles contained herein provide a snapshot of the latest developments which we hope will serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and other scientists wishing to learn about the current state of the field, even if our continually evolving understanding of the subject might soon render this compilation incomplete. Why the fascination with scattering amplitudes, which have attracted the imagination and dedicated effort of so many physicists? Part of it stems from the belief, supported now by numerous examples, that unexpected simplifications of otherwise apparently complicated calculations do not happen by accident. Instead they provide a strong motivation to seek out an underlying explanation. The insight thereby gained can subsequently be used to make the next class of seemingly impossible calculations not only possible, but in some cases even trivial. This two-pronged strategy of exploring and exploiting the structure of gauge theory amplitudes appeals to a wide audience from formal theorists interested in mathematical structure for the sake of its own beauty to more phenomenologically-minded physicists eager to speed up the next generation of analysis software. Understandably it is the maximally supersymmetric 𝒩 = 4 Yang-Mills theory (SYM) which has the simplest structure and has correspondingly received the most attention. Rarely in theoretical physics are we fortunate enough to encounter a toy model which is simple enough to be solved completely yet rich enough to possess interesting non-trivial structure while simultaneously, and most importantly, being applicable (even if only as a good approximation) to a wide range of 'real' systems. The canonical example in quantum mechanics is of course the harmonic

  20. Inconstancy-theory/quantum-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Faheem

    1999-05-01

    Inconstancy-theory is the union of "relativity" and "quantum" theories which rests upon the answers of the simple questions. 1) That if only the simple motion of a particle can not be observed without the "reference-frame" then how the whole universe can be expected to be observable without any "reference-frame". 2) Does not the inter-influence (Unity) of space-time-mass suggest that these are generated by common source and might not there be some invisible "flow" (dynamical-equilibrium) that is the cause of space-time-mass,as time itself is a flow. "Inconstancy" proposes, interalia, the principle that "relativity (generalised) is the universal law of nature in each and every respect". For that "inconstancy" admits only the light, being absolute, a real reference-frame and medium(mirror) for the display of relative "space-time-mass". Light as reference-frame in "Inconstancy" unifies "relativity" and "quantum" theories and establishes the inter-connection between "quantum-gravity" and strong-nuclear interactions, which offers the velocity of light in terms of physical and spatial-temporal components. "Inconstancy" introduces another "constant" operative in "quantum-gravity" and unveils the "graviton" location for its novel range as previously "relativity" escaped detection for v<<quantum" for h<<<1. "Inconstancy" predictions. 1) Gravity abolition hypothesis of "static" particles as the dynamical property of the particle influences the space around it through "graviton" in the similar fashion as previously mass-variation was replaced by "momentum-variation" in special relativity. 2) Due to new constant of inconstancy, negligibly small angular motion of rectilinearly moving particle occurs.

  1. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theories in Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  2. Effective equilibrium theory of nonequilibrium quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit; Koch, Jens; Han, Jong; Le Hur, Karyn

    2011-12-01

    The theoretical description of strongly correlated quantum systems out of equilibrium presents several challenges and a number of open questions persist. Here, we focus on nonlinear electronic transport through an interacting quantum dot maintained at finite bias using a concept introduced by Hershfield [S. Hershfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 2134 (1993)] whereby one can express such nonequilibrium quantum impurity models in terms of the system's Lippmann-Schwinger operators. These scattering operators allow one to reformulate the nonequilibrium problem as an effective equilibrium problem associated with a modified Hamiltonian. In this paper, we provide a pedagogical analysis of the core concepts of the effective equilibrium theory. First, we demonstrate the equivalence between observables computed using the Schwinger-Keldysh framework and the effective equilibrium approach, and relate Green's functions in the two theoretical frameworks. Second, we expound some applications of this method in the context of interacting quantum impurity models. We introduce a novel framework to treat effects of interactions perturbatively while capturing the entire dependence on the bias voltage. For the sake of concreteness, we employ the Anderson model as a prototype for this scheme. Working at the particle-hole symmetric point, we investigate the fate of the Abrikosov-Suhl resonance as a function of bias voltage and magnetic field.

  3. Complex quantum trajectories for barrier scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Bradley Allen

    We have directed much attention towards developing quantum trajectory methods which can accurately predict the transmission probabilities for a variety of quantum mechanical barrier scattering processes. One promising method involves solving the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Derivative Propagation Method (DPM). We present this method, termed complex valued DPM (CVDPM(n)). CVDPM(n) has been successfully employed in the Lagrangian frame to accurately compute transmission probabilities on 'thick' one dimensional Eckart and Gaussian potential surfaces. CVDPM(n) is able to reproduce accurate results with a much lower order of approximation than is required by real valued quantum trajectory methods, from initial wave packet energies ranging from the tunneling case (Eo = 0) to high energy cases (twice the barrier height). We successfully extended CVDPM(n) to two-dimensional problems (one translational degree of freedom representing an Eckart or Gaussian barrier coupled to a vibrational degree of freedom) in the Lagrangian framework with great success. CVDPM helps to explain why barrier scattering from "thick" barriers is a much more well posed problem than barrier scattering from "thin" barriers. Though results in these two cases are in very good agreement with grid methods, the search for an appropriate set of initial conditions (termed an 'isochrone) from which to launch the trajectories leads to a time-consuming search problem that is reminiscent of the root-searching problem from semi-classical dynamics. In order to circumvent the isochrone problem, we present CVDPM(n) equations of motion which are derived and implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian frame for a metastable potential as well as the Eckart and Gaussian surfaces. In this way, the isochrone problem can be circumvented but at the cost of introducing other computational difficulties. In order to understand why CVDPM may give better transmission probabilities than real valued

  4. Quantum theory of bilayer quantum Hall smectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Emiliano; Schliemann, John; MacDonald, A. H.; Fisher, Matthew P.

    2003-03-01

    Mean-field theory predicts that bilayer quantum Hall systems at odd integer total filling factors can have stripe ground states, in which the top Landau level is occupied alternately by electrons in one of the two layers. We report on an analysis of the properties of these states based on a coupled-Luttinger-liquid description that is able to account for quantum fluctuations of charge-density and position along each stripe edge. The soft modes associated with the broken symmetries of the stripe state lead to an unusual coupled-Luttinger-liquid system with strongly enhanced low-temperature heat capacity and strongly suppressed low-energy tunneling density of states. We assess the importance of the intralayer and interlayer backscattering terms in the microscopic Hamiltonian, which are absent in the Luttinger liquid description, by employing a perturbative renormalization group approach which rescales time and length along but not transverse to the stripes. With interlayer backscattering interactions present the Luttinger-liquid states are unstable either to an incompressible striped state that has spontaneous interlayer phase coherence and a sizable charge gap even at relatively large layer separations, or to Wigner crystal states. Our quantitative estimates of the gaps produced by backscattering interactions are summarized in Fig. 11 by a schematic phase diagram intended to represent predicted experimental findings in very high mobility bilayer systems at dilution refrigerator temperatures as a function of layer separation and bilayer density balance. We predict that the bilayer will form incompressible isotropic interlayer phase-coherent states for small layer separations, say d⩽1.5l. At larger interlayer spacings, however, the bilayer will tend to form one of several different anisotropic states depending on the layer charge balance, which we parametrize by the fractional filling factor ν contributed by one of the two layers. For large charge imbalances (

  5. Minimal unitary (covariant) scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lindesay, J.V.; Markevich, A.

    1983-06-01

    In the minimal three particle equations developed by Lindesay the two body input amplitude was an on shell relativistic generalization of the non-relativistic scattering model characterized by a single mass parameter ..mu.. which in the two body (m + m) system looks like an s-channel bound state (..mu.. < 2m) or virtual state (..mu.. > 2m). Using this driving term in covariant Faddeev equations generates a rich covariant and unitary three particle dynamics. However, the simplest way of writing the relativisitic generalization of the Faddeev equations can take the on shell Mandelstam parameter s = 4(q/sup 2/ + m/sup 2/), in terms of which the two particle input is expressed, to negative values in the range of integration required by the dynamics. This problem was met in the original treatment by multiplying the two particle input amplitude by THETA(s). This paper provides what we hope to be a more direct way of meeting the problem.

  6. Bit-string scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1990-01-29

    We construct discrete space-time coordinates separated by the Lorentz-invariant intervals h/mc in space and h/mc{sup 2} in time using discrimination (XOR) between pairs of independently generated bit-strings; we prove that if this space is homogeneous and isotropic, it can have only 1, 2 or 3 spacial dimensions once we have related time to a global ordering operator. On this space we construct exact combinatorial expressions for free particle wave functions taking proper account of the interference between indistinguishable alternative paths created by the construction. Because the end-points of the paths are fixed, they specify completed processes; our wave functions are born collapsed''. A convenient way to represent this model is in terms of complex amplitudes whose squares give the probability for a particular set of observable processes to be completed. For distances much greater than h/mc and times much greater than h/mc{sup 2} our wave functions can be approximated by solutions of the free particle Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations. Using a eight-counter paradigm we relate this construction to scattering experiments involving four distinguishable particles, and indicate how this can be used to calculate electromagnetic and weak scattering processes. We derive a non-perturbative formula relating relativistic bound and resonant state energies to mass ratios and coupling constants, equivalent to our earlier derivation of the Bohr relativistic formula for hydrogen. Using the Fermi-Yang model of the pion as a relativistic bound state containing a nucleon-antinucleon pair, we find that (G{sub {pi}N}{sup 2}){sup 2} = (2m{sub N}/m{sub {pi}}){sup 2} {minus} 1. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Gravity and Quantum Theory Unified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Gary

    Historic arguments against Aether theories disappear if the Aether is a 4D compressible hyperfluid in which each particle is our observation of a hypervortex, formed in and comprised of hyperfluid. Such Aether resolves ``spooky action at a distance'' which allows unification of gravity and quantum theory. Light is transverse waves in free space (away from hypervortices) in the hyperfluid. Their detailed behavior is why we observe a curved 3D Lorentz universe - a slice through the 4D hyperverse. Meanwhile, detailed hypervortex behavior, including faster-than-light longitudinal waves in and along hypervortices, explain quantum phenomena. A particular Lagrangian for such a hyperfluid regenerates Maxwell's equations, plus an equation for gravity, and an equation for electric charge. Couplings among these equations generate a discrete spectrum of hypervortex solutions that we observe as a spectrum of particles. Gravity results from gradients in the fluid density near vortices. Observed clock rates depend on fluid density, and vortex motion thus intertwining gravity, clock rates and quantum phenomena. Implied experiments will be discussed.

  8. Quantum Information Theory for Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koashi, Masato

    This chapter gives a concise description of the fundamental concepts of quantum information and quantum communication, which is pertinent to the discussions in the subsequent chapters. Beginning with the basic set of rules that dictate quantum mechanics, the chapter explains the most general ways to describe quantum states, measurements, and state transformations. Convenient mathematical tools are also presented to provide an intuitive picture of a qubit, which is the simplest unit of quantum information. The chapter then elaborates on the distinction between quantum communication and classical communication, with emphasis on the role of quantum entanglement as a communication resource. Quantum teleportation and dense coding are then explained in the context of optimal resource conversions among quantum channels, classical channels, and entanglement.

  9. Collective field theory for quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, M.; Can, T.; Wiegmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a collective field theory for fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. We show that in the leading approximation for a large number of particles, the properties of Laughlin states are captured by a Gaussian free field theory with a background charge. Gradient corrections to the Gaussian field theory arise from the covariant ultraviolet regularization of the theory, which produces the gravitational anomaly. These corrections are described by a theory closely related to the Liouville theory of quantum gravity. The field theory simplifies the computation of correlation functions in FQH states and makes manifest the effect of quantum anomalies.

  10. Magnetization dissipation in ferromagnets from scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetization dynamics of ferromagnets is often formulated in terms of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The reactive part of this equation describes the response of the magnetization in terms of effective fields, whereas the dissipative part is parametrized by the Gilbert damping tensor. We formulate a scattering theory for the magnetization dynamics and map this description on the linearized LLG equation by attaching electric contacts to the ferromagnet. The reactive part can then be expressed in terms of the static scattering matrix. The dissipative contribution to the low-frequency magnetization dynamics can be described as an adiabatic energy pumping process to the electronic subsystem by the time-dependent magnetization. The Gilbert damping tensor depends on the time derivative of the scattering matrix as a function of the magnetization direction. By the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the fluctuations of the effective fields can also be formulated in terms of the quasistatic scattering matrix. The theory is formulated for general magnetization textures and worked out for monodomain precessions and domain-wall motions. We prove that the Gilbert damping from scattering theory is identical to the result obtained by the Kubo formalism.

  11. Effective string theory and QCD scattering amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2011-01-15

    QCD string is formed at distances larger than the confinement scale and can be described by the Polchinski-Strominger effective string theory with a nonpolynomial action, which has nevertheless a well-defined semiclassical expansion around a long-string ground state. We utilize modern ideas about the Wilson-loop/scattering-amplitude duality to calculate scattering amplitudes and show that the expansion parameter in the effective string theory is small in the Regge kinematical regime. For the amplitudes we obtain the Regge behavior with a linear trajectory of the intercept (d-2)/24 in d dimensions, which is computed semiclassically as a momentum-space Luescher term, and discuss an application to meson scattering amplitudes in QCD.

  12. Quantum field perturbation theory revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Schwinger's formalism in quantum field theory can be easily implemented in the case of scalar theories in D dimension with exponential interactions, such as μDexp (α ϕ ). In particular, we use the relation exp (α δ/δ J (x ) )exp (-Z0[J ])=exp (-Z0[J +αx]) with J the external source, and αx(y )=α δ (y -x ). Such a shift is strictly related to the normal ordering of exp (α ϕ ) and to a scaling relation which follows by renormalizing μ . Next, we derive a new formulation of perturbation theory for the potentials V (ϕ )=λ/n ! :ϕn: , using the generating functional associated to :exp (α ϕ ):. The Δ (0 )-terms related to the normal ordering are absorbed at once. The functional derivatives with respect to J to compute the generating functional are replaced by ordinary derivatives with respect to auxiliary parameters. We focus on scalar theories, but the method is general and similar investigations extend to other theories.

  13. Scattering theory for Floquet-Bloch states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitewski, Thomas; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by recent experimental implementations of artificial gauge fields for gases of cold atoms, we study the scattering properties of particles that are subjected to time-periodic Hamiltonians. Making use of Floquet theory, we focus on translationally invariant situations in which the single-particle dynamics can be described in terms of spatially extended Floquet-Bloch waves. We develop a general formalism for the scattering of these Floquet-Bloch waves. An important role is played by the conservation of Floquet quasienergy, which is defined only up to the addition of integer multiples of ℏ ω for a Hamiltonian with period T =2 π /ω . We discuss the consequences of this for the interpretation of "elastic" and "inelastic" scattering in cases of physical interest. We illustrate our general results with applications to the scattering of a single particle in a Floquet-Bloch state from a static potential and the scattering of two bosonic particles in Floquet-Bloch states through their interparticle interaction. We analyze examples of these scattering processes that are closely related to the schemes used to generate artificial gauge fields in cold-atom experiments, through optical dressing of internal states, or through time-periodic modulations of tight-binding lattices. We show that the effects of scattering cannot, in general, be understood by an effective time-independent Hamiltonian, even in the limit ω →∞ of rapid modulation. We discuss the relative sizes of the elastic scattering (required to stabilize many-body phases) and of the inelastic scattering (leading to deleterious heating effects). In particular, we describe how inelastic processes that can cause significant heating in the current experimental setup can be switched off by additional confinement of transverse motion.

  14. Quantum theory of Manakov solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Darren; Prucnal, Paul R.; Steiglitz, Ken

    2005-05-15

    A fully quantum mechanical model of two-component Manakov solitons is developed in both the Heisenberg and Schroedinger representations, followed by an analytical, linearized quantum theory of Manakov solitons in the Heisenberg picture. This theory is used to analyze the vacuum-induced fluctuations of Manakov soliton propagation and collision. The vacuum fluctuations induce phase diffusion and dispersion in Manakov soliton propagation. Calculations of the position, polarization angle, and polarization state fluctuations show an increase in collision-induced noise with a decrease in the relative velocity between the two solitons, as expected because of an increase in the interaction length. Fluctuations in both the polarization angle and state are shown to be independent of propagation distance, opening up possibilities for communications, switching, and logic, exploiting these properties of Manakov solitons. Calculations of the phase noise reveal, surprisingly, that the collision-induced fluctuations can be reduced slightly below the level of fluctuations in the absence of collision, due to cross-correlation effects between the collision-induced phase and amplitude fluctuations of the soliton. The squeezing effect of Manakov solitons is also studied and proven, unexpectedly, to have the same theoretical optimum as scalar solitons.

  15. Surface-integral formulation of scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A.S. Bray, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Stelbovics, A.T.

    2009-07-15

    We formulate scattering theory in the framework of a surface-integral approach utilizing analytically known asymptotic forms of the two-body and three-body scattering wavefunctions. This formulation is valid for both short-range and long-range Coulombic interactions. New general definitions for the potential scattering amplitude are presented. For the Coulombic potentials, the generalized amplitude gives the physical on-shell amplitude without recourse to a renormalization procedure. New post and prior forms for the Coulomb three-body breakup amplitude are derived. This resolves the problem of the inability of the conventional scattering theory to define the post form of the breakup amplitude for charged particles. The new definitions can be written as surface-integrals convenient for practical calculations. The surface-integral representations are extended to amplitudes of direct and rearrangement scattering processes taking place in an arbitrary three-body system. General definitions for the wave operators are given that unify the currently used channel-dependent definitions.

  16. Suppression of Quantum Scattering in Strongly Confined Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. I.; Melezhik, V. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2006-11-10

    We demonstrate that scattering of particles strongly interacting in three dimensions (3D) can be suppressed at low energies in a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) confinement. The underlying mechanism is the interference of the s- and p-wave scattering contributions with large s- and p-wave 3D scattering lengths being a necessary prerequisite. This low-dimensional quantum scattering effect might be useful in 'interacting' quasi-1D ultracold atomic gases, guided atom interferometry, and impurity scattering in strongly confined quantum wire-based electronic devices.

  17. Theory of Multiple Coulomb Scattering from Extended Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, L. N.; Rainwater, J.

    1954-08-01

    Two independent methods are described for calculating the multiple scattering distribution for projected angle scattering resulting when very high energy charged particles traverse a thick scatterer. The results are compared with the theories of Moliere and Olbert.

  18. Space--Time from Topos Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, Cecilia

    One of the main challenges in theoretical physics in the past 50 years has been to define a theory of quantum gravity, i.e. a theory which consistently combines general relativity and quantum theory in order to define a theory of space-time itself seen as a fluctuating field. As such, a definition of space-time is of paramount importance, but it is precisely the attainment of such a definition which is one of the main stumbling blocks in quantum gravity. One of the striking features of quantum gravity is that although both general relativity and quantum theory treat space-time as a four-dimensional (4D) manifold equipped with a metric, quantum gravity would suggest that, at the microscopic scale, space-time is somewhat discrete. Therefore the continuum structure of space-time suggested by the two main ingredients of quantum gravity seems to be thrown into discussion by quantum gravity itself. This seems quite an odd predicament, but it might suggest that perhaps a different mathematical structure other than a smooth manifold should model space-time. These considerations seem to shed doubts on the use of the continuum in general in a possible theory of quantum gravity. An alternative would be to develop a mathematical formalism for quantum gravity in which no fundamental role is played by the continuum and where a new concept of space-time, not modeled on a differentiable manifold, will emerge. This is precisely one of the aims of the topos theory approach to quantum theory and quantum gravity put forward by Isham, Butterfield, and Doering and subsequently developed by other authors. The aim of this article is to precisely elucidate how such an approach gives rise to a new definition of space-time which might be more appropriate for quantum gravity.

  19. Uncertainty relation revisited from quantum estimation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yu; Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2011-10-15

    We use quantum estimation theory to formulate bounds of errors in quantum measurement for arbitrary quantum states and observables in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. We prove that the measurement errors of two noncommuting observables satisfy Heisenberg-type uncertainty relation, find the achievable bound, and propose a strategy to achieve it.

  20. VLF scattering from Red Sprites-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Wait, J. R.; Dowden, R. L.

    1998-05-01

    A relatively simple model of Red Sprites as a set of conducting columns reproduces the radio physics properties of VLF sprites. The columnar structure of optical sprites is represented by thin vertical conducting columns (or `Spritelets') in free space, with dimensions taken from optical observations. The scattered field from a set of coupled Spritelets has a complex amplitude pattern which normally includes some deep minima reproducing the `perturbation shadows' seen in some experimental events. It is not uncommon for the back scattered amplitudes to be similar to those for forward scatter in the theoretical model, as in experimental reports. As some sprite events appear to have closely spaced Spritelets, the results presented here indicate that there will be a high degree of electrical shielding. This is an application of the theory presented by[Rodger et al. (1997a)].

  1. Whiteheadian process and quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.

    1998-08-01

    There are deep similarities between Whitehead's idea of the process by which nature unfolds and the ideas of quantum theory. Whitehead says that the world is made of ''actual occasions'', each of which arises from potentialities created by prior actual occasions. These actual occasions are happenings modeled on experiential events, each of which comes into being and then perishes, only to be replaced by a successor. It is these experience-like happenings that are the basic realities of nature, according to Whitehead, not the persisting physical particles that Newtonian physics took be the basic entities. Similarly, Heisenberg says that what is really happening in a quantum process is the emergence of an actual from potentialities created by prior actualities. In the orthodox Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory the actual things to which the theory refer are increments in ''our knowledge''. These increments are experiential events. The particles of classical physics lose their fundamental status: they dissolve into diffuse clouds of possibilities. At each stage of the unfolding of nature the complete cloud of possibilities acts like the potentiality for the occurrence of a next increment in knowledge, whose occurrence can radically change the cloud of possibilities/potentialities for the still-later increments in knowledge. The fundamental difference between these ideas about nature and the classical ideas that reigned from the time of Newton until this century concerns the status of the experiential aspects of nature. These are things such as thoughts, ideas, feelings, and sensations. They are distinguished from the physical aspects of nature, which are described in terms of quantities explicitly located in tiny regions of space and time. According to the ideas of classical physics the physical world is made up exclusively of things of this latter type, and the unfolding of the physical world is determined by causal connections involving only these things

  2. Multiscale quantum simulation of quantum field theory using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennen, Gavin K.; Rohde, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.; Singh, Sukhwinder

    2015-09-01

    A successful approach to understand field theories is to resolve the physics into different length or energy scales using the renormalization group framework. We propose a quantum simulation of quantum field theory which encodes field degrees of freedom in a wavelet basis—a multiscale description of the theory. Since wavelet families can be constructed to have compact support at all resolutions, this encoding allows for quantum simulations to create particle excitations which are local at some chosen scale and provides a natural way to associate observables in the theory to finite-resolution detectors.

  3. Deep Wavelet Scattering for Quantum Energy Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Matthew

    Physical functionals are usually computed as solutions of variational problems or from solutions of partial differential equations, which may require huge computations for complex systems. Quantum chemistry calculations of ground state molecular energies is such an example. Indeed, if x is a quantum molecular state, then the ground state energy E0 (x) is the minimum eigenvalue solution of the time independent Schrödinger Equation, which is computationally intensive for large systems. Machine learning algorithms do not simulate the physical system but estimate solutions by interpolating values provided by a training set of known examples {(xi ,E0 (xi) } i <= n . However, precise interpolations may require a number of examples that is exponential in the system dimension, and are thus intractable. This curse of dimensionality may be circumvented by computing interpolations in smaller approximation spaces, which take advantage of physical invariants. Linear regressions of E0 over a dictionary Φ ={ϕk } k compute an approximation E 0 as: E 0 (x) =∑kwkϕk (x) , where the weights {wk } k are selected to minimize the error between E0 and E 0 on the training set. The key to such a regression approach then lies in the design of the dictionary Φ. It must be intricate enough to capture the essential variability of E0 (x) over the molecular states x of interest, while simple enough so that evaluation of Φ (x) is significantly less intensive than a direct quantum mechanical computation (or approximation) of E0 (x) . In this talk we present a novel dictionary Φ for the regression of quantum mechanical energies based on the scattering transform of an intermediate, approximate electron density representation ρx of the state x. The scattering transform has the architecture of a deep convolutional network, composed of an alternating sequence of linear filters and nonlinear maps. Whereas in many deep learning tasks the linear filters are learned from the training data, here

  4. Quantum Theory of Laser Amplifiers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mander, Gillian Linda

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We calculate the input-output characteristics of a below threshold laser amplifier. Expressions are derived for the output second- and fourth-order spectral and temporal correlation functions in terms of the corresponding input quantities, and for the photocount first and second factorial moments for both homodyne and direct detection. The general results are applied to several cases of practical interest, including specific non-classical input states. We show that a maximum of twofold amplification is permitted if squeezing in the input is to survive at the output. Similarly, for preservation of photon antibunching in amplification we show that only very small gains are allowed. The model treated here provides a detailed example of the amplifier noise limitations imposed by quantum mechanics. In particular, we show that minimum noise occurs in a cavity that is asymmetric with respect to the mirror reflectivities. The latter part of this work treats the above threshold laser amplifier. The laser output is back-scattered from a moving target to provide a weak Doppler-shifted signal which re-enters the laser cavity and is amplified. We show that the three-level atomic lasing medium is equivalent to a two-level medium pumped by an inverted bath. We use the methods of quantum statistical analysis to obtain time -evolution equations for the c-number amplitudes of the laser and signal fields. We show that the results may be applied to the below threshold regime for appropriate values of the pump parameter. By considering the amplitude differential gain we show explicitly that the behaviour of the laser around threshold is characteristic of a second -order phase transition. We calculate the output intensity gain appropriate to a heterodyne detection process, and find good agreement between the predicted gain profiles and measured data for both carbon dioxide and argon-ion lasers.

  5. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - The Correct Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a clear, definitive Scientific explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and with distinct Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 certain, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are obviously Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli- Foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  6. Multiloop calculations in perturbative quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, Ian Richard

    This thesis deals with high-precision calculations in perturbative quantum field theory. In conjunction with detailed experimental measurements, perturbative quantum field theory provides the quantitative framework with which much of modern particle physics is understood. The results of three new theoretical calculations are presented. The first is a definitive resolution of a recent controversy involving the interaction of a muon with a magnetic field. Specifically, the light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is shown to be of positive sign, thereby decreasing the discrepancy between theory and experiment. Despite this adjustment to the theoretical prediction, the remaining discrepancy might be a subtle signature of new kinds of particles. The second calculation involves the energy levels of a bound state formed from two charged particles of arbitrary masses. By employing recently developed mass expansion techniques, new classes of solutions are obtained for problems in a field of particle physics with a very rich history. The third calculation provides an improved prediction for the decay of a top quark. In order to obtain this result, a large class of multiloop integrals has been solved for the first time. Top quark decay is just one member of a family of interesting physical processes to which these new results apply. Since specialized calculational techniques are essential ingredients in all three calculations, they are motivated and explained carefully in this thesis. These techniques, once automated with symbolic computational software, have recently opened avenues of solution to a wide variety of important problems in particle physics.

  7. Free Quantum Field Theory from Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    After leading to a new axiomatic derivation of quantum theory (see D'Ariano et al. in Found Phys, 2015), the new informational paradigm is entering the domain of quantum field theory, suggesting a quantum automata framework that can be regarded as an extension of quantum field theory to including an hypothetical Planck scale, and with the usual quantum field theory recovered in the relativistic limit of small wave-vectors. Being derived from simple principles (linearity, unitarity, locality, homogeneity, isotropy, and minimality of dimension), the automata theory is quantum ab-initio, and does not assume Lorentz covariance and mechanical notions. Being discrete it can describe localized states and measurements (unmanageable by quantum field theory), solving all the issues plaguing field theory originated from the continuum. These features make the theory an ideal framework for quantum gravity, with relativistic covariance and space-time emergent solely from the interactions, and not assumed a priori. The paper presents a synthetic derivation of the automata theory, showing how the principles lead to a description in terms of a quantum automaton over a Cayley graph of a group. Restricting to Abelian groups we show how the automata recover the Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell dynamics in the relativistic limit. We conclude with some new routes about the more general scenario of non-Abelian Cayley graphs. The phenomenology arising from the automata theory in the ultra-relativistic domain and the analysis of corresponding distorted Lorentz covariance is reviewed in Bisio et al. (Found Phys 2015, in this same issue).

  8. Generalized Rayleigh scattering. I. Basic theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.

    1995-11-01

    The classsical problem of multiple molecular (in particular, Rayleigh) scattering in plane-parallel atmospheres is considered from a somewhat broader viewpoint than usual. The general approach and ideology are borrowed from non-LTE line formation theory. The main emphasis is on the depth dependence of the corresponding source matrix rather than on the emergent radiation. We study the azimuth-averaged radiation field of polarized radiation in a semi-infinite atmosphere with embedded primary sources. The corresponding 2x2 phase matrix of molecular scattering is P=(1-W) P_I_+W P_R_, where P_I_ and P_R_ are the phase matrices of the scalar isotropic scattering and of the Rayleigh scattering, respectively, and W is the depolarization parameter. Contrary to the usual assumption that W{in}[0,1], we assume W{in} [0,{infinity}) and call this generalized Rayleigh scattering (GRS). Using the factorization of P which is intimately related to its diadic expansion, we reduce the problem to an integral equation for the source matrix S(τ) with a matrix displacement kernel. In operator form this equation is S={LAMBDA}S+S^*^, where {LAMBDA} is the matrix {LAMBDA}-operator and S^*^ is the primary source term. This leads to a new concept, the matrix albedo of single scattering λ =diag(λ_I_,λ_Q_), where λ_I_ is the usual (scalar) single scattering albedo and λ_Q_=0.7Wλ_I_. Its use enables one to formulate matrix equivalents of many of the results of the scalar theory in exactly the same form as in the scalar case. Of crucial importance is the matrix equivalent of the sqrt(ɛ) law of the scalar theory. Another useful new concept is the λ-plane, i.e., the plane with the axes (λ_I_,λ_Q_). Systematic use of the matrix sqrt(ɛ) law and of the λ-plane proved to be a useful instrument in classifying various limiting and particular cases of GRS and in discussing numerical data on the matrix source functions (to be given in Paper II of the series).

  9. Reconstruction and Reinvention in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Michael

    2015-10-01

    I consider the fact that there are a number of interesting ways to `reconstruct' quantum theory, and suggest that, very broadly speaking, a form of `instrumentalism' makes good sense of the situation. This view runs against some common wisdom, which dismisses instrumentalism as `cheap'. In contrast, I consider how an instrumentalist might think about the reconstruction theorems, and, having made a distinction between `reconstructing' quantum theory and `reinventing' quantum theory, I suggest that there is an adequate (not `cheap') instrumentalist approach to the theory (and to these theorems) that invokes both.

  10. Quantum Probability Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Jürg; Schubnel, Baptiste

    By and large, people are better at coining expressions than at filling them with interesting, concrete contents. Thus, it may not be very surprising that there are many professional probabilists who may have heard the expression but do not appear to be aware of the need to develop "quantum probability theory" into a thriving, rich, useful field featured at meetings and conferences on probability theory. Although our aim, in this essay, is not to contribute new results on quantum probability theory, we hope to be able to let the reader feel the enormous potential and richness of this field. What we intend to do, in the following, is to contribute some novel points of view to the "foundations of quantum mechanics", using mathematical tools from "quantum probability theory" (such as the theory of operator algebras).

  11. Theory of scattering by complex potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Thylwe, K.; Froeman, N.

    1983-10-15

    The scattering problem for a non-relativistic spinless particle under the influence of a complex effective potential, which is spherically symmetric and tends to zero faster than 1/r at infinity, is considered. Certain general relations, which illuminate the influence of the imaginary part of the potential on the scattering process, are derived with the use of the expression for the probability current density. The rigorous phase-integral method developed by N. Froeman and P. O. Froeman is used for obtaining an exact, general formula for the scattering matrix, or equivalently, for the phase shift. The formula is expressed in terms of phase-integral approximations of an arbitrary order and certain quantities defined by convergent series. Estimating the latter quantities and omitting small corrections, an approximate formula is derived for the phase shift, valid for the case that only one complex turning point contributes essentially to the phase shift. Criteria for classifying a scattering problem as such a one-turning-point problem are given. The treatment is made general enough to also cover situations of interest in Regge-pole or complex angular momentum theory.

  12. Resonances in Coupled πK-ηK Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  13. Electron-exchange and quantum screening effects on the Thomson scattering process in quantum Fermi plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyeong Won; Jung, Young-Dae; Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590

    2013-06-15

    The influence of the electron-exchange and quantum screening on the Thomson scattering process is investigated in degenerate quantum Fermi plasmas. The Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas is obtained by the plasma dielectric function and fluctuation-dissipation theorem as a function of the electron-exchange parameter, Fermi energy, plasmon energy, and wave number. It is shown that the electron-exchange effect enhances the Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas. It is also shown that the differential Thomson scattering cross section has a minimum at the scattering angle Θ=π/2. It is also found that the Thomson scattering cross section increases with an increase of the Fermi energy. In addition, the Thomson scattering cross section is found to be decreased with increasing plasmon energy.

  14. A general theory of quantum relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minic, Djordje; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    2004-02-01

    The geometric form of standard quantum mechanics is compatible with the two postulates: (1) the laws of physics are invariant under the choice of experimental setup and (2) every quantum observation or event is intrinsically statistical. These postulates remain compatible within a background independent extension of quantum theory with a local intrinsic time implying the relativity of the concept of a quantum event. In this extension the space of quantum events becomes dynamical and only individual quantum events make sense observationally. At the core of such a general theory of quantum relativity is the three-way interplay between the symplectic form, the dynamical metric and non-integrable almost complex structure of the space of quantum events. Such a formulation provides a missing conceptual ingredient in the search for a background independent quantum theory of gravity and matter. The crucial new technical element in our scheme derives from a set of recent mathematical results on certain infinite-dimensional almost Kahler manifolds which replace the complex projective spaces of standard quantum mechanics.

  15. Asymptotic theory of quantum statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito

    Part I: Hypothesis Testing: Introduction to Part I -- Strong Converse and Stein's lemma in quantum hypothesis testing/Tomohiro Ogawa and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- The proper formula for relative entropy and its asymptotics in quantum probability/Fumio Hiai and Dénes Petz -- Strong Converse theorems in Quantum Information Theory/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- Asymptotics of quantum relative entropy from a representation theoretical viewpoint/Masahito Hayashi -- Quantum birthday problems: geometrical aspects of Quantum Random Coding/Akio Fujiwara -- Part II: Quantum Cramèr-Rao Bound in Mixed States Model: Introduction to Part II -- A new approach to Cramèr-Rao Bounds for quantum state estimation/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- On Fisher information of Quantum Statistical Models/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- On the parameter estimation problem for Quantum Statistical Models/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A generalization of the simultaneous diagonalization of Hermitian matrices and its relation to Quantum Estimation Theory/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A linear programming approach to Attainable Cramèr-Rao Type Bounds/Masahito Hayashi -- Statistical model with measurement degree of freedom and quantum physics/Masahito Hayashi and Keiji Matsumoto -- Asymptotic Quantum Theory for the Thermal States Family/Masahito Hayashi -- State estimation for large ensembles/Richard D. Gill and Serge Massar -- Part III: Quantum Cramèr-Rao Bound in Pure States Model: Introduction to Part III-- Quantum Fisher Metric and estimation for Pure State Models/Akio Fujiwara and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- Geometry of Quantum Estimation Theory/Akio Fujiwara -- An estimation theoretical characterization of coherent states/Akio Fujiwara and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A geometrical approach to Quantum Estimation Theory/Keiji Matsumoto -- Part IV: Group symmetric approach to Pure States Model: Introduction to Part IV -- Optimal extraction of information from finite quantum ensembles/Serge Massar and Sandu Popescu -- Asymptotic Estimation Theory for a Finite-Dimensional Pure

  16. Inelastic microwave photon scattering off a quantum impurity in a Josephson-junction array.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Moshe; Devoret, Michel H; Houzet, Manuel; Glazman, Leonid I

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in an anharmonic superconducting circuit enable frequency conversion of individual incoming photons. This effect, linear in the photon beam intensity, leads to ramifications for the standard input-output circuit theory. We consider an extreme case of anharmonicity in which photons scatter off a small set of weak links within a Josephson junction array. We show that this quantum impurity displays Kondo physics and evaluate the elastic and inelastic photon scattering cross sections. These cross sections reveal many-body properties of the Kondo problem that are hard to access in its traditional fermionic version. PMID:23383827

  17. Teaching Quantum Theory in the Introductory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching quantum theory without math with emphasis on some innovative approaches and topics such as nonlocality and Bell's theorem. Written in the form of suggestions to prospective instructors. (JRH)

  18. Effective theories for dark matter nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisano, Junji; Nagai, Ryo; Nagata, Natsumi

    2015-05-01

    We reformulate the calculation of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections based on the method of effective field theories. We assume that the scatterings are induced by the exchange of colored mediators, and construct the effective theories by integrating out the colored particles. All of the leading order matching conditions as well as the renormalization group equations are presented. We consider a Majorana fermion, and real scalar and vector bosons for the dark matter and show the results for each case. The treatment for the twist-2 operators is discussed in detail, and it is shown that the scale of evaluating their nucleon matrix elements does not have to be the hadronic scale. The effects of the QCD corrections are evaluated on the assumption that the masses of the colored mediators are much heavier than the electroweak scale. Our formulation is systematic and model-independent, and thus suitable to be implemented in numerical packages, such as micrOMEGAs and DarkSUSY.

  19. Quantum scattering in the strip: From ballistic to localized regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebarowski, R.; Šeba, P.; Życzkowski, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1998-11-01

    Quantum scattering is studied in a system consisting of randomly distributed point scatterers in the strip. The model is continuous yet exactly solvable. Varying the number of scatterers (the sample length) we investigate a transition between the ballistic and the localized regimes. By considering the cylinder geometry and introducing the magnetic flux we are able to study time reversal symmetry breaking in the system. Both macroscopic (conductance) and microscopic (eigenphases distribution, statistics of S-matrix elements) characteristics of the system are examined.

  20. Quantum theory - essential from cosmos to consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görnitz, T.

    2010-06-01

    Quantum theory is the most successful physical theory. About one third of the gross national product in the developed countries results from its applications. But very often quantum theory is still declared as "crazy" or "not understandable". However, quantum theory has a clear mathematical structure that expresses well-known experiences from every day life: A whole is often more than the sum of its parts, and not only the facts also the possibilities can act. If such structures become important then the consequences differ from the models of classical physics which rests on the fundamental differences between matter and motion, material and force, localization and extension, fullness and emptiness. From quantum theory one can learn that all these differences are useful in many cases but are not fundamental. There are equivalences between them, and these can be extended even to the equivalence between matter, energy and abstract quantum information. It is cosmological funded and is denominated as "Protyposis" to avoid the connotation of information and meaning. Protyposis enables a fundamentally new understanding of matter which can be seen as "formed", "condensed" or "designed" abstract quantum information. One result of the Protyposis is a derivation of Einstein's equations from the abstract quantum information. Another consequence is the ontological reality of the mind and its connection to a brain which can be explained without any dualistic model.

  1. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  2. A supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.; Scharf, G.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory based on a vector multiplet containing supersymmetric partners of spin 3/2 for the vector fields. The constructions of the model follows closely the usual construction of gauge models in the Epstein-Glaser framework for perturbative field theory. Accordingly, all the arguments are completely of quantum nature without reference to a classical supersymmetric theory. As an application we consider the supersymmetric electroweak theory. The resulting self-couplings of the gauge bosons agree with the standard model up to a divergence.

  3. The Nature of Quantum Truth: Logic, Set Theory, & Mathematics in the Context of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Kimberly

    The purpose of this dissertation is to construct a radically new type of mathematics whose underlying logic differs from the ordinary classical logic used in standard mathematics, and which we feel may be more natural for applications in quantum mechanics. Specifically, we begin by constructing a first order quantum logic, the development of which closely parallels that of ordinary (classical) first order logic --- the essential differences are in the nature of the logical axioms, which, in our construction, are motivated by quantum theory. After showing that the axiomatic first order logic we develop is sound and complete (with respect to a particular class of models), this logic is then used as a foundation on which to build (axiomatic) mathematical systems --- and we refer to the resulting new mathematics as "quantum mathematics." As noted above, the hope is that this form of mathematics is more natural than classical mathematics for the description of quantum systems, and will enable us to address some foundational aspects of quantum theory which are still troublesome --- e.g. the measurement problem --- as well as possibly even inform our thinking about quantum gravity. After constructing the underlying logic, we investigate properties of several mathematical systems --- e.g. axiom systems for abstract algebras, group theory, linear algebra, etc. --- in the presence of this quantum logic. In the process, we demonstrate that the resulting quantum mathematical systems have some strange, but very interesting features, which indicates a richness in the structure of mathematics that is classically inaccessible. Moreover, some of these features do indeed suggest possible applications to foundational questions in quantum theory. We continue our investigation of quantum mathematics by constructing an axiomatic quantum set theory, which we show satisfies certain desirable criteria. Ultimately, we hope that such a set theory will lead to a foundation for quantum

  4. Quantum superposition principle and gravitational collapse: Scattering times for spherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrus, M.; Hajicek, P.

    2005-09-15

    A quantum theory of spherically symmetric thin shells of null dust and their gravitational field is studied. In Nucl. Phys. B603, 555 (2001), it has been shown how superpositions of quantum states with different geometries can lead to a solution of the singularity problem and black hole information paradox: the shells bounce and re-expand and the evolution is unitary. The corresponding scattering times will be defined in the present paper. To this aim, a spherical mirror of radius R{sub m} is introduced. The classical formula for scattering times of the shell reflected from the mirror is extended to quantum theory. The scattering times and their spreads are calculated. They have a regular limit for R{sub m}{yields}0 and they reveal a resonance at E{sub m}=c{sup 4}R{sub m}/2G. Except for the resonance, they are roughly of the order of the time the light needs to cross the flat space distance between the observer and the mirror. Some ideas are discussed of how the construction of the quantum theory could be changed so that the scattering times become considerably longer.

  5. The decoupling approach to quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Frédéric

    2010-04-01

    Quantum information theory studies the fundamental limits that physical laws impose on information processing tasks such as data compression and data transmission on noisy channels. This thesis presents general techniques that allow one to solve many fundamental problems of quantum information theory in a unified framework. The central theorem of this thesis proves the existence of a protocol that transmits quantum data that is partially known to the receiver through a single use of an arbitrary noisy quantum channel. In addition to the intrinsic interest of this problem, this theorem has as immediate corollaries several central theorems of quantum information theory. The following chapters use this theorem to prove the existence of new protocols for two other types of quantum channels, namely quantum broadcast channels and quantum channels with side information at the transmitter. These protocols also involve sending quantum information partially known by the receiver with a single use of the channel, and have as corollaries entanglement-assisted and unassisted asymptotic coding theorems. The entanglement-assisted asymptotic versions can, in both cases, be considered as quantum versions of the best coding theorems known for the classical versions of these problems. The last chapter deals with a purely quantum phenomenon called locking. We demonstrate that it is possible to encode a classical message into a quantum state such that, by removing a subsystem of logarithmic size with respect to its total size, no measurement can have significant correlations with the message. The message is therefore "locked" by a logarithmic-size key. This thesis presents the first locking protocol for which the success criterion is that the trace distance between the joint distribution of the message and the measurement result and the product of their marginals be sufficiently small.

  6. Loss of quantum coherence through scattering off virtual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.; Ross, Simon F.

    1997-11-01

    In quantum gravity, fields may lose quantum coherence by scattering off vacuum fluctuations in which virtual black hole pairs appear and disappear. Although it is not possible to properly compute the scattering off such fluctuations, we argue that one can get useful qualitative results, which provide a guide to the possible effects of such scattering, by considering a quantum field on the C metric, which has the same topology as a virtual black hole pair. We study a scalar field on the Lorentzian C metric background, with the scalar field in the analytically continued Euclidean vacuum state. We find that there are a finite number of particles at infinity in this state, contrary to recent claims made by Yi. Thus, this state is not determined by data at infinity, and there is loss of quantum coherence in this semiclassical calculation.

  7. Quantumness of correlations and Maxwell's demons in elementary scattering processes—Energetic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Dreismann, A.

    2014-10-01

    The interactions between physical systems generally lead to the formation of correlations. In this paper we consider the phenomena of entanglement and "quantumness of correlations", such as quantum discord, with particular emphasis on their energetic consequences for the participating systems. We describe a number of theoretical models that are commonly employed in this context, highlighting the general character of one of their most intriguing results: In contradiction to conventional expectations, erasure (decay, consumption) of quantum correlations may be a source of work, i.e. may have "negative energetic costs". We report experimental evidence of this surprising effect obtained within the framework of an elementary scattering experiment, namely ultrafast neutron Compton scattering from normal-state liquid 4He. The general theory of quantumness of correlations provides a natural way of interpreting the reported results, which stand in blatant contrast to the conventional theory of scattering, where neutron-atom-environment quantum correlations and decoherence play no role. Moreover, they provide a new operational meaning of discord and related measures of quantumness.

  8. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  9. The facets of relativistic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, H. G.; Müller, V. F.

    2010-04-01

    Relativistic quantum field theory is generally recognized to form the adequate theoretical frame for subatomic physics, with the Standard Model of Particle Physics as a major achievement. We point out that quantum field theory in its present form is not a monolithic theory, but rather consists of distinct facets, which aim at a common ideal goal. We give a short overview of the strengths and limitations of these facets. We emphasize the theory-dependent relation between the quantum fields, and the basic objects in the empirical domain, the particles. Given the marked conceptual differences between the facets, we argue to view these, and therefore also the Standard Model, as symbolic constructions. We finally note that this view of physical theories originated in the 19th century and is related to the emergence of the classical field as an autonomous concept.

  10. The facets of relativistic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, H. G.; Müller, V. F.

    2011-04-01

    Relativistic quantum field theory is generally recognized to form the adequate theoretical frame for subatomic physics, with the Standard Model of Particle Physics as a major achievement. We point out that quantum field theory in its present form is not a monolithic theory, but rather consists of distinct facets, which aim at a common ideal goal. We give a short overview of the strengths and limitations of these facets. We emphasize the theory-dependent relation between the quantum fields, and the basic objects in the empirical domain, the particles. Given the marked conceptual differences between the facets, we argue to view these, and therefore also the Standard Model, as symbolic constructions. We finally note that this view of physical theories originated in the 19th century and is related to the emergence of the classical field as an autonomous concept.

  11. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  12. Tests of alternative quantum theories with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sponar, S.; Durstberger-Rennhofer, K.; Badurek, G.; Hasegawa, Y.; Klepp, J.; Schmitzer, C.; Bartosik, H.

    2014-12-04

    According to Bell’s theorem, every theory based on local realism is at variance with certain predictions of quantum mechanics. A theory that maintains realism but abandons reliance on locality, which has been proposed by Leggett, is incompatible with experimentally observable quantum correlations. In our experiment correlation measurements of spin-energy entangled single-neutrons violate a Leggett-type inequality by more than 7.6 standard deviations. The experimental data falsify the contextual realistic model and are fully in favor of quantum mechanics.

  13. Toward a physical theory of quantum cognition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Taiki

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mathematical models based on quantum formalism have been developed in cognitive science. The target articles in this special issue of Topics in Cognitive Science clearly illustrate how quantum theoretical formalism can account for various aspects of human judgment and decision making in a quantitatively and mathematically rigorous manner. In this commentary, we show how future studies in quantum cognition and decision making should be developed to establish theoretical foundations based on physical theory, by introducing Taketani's three-stage theory of the development of science. Also, implications for neuroeconomics (another rapidly evolving approach to human judgment and decision making) are discussed. PMID:24482329

  14. Categorical aspects of reconstructing quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Raymond; Coecke, Bob

    2012-02-01

    We present steps towards a new understanding of reconstructions of quantum theory. Chiribella, D'Ariano, and Perinotti (CDP) have recently produced a fascinating reconstruction of the formalism of quantum theory, which brings to light its operational origins. We use parts of the formalism of categorical quantum mechanics to expose the underlying mathematical structures of information flow in the CDP reconstruction. Our results include an elegant relation between teleportation and local tomography, and an equivalence betweeen a purely category-theoretic description of the purification of a mixed state, and the purification axiom of CDP.

  15. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of novel quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp W.

    excitations. Dynamic spin correlations in BiCu 2PO6 are the quantum analog of the incommensurate spiral order that appears in classical frustrated magnets and the dispersion minimum occurs at an incommensurate wavevector with a gap of Delta1 = 1.67(2) meV. Neutron scattering measurements in applied magnetic field show that the triplon degeneracy in zero field is completely broken by anisotropic magnetic interactions and each branch was observed to exhibit an anomalous Zeeman behavior. The lowest energy excitation spectrum and anomalous Zeeman splitting is captured by a bond-operator theory, incorporating very significant anisotropic magnetic exchange interactions. At high energies, we have also observed a continuum of two-triplon scattering and a unique two-triplon bound state excitation. Anharmonic terms in the magnetic Hamiltonian of BiCu2PO6 result in a spectacular spontaneous decay of the triplon quasiparticles.

  16. α∗-cohomology, and classification of translation-invariant non-commutative quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshovi, Amir Abbass

    2014-09-01

    Translation-invariant ⋆ products are studied in the setting of α∗-cohomology. It is explicitly shown that all quantum behaviors including Green's functions and the scattering matrix of translation-invariant non-commutative quantum field theories are thoroughly characterized by α∗-cohomology classes of the star products.

  17. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  18. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Franz

    1999-04-01

    An accessible, comprehensive reference to modern quantum mechanics and field theory. In surveying available books on advanced quantum mechanics and field theory, Franz Gross determined that while established books were outdated, newer titles tended to focus on recent developments and disregard the basics. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory fills this striking gap in the field. With a strong emphasis on applications to practical problems as well as calculations, Dr. Gross provides complete, up-to-date coverage of both elementary and advanced topics essential for a well-rounded understanding of the field. Developing the material at a level accessible even to newcomers to quantum mechanics, the book begins with topics that every physicist should know-quantization of the electromagnetic field, relativistic one body wave equations, and the theoretical explanation of atomic decay. Subsequent chapters prepare readers for advanced work, covering such major topics as gauge theories, path integral techniques, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and an introduction to QCD, chiral symmetry, and the Standard Model. A special chapter is devoted to relativistic bound state wave equations-an important topic that is often overlooked in other books. Clear and concise throughout, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory boasts examples from atomic and nuclear physics as well as particle physics, and includes appendices with background material. It is an essential reference for anyone working in quantum mechanics today.

  19. Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, Dave; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A. A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-06-23

    The resonant scattering of surface plasmon-polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In contrast to non-resonant scattering by a localized dielectric surface defect, a strong resonant peak in the spectrum of the scattered field is predicted that is accompanied by two side valleys. The peak height depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of SPP waves, reflecting the feedback dynamics from a photon-dressed electron-hole plasma inside the quantum dots. This unique behavior in the scattered field peak strength is correlated with the occurrence of a resonant dip in the absorption spectrum of SPP waves due to the interband photon-dressing effect. Our result on the scattering of SPP waves may be experimentally observable and applied to spatially selective illumination and imaging of individual molecules.

  20. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  1. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  2. Dual field theories of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Given two quantum states of N q-bits we are interested to find the shortest quantum circuit consisting of only one- and two- q-bit gates that would transfer one state into another. We call it the quantum maze problem for the reasons described in the paper. We argue that in a large N limit the quantum maze problem is equivalent to the problem of finding a semiclassical trajectory of some lattice field theory (the dual theory) on an N +1 dimensional space-time with geometrically flat, but topologically compact spatial slices. The spatial fundamental domain is an N dimensional hyper-rhombohedron, and the temporal direction describes transitions from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary target state and so the initial and final dual field theory conditions are described by these two quantum computational states. We first consider a complex Klein-Gordon field theory and argue that it can only be used to study the shortest quantum circuits which do not involve generators composed of tensor products of multiple Pauli Z matrices. Since such situation is not generic we call it the Z-problem. On the dual field theory side the Z-problem corresponds to massless excitations of the phase (Goldstone modes) that we attempt to fix using Higgs mechanism. The simplest dual theory which does not suffer from the massless excitation (or from the Z-problem) is the Abelian-Higgs model which we argue can be used for finding the shortest quantum circuits. Since every trajectory of the field theory is mapped directly to a quantum circuit, the shortest quantum circuits are identified with semiclassical trajectories. We also discuss the complexity of an actual algorithm that uses a dual theory prospective for solving the quantum maze problem and compare it with a geometric approach. We argue that it might be possible to solve the problem in sub-exponential time in 2 N , but for that we must consider the Klein-Gordon theory on curved spatial geometry and/or more complicated (than N -torus

  3. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  4. Theory of Nematic Fractional Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    We derive an effective field theory for the isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition of fractional quantum Hall states. We demonstrate that for a system with an isotropic background the low-energy effective theory of the nematic order parameter has z =2 dynamical scaling exponent, due to a Berry phase term of the order parameter, which is related to the nondissipative Hall viscosity. Employing the composite fermion theory with a quadrupolar interaction between electrons, we show that a sufficiently attractive quadrupolar interaction triggers a phase transition from the isotropic fractional quantum Hall fluid into a nematic fractional quantum Hall phase. By investigating the spectrum of collective excitations, we demonstrate that the mass gap of the Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman mode collapses at the isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition. On the other hand, Laughlin quasiparticles and the Kohn collective mode remain gapped at this quantum phase transition, and Kohn's theorem is satisfied. The leading couplings between the nematic order parameter and the gauge fields include a term of the same form as the Wen-Zee term. A disclination of the nematic order parameter carries an unquantized electric charge. We also discuss the relation between nematic degrees of freedom and the geometrical response of the fractional quantum Hall fluid.

  5. Path integral formulation of scattering theory with application to scattering by black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The computational power of Feynman path integrals was exploited. Path-integration formalism for the quantum mechanics scattering and classical wave scattering was generalized. Firstly, the standard WKB approximation was generalized to the cases where the critical points of the action functional are degenerate. Three typical semiclassical scattering features served as examples for a classification of degenerate critical points: conservation laws, rainbows, glories. Secondly, the method developed for non-relativistic quantum mechanics scattering was used in the case of classical wave scattering. Scattering by Schwarzschild black holes was chosen as an example, and WKB cross sections for scalar, vector, and tensor fields were worked out. Finally, 2s-th Bessel function behavior of WKB cross section for helicity-s polarized glory scattering in curved space time was proved.

  6. Basing quantum theory on information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard

    2008-03-01

    I consider information-based derivations of the quantum formalism, in a framework encompassing quantum and classical theory and a broad spectrum of theories serving as foils to them. The most ambitious hope for such a derivation is a role analogous to Einstein's development of the dynamics and kinetics of macroscopic bodies, and later of their gravitational interactions, on the basis of simple principles with clear operational meanings and experimental consequences. Short of this, it could still provide a principled understanding of the features of quantum mechanics that account for its greater-than-classical information-processing power, helping guide the search for new quantum algorithms and protocols. I summarize the convex operational framework for theories, and discuss information-processing in theories therein. Results include the fact that information that can be obtained without disturbance is inherently classical, generalized no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, exponentially secure bit commitment in all non-classical theories without entanglement, properties of theories that allow teleportation, and properties of theories that allow ``remote steering'' of ensembles using entanglement. Joint work with collaborators including Jonathan Barrett, Matthew Leifer, Alexander Wilce, Oscar Dahlsten, and Ben Toner.

  7. Quantum chaotic scattering in graphene systems in the absence of invariant classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Lei; Ying, Lei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-01

    Quantum chaotic scattering is referred to as the study of quantum behaviors of open Hamiltonian systems that exhibit transient chaos in the classical limit. Traditionally a central issue in this field is how the elements of the scattering matrix or their functions fluctuate as a system parameter, e.g., the electron Fermi energy, is changed. A tacit hypothesis underlying previous works was that the underlying classical phase-space structure remains invariant as the parameter varies, so semiclassical theory can be used to explain various phenomena in quantum chaotic scattering. There are, however, experimental situations where the corresponding classical chaotic dynamics can change characteristically with some physical parameter. Multiple-terminal quantum dots are one such example where, when a magnetic field is present, the classical chaotic-scattering dynamics can change between being nonhyperbolic and being hyperbolic as the Fermi energy is changed continuously. For such systems semiclassical theory is inadequate to account for the characteristics of conductance fluctuations with the Fermi energy. To develop a general framework for quantum chaotic scattering associated with variable classical dynamics, we use multi-terminal graphene quantum-dot systems as a prototypical model. We find that significant conductance fluctuations occur with the Fermi energy even for fixed magnetic field strength, and the characteristics of the fluctuation patterns depend on the energy. We propose and validate that the statistical behaviors of the conductance-fluctuation patterns can be understood by the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the generalized, complex Hamiltonian of the system which includes self-energies resulted from the interactions between the device and the semi-infinite leads. As the Fermi energy is increased, complex eigenvalues with extremely smaller imaginary parts emerge, leading to sharp resonances in the conductance.

  8. Classical And Quantum Rainbow Scattering From Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, H.; Schueller, A.; Busch, M.; Seifert, J.; Wethekam, S.

    2011-06-01

    The structure of clean and adsorbate covered surfaces as well as of ultrathin films can be investigated by grazing scattering of fast atoms. We present two recent experimental techniques which allow one to study the structure of ordered arrangements of surface atoms in detail. (1) Rainbow scattering under axial surface channeling conditions, and (2) fast atom diffraction. Our examples demonstrate the attractive features of grazing fast atom scattering as a powerful analytical tool in studies on the structure of surfaces. We will concentrate our discussion on the structure of ultrathin silica films on a Mo(112) surface and of adsorbed oxygen atoms on a Fe(110) surface.

  9. Knot theory and quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rovelli, C.; Smolin, L.

    1988-09-05

    A new represenatation for quantum general relativity is described, which is defined in terms of functionals of sets of loops in three-space. In this representation exact solutions of the quantum constraints may be obtained. This result is related to the simplification of the constraints in Ashtekar's new formalism. We give in closed form the general solution of the diffeomorphisms constraint and a large class of solutions of the full set of constraints. These are classified by the knot and link classes of the spatial three-manifold.

  10. Quantum processes: A Whiteheadian interpretation of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Jonathan

    Quantum processes: A Whiteheadian interpretation of quantum field theory is an ambitious and thought-provoking exercise in physics and metaphysics, combining an erudite study of the very complex metaphysics of A.N. Whitehead with a well-informed discussion of contemporary issues in the philosophy of algebraic quantum field theory. Hättich's overall goal is to construct an interpretation of quantum field theory. He does this by translating key concepts in Whitehead's metaphysics into the language of algebraic quantum field theory. In brief, this Hättich-Whitehead (H-W, hereafter) interpretation takes "actual occasions" as the fundamental ontological entities of quantum field theory. An actual occasion is the result of two types of processes: a "transition process" in which a set of initial possibly-possessed properties for the occasion (in the form of "eternal objects") is localized to a space-time region; and a "concrescence process" in which a subset of these initial possibly-possessed properties is selected and actualized to produce the occasion. Essential to these processes is the "underlying activity", which conditions the way in which properties are initially selected and subsequently actualized. In short, under the H-W interpretation of quantum field theory, an initial set of possibly-possessed eternal objects is represented by a Boolean sublattice of the lattice of projection operators determined by a von Neumann algebra R (O) associated with a region O of Minkowski space-time, and the underlying activity is represented by a state on R (O) obtained by conditionalizing off of the vacuum state. The details associated with the H-W interpretation involve imposing constraints on these representations motivated by principles found in Whitehead's metaphysics. These details are spelled out in the three sections of the book. The first section is a summary and critique of Whitehead's metaphysics, the second section introduces the formalism of algebraic quantum field

  11. Quantum Computing and Number Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-01

    The prime factorization can be efficiently solved on a quantum computer. This result was given by Shor in 1994. In the first half of this article, a review of Shor's algorithm with mathematical setups is given. In the second half of this article, the prime number theorem which is an essential tool to understand the distribution of prime numbers is given.

  12. Creativity and the Quantum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Amit

    1988-01-01

    The idea that creative acts are quantum jumps in the brain's mechanism is explored. Descriptions of the creative process that support the central role of sudden and discontinuous leaps of thought are cited from various philosophers and scientists. Distinctions between the functions of the brain and of computers are drawn. (VW)

  13. Reasonable fermionic quantum information theories require relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, Nicolai

    2016-03-01

    We show that any quantum information theory based on anticommuting operators must be supplemented by a superselection rule deeply rooted in relativity to establish a reasonable notion of entanglement. While quantum information may be encoded in the fermionic Fock space, the unrestricted theory has a peculiar feature: the marginals of bipartite pure states need not have identical entropies, which leads to an ambiguous definition of entanglement. We solve this problem, by proving that it is removed by relativity, i.e., by the parity superselection rule that arises from Lorentz invariance via the spin-statistics connection. Our results hence unveil a fundamental conceptual inseparability of quantum information and the causal structure of relativistic field theory.

  14. Spacetime states and covariant quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenberger, Michael; Rovelli, Carlo

    2002-06-01

    In its usual presentation, classical mechanics appears to give time a very special role. But it is well known that mechanics can be formulated so as to treat the time variable on the same footing as the other variables in the extended configuration space. Such covariant formulations are natural for relativistic gravitational systems, where general covariance conflicts with the notion of a preferred physical-time variable. The standard presentation of quantum mechanics, in turn, again gives time a very special role, raising well known difficulties for quantum gravity. Is there a covariant form of (canonical) quantum mechanics? We observe that the preferred role of time in quantum theory is the consequence of an idealization: that measurements are instantaneous. Canonical quantum theory can be given a covariant form by dropping this idealization. States prepared by noninstantaneous measurements are described by ``spacetime smeared states.'' The theory can be formulated in terms of these states, without making any reference to a special time variable. The quantum dynamics is expressed in terms of the propagator, an object covariantly defined on the extended configuration space.

  15. Evaluation of Quantum Scattering Time in Ultra-High Quality GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qi; Mondal, Sumit; Gardner, Geoffrey C.; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a critical analysis of the extraction of quantum scattering time from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in ultra-high quality GaAs quantum wells. In the regime of temperature and magnetic field study here (T ~0.3K, B <=0.3T) we find the canonical method for determination of quantum scattering time yields unreliable results (cf.). We elaborate a formalism that allows extraction of the quantum scattering time in a regime in which the normalized modulation of the density of states Δg /g0 is greater than unity. This approach describes well low-field data for samples that display very large excitation gaps for fragile fractional quantum Hall states at large magnetic field.

  16. Backlund Transformation in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Philip

    1996-11-01

    Solutions of nonlinear field equations with polynomial nonlin earities are well known(P.B.Burt,Quantum Mechanics and Nonlinear Waves,Harwood Academic,Chur,1981).These solutions have been used to describe spin zero systems with self interactions. General- izations to systmes of fermions and bosons with various inter- actions lend themselves to description of quantum field theories with proper normalization. No ultraviolet divergences occur in such theories. The solutions themselves represent weak Backlund transformation of the nonlinear field equations and the related Klein Gordonequation(C.Rogers and W.F.Ames,Nonlinear Boundary Value Problems in Science and Engineering, Academic Press,New York,1989).

  17. Quantum mechanics of 4-derivative theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    A renormalizable theory of gravity is obtained if the dimension-less 4-derivative kinetic term of the graviton, which classically suffers from negative unbounded energy, admits a sensible quantization. We find that a 4-derivative degree of freedom involves a canonical coordinate with unusual time-inversion parity, and that a correspondingly unusual representation must be employed for the relative quantum operator. The resulting theory has positive energy eigenvalues, normalizable wavefunctions, unitary evolution in a negative-norm configuration space. We present a formalism for quantum mechanics with a generic norm.

  18. Quantum Walks: Theory, Application, and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Albert Thomas

    The quantum walk is a method for conceptualizing and designing quantum computing algorithms and it comes in two forms: the continuous-time and discrete-time quantum walk. The thesis is organized into three parts, each of which looks to develop the concept and uses of the quantum walk. The first part is the theory of the quantum walk. This includes definitions and considerations for the various incarnations of the discrete-time quantum walk and a discussion on the general method for connecting the continuous-time and discrete-time versions. As a result, it is shown that most versions of the discrete-time quantum walk can be put into a general form and this can be used to simulate any continuous-time quantum walk. The second part uses these results for a hypothetical application. The application presented is a search algorithm that appears to scale in the time for completion independent of the size of the search space. This behavior is then elaborated upon and shown to have general qualitative agreement with simulations to within the approximations that are made. The third part introduces a method of implementation. Given a universal quantum computer, the method is discussed and shown to simulate an arbitrary discrete-time quantum walk. Some of the benefits of this method are that half the unitary evolution can be achieved without the use of any gates and there may be some possibility for error detection. The three parts combined suggest a possible experiment, given a quantum computing scheme of sufficient robustness.

  19. Continuous wavelet transform in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaisky, M. V.; Kaputkina, N. E.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the application of the continuous wavelet transform to calculation of the Green functions in quantum field theory: scalar ϕ4 theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The method of continuous wavelet transform in quantum field theory, presented by Altaisky [Phys. Rev. D 81, 125003 (2010)] for the scalar ϕ4 theory, consists in substitution of the local fields ϕ(x) by those dependent on both the position x and the resolution a. The substitution of the action S[ϕ(x)] by the action S[ϕa(x)] makes the local theory into a nonlocal one and implies the causality conditions related to the scale a, the region causality [J. D. Christensen and L. Crane, J. Math. Phys. (N.Y.) 46, 122502 (2005)]. These conditions make the Green functions G(x1,a1,…,xn,an)=⟨ϕa1(x1)…ϕan(xn)⟩ finite for any given set of regions by means of an effective cutoff scale A=min⁡(a1,…,an).

  20. Next-to-simplest quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Shailesh; Raju, Suvrat

    2010-05-01

    We describe new on-shell recursion relations for tree amplitudes in N=1 and N=2 gauge theories and use these to show that the structure of the one-loop S-matrix in pure (i.e. without any matter) N=1 and N=2 gauge theories resembles that of pure Yang-Mills theory. We proceed to study gluon scattering in gauge theories coupled to matter in arbitrary representations. The contribution of matter to individual bubble and triangle coefficients can depend on the fourth- and sixth-order indices of the matter representation, respectively. So, the condition that one-loop amplitudes be free of bubbles and triangles can be written as a set of linear Diophantine equations involving these higher-order indices. These equations simplify for supersymmetric theories. We present new examples of supersymmetric theories that have only boxes (and no triangles or bubbles at one-loop) and nonsupersymmetric theories that are free of bubbles. These theories see simplifications in their S-matrices that cannot be deduced just from naive power-counting. In particular, our results indicate that one-loop scattering amplitudes in the N=2, SU(N) theory with a symmetric tensor hypermultiplet and an antisymmetric tensor hypermultiplet are simple like those in the N=4 theory.

  1. Next-to-simplest quantum field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shailesh; Raju, Suvrat

    2010-05-15

    We describe new on-shell recursion relations for tree amplitudes in N=1 and N=2 gauge theories and use these to show that the structure of the one-loop S-matrix in pure (i.e. without any matter) N=1 and N=2 gauge theories resembles that of pure Yang-Mills theory. We proceed to study gluon scattering in gauge theories coupled to matter in arbitrary representations. The contribution of matter to individual bubble and triangle coefficients can depend on the fourth- and sixth-order indices of the matter representation, respectively. So, the condition that one-loop amplitudes be free of bubbles and triangles can be written as a set of linear Diophantine equations involving these higher-order indices. These equations simplify for supersymmetric theories. We present new examples of supersymmetric theories that have only boxes (and no triangles or bubbles at one-loop) and nonsupersymmetric theories that are free of bubbles. These theories see simplifications in their S-matrices that cannot be deduced just from naive power-counting. In particular, our results indicate that one-loop scattering amplitudes in the N=2, SU(N) theory with a symmetric tensor hypermultiplet and an antisymmetric tensor hypermultiplet are simple like those in the N=4 theory.

  2. Construction of Quantum Field Theories with Factorizing S-Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Gandalf

    2008-02-01

    A new approach to the construction of interacting quantum field theories on two-dimensional Minkowski space is discussed. In this program, models are obtained from a prescribed factorizing S-matrix in two steps. At first, quantum fields which are localized in infinitely extended, wedge-shaped regions of Minkowski space are constructed explicitly. In the second step, local observables are analyzed with operator-algebraic techniques, in particular by using the modular nuclearity condition of Buchholz, d’Antoni and Longo. Besides a model-independent result regarding the Reeh Schlieder property of the vacuum in this framework, an infinite class of quantum field theoretic models with non-trivial interaction is constructed. This construction completes a program initiated by Schroer in a large family of theories, a particular example being the Sinh-Gordon model. The crucial problem of establishing the existence of local observables in these models is solved by verifying the modular nuclearity condition, which here amounts to a condition on analytic properties of form factors of observables localized in wedge regions. It is shown that the constructed models solve the inverse scattering problem for the considered class of S-matrices. Moreover, a proof of asymptotic completeness is obtained by explicitly computing total sets of scattering states. The structure of these collision states is found to be in agreement with the heuristic formulae underlying the Zamolodchikov-Faddeev algebra.

  3. Multigluon scattering in open superstring theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2006-12-15

    We discuss the amplitudes describing N-gluon scattering in type I superstring theory, on a disk world sheet. After reviewing the general structure of amplitudes and the complications created by the presence of a large number of vertices at the boundary, we focus on the most promising case of maximally helicity violating (MHV) configurations because in this case, the zero Regge slope limit ({alpha}{sup '}{yields}0) is particularly simple. We obtain the full-fledged MHV disk amplitudes for N=4, 5, and N=6 gluons, expressed in terms of one, two and six functions of kinematic invariants, respectively. These functions represent certain boundary integrals--generalized Euler integrals--which for N{>=}6 correspond to multiple hypergeometric series (generalized Kampe de Feriet functions). Their {alpha}{sup '} expansions lead to Euler-Zagier sums. For arbitrary N, we show that the leading string corrections to the Yang-Mills amplitude, of order O({alpha}{sup '2}), originate from the well-known {alpha}{sup '2} TrF{sup 4} effective interactions of four gauge field strength tensors. By using iteration based on the soft gluon limit, we derive a simple formula valid to that order for arbitrary N. We argue that such a procedure can be extended to all orders in {alpha}{sup '}. If nature gracefully picked a sufficiently low string mass scale, our results would be important for studying string effects in multijet production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  4. Scattering bright solitons: Quantum versus mean-field behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertjerenken, Bettina; Billam, Thomas P.; Khaykovich, Lev; Weiss, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    We investigate scattering bright solitons off a potential using both analytical and numerical methods. Our paper focuses on low kinetic energies for which differences between the mean-field description via the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) and the quantum behavior are particularly large. On the N-particle quantum level, adding an additional harmonic confinement leads to a simple signature to distinguish quantum superpositions from statistical mixtures. While the nonlinear character of the GPE does not allow quantum superpositions, the splitting of GPE solitons takes place only partially. When the potential strength is increased, the fraction of the soliton which is transmitted or reflected jumps noncontinuously. We explain these jumps via energy conservation and interpret them as indications for quantum superpositions on the N-particle level. On the GPE level, we also investigate the transition from this stepwise behavior to the continuous case.

  5. The amplitude of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, B.V. ); Pavlov, V.P.; Polivanov, M.K. ); Sukhanov, A.D. )

    1989-05-01

    General properties of the transition amplitude in axiomatic quantum field theory are discussed. Bogolyubov's axiomatic method is chosen as the variant of the theory. The axioms of this method are analyzed. In particular, the significance of the off-shell extension and of the various forms of the causality condition are examined. A complete proof is given of the existence of a single analytic function whose boundary values are the amplitudes of all channels of a process with given particle number.

  6. Quantum theory of dynamic nuclear polarization in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia; Barnes, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear spins play a major role in the dynamics of spin qubits in III-V semiconductor quantum dots. Although the hyperfine interaction between nuclear and electron (or hole) spins is typically viewed as the leading source of decoherence in these qubits, understanding how to experimentally control the nuclear spin polarization can not only ameliorate this problem, but in fact turn the nuclear spins into a valuable resource for quantum computing. Beyond extending decoherence times, control of this polarization can enable universal quantum computation as shown in singlet-triplet qubits and, in addition, offers the possibility of repurposing the nuclear spins into a robust quantum memory. In, we took a first step toward taking advantage of this resource by developing a general, fully quantum theory of non-unitary electron-nuclear spin dynamics with a periodic train of delta-function pulses as the external control driving the electron spin. Here, we extend this approach to other types of controls and further expand on the predictions and physical insights that emerge from the theory.

  7. Universality of computation in real quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, A.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2013-10-01

    Recently de la Torre et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 109 (2012) 090403) reconstructed Quantum Theory from its local structure on the basis of local discriminability and the existence of a one-parameter group of bipartite transformations containing an entangling gate. This result relies on universality of any entangling gate for quantum computation. Here we prove universality of C-NOT with local gates for Real Quantum Theory (RQT), showing that the universality requirement would not be sufficient for the result, whereas local discriminability and the local qubit structure play a crucial role. For reversible computation, generally an extra rebit is needed for RQT. As a by-product we also provide a short proof of universality of C-NOT for CQT.

  8. Quantum Cylindrical Waves and Parametrized Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadarajan, Madhavan

    In this article, we review some illustrative results in the study of two related toy models for quantum gravity, namely cylindrical waves (which are cylindrically symmetric gravitational fields)and parametrized field theory (which is just free scalar field theory on a flat space-time in generally covariant disguise). In the former, we focus on the phenomenon of unexpected large quantum gravity effects in regions of weak classical gravitational fields and on an analysis of causality in a quantum geometry. In the latter, we focus on Dirac quantization, argue that this is related to the unitary implementability of free scalar field evolution along curved foliations of the flat space-time and review the relevant results for unitary implementability.

  9. Quantum stability of chameleon field theories.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Amol; Hu, Wayne; Khoury, Justin

    2012-07-27

    Chameleon scalar fields are dark-energy candidates which suppress fifth forces in high density regions of the Universe by becoming massive. We consider chameleon models as effective field theories and estimate quantum corrections to their potentials. Requiring that quantum corrections be small, so as to allow reliable predictions of fifth forces, leads to an upper bound m<0.0073(ρ/10 g cm(-3))(1/3) eV for gravitational-strength coupling whereas fifth force experiments place a lower bound of m>0.0042 eV. An improvement of less than a factor of two in the range of fifth force experiments could test all classical chameleon field theories whose quantum corrections are well controlled and couple to matter with nearly gravitational strength regardless of the specific form of the chameleon potential. PMID:23006073

  10. PT-Symmetric Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.

    2011-09-01

    In 1998 it was discovered that the requirement that a Hamiltonian be Dirac Hermitian (H = H†) can be weakened and generalized to the requirement that a Hamiltonian be PT symmetric ([H,PT] = 0); that is, invariant under combined space reflection and time reversal. Weakening the constraint of Hermiticity allows one to consider new kinds of physically acceptable Hamiltonians and, in effect, it amounts to extending quantum mechanics from the real (Hermitian) domain into the complex domain. Much work has been done on the analysis of various PT-symmetric quantum-mechanical models. However, only very little analysis has been done on PT-symmetric quantum-field-theoretic models. Here, we describe some of what has been done in the context of PT-symmetric quantum field theory and describe some possible fundamental applications.

  11. Global effects in quaternionic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumby, S. P.; Joshi, G. C.

    1996-12-01

    We present some striking global consequences of a model quaternionic quantum field theory which is locally complex. We show how making the quaternionic structure a dynamical quantity naturally leads to the prediction of cosmic strings and nonbaryonic hot dark matter candidates.

  12. Neutron Interference Experiments and Quantum Measurement Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiko, M.; Otake, Y.; Soshi, H.

    1987-03-01

    Physical and epistemological implications of recent experiments on the neutron interference are discussed from the viewpoint of the Machida-Namiki theory of measurement in quantum mechanics, without resort to discussion on the number-phase uncertainty relation. The same idea is also applied to the neutrino oscillation problem.

  13. Operational quantum theory without predefined time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    The standard formulation of quantum theory assumes a predefined notion of time. This is a major obstacle in the search for a quantum theory of gravity, where the causal structure of space-time is expected to be dynamical and fundamentally probabilistic in character. Here, we propose a generalized formulation of quantum theory without predefined time or causal structure, building upon a recently introduced operationally time-symmetric approach to quantum theory. The key idea is a novel isomorphism between transformations and states which depends on the symmetry transformation of time reversal. This allows us to express the time-symmetric formulation in a time-neutral form with a clear physical interpretation, and ultimately drop the assumption of time. In the resultant generalized formulation, operations are associated with regions that can be connected in networks with no directionality assumed for the connections, generalizing the standard circuit framework and the process matrix framework for operations without global causal order. The possible events in a given region are described by positive semidefinite operators on a Hilbert space at the boundary, while the connections between regions are described by entangled states that encode a nontrivial symmetry and could be tested in principle. We discuss how the causal structure of space-time could be understood as emergent from properties of the operators on the boundaries of compact space-time regions. The framework is compatible with indefinite causal order, timelike loops, and other acausal structures.

  14. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Anthony J.; Lee, James P.; Ellis, David J. P.; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F.; Griffths, Jonathan P.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  15. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Anthony J; Lee, James P; Ellis, David J P; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F; Griffths, Jonathan P; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  16. Final state effects in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei: Clues from quantum fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Clark, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The impulse approximation (IA) predicts that momentum distributions, n/sub k/, in many-body systems should be measurable by inclusive quasielastic scattering at high energy and momentum (w,Q) transfer. The observations that the cross section appears to satisfy ''Y-scaling'' (i.e., is a function not of both w and Q of a single variable, Y) is usually taken as a signature of the IA. In nuclear physics, inelastic electron scattering at GeV energies should reveal the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. In quantum fluids, neutron scattering at hundreds of MeV energies should measure the Bose condensate in superfluid /sup 4/He and the Fermi surface discontinuity and depletion of the Fermi sea in /sup 3/He. In molecular and condensed matter systems, X-ray Compton scattering at keV energies reveals electronic n/sub k/. Such experiments test many-body wave functions calculated by methods such as Green Function and Path Integral Monte Carlo, and Fermi Hypernetted Chain. However, an outstanding issue has been the corrections to the IA due to the scattering of the recoiling particle from neighboring particles, which are termed ''final state effects'' (FSE). The FSE should be especially important in nuclei and quantum fluids where the potentials have steeply repulsive cores. While there have been a variety of theories proposed for FSE, until now none has been adequately tested by experiment. Recently, the ''hard core perturbation theory'' (HCPT) for FSE in quantum fluids by Silver has been successfully compared to new neutron scattering measurements on /sup 4/He by P. E. Sokol and colleagues. In this paper, we shall discuss the lessons of this success for the extraction of n/sub k/ in nuclei by inclusive ''quasielastic electron-nucleus scattering'' (QENS). 19 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Quantum error correction of photon-scattering errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee

    2011-05-01

    Photon scattering by an atomic ground-state superposition is often considered as a source of decoherence. The same process also results in atom-photon entanglement which had been directly observed in various experiments using single atom, ion or a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center. Here we combine these two aspects to implement a quantum error correction protocol. We encode a qubit in the two Zeeman-splitted ground states of a single trapped 88 Sr+ ion. Photons are resonantly scattered on the S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2 transition. We study the process of single photon scattering i.e. the excitation of the ion to the excited manifold followed by a spontaneous emission and decay. In the absence of any knowledge on the emitted photon, the ion-qubit coherence is lost. However the joined ion-photon system still maintains coherence. We show that while scattering events where spin population is preserved (Rayleigh scattering) do not affect coherence, spin-changing (Raman) scattering events result in coherent amplitude exchange between the two qubit states. By applying a unitary spin rotation that is dependent on the detected photon polarization we retrieve the ion-qubit initial state. We characterize this quantum error correction protocol by process tomography and demonstrate an ability to preserve ion-qubit coherence with high fidelity.

  18. Theory of ghost scattering with incoherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the idea of ghost imaging, we propose a ghost scattering scheme to study light scattering with incoherent light sources through the nonlocal correlation measurement of the differential scattering cross-section fluctuations in two different optical paths. We present a rigorous formal theory to describe the ghost scattering process. Also we have derived a simple and closed-form ghost scattering formula within the first-order Born approximation which is particularly suited for weak scatterers. We find that the scattering information of a test scatterer can be obtained by using only a single-pixel detector in the corresponding optical path through the nonlocal correlation measurement with the help of another reference path.

  19. Solvay 1927: Quantum Theory at the Crossroads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Antony

    2011-04-01

    We reconsider the crucial 1927 Solvay conference in the context of current research in the foundations of quantum theory. Contrary to folklore, the interpretation question was not settled at this conference and no consensus was reached; instead, a range of sharply conflicting views were presented and extensively discussed. Today, there is no longer an established or dominant interpretation of quantum theory, so it is important to re-evaluate the historical sources and keep the interpretation debate open. The proceedings of the conference contain much unexpected material, and are remarkable for their clear identification of key issues that remain controversial to this day. After providing a general overview, we focus on the extensive discussions of de Broglie's pilot-wave theory, which de Broglie presented for a many-body system, including the much misunderstood critique by Pauli.

  20. Quantum to classical transition in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Fernando C.

    1998-12-01

    We study the quatum to classical transition process in the context of quantum field theory. Extending the influence functional formalism of Feynman and Vernon, we study the decoherence process for self-interacting quantum fields in flat space. We also use this formalism for arbitrary geometries to analyze the quantum to classical transition in quantum gravity. After summarizing the main results known for the quantum Brownian motion, we consider a self-interacting field theory in Minkowski spacetime. We compute a coarse grained effective action by integrating out the field modes with wavelength shorter than a critical value. From this effective action we obtain the evolution equation for the reduced density matrix (master equation). We compute the diffusion coefficients for this equation and analyze the decoherence induced on the long-wavelength modes. We generalize the results to the case of a conformally coupled scalar field in de Sitter spacetime. We show that the decoherence is effective as long as the critical wavelength is taken to be not shorter than the Hubble radius. On the other hand, we study the classical limit for scalar-tensorial models in two dimensions. We consider different couplings between the dilaton and the scalar field. We discuss the Hawking radiation process and, from an exact evaluation of the influence functional, we study the conditions by which decoherence ensures the validity of the semiclassical approximation in cosmological metrics. Finally we consider four dimensional models with massive scalar fields, arbitrary coupled to the geometry. We compute the Einstein-Langevin equations in order to study the effect of the fluctuations induced by the quantum fields on the classical geometry.

  1. Quantum cellular automaton theory of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum theory of light based on the recent derivation of Weyl and Dirac quantum fields from general principles ruling the interactions of a countable set of abstract quantum systems, without using space-time and mechanics (D'Ariano and Perinotti, 2014). In a Planckian interpretation of the discreteness, the usual quantum field theory corresponds to the so-called relativistic regime of small wave-vectors. Within the present framework the photon is a composite particle made of an entangled pair of free Weyl Fermions, and the usual Bosonic statistics is recovered in the low photon density limit, whereas the Maxwell equations describe the relativistic regime. We derive the main phenomenological features of the theory in the ultra-relativistic regime, consisting in a dispersive propagation in vacuum, and in the occurrence of a small longitudinal polarization, along with a saturation effect originated by the Fermionic nature of the photon. We then discuss whether all these effects can be experimentally tested, and observe that only the dispersive effects are accessible to the current technology via observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  2. Density fluctuations due to Raman forward scattering in quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Punit; Singh, Shiv; Rathore, Nisha Singh

    2016-05-01

    Density fluctuations due Raman forward scattering (RFS) is analysed in the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with high density quantum plasma. The interaction model is developed using the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model which consist of a set of equations describing the transport of charge, density, momentum and energy of a charged particle system interacting through a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The nonlinear source current has been obtained incorporating the effects of quantum Bohm potential, Fermi pressure and electron spin. The laser spectrum is strongly modulated by the interaction, showing sidebands at the plasma frequency. Furthermore, as the quiver velocity of the electrons in the high electric field of the laser beam is quit large, various quantum effects are observed which can be attributed to the variation of electron mass with laser intensity.

  3. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  4. Theory of quantum error-correcting codes

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-02-01

    Quantum error correction will be necessary for preserving coherent states against noise and other unwanted interactions in quantum computation and communication. We develop a general theory of quantum error correction based on encoding states into larger Hilbert spaces subject to known interactions. We obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the perfect recovery of an encoded state after its degradation by an interaction. The conditions depend only on the behavior of the logical states. We use them to give a recovery-operator-independent definition of error-correcting codes. We relate this definition to four others: the existence of a left inverse of the interaction, an explicit representation of the error syndrome using tensor products, perfect recovery of the completely entangled state, and an information theoretic identity. Two notions of fidelity and error for imperfect recovery are introduced, one for pure and the other for entangled states. The latter is more appropriate when using codes in a quantum memory or in applications of quantum teleportation to communication. We show that the error for entangled states is bounded linearly by the error for pure states. A formal definition of independent interactions for qubits is given. This leads to lower bounds on the number of qubits required to correct e errors and a formal proof that the classical bounds on the probability of error of e-error-correcting codes applies to e-error-correcting quantum codes, provided that the interaction is dominated by an identity component. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. On the similarity of theories of anelastic and scattering attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wennerberg, L.; Frankel, A.

    1989-01-01

    We point out basic parallels between theories of anelastic and scattering attenuation. We consider approximations to scattering effects presented by O'Doherty and Anstey (1971), Sato (1982), and Wu (1982). We use the linear theory of anelasticity. We note that the frequency dependence of Q can be related to a distribution of scales of physical properties of the medium. The frequency dependence of anelastic Q is related to the distribution of relaxation times in exactly the same manner as the frequency dependence of scattering Q is related to the distribution of scatterer sizes. Thus, the well-known difficulty of separating scattering from intrinsic attenuation is seen from this point of view as a consequence of the fact that certain observables can be interpreted by identical equations resulting from either of two credible physical theories describing fundamentally different processes. -from Authors

  6. Theory for magnetic excitations in quantum spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Datta, Trinanjan

    Magnetic excitations in magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore oxides called quantum spin ice (QSI) systems such as Yb2Ti2O7, Pr2Zr2O7, and Tb2Ti2O7 have attracted great interest for possible observations of the quantum dynamics of spin ice monopoles and emergent photon excitations. However, their spectral properties remain open especially for cases relevant to experimental systems. Here, we develop a theoretical framework that incorporates gauge fluctuations into a modified gauge mean-field approach, so that it reproduces key features of recent quantum Monte-Carlo results on the double broad specific heat in the simplest QSI model and can describe a continuous growth of a coherence in gauge-field correlations on cooling down to Coulomb-phase ground states. Using this new approach, we provide a theory for magnetic neutron-scattering spectra. It is found that spin-flip exchange interactions produce dispersive QSI monopole excitations which create a particle-hole continuum neutron-scattering spectrum. Gauge fluctuations give multi-particle contributions to the spectrum, which will be possibly detected in Higgs phases.

  7. Scattering in the Euclidean formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzou, Wayne

    2013-10-01

    Euclidean relativistic quantum mechanics is a formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics based on the Osterwalder-Schrader reconstruction theorem that exploits the logical independence of locality from the rest of the axioms of Euclidean field theory. I discuss the properties of Euclidean Green functions necessary for the existence of Møller wave operators and the construction of these wave operators in this formalism. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Grant - DE-AC02-81ER40038.

  8. Quantum scattering of neon from a nanotextured surface.

    PubMed

    Levi, A C; Huang, C; Allison, W; Maclaren, D A

    2009-06-01

    Phonon exchange is the usual cause of decoherence in atom-surface scattering. By including quantum effects in the treatment of Debye-Waller scattering, we show that phonon exchange becomes ineffective when the relevant phonon frequencies are high. The result explains the surprising observation of strong elastic scattering of Ne from a Cu(100) surface nanotextured with a c(2 × 2) Li adsorbate structure. We extend a previous model to describe the phonon spectra by an Einstein oscillator component with an admixture of a Debye spectrum. The Einstein oscillator represents the dominant, high frequency vibration of the adsorbate, normal to the surface, while the Debye spectrum represents the substrate contribution. Neon scattering is so slow that exciting the adsorbate mode has a low probability and is impossible if the incident energy is below the threshold. Thus, adsorbate vibrations are averaged out. A theoretical discussion and calculation shows that under such circumstances the vibrations of a light adsorbate do not contribute to the Debye-Waller effect, with the result that Ne scattering at thermal energies is quantum mechanical and largely elastic, explaining the high reflectivity and the diffraction peaks observed experimentally. PMID:21715773

  9. Green-function approach for scattering quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, F. M.; Luz, M. G. E. da

    2011-10-15

    In this work a Green-function approach for scattering quantum walks is developed. The exact formula has the form of a sum over paths and always can be cast into a closed analytic expression for arbitrary topologies and position-dependent quantum amplitudes. By introducing the step and path operators, it is shown how to extract any information about the system from the Green function. The method's relevant features are demonstrated by discussing in detail an example, a general diamond-shaped graph.

  10. Electromagnetic scattering by magnetic spheres: Theory and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milham, Merill E.

    1994-10-01

    The theory for the scattering of magnetic spheres is developed by means of scaling functions. This theory leads in a natural way to the development of scattering algorithms which use exponential scaling to overcome computational overflow problems. The design and testing of the algorithm is described. Fortran codes which implement the algorithmic design are presented and examples of code use are given. Listings of the code are included.

  11. Quantum Theories of Self-Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Lisa Joan

    In the classical dynamics of coupled oscillator systems, nonlinearity leads to the existence of stable solutions in which energy remains localized for all time. Here the quantum-mechanical counterpart of classical self-localization is investigated in the context of two model systems. For these quantum models, the terms corresponding to classical nonlinearities modify a subset of the stationary quantum states to be particularly suited to the creation of nonstationary wavepackets that localize energy for long times. The first model considered here is the Quantized Discrete Self-Trapping model (QDST), a system of anharmonic oscillators with linear dispersive coupling used to model local modes of vibration in polyatomic molecules. A simple formula is derived for a particular symmetry class of QDST systems which gives an analytic connection between quantum self-localization and classical local modes. This formula is also shown to be useful in the interpretation of the vibrational spectra of some molecules. The second model studied is the Frohlich/Einstein Dimer (FED), a two-site system of anharmonically coupled oscillators based on the Frohlich Hamiltonian and motivated by the theory of Davydov solitons in biological protein. The Born-Oppenheimer perturbation method is used to obtain approximate stationary state wavefunctions with error estimates for the FED at the first excited level. A second approach is used to reduce the first excited level FED eigenvalue problem to a system of ordinary differential equations. A simple theory of low-energy self-localization in the FED is discussed. The quantum theories of self-localization in the intrinsic QDST model and the extrinsic FED model are compared.

  12. From Entropic Dynamics to Quantum Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caticha, Ariel

    2009-12-08

    Non-relativistic quantum theory is derived from information codified into an appropriate statistical model. The basic assumption is that there is an irreducible uncertainty in the location of particles so that the configuration space is a statistical manifold. The dynamics then follows from a principle of inference, the method of Maximum Entropy. The concept of time is introduced as a convenient way to keep track of change. The resulting theory resembles both Nelson's stochastic mechanics and general relativity. The statistical manifold is a dynamical entity: its geometry determines the evolution of the probability distribution which, in its turn, reacts back and determines the evolution of the geometry. There is a new quantum version of the equivalence principle: 'osmotic' mass equals inertial mass. Mass and the phase of the wave function are explained as features of purely statistical origin.

  13. A quantum photonic dissipative transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chan U.; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a quantum transport theory for describing photonic dissipative transport dynamics in nanophotonics is developed. The nanophotonic devices concerned in this paper consist of on-chip all-optical integrated circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators embedded in nanostructured photonic crystals. The photonic transport through waveguides is entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators, which is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the degrees of freedom of the waveguides (treated as reservoirs). Back-reactions from the reservoirs are fully taken into account. The relation between the driven photonic dynamics and photocurrents is obtained explicitly. The non-Markovian memory structure and quantum decoherence dynamics in photonic transport can then be fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is utilized to study the transport dynamics of a photonic transistor consisting of a nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the external driven field is demonstrated.

  14. Correlating scattering times with the strength of the ν=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sumit; Watson, John; Gardner, Geoffrey; Samkharadze, Nodar; Csathy, Gabor; Manfra, Michael

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread interest in the fractional quantum Hall effect at ν=5/2. Theory predicts that the state at ν=5/2 may possess non-Abelian braiding statistics. Experimental interrogation remains difficult due to the fragility of the excitation gaps requiring both high quality samples and examination at low temperatures. Mounting evidence suggests that the strength of the most fragile fractional quantum Hall states in the 2^nd Landau level including ν=5/2 are poorly correlated with the scattering time extracted from zero-field mobility measurements at higher temperatures. It is also unclear if the quantum scattering time derived from analysis of the low-field Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations provides any additional information relevant to prediction of the strengths of the observed fractional states. We report on a systematic attempt to correlate the T=0.3K behavior of the mobility lifetime, quantum scattering time, and an effective high field mobility lifetime evaluated at ν=5/2 with the measured activation gap. We will present results from a number of heterostructure designs over a wide span of zero-field mobility ranging from ˜10x10^6cm^2/Vs to greater than 20x10^6cm^2/Vs.

  15. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special Issue on `Trends in Quantum Chaotic Scattering'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Y. V.; Kottos, T.; Stöckmann, H.-J.

    2005-04-01

    Quantum scattering of waves in classically chaotic systems has been the subject of rather intensive research activity for more than two decades, both theoretically and experimentally. This interest was motivated by phenomena discovered in various areas, ranging from nuclear, atomic and molecular physics, to mesoscopics and theory of electron transport, quantum chaos, and classical wave scattering. Recently, the interest in this subject was renewed due to technological developments in quantum optics (in particular the ability to construct microlasers with chaotic resonators which produce high-power directional emission) as well as the experimental realizations of the so-called random lasers where the feedback is due to multiple scattering within the medium. The articles collected in this special issue, which contains both review-style contributions and regular research papers, should give an up-to-date, fairly representative (but definitely not complete) picture of current activity related to the various facets of chaotic wave scattering, and its diverse manifestations. We hope that this will serve as a good basis for boosting the research in this fascinating area to a new level of understanding.

  16. Quantum Markovian master equation for scattering from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haifeng; Shao, Jiushu; Azuri, Asaf; Pollak, Eli Alicki, Robert

    2014-01-07

    We propose a semi-phenomenological Markovian Master equation for describing the quantum dynamics of atom-surface scattering. It embodies the Lindblad-like structure and can describe both damping and pumping of energy between the system and the bath. It preserves positivity and correctly accounts for the vanishing of the interaction of the particle with the surface when the particle is distant from the surface. As a numerical test, we apply it to a model of an Ar atom scattered from a LiF surface, allowing for interaction only in the vertical direction. At low temperatures, we find that the quantum mechanical average energy loss is smaller than the classical energy loss. The numerical results obtained from the space dependent friction master equation are compared with numerical simulations for a discretized bath, using the multi-configurational time dependent Hartree methodology. The agreement between the two simulations is quantitative.

  17. Theory of helimagnons in itinerant quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitz, D.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Rosch, A.

    2006-02-01

    The nature and effects of the Goldstone mode in the ordered phase of helical or chiral itinerant magnets such as MnSi are investigated theoretically. It is shown that the Goldstone mode, or helimagnon, is a propagating mode with a highly anisotropic dispersion relation, in analogy to the Goldstone mode in chiral liquid crystals. Starting from a microscopic theory, a comprehensive effective theory is developed that allows for an explicit description of the helically ordered phase, including the helimagnons, for both classical and quantum helimagnets. The directly observable dynamical spin susceptibility, which reflects the properties of the helimagnon, is calculated.

  18. Aspects of quantum gravity theory and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampeli, Adamantia

    Quantum gravity deals with the formulation of a physical theory consistent with both quantum and gravitational principles. The formulation is based on two main methods of quantisation, the canonical and the covariant one. In the first part of the thesis, the main problems of each method of quantisation are stated. In particular, the problem of time is analysed in the canonical quantisation framework and the conformal sickness problem of the Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with covariant methods. Quantum gravity phenomenology is studied through two models. The first one is a cosmological model obtained by reduced phase space quantisation. Implications for the early era of the universe as well as how phantom fields might arise are studied. The second one deals with the calculation of the response function of a detector in the presence of Dirac fields in a 2+1 dimensional spacetime. The spectrum detected is expected to invoke the apparent inversion of statistics of a quantum field. This calculation might have potential indications for the actual detection of thermal radiation in a graphene sheet.

  19. Multiple Scattering Theory for Inelastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V. M.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    The review is devoted to the description of inelastic interactions of composite systems in the framework of the multiple scattering approach. Quasielastic scattering and multiple hadron production processes are considered for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies. We show that important information on inelastic processes follows on very general grounds from the classification of various intermediate states in the elastic amplitude, as similarly AGK cutting rules arise for reggeon diagrams. Attention is mainly given to the appropriate technique, which is illustrated with several examples of increasing complexity. The general formalism for the inelastic screening corrections is presented and its particular applications to various reactions. The review does not aim at the systematic study of numerous versions of the multiple scattering calculus confronting each other and to the extensive experimental data. Instead, we concentrate on a few simple examples to make clear the underlying physics and to work out the needed machinery employed in practical calculations.

  20. Theory of Thomson scattering in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, P. M.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Gericke, D. O.; Regan, S. P.; Gregori, G.

    2016-04-01

    Thomson scattering of laser light is one of the most fundamental diagnostics of plasma density, temperature and magnetic fields. It relies on the assumption that the properties in the probed volume are homogeneous and constant during the probing time. On the other hand, laboratory plasmas are seldom uniform and homogeneous on the temporal and spatial dimensions over which data is collected. This is particularly true for laser-produced high-energy-density matter, which often exhibits steep gradients in temperature, density and pressure, on a scale determined by the laser focus. Here, we discuss the modification of the cross section for Thomson scattering in fully-ionized media exhibiting steep spatial inhomogeneities and/or fast temporal fluctuations. We show that the predicted Thomson scattering spectra are greatly altered compared to the uniform case, and may lead to violations of detailed balance. Therefore, careful interpretation of the spectra is necessary for spatially or temporally inhomogeneous systems.

  1. Theory of Thomson scattering in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, P M; Crowley, B J B; Gericke, D O; Regan, S P; Gregori, G

    2016-01-01

    Thomson scattering of laser light is one of the most fundamental diagnostics of plasma density, temperature and magnetic fields. It relies on the assumption that the properties in the probed volume are homogeneous and constant during the probing time. On the other hand, laboratory plasmas are seldom uniform and homogeneous on the temporal and spatial dimensions over which data is collected. This is particularly true for laser-produced high-energy-density matter, which often exhibits steep gradients in temperature, density and pressure, on a scale determined by the laser focus. Here, we discuss the modification of the cross section for Thomson scattering in fully-ionized media exhibiting steep spatial inhomogeneities and/or fast temporal fluctuations. We show that the predicted Thomson scattering spectra are greatly altered compared to the uniform case, and may lead to violations of detailed balance. Therefore, careful interpretation of the spectra is necessary for spatially or temporally inhomogeneous systems. PMID:27068215

  2. Theory of Thomson scattering in inhomogeneous media

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, P. M.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Gericke, D. O.; Regan, S. P.; Gregori, G.

    2016-01-01

    Thomson scattering of laser light is one of the most fundamental diagnostics of plasma density, temperature and magnetic fields. It relies on the assumption that the properties in the probed volume are homogeneous and constant during the probing time. On the other hand, laboratory plasmas are seldom uniform and homogeneous on the temporal and spatial dimensions over which data is collected. This is particularly true for laser-produced high-energy-density matter, which often exhibits steep gradients in temperature, density and pressure, on a scale determined by the laser focus. Here, we discuss the modification of the cross section for Thomson scattering in fully-ionized media exhibiting steep spatial inhomogeneities and/or fast temporal fluctuations. We show that the predicted Thomson scattering spectra are greatly altered compared to the uniform case, and may lead to violations of detailed balance. Therefore, careful interpretation of the spectra is necessary for spatially or temporally inhomogeneous systems. PMID:27068215

  3. No extension of quantum theory can have improved predictive power.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Roger; Renner, Renato

    2011-01-01

    According to quantum theory, measurements generate random outcomes, in stark contrast with classical mechanics. This raises the question of whether there could exist an extension of the theory that removes this indeterminism, as suspected by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen. Although this has been shown to be impossible, existing results do not imply that the current theory is maximally informative. Here we ask the more general question of whether any improved predictions can be achieved by any extension of quantum theory. Under the assumption that measurements can be chosen freely, we answer this question in the negative: no extension of quantum theory can give more information about the outcomes of future measurements than quantum theory itself. Our result has significance for the foundations of quantum mechanics, as well as applications to tasks that exploit the inherent randomness in quantum theory, such as quantum cryptography. PMID:21811240

  4. Scattering theory with localized non-Hermiticities

    SciTech Connect

    Znojil, Miloslav

    2008-07-15

    In the context of the recent interest in solvable models of scattering mediated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians (cf. H. F. Jones, Phys. Rev. D 76, 125003 (2007)) we show that the well-known variability of the ad hoc choice of the metric {theta} which defines the physical Hilbert space of states can help us to clarify several apparent paradoxes. We argue that with a suitable {theta}, a fully plausible physical picture of the scattering can be recovered. Quantitatively, our new recipe is illustrated on an exactly solvable toy model.

  5. Landau retardation on the occurrence scattering time in quantum electron-hole plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-03-01

    The Landau damping effects on the occurrence scattering time in electron collisions are investigated in a quantum plasma composed of electrons and holes. The Shukla-Stenflo-Bingham effective potential model is employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time in a quantum electron-hole plasma. The result shows that the influence of Landau damping produces the imaginary term in the scattering amplitude. It is then found that the Landau damping generates the retardation effect on the occurrence scattering time. It is found that the occurrence scattering time increases in forward scattering domains and decreases in backward scattering domains with an increase of the Landau parameter. It is also found that the occurrence scattering time decreases with increasing collision energy. In addition, it is found that the quantum shielding effect enhances the occurrence scattering time in the forward scattering and, however, suppresses the occurrence scattering time in the backward scattering.

  6. Quantum random bit generation using stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Moffatt, Doug; Lausten, Rune; Wu, Guorong; Walmsley, Ian A; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-12-01

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in a wide variety of information systems, including applications in cryptography, simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the phase measurement of Stokes light generated by amplification of zero-point vacuum fluctuations using stimulated Raman scattering. This is an example of quantum noise amplification using the most noise-free process possible: near unitary quantum evolution. The use of phase offers robustness to classical pump noise and the ability to generate multiple bits per measurement. The Stokes light is generated with high intensity and as a result, fast detectors with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used for measurement, eliminating the need for single-photon sensitive devices. The demonstrated implementation uses optical phonons in bulk diamond. PMID:22273908

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiringa, R. B.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Brida, I.

    2009-10-01

    We report recent quantum Monte Carlo (variational and Green's function) calculations of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering. We are adding the cases of proton-^4He, neutron-^3H and proton-^3He scattering to a previous GFMC study of neutron-^4He scattering [1]. To do this requires generalizing our methods to include long-range Coulomb forces and to treat coupled channels. The two four-body cases can be compared to other accurate four-body calculational methods such as the AGS equations and hyperspherical harmonic expansions. We will present results for the Argonne v18 interaction alone and with Urbana and Illinois three-nucleon potentials. [4pt] [1] K.M. Nollett, S. C. Pieper, R.B. Wiringa, J. Carlson, and G.M. Hale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022502 (2007)

  8. Nonequilibrium GREEN’S Functions for High-Field Quantum Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, Rita

    A formulation of the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh theory of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics is developed in order to describe nonperturbatively the effects of the electric field on electron-phonon scattering in nondegenerate semiconductors. We derive an analytic, gauge-invariant model for the spectral density of energy states that accounts for both intracollisional field effect and collisional broadening simultaneously. A kinetic equation for the quantum distribution function is derived and solved numerically. The nonlinear drift velocity versus applied field characteristics is also evaluated numerically. Many features of our nonlinear theory bear formal resemblance to linear-response theory.

  9. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid. PMID:19556462

  10. Weak Quantum Theory: Formal Framework and Selected Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas; Roemer, Hartmann

    2006-01-04

    Two key concepts of quantum theory, complementarity and entanglement, are considered with respect to their significance in and beyond physics. An axiomatically formalized, weak version of quantum theory, more general than the ordinary quantum theory of physical systems, is described. Its mathematical structure generalizes the algebraic approach to ordinary quantum theory. The crucial formal feature leading to complementarity and entanglement is the non-commutativity of observables.The ordinary Hilbert space quantum mechanics can be recovered by stepwise adding the necessary features. This provides a hierarchy of formal frameworks of decreasing generality and increasing specificity. Two concrete applications, more specific than weak quantum theory and more general than ordinary quantum theory, are discussed: (i) complementarity and entanglement in classical dynamical systems, and (ii) complementarity and entanglement in the bistable perception of ambiguous stimuli.

  11. Scatter Theories and Their Application to Lunar Radar Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayre, H. S.

    1961-01-01

    The research work being done under this NASA grant is divided into the following three categories: (1) An estimate of the radar return for the NASA Aerobee rocket shot at White Sands Missile Range. (WSMR) (2) Development of new scatter theories, modification and correlation of existing scatter theories, and application of the theories to moon-echo data for estimation of the surface features of the moon. (3) Acoustic modeling of the lunar surface and correlation of the theoretical with both full scale and acoustical experimental results.

  12. Multiple-scattering theory for electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. ); Zhang, X. ); Yu, Q.; Harmon, B.N. )

    1993-02-15

    In this paper, a multiple-scattering formalism for electromagnetic waves is presented. Its application to the three-dimensional periodic dielectric structures is given in a form similar to the usual Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker form of scalar waves. Using this approach, the band-structure results of touching spheres of diamond structure in a dielectric medium with dielectric constant 12.96 are calculated. The application to disordered systems under the coherent-potential approximation is discussed.

  13. Relational quadrilateralland II: The Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward; Kneller, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    We provide the quantum treatment of the relational quadrilateral. The underlying reduced configuration spaces are ℂℙ2 and the cone over this. We consider exact free and isotropic HO potential cases and perturbations about these. Moreover, our purely relational kinematical quantization is distinct from the usual one for ℂℙ2, which turns out to carry absolutist connotations instead. Thus, this paper is the first to note absolute-versus-relational motion distinctions at the kinematical rather than dynamical level. It is also an example of value to the discussion of kinematical quantization along the lines of Isham, 1984. The relational quadrilateral is the simplest RPM whose mathematics is not standard in atomic physics (the triangle and four particles on a line are both based on 𝕊2 and ℝ3 mathematics). It is far more typical of the general quantum relational N-a-gon than the previously studied case of the relational triangle. We consider useful integrals as regards perturbation theory and the peaking interpretation of quantum cosmology. We subsequently consider problem of time (PoT) applications of this: quantum Kuchař beables, the Machian version of the semiclassical approach and the timeless naïve Schrödinger interpretation. These go toward extending the combined Machian semiclassical-Histories-Timeless Approach of [Int. J. Mod. Phys. D23 (2014) 1450014] to the case of the quadrilateral, which will be treated in subsequent papers.

  14. Twistor Diagrams and Quantum Field Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donald, Lewis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis uses twistor diagram theory, as developed by Penrose (1975) and Hodges (1990c), to try to approach some of the difficulties inherent in the standard quantum field theoretic description of particle interactions. The resolution of these issues is the eventual goal of the twistor diagram program. First twistor diagram theory is introduced from a physical view-point, with the aim of studying larger diagrams than have been typically explored. Methods are evolved to tackle the double box and triple box diagrams. These lead to three methods of constructing an amplitude for the double box, and two ways for the triple box. Next this theory is applied to translate the channels of a Yukawa Feynman diagram, which has more than four external states, into various twistor diagrams. This provides a test of the skeleton hypothesis (of Hodges, 1990c) in these cases, and also shows that conformal breaking must enter into twistor diagrams before the translation of loop level Feynman diagrams. The issue of divergent Feynman diagrams is then considered. By using a twistor equivalent of the sum-over -states idea of quantum field theory, twistor translations of loop diagrams are conjectured. The various massless propagator corrections and vacuum diagrams calculated give results consistent with Feynman theory. Two diagrams are also found that give agreement with the finite parts of the Feynman "fish" diagrams of phi^4 -theory. However it is found that a more rigorous translation for the time-like fish requires new boundaries to be added to the twistor sum-over-states. The twistor diagram obtained is found to give the finite part of the relevant Feynman diagram.

  15. Scattering Theory of Kondo Mirages and Observation of Single Kondo Atom Phase Shift*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Gregory A.; Hersch, Jesse S.; Heller, Eric J.; Manoharan, H. C.; Lutz, C. P.; Eigler, D. M.

    2001-03-01

    We explain the origin of the Kondo mirage seen in recent quantum corral Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) experiments with a scattering theory of electrons on the surfaces of metals. Our theory combined with experimental data provides the first direct observation of a single Kondo atom phase shift. The Kondo mirage observed at the empty focus of an elliptical quantum corral is shown to arise from multiple electron bounces off the corral wall adatoms in a manner analagous to the formation of a real image in optics. We demonstrate our theory with direct quantitive comparision to experimental data. *This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE9610501 and by ITAMP.

  16. Multichannel quantum defect theory for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimov, Sergei V.; Dorofeev, Dmitrii L.; Zon, Boris A.

    2014-02-01

    Our work is devoted to developing a general approach for nonpenetrating Rydberg states of polar molecules. We propose a method to estimate the accuracy of calculation of their wave functions and quantum defects. Basing on this method we estimate the accuracy of Born-Oppenheimer (BO) and inverse Born-Oppenheimer (IBO) approximations for these states. This estimation enables us to determine the space and energy regions where BO and IBO approximations are valid. It depends on the interplay between l coupling (due to dipole potential of the core) and l uncoupling (due to rotation the core). Next we consider the intermediate region where both BO and IBO are not valid. For this intermediate region we propose a modification of Fano's multichannel quantum defect theory to match BO and IBO wave functions and show that it gives more reliable results. They are demonstrated on the example of SO molecule.

  17. Environmental management: principles from quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Valadez, A M; Sportsman, S

    1999-01-01

    Management of the environment is a critical role component for any health care provider. Turmoil, multiple relationships, and new ways of "doing business" characterize today's health care system, and traditional management techniques, based on Newtonian physics may no longer be effective. Principles helpful for managing the current health care environment may be found in quantum theory. These include (1) the world is unpredictable; (2) the intent of the observer influences how the world is seen; and (3) interrelationships are what count, not the things themselves. These principles are derived from the work of Wheatley, who applied the quantum theoretical framework to leadership. Strategies for gaining competence in managing the new environment are explored. Such strategies include shared governance, the process of delegation, and coordination of services. These strategies may be helpful to colleagues in education as well as in practice. PMID:10450646

  18. Reassessment of the theory of stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, G. C.; Deck, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A modification of the standard theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) first proposed by Sparks (1974, 1975) is analyzed and shown to incorporate a possibly important physical effect; however, its original formulation is incorrect. The analysis is based on an exact numerical integration of the coupled equations of the modified theory, the results of which are compared with both the conventional theory of SRS and with one set of experimental data. A reformulation of the modified theory is suggested that leads to a gain which is in somewhat better agreement with the data than is the conventional theory.

  19. The Conformal Steady-State Free Precession:. a Kepplerian Approach to Automorphic Scattering Theory of Orbiton/spinon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Walter J.

    2013-09-01

    Based on projective geometry, a quantum holographic approach to the orbiton / spinon dynamics of quantum blackholography and clinical magnetic resonance tomography is mathematically described. Crucial applications of the conformal steady-state free-precession modality and automorphic scattering theory are the evidence for a supermassive central black hole in the Milky Way galaxy and the modalities of clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance tomography and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance tomography of non-invasive radiological diagnostics.

  20. A Theory of Radar Scattering by the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Siegel, K. M.

    1959-01-01

    A theory is described in which the moon is regarded as a "quasi-smooth" scatterer at radar frequencies. A scattered pulse is then composed of a number of individual returns each of which is provided by a single scattering area. In this manner it is possible to account for all the major features of the pulse, and the evidence in favor of the theory is presented. From a study of the measured power received at different frequencies, it is shown that the scattering area nearest to the earth is the source of a specular return, and it is then possible to obtain information about the material of which the area is composed. The electromagnetic constants are derived and their significance discussed.

  1. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-08-15

    Scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms embedded in dense quantum plasma has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in dense quantum plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Variationally determined hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e{sup +}+H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s→1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported in the energy range 13.6-350 eV. Furthermore, a comparison has been made on the plasma screening effect of a dense quantum plasma with that of a weakly coupled plasma for which the plasma screening effect has been represented by the Debye model. Our results for the unscreened case are in fair agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  2. Scattering theory approach to electrodynamic Casimir forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2009-10-15

    We give a comprehensive presentation of methods for calculating the Casimir force to arbitrary accuracy, for any number of objects, arbitrary shapes, susceptibility functions, and separations. The technique is applicable to objects immersed in media other than vacuum, nonzero temperatures, and spatial arrangements in which one object is enclosed in another. Our method combines each object's classical electromagnetic scattering amplitude with universal translation matrices, which convert between the bases used to calculate scattering for each object, but are otherwise independent of the details of the individual objects. The method is illustrated by rederiving the Lifshitz formula for infinite half-spaces, by demonstrating the Casimir-Polder to van der Waals crossover, and by computing the Casimir interaction energy of two infinite, parallel, perfect metal cylinders either inside or outside one another. Furthermore, it is used to obtain new results, namely, the Casimir energies of a sphere or a cylinder opposite a plate, all with finite permittivity and permeability, to leading order at large separation.

  3. Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory: Quantum nonlocal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-04-15

    We develop the Maxwell-Garnett theory for the effective medium approximation of composite materials with metallic nanoparticles by taking into account the quantum spatial dispersion effects in dielectric response of nanoparticles. We derive a quantum nonlocal generalization of the standard Maxwell-Garnett formula, by means the linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory in conjunction with the Poisson equation as well as the appropriate additional quantum boundary conditions.

  4. Elements of QED-NRQED effective field theory: NLO scattering at leading power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, Steven P.; Gonderinger, Matthew; Paz, Gil

    2016-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle, i.e. the large discrepancy in the extraction of the proton charge radius between regular and muonic hydrogen, challenges our understanding of the structure of the proton. It can also be an indication of a new force that couples to muons, but not to electrons. An effective field theory analysis using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics (NRQED) indicates that the muonic hydrogen result can be interpreted as a large, compared to some model estimates, muon-proton spin-independent contact interaction. The muonic hydrogen result can be tested by a muon-proton scattering experiment, MUSE, that is planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The typical momenta of the muons in this experiment are of the order of the muon mass. In this energy regime the muons are relativistic but the protons are still nonrelativistic. The interaction between the muons and protons can be described by a hybrid QED-NRQED effective field theory. We present some elements of this effective field theory. In particular we consider O (Z α ) scattering up to power m2/M2 , where m (M ) is the muon (proton) mass and Z =1 for a proton, and O (Z2α2) scattering at leading power. We show how the former reproduces Rosenbluth scattering up to power m2/M2 and the latter the relativistic scattering off a static potential. Proton structure corrections at O (Z2α2) will be considered in a subsequent paper.

  5. Scattering of a vortex pair by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, L. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Mironov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the scattering of vortex pairs (the particular case of 2D dark solitons) by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive interaction between atoms. For this purpose, an asymptotic theory describing the dynamics of such 2D soliton-like formations in an arbitrary smoothly nonuniform flow of a ultracold Bose gas is developed. Disregarding the radiation loss associated with acoustic wave emission, we demonstrate that vortex-antivortex pairs can be put in correspondence with quasiparticles, and their behavior can be described by canonical Hamilton equations. For these equations, we determine the integrals of motion that can be used to classify various regimes of scattering of vortex pairs by a single quantum vortex. Theoretical constructions are confirmed by numerical calculations performed directly in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We propose a method for estimating the radiation loss in a collision of a soliton-like formation with a phase singularity. It is shown by direct numerical simulation that under certain conditions, the interaction of vortex pairs with a core of a single quantum vortex is accompanied by quite intense acoustic wave emission; as a result, the conditions for applicability of the asymptotic theory developed here are violated. In particular, it is visually demonstrated by a specific example how radiation losses lead to a transformation of a vortex-antivortex pair into a vortex-free 2D dark soliton (i.e., to the annihilation of phase singularities).

  6. Quantum defect theory for the van der Waals plus dipole-dipole interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gao-Ren; Xie, Ting; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the scattering dynamics governed by the long-range van der Waals plus dipole-dipole interaction potential, -C6/R6-C3/R3, which describes the long-range interaction between two polar molecules in an electric field. In the spirit of quantum defect theory, a set of parameters which are nearly constants in the threshold regime is defined to characterize the scattering process. Using appropriate boundary conditions for the scattering wave functions and relevant parameters, we explore the quantum reflection by and quantum tunneling through the long-range potential. As a sample application, the reactive collision rates of 40K87Rb + 40K87Rb are calculated.

  7. New optimal polynomial theory for NN-scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, T A; Signell, P

    1980-01-01

    A new optimal polynomial theory for nucleon-nucleon scattering is presented. For the first time in nucleon-nucleon scattering, the derivative amplitudes originally introduced by Fubini, Furlan, and Rosetti are applied. Based on the properties of these amplitudes we introduce K-matrix functions which have suitable analyticity properties as functions of cos theta, where theta is the center of mass scattering angle. The K-matrix functions enable introduction of a new set of functions for which the optimal mapping techniques of Cutkosky, Deo and Ciulli can be applied. Results are shown for proton-proton phase shift analyses at 210 and 330 MeV.

  8. Interferences of real trajectories and the emergence of quantum features in electron-atom scattering in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Cerkic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2006-03-15

    Using the example of electron-atom scattering in a strong laser field, it is shown that the oscillatory structure of the scattered electron spectrum can be explained as a consequence of the interference of the real electron trajectories in terms of Feynman's path integral. While in previous work on quantum-orbit theory the complex solutions of the saddle-point equations were considered, we show here that for the electron-atom scattering with much simpler real solutions a satisfactory agreement with the strong-field-approximation results can be achieved. Real solutions are applicable both for the direct (low-energy) and the rescattering (high-energy) plateau in the scattered electron spectrum. In between the plateaus and beyond the rescattering cutoff good results can be obtained using the complex (quantum) solutions and the uniform approximation. The interference of real solutions is related to the recent attosecond double-slit experiment in time.

  9. Quantum theory of multimode polariton condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, David; Eastham, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    We develop a theory for the dynamics of the density matrix describing a multimode polariton condensate. In such a condensate several single-particle orbitals become highly occupied, due to stimulated scattering from reservoirs of high-energy excitons. A generic few-parameter model for the system leads to a Lindblad equation which includes saturable pumping, decay, and condensate interactions. We show how this theory can be used to obtain the population distributions, and the time-dependent first- and second-order coherence functions, in such a multimode condensate. As a specific application, we consider a polaritonic Josephson junction, formed from a double-well potential. We obtain the population distributions, emission line shapes, and widths (first-order coherence functions), and predict the dephasing time of the Josephson oscillations.

  10. Communication: Heavy atom quantum diffraction by scattering from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Pollak, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Typically one expects that when a heavy particle collides with a surface, the scattered angular distribution will follow classical mechanics. The heavy mass usually assures that the coherence length of the incident particle in the direction of the propagation of the particle (the parallel direction) will be much shorter than the characteristic lattice length of the surface, thus leading to a classical description. Recent work on molecular interferometry has shown that extreme collimation of the beam creates a perpendicular coherence length which is sufficiently long so as to observe interference of very heavy species passing through a grating. Here we show, using quantum mechanical simulations, that the same effect will lead to quantum diffraction of heavy particles colliding with a surface. The effect is robust with respect to the incident energy, the angle of incidence, and the mass of the particle. PMID:21218990

  11. Scattering assisted injection based injectorless mid infrared quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Siddharth Kamoua, Ridha

    2014-06-07

    An injectorless five-well mid infrared quantum cascade laser is analyzed which relies on phonon scattering injection in contrast to resonant tunneling injection, which has been previously used for injectorless designs. A Monte Carlo based self-consistent electron and photon transport simulator is used to analyze the performance of the analyzed design and compare it to existing injectorless designs. The simulation results show that the analyzed design could greatly enhance the optical gain and the characteristic temperatures of injectorless quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which have typically been hindered by low characteristic temperatures and significant temperature related performance degradation. Simulations of the analyzed device predict threshold current densities of 0.85 kA/cm{sup 2} and 1.95 kA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and 300 K, respectively, which are comparable to the threshold current densities of conventional injector based QCLs.

  12. Single quantum dot controls a plasmonic cavity's scattering and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Hartsfield, Thomas; Chang, Wei-Shun; Yang, Seung-Cheol; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Shi, Jinwei; Sun, Liuyang; Shvets, Gennady; Link, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic cavities represent a promising platform for controlling light-matter interaction due to their exceptionally small mode volume and high density of photonic states. Using plasmonic cavities for enhancing light's coupling to individual two-level systems, such as single semiconductor quantum dots (QD), is particularly desirable for exploring cavity quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects and using them in quantum information applications. The lack of experimental progress in this area is in part due to the difficulty of precisely placing a QD within nanometers of the plasmonic cavity. Here, we study the simplest plasmonic cavity in the form of a spherical metallic nanoparticle (MNP). By controllably positioning a semiconductor QD in the close proximity of the MNP cavity via atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulation, the scattering spectrum of the MNP is dramatically modified due to Fano interference between the classical plasmonic resonance of the MNP and the quantized exciton resonance in the QD. Moreover, our experiment demonstrates that a single two-level system can render a spherical MNP strongly anisotropic. These findings represent an important step toward realizing quantum plasmonic devices. PMID:26372957

  13. Quantum manifestations of chaos in elastic atom-surface scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Guantes, R.; Miret-Artes, S.; Borondo, F.

    2001-06-15

    Quantum manifestations of chaos in the diffraction of atoms from corrugated surfaces, for a range of initial conditions easily attainable in scattering experiments, are presented and discussed. The appearance of strong oscillations in diffraction patterns is shown to be directly related to the presence of classical chaos and threshold effects. We also show that the autocorrelation function for some of the collision S-matrix elements over incident angles is sensitive to the character, hyperbolic or nonhyperbolic, of the underlying chaotic dynamics, in agreement with general semiclassical arguments for unbound chaotic systems.

  14. Dual quantum electrodynamics: Dyon-dyon and charge-monopole scattering in a high-energy approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, Leonard; Milton, Kimball A.

    2000-04-01

    We develop the quantum field theory of electron-point magnetic monopole interactions and, more generally, dyon-dyon interactions, based on the original string-dependent ''nonlocal'' action of Dirac and Schwinger. We demonstrate that a viable nonperturbative quantum field theoretic formulation can be constructed that results in a string independent cross section for monopole-electron and dyon-dyon scattering. Such calculations can be done only by using nonperturbative approximations such as the eikonal approximation and not by some mutilation of lowest-order perturbation theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Dual quantum electrodynamics: Dyon-dyon and charge-monopole scattering in a high-energy approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamberg, Leonard; Milton, Kimball A.

    2000-04-01

    We develop the quantum field theory of electron-point magnetic monopole interactions and, more generally, dyon-dyon interactions, based on the original string-dependent ``nonlocal'' action of Dirac and Schwinger. We demonstrate that a viable nonperturbative quantum field theoretic formulation can be constructed that results in a string independent cross section for monopole-electron and dyon-dyon scattering. Such calculations can be done only by using nonperturbative approximations such as the eikonal approximation and not by some mutilation of lowest-order perturbation theory.

  16. The $\\hbar$ Expansion in Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hoyer, Paul; /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2010-10-27

    We show how expansions in powers of Planck's constant {h_bar} = h = 2{pi} can give new insights into perturbative and nonperturbative properties of quantum field theories. Since {h_bar} is a fundamental parameter, exact Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance are maintained at each order of the expansion. The physics of the {h_bar} expansion depends on the scheme; i.e., different expansions are obtained depending on which quantities (momenta, couplings and masses) are assumed to be independent of {h_bar}. We show that if the coupling and mass parameters appearing in the Lagrangian density are taken to be independent of {h_bar}, then each loop in perturbation theory brings a factor of {h_bar}. In the case of quantum electrodynamics, this scheme implies that the classical charge e, as well as the fine structure constant are linear in {h_bar}. The connection between the number of loops and factors of {h_bar} is more subtle for bound states since the binding energies and bound-state momenta themselves scale with {h_bar}. The {h_bar} expansion allows one to identify equal-time relativistic bound states in QED and QCD which are of lowest order in {h_bar} and transform dynamically under Lorentz boosts. The possibility to use retarded propagators at the Born level gives valence-like wave-functions which implicitly describe the sea constituents of the bound states normally present in its Fock state representation.

  17. Six-dimensional formulation of the quantum theory of superluminal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Patty, C.E. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    By operating in a six dimensional spacetime, transformations which relate superluminal to subluminal observers and do not introduce imaginary numbers are developed. These transformations preserve the Lorentz invariance of physical quantities. A six dimensional quantum theory is built upon this spacetime. All formal properties and the operators of the four dimensional Dirac quantum theory are duplicated. In addition, the extended quantum theory predicts the known behavior of subliminal matter and permits the calculation of the behavior of superluminal matter. The most distinctive characteristics of superluminal matter are found to be a spatial polarization during interactions with subluminal matter and an intrensic multi-temporal nature. The theory is applied to the Rutherford scattering problem for an incident beam of electrons. The results of the calculation indicate that the behavior of superluminal matter differs in an unambigious way from that of subluminal matter. The superluminal state is detectable.

  18. Unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement - Scattering and inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacker, P. F.

    1981-03-01

    The scanning procedures of unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement are adapted to the determination of scattering patterns of electromagnetic and scalar systems from measurements made in the near, intermediate, or far field, with emphasis on high accuracy and efficient data processing. The scanning procedures include spherical, improved plane polar, and many types of plane rectangular, plane radial, and circular cylindrical scanning. Application of group representation to inverse scattering analysis is discussed.

  19. Perturbative quantum gravity in double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Horst, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We study perturbative general relativity with a two-form and a dilaton using the double field theory formulation which features explicit index factorisation at the Lagrangian level. Explicit checks to known tree level results are performed. In a natural covariant gauge a ghost-like scalar which contributes even at tree level is shown to decouple consistently as required by perturbative unitarity. In addition, a lightcone gauge is explored which bypasses the problem altogether. Using this gauge to study BCFW on-shell recursion, we can show that most of the D-dimensional tree level S-matrix of the theory, including all pure graviton scattering amplitudes, is reproduced by the double field theory. More generally, we argue that the integrand may be reconstructed from its single cuts and provide limited evidence for off-shell cancellations in the Feynman graphs. As a straightforward application of the developed technology double field theory-like expressions for four field string corrections are derived.

  20. Nonlinear quantum equations: Classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rego-Monteiro, M. A.; Nobre, F. D.

    2013-10-15

    An exact classical field theory for nonlinear quantum equations is presented herein. It has been applied recently to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation, and it is shown herein to hold also for a nonlinear generalization of the Klein-Gordon equation. These generalizations were carried by introducing nonlinear terms, characterized by exponents depending on an index q, in such a way that the standard, linear equations, are recovered in the limit q→ 1. The main characteristic of this field theory consists on the fact that besides the usual Ψ(x(vector sign),t), a new field Φ(x(vector sign),t) needs to be introduced in the Lagrangian, as well. The field Φ(x(vector sign),t), which is defined by means of an additional equation, becomes Ψ{sup *}(x(vector sign),t) only when q→ 1. The solutions for the fields Ψ(x(vector sign),t) and Φ(x(vector sign),t) are found herein, being expressed in terms of a q-plane wave; moreover, both field equations lead to the relation E{sup 2}=p{sup 2}c{sup 2}+m{sup 2}c{sup 4}, for all values of q. The fact that such a classical field theory works well for two very distinct nonlinear quantum equations, namely, the Schrödinger and Klein-Gordon ones, suggests that this procedure should be appropriate for a wider class nonlinear equations. It is shown that the standard global gauge invariance is broken as a consequence of the nonlinearity.

  1. The future (and past) of quantum theory after the Higgs boson: a quantum-informational viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2016-05-28

    Taking as its point of departure the discovery of the Higgs boson, this article considers quantum theory, including quantum field theory, which predicted the Higgs boson, through the combined perspective of quantum information theory and the idea of technology, while also adopting anon-realistinterpretation, in 'the spirit of Copenhagen', of quantum theory and quantum phenomena themselves. The article argues that the 'events' in question in fundamental physics, such as the discovery of the Higgs boson (a particularly complex and dramatic, but not essentially different, case), are made possible by the joint workings of three technologies: experimental technology, mathematical technology and, more recently, digital computer technology. The article will consider the role of and the relationships among these technologies, focusing on experimental and mathematical technologies, in quantum mechanics (QM), quantum field theory (QFT) and finite-dimensional quantum theory, with which quantum information theory has been primarily concerned thus far. It will do so, in part, by reassessing the history of quantum theory, beginning with Heisenberg's discovery of QM, in quantum-informational and technological terms. This history, the article argues, is defined by the discoveries of increasingly complex configurations of observed phenomena and the emergence of the increasingly complex mathematical formalism accounting for these phenomena, culminating in the standard model of elementary-particle physics, defining the current state of QFT. PMID:27091170

  2. Theory of direct scattering of neutral and charged atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.

    1979-01-01

    The theory for direct elastic and inelastic collisions between composite atomic systems formulated within the framework of the Glauber approximation is presented. It is shown that the phase-shift function is the sum of a point Coulomb contribution and of an expression in terms of the known electron-hydrogen-atom and proton-hydrogen-atom phase shift function. The scattering amplitude is reexpressed, the pure Coulomb scattering in the case of elastic collisions between ions is isolated, and the exact optical profile function is approximated by a first-order expansion in Glauber theory which takes into account some multiple collisions. The approximate optical profile function terms corresponding to interactions involving one and two electrons are obtained in forms of Meijer G functions and as a one-dimensional integral, and for collisions involving one or two neutral atoms, the scattering amplitude is further reduced to a simple closed-form expression.

  3. Steady-state current transfer and scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Vered; Rai, Dhurba; Skourtis, Spiros S; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The correspondence between the steady-state theory of current transfer and scattering theory in a system of coupled tight-binding models of one-dimensional wires is explored. For weak interwire coupling both calculations give nearly identical results, except at singular points associated with band edges. The effect of decoherence in each of these models is studied using a generalization of the Liouville-von Neuman equation suitable for steady-state situations. An example of a single impurity model is studied in detail, leading to a lattice model of scattering off target that affects both potential scattering and decoherence. For an impurity level lying inside the energy band, the transmission coefficient diminishes with increasing dephasing rate, while the opposite holds for impurity energy outside the band. The efficiency of current transfer in the coupled wire system decreases with increasing dephasing. PMID:20707524

  4. The effective field theory treatment of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.

    2012-09-24

    This is a pedagogical introduction to the treatment of quantum general relativity as an effective field theory. It starts with an overview of the methods of effective field theory and includes an explicit example. Quantum general relativity matches this framework and I discuss gravitational examples as well as the limits of the effective field theory. I also discuss the insights from effective field theory on the gravitational effects on running couplings in the perturbative regime.

  5. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Quantum Gravity from the Point of View of Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Romeo; Fredenhagen, Klaus; Rejzner, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    We construct perturbative quantum gravity in a generally covariant way. In particular our construction is background independent. It is based on the locally covariant approach to quantum field theory and the renormalized Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism. We do not touch the problem of nonrenormalizability and interpret the theory as an effective theory at large length scales.

  7. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena-Junior, M. I.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample's average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry-Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry-Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov's universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels.

  8. Determining angles of incidence and heights of quantum dot faces by analyzing X-ray diffuse and specular scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goray, L. I.; Chkhalo, N. I.; Tsyrlin, G. E.

    2009-04-01

    Scattering of X rays by structures with multilayer ensembles of quantum dots MBE-grown in the In(Ga)As-GaAs system is studied by high-resolution grazing X-ray reflectometry. The peaks of the diffuse scattering intensity are discovered for the first time in structures with both vertically uncorrelated and vertically correlated quantum dots. It is shown that the position of the peak is totally determined by angle of inclination of the quantum dot pyramidal faces (the so-called blaze condition for diffraction gratings), which was theoretically predicted earlier. Comparison with the results of scattering simulation carried out by the technique of boundary integral equations indicates that a simple geometrical condition allows one to exactly determine the value of from the position of the intensity peak, the shape of which depends on many parameters. As follows from the theory and experiment, the width and height of the peaks for samples with vertically correlated quantum dots are larger than for those with uncorrelated dots. The roughness and interdiffusion of interfaces and the height of quantum dots are found from the position and amplitude of Bragg peaks. Thus, the conventional application of high-resolution grazing X-ray reflectometry is extended in this work to determination of the quantum dot geometry.

  9. Causality Is Inconsistent With Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Fred Alan

    2011-11-29

    Causality in quantum field theory means the vanishing of commutators for spacelike separated fields (VCSSF). I will show that VCSSF is not tenable. For VCSSF to be tenable, and therefore, to have both retarded and advanced propagators vanish in the elsewhere, a superposition of negative energy antiparticle and positive energy particle propagators, traveling forward in time, and a superposition of negative energy particle and positive energy antiparticle propagators, traveling backward in time, are required. Hence VCSSF predicts non-vanishing probabilities for both negative energy particles in the forward-through-time direction and positive energy antiparticles in the backwards-through-time direction. Therefore, since VCSSF is unrealizable in a stable universe, tachyonic propagation must occur in denial of causality.

  10. Quantum graphs and random-matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    For simple connected graphs with incommensurate bond lengths and with unitary symmetry we prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit (BGS) conjecture in its most general form. Using supersymmetry and taking the limit of infinite graph size, we show that the generating function for every (P,Q) correlation function for both closed and open graphs coincides with the corresponding expression of random-matrix theory. We show that the classical Perron-Frobenius operator is bistochastic and possesses a single eigenvalue +1. In the quantum case that implies the existence of a zero (or massless) mode of the effective action. That mode causes universal fluctuation properties. Avoiding the saddle-point approximation we show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e. for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap) and that do not carry a special class of bound states, the zero mode dominates in the limit of infinite graph size.

  11. Hydrodynamic theory of quantum fluctuating superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Richard A.; Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Goutéraux, Blaise; Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2016-08-01

    A hydrodynamic theory of transport in quantum mechanically phase-disordered superconductors is possible when supercurrent relaxation can be treated as a slow process. We obtain general results for the frequency-dependent conductivity of such a regime. With time-reversal invariance, the conductivity is characterized by a Drude-type peak, with width given by the supercurrent relaxation rate. Using the memory matrix formalism, we obtain a formula for this width (and hence also the dc resistivity) when the supercurrent is relaxed by short-range density-density interactions. This leads to an effective field theoretic and fully quantum derivation of a classic result on flux flow resistance. With strong breaking of time-reversal invariance, the optical conductivity exhibits what we call a "hydrodynamic supercyclotron" resonance. We obtain the frequency and decay rate of this resonance for the case of supercurrent relaxation due to an emergent Chern-Simons gauge field. The supercurrent decay rate in this "topologically ordered superfluid vortex liquid" is determined by the conductivities of the normal fluid component, rather than the vortex core.

  12. Quantum walks and discrete gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Pablo; Debbasch, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    A particular example is produced to prove that quantum walks can be used to simulate full-fledged discrete gauge theories. A family of two-dimensional walks is introduced and its continuous limit is shown to coincide with the dynamics of a Dirac fermion coupled to arbitrary electromagnetic fields. The electromagnetic interpretation is extended beyond the continuous limit by proving that these discrete-time quantum walks (DTQWs) exhibit an exact discrete local U(1) gauge invariance and possess a discrete gauge-invariant conserved current. A discrete gauge-invariant electromagnetic field is also constructed and that field is coupled to the conserved current by a discrete generalization of Maxwell equations. The dynamics of the DTQWs under crossed electric and magnetic fields is finally explored outside the continuous limit by numerical simulations. Bloch oscillations and the so-called E ×B drift are recovered in the weak-field limit. Localization is observed for some values of the gauge fields.

  13. Preference reversal in quantum decision theory

    PubMed Central

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav I.; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We consider the psychological effect of preference reversal and show that it finds a natural explanation in the frame of quantum decision theory. When people choose between lotteries with non-negative payoffs, they prefer a more certain lottery because of uncertainty aversion. But when people evaluate lottery prices, e.g., for selling to others the right to play them, they do this more rationally, being less subject to behavioral biases. This difference can be explained by the presence of the attraction factors entering the expression of quantum probabilities. Only the existence of attraction factors can explain why, considering two lotteries with close utility factors, a decision maker prefers one of them when choosing, but evaluates higher the other one when pricing. We derive a general quantitative criterion for the preference reversal to occur that relates the utilities of the two lotteries to the attraction factors under choosing vs. pricing and test successfully its application on experiments by Tversky et al. We also show that the planning paradox can be treated as a kind of preference reversal. PMID:26500592

  14. Quantum optics with quantum gases: Controlled state reduction by designed light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Ritsch, Helmut

    2009-07-15

    Cavity-enhanced light scattering from an ultracold gas in an optical lattice constitutes a quantum measurement with a controllable form of the measurement backaction. Time-resolved counting of scattered photons alters the state of the atoms without particle loss implementing a quantum nondemolition measurement. The conditional dynamics is given by the interplay between photodetection events (quantum jumps) and no-count processes. The class of emerging atomic many-body states can be chosen via the optical geometry and light frequencies. Light detection along the angle of a diffraction maximum (Bragg angle) creates an atom-number-squeezed state, while light detection at diffraction minima leads to the macroscopic superposition states (Schroedinger cat states) of different atom numbers in the cavity mode. A measurement of the cavity transmission intensity can lead to atom-number-squeezed or macroscopic superposition states depending on its outcome. We analyze the robustness of the superposition with respect to missed counts and find that a transmission measurement yields more robust and controllable superposition states than the ones obtained by scattering at a diffraction minimum.

  15. Relativistic off-mass-shell and off-energy-shell scattering theories: an application of the rotation and Lorentz groups

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    A relativistic, phenomenological scattering theory for particles with arbitrary spin is presented, and the relation between off-mass-shell and off-energy-shell theories is discussed. The theory is formulated from the Hilbert-space representation of particles with spin in relativistic quantum mechanics. This topic is reviewed in a basis-independent manner by appealing to the properties of the rotation and Lorentz groups and their representations. Spin is discussed and a set of basis state vectors for the single-particle Hilbert space is derived from this perspective. Two- and three-particle Hilbert-space bases are then constructed, and angular momentum is discussed. The z-circumflex and helicity bases are presented as examples of the general procedure. These foundations allow the on-shell scattering amplitude to be defined. The space-inversion and time-reversal properties of this amplitude suggest that a new scattering function be defined such that a continuation of that function to negative energies can be considered. Antiparticle scattering events are associated with the continued function, and the CPT theorem arises as a natural consequence of this association. Moreover, these considerations lead to the definition of an off-mass-shell scattering function. The resulting off-mass-shell scattering theory has a number of very appealing properties. The off-energy-shell theory is dependent on fewer variables than the off-mass-shell theory, and is more susceptible to a phenomenological treatment.

  16. Quantum dynamical simulation of the scattering of Ar from a frozen LiF(100) surface based on a first principles interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Azuri, Asaf; Pollak, Eli

    2015-07-07

    In-plane two and three dimensional diffraction patterns are computed for the vertical scattering of an Ar atom from a frozen LiF(100) surface. Suitable collimation of the incoming wavepacket serves to reveal the quantum mechanical diffraction. The interaction potential is based on a fit to an ab initio potential calculated using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. Due to the potential coupling found between the two horizontal surface directions, there are noticeable differences between the quantum angular distributions computed for two and three dimensional scattering. The quantum results are compared to analogous classical Wigner computations on the same surface and with the same conditions. The classical dynamics largely provides the envelope for the quantum diffractive scattering. The classical results also show that the corrugation along the [110] direction of the surface is smaller than along the [100] direction, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations of unimodal and bimodal scattering for the [110] and [100] directions, respectively.

  17. Theory of raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, H.

    1983-09-01

    A theory is presented to calculate the Raman polarizability of an adsorbed molecule at a semiconductor surface, where the electronic excitation in the molecular site interacts with excitons (elementary excitations in the semiconductor) through non-radiative energy transfer between them, in an intermediate state in the Raman scattering process. The Raman polarizability thus calculated is found to exhibit a peak at the energy corresponding to a resonant excitation of excitons, thereby suggesting the possibility of surface enhanced Raman scattering on semiconductor surfaces. The mechanism studied here can also give an explanation of a recent observation of the Raman excitation profiles of p-NDMA and p-DMAAB adsorbed on ZnO or TiO 2, where those profiles were best described by assuming a resonant intermediate state of the exciton transition in the semiconductors. It is also demonstrated that in addition to vibrational Raman scattering, excitonic Raman scattering of adsorbed molecules will occur in the coupled molecule-semiconductor system, where the molecular returns to its ground electronic state by leaving an exciton in the semiconductor. A spectrum of the excitonic Raman scattering is expected to appear in the background of the vibrational Raman band and to be characterized by the electronic structure of excitons. A desirable experiment is suggested for an examination of the theory.

  18. Density functional theory for low-energy electron-molecule scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kieron; Wasserman, Adam

    2004-09-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is becoming popular as an approach to time-dependent electronic problems[1]. In the weak field regime, TDDFT predicts electronic transition frequencies and optical spectra of atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids, with an accuracy comparable to high-level wavefunction calculations at a fraction of the computational cost[2]. For large systems, TDDFT is the method of choice. Given the importance of correlation effects in low-energy electron-molecule scattering, extracting scattering amplitudes from TDDFT appears desirable. I will review this background, and outline how this can be done[3]. Detailed results will be shown by Wasserman in another talk. [1] Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory, M.A.L. Marques and E.K.U. Gross, Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 55, 427 (2004). [2] Time-dependent density functional theory in quantum chemistry, F. Furche and K. Burke, to appear in 1st vol. of Annu. Rev. of Computational Chemistry (2004) [3] Electron-molecule scattering from time-dependent density functional theory A. Wasserman, N.T. Maitra, and K. Burke, submitted (see http:dft.rutgers.edu/pubs/publist.html).

  19. Scattering Theory Calculations of Casimir Energies at High Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Noah; Emig, Thorsten; Forrow, Aden; Jaffe, Robert; Kardar, Mehran; Maghrebi, Mohammad; Rahi, Jamal; Shpunt, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Scattering theory provides a powerful tool for capturing the response of an object to electromagnetic charge and field fluctuations. Techniques based on scattering theory have made possible a wide range of new calculations of Casimir energies. In this approach, the Casimir interaction energy for a collection of objects can be expressed in terms of the scattering T-matrices for each object individually, combined with universal translation matrices describing the objects' relative positions and orientations. These translation matrices are derived from an expansion of the free Green's function in an appropriate coordinate system, independent of the details of the objects themselves. This method proves particularly valuable for geometries involving high curvature, such as edges and tips. I will describe this approach in general terms and then give results from several problems to which it has been applied successfully. I will also discuss new developments in scattering theory that have been motivated by these problems. I would like to request that this abstract be part of a session on Casimir physics. Supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

  20. Quantum-electrodynamical density-functional theory: Bridging quantum optics and electronic-structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggenthaler, Michael; Flick, Johannes; Pellegrini, Camilla; Appel, Heiko; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Rubio, Angel

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we give a comprehensive derivation of an exact and numerically feasible method to perform ab initio calculations of quantum particles interacting with a quantized electromagnetic field. We present a hierarchy of density-functional-type theories that describe the interaction of charged particles with photons and introduce the appropriate Kohn-Sham schemes. We show how the evolution of a system described by quantum electrodynamics in Coulomb gauge is uniquely determined by its initial state and two reduced quantities. These two fundamental observables, the polarization of the Dirac field and the vector potential of the photon field, can be calculated by solving two coupled, nonlinear evolution equations without the need to explicitly determine the (numerically infeasible) many-body wave function of the coupled quantum system. To find reliable approximations to the implicit functionals, we present the appropriate Kohn-Sham construction. In the nonrelativistic limit, this density-functional-type theory of quantum electrodynamics reduces to the density-functional reformulation of the Pauli-Fierz Hamiltonian, which is based on the current density of the electrons and the vector potential of the photon field. By making further approximations, e.g., restricting the allowed modes of the photon field, we derive further density-functional-type theories of coupled matter-photon systems for the corresponding approximate Hamiltonians. In the limit of only two sites and one mode we deduce the appropriate effective theory for the two-site Hubbard model coupled to one photonic mode. This model system is used to illustrate the basic ideas of a density-functional reformulation in great detail and we present the exact Kohn-Sham potentials for our coupled matter-photon model system.

  1. Theory of X-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Kathrin

    This thesis presents the theoretical framework required to apply spectrally resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) as a diagnostic method for warm dense matter. In particular, the theory is generalised to allow for the description of systems with multiple ion species where all mutual correlations are taken into account within the new approach. Supplemented with the theory presented, XRTS is now a promising diagnostics for high-energy-density matter containing different chemical elements or mixtures of different materials. The signal measured at XRTS contains the unshifted Rayleigh peak and frequency-shifted features. The first is related to elastic scattering from electrons co-moving with the ions whilst the second occurs due to scattering from free electrons and excitation/ionisation events. The focus of this thesis lies on the elastic scattering feature which requires the ion structure and the electron density around the ion as input for the theoretical modelling. The ion structure is obtained from quantum simulations (DFT-MD) and classical hypernetted-chain (HNC) equations. The analysis of the DTF-MD simulation data reveals that partial ionisation yields strong modifications of the ion-ion interactions. Similar effects are found for the form of the electron screening cloud around an ion. On the basis of the newly developed theory and structural models, multicomponent effects on the XRTS signal are studied. It is shown that the Rayleigh feature is very sensitive to the ratio of the elements in the scattering volume and their mutual correlations. These results indicate that XRTS is well-suited to probe the properties of complex materials and the process of mixing in the WDM regime. The advanced theories are finally applied to experimental spectra. The procedure allows for both extracting the basic plasma parameters and assessing the quality of the theoretical models applied. Comparisons with several experiments demonstrated that the non-collective regime (large

  2. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-01

    We derive scalar effective field theories-Lagrangians, symmetries, and all-from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist. PMID:26196613

  3. Quantum and concept combination, entangled measurements, and prototype theory.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the meaning of the violation of the marginal probability law for situations of correlation measurements where entanglement is identified. We show that for quantum theory applied to the cognitive realm such a violation does not lead to the type of problems commonly believed to occur in situations of quantum theory applied to the physical realm. We briefly situate our quantum approach for modeling concepts and their combinations with respect to the notions of "extension" and "intension" in theories of meaning, and in existing concept theories. PMID:24482332

  4. Modern Quantum Field Theory II - Proceeeings of the International Colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. R.; Mandal, G.; Mukhi, S.; Wadia, S. R.

    1995-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Foreword * 1. Black Holes and Quantum Gravity * Quantum Black Holes and the Problem of Time * Black Hole Entropy and the Semiclassical Approximation * Entropy and Information Loss in Two Dimensions * Strings on a Cone and Black Hole Entropy (Abstract) * Boundary Dynamics, Black Holes and Spacetime Fluctuations in Dilation Gravity (Abstract) * Pair Creation of Black Holes (Abstract) * A Brief View of 2-Dim. String Theory and Black Holes (Abstract) * 2. String Theory * Non-Abelian Duality in WZW Models * Operators and Correlation Functions in c ≤ 1 String Theory * New Symmetries in String Theory * A Look at the Discretized Superstring Using Random Matrices * The Nested BRST Structure of Wn-Symmetries * Landau-Ginzburg Model for a Critical Topological String (Abstract) * On the Geometry of Wn Gravity (Abstract) * O(d, d) Tranformations, Marginal Deformations and the Coset Construction in WZNW Models (Abstract) * Nonperturbative Effects and Multicritical Behaviour of c = 1 Matrix Model (Abstract) * Singular Limits and String Solutions (Abstract) * BV Algebra on the Moduli Spaces of Riemann Surfaces and String Field Theory (Abstract) * 3. Condensed Matter and Statistical Mechanics * Stochastic Dynamics in a Deposition-Evaporation Model on a Line * Models with Inverse-Square Interactions: Conjectured Dynamical Correlation Functions of the Calogero-Sutherland Model at Rational Couplings * Turbulence and Generic Scale Invariance * Singular Perturbation Approach to Phase Ordering Dynamics * Kinetics of Diffusion-Controlled and Ballistically-Controlled Reactions * Field Theory of a Frustrated Heisenberg Spin Chain * FQHE Physics in Relativistic Field Theories * Importance of Initial Conditions in Determining the Dynamical Class of Cellular Automata (Abstract) * Do Hard-Core Bosons Exhibit Quantum Hall Effect? (Abstract) * Hysteresis in Ferromagnets * 4. Fundamental Aspects of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory

  5. Coverage-dependent quantum versus classical scattering of thermal neon atoms from Li/Cu(100).

    PubMed

    Maclaren, D A; Huang, C; Levi, A C; Allison, W

    2008-09-01

    We show that subtle variations in surface structure can enhance quantum scattering and quench atom-surface energy transfer. The scattering of thermal energy neon atoms from a lithium overlayer on a copper substrate switches between a classical regime, dominated by multiphonon interactions, and a quantum regime, dominated by elastic diffraction. The transition is achieved by simple tailoring of the lithium coverage and quantum scattering dominates only in the narrow coverage range of theta=0.3-0.6 ML. The results are described qualitatively using a modified Debye-Waller model that incorporates an approximate quantum treatment of the adsorbate-substrate vibration. PMID:19044885

  6. On the optical theorem and non-plane-wave scattering in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.

    2009-11-01

    In quantum mechanics, the optical theorem states that the extinction cross section is equal (within a prefactor 4π/k, in which k is a quantum wave number) to the imaginary part of the forward scattering angular function. This theorem is valid for plane wave scattering. We discuss modifications required for non-plane-wave scattering and establish a generalized expression for the extinction cross section in quantum mechanics. Examples are provided for two kinds of quantum shaped beams, namely, Gaussian and Bessel beams.

  7. Classical and quantum theories of proton disorder in hexagonal water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Owen; Sikora, Olga; Shannon, Nic

    2016-03-01

    It has been known since the pioneering work of Bernal, Fowler, and Pauling that common, hexagonal (Ih) water ice is the archetype of a frustrated material: a proton-bonded network in which protons satisfy strong local constraints (the "ice rules") but do not order. While this proton disorder is well established, there is now a growing body of evidence that quantum effects may also have a role to play in the physics of ice at low temperatures. In this paper, we use a combination of numerical and analytic techniques to explore the nature of proton correlations in both classical and quantum models of ice Ih. In the case of classical ice Ih, we find that the ice rules have two, distinct, consequences for scattering experiments: singular "pinch points," reflecting a zero-divergence condition on the uniform polarization of the crystal, and broad, asymmetric features, coming from its staggered polarization. In the case of the quantum model, we find that the collective quantum tunneling of groups of protons can convert states obeying the ice rules into a quantum liquid, whose excitations are birefringent, emergent photons. We make explicit predictions for scattering experiments on both classical and quantum ice Ih, and show how the quantum theory can explain the "wings" of incoherent inelastic scattering observed in recent neutron scattering experiments [Bove et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 165901 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.165901]. These results raise the intriguing possibility that the protons in ice Ih could form a quantum liquid at low temperatures, in which protons are not merely disordered, but continually fluctuate between different configurations obeying the ice rules.

  8. Theory of polariton-mediated Raman scattering in microcavities.

    PubMed

    León Hilario, L M; Bruchhausen, A; Lobos, A M; Aligia, A A

    2007-04-30

    We calculate the intensity of the polariton-mediated inelastic light scattering in semiconductor microcavities. We treat the exciton-photon coupling nonperturbatively and incorporate lifetime effects in both excitons and photons, and a coupling of the photons to the electron-hole continuum. Taking the matrix elements as fitting parameters, the results are in excellent agreement with measured Raman intensities due to optical phonons that are resonant with the upper polariton branches in II-VI microcavities with embedded CdTe quantum wells. PMID:21690956

  9. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  10. Floquet theory of electron waiting times in quantum-coherent conductors.

    PubMed

    Dasenbrook, David; Flindt, Christian; Büttiker, Markus

    2014-04-11

    We present a Floquet scattering theory of electron waiting time distributions in periodically driven quantum conductors. We employ a second-quantized formulation that allows us to relate the waiting time distribution to the Floquet scattering matrix of the system. As an application we evaluate the electron waiting times for a quantum point contact, modulating either the applied voltage (external driving) or the transmission probability (internal driving) periodically in time. Lorentzian-shaped voltage pulses are of particular interest as they lead to the emission of clean single-particle excitations as recently demonstrated experimentally. The distributions of waiting times provide us with a detailed characterization of the dynamical properties of the quantum-coherent conductor in addition to what can be obtained from the shot noise or the full counting statistics. PMID:24766000

  11. Four loop scattering in the Nambu-Goto theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conkey, Peter; Dubovsky, Sergei

    2016-05-01

    We initiate the study of multiloop scattering amplitudes in the Nambu-Goto theory on the worldsheet of a non-critical string. We start with a brute force calculation of two loop four particle scattering. Somewhat surprisingly, even though non-trivial UV counterterms are present at this order, on-shell amplitudes remain polynomial in the momenta of colliding particles. We show that this can be understood as a consequence of existence of certain close by (semi)integrable models. Furthermore, these arguments can be extended to obtain the answer for three and four loop scattering, bypassing the brute force calculation. The resulting amplitudes develop non-polynomial (logarithmic) dependence on the momenta starting at three loops.

  12. Radar scattering from the summer polar mesosphere: Theory and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.Y.N.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalously large radar reflectivities observed in the summer polar mesosphere have eluded satisfactory explanation until now. The author proposes that the following chain of causality is responsible for the so-called polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE): The uniquely low temperature in the summer mesopause produce ice aerosols. Because the aerosols exist in a plasma, they become electrically charged. The ambient electrons become coupled to the aerosols through electric fields and their effective diffusivity is retarded due to the large size of the aerosols. The reduction in diffusivity allows electron density inhomogeneities to be maintained at the radar Bragg scales. The radar waves are then scattered by the inhomogeneities. The above concept is supported by developing a quantitative theory of ambipolar diffusion in the mesosphere. The results to isotropic turbulence and Fresnel radar scatter are applied to show that the observed radar reflectivities can be explained by the theory. It is shown that the presence of realistic charged aerosols are sufficient to explain PMSE. The author also shows that dressed aerosol radar scatter can only apply to echoes detected by UHF radars. The data is taken with the Sondrestrom 1.29-GHz radar and attribute it to dressed aerosol scatter. The author used the Cornell University portable radar interferometer (CUPRI) to observe the mesosphere while rockets carrying in situ sensors were flown through two PMSE occurrences and a noctilucent cloud/PMSE event. The first simultaneous height comparison between noctilucent clouds and PMSE show that the radar scattering region was near or slightly above the visible cloud layer. The author also infers from aspect sensitivity measurements and Doppler spectrograms that there were two distinct types of PMSE: Enhanced turbulent scatter and partial (Fresnel) reflection from steep edges in the electron density. Both mechanisms require an anomalously low electron diffusion coefficient.

  13. Projective spatial decomposition in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu-Svirscevschi, Speranta Nadejda

    A spatial projection theoretical framework is studied for the extraction of the dynamics within a bounded spatial domain of a quantum system. The functional structure of the projected subspace of states is identified as a Sobolev Hilbert space in order to accommodate arbitrary values of the wave functions on the domain boundary. Projected fundamental observables are constructed as projected bilinear forms on the total Hilbert space and their commutation relations and equations of motion are derived. Local density limits can be retrieved for first- order differential observables, but not for most higher- order differential operators due to the occurrence of products of singular distributions. The projected evolution is shown to be a time-reversible superposition of two unitary evolutions on the total Hilbert space. The theory is then extended to many-particle systems, although it looses the projective character through averaging over identical particles. As formal applications, flux-correlation function expressions for quantum transition rates are generalized in this projective ansatz and a double-well problem is transposed onto a two-level model on projected Sobolev subspaces corresponding to the individual potential wells. The spatial projection framework is also shown to find application as a computational method intended to yield a significant reduction in size for large-scale time- dependent Schroedinger problems. A domain-projection algorithm is proposed, which iterates in time the wave function on a limited domain by constructing consistent time-dependent boundary conditions on its surface. Test results are given for a model finite-difference version.

  14. A microscopic, coupled-channel theory of pion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kagarlis, M.A.; Johnson, M.B.; Fortune, H.T.

    1995-05-15

    The authors develop a new and comprehensive coordinate-space theory of pion-nucleus scattering to facilitate disentangling the conventional aspects of pion scattering from the non-conventional ones relevant to issues of hadron dynamics. They work in coordinate space in order to both unify and extend the relatively extensive and successful analyses of exclusive pion-nucleus reactions previously made within a similar framework. They construct the optical potential microscopically in shell-model framework by summing particle-hole pair configurations, leading naturally to a coupled-channel formulation. The theory includes a complete treatment of all spin-isospin components of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude, and Fermi averaging is done explicitly. The authors present numerical results showing the significance of Fermi motion and spin dependence on charge-exchange angular distributions: Single and double spin flip are shown to play dominant and generally unappreciated roles in charge-exchange reactions, and corrections for Fermi motion are shown to be needed in order to quantitatively separate medium effects from conventional multiple scattering. 72 refs., 11 figs.

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    work done to date relates to point-to-point links. Another recent advance has been the development of trusted networks for QKD. This is important for further increasing the range of the technology, and for overcoming denial-of-service attacks on an individual link. It is interesting to see that the optimization of QKD devices differs for point-to-point and network applications. Network operation is essential for widespread adoption of the technology, as it can dramatically reduce the deployment costs and allow connection flexibility. Also important is the multiplexing of the quantum signals with conventional network traffic. For the future, quantum repeaters should be developed for longer range links. On the theoretical side, different approaches to security proofs have recently started to converge, offering several paradigms of the same basic idea. Our improved theoretical understanding places more stringent demands on the QKD devices. We are aware by now that finite size effects in key generation arise not only from parameter estimation. It will not be possible to generate a key from just a few hundred received signals. It is a stimulating challenge for the theory of security proofs to develop lean proof strategies that work with finite signal block sizes. As QKD advances to a real-world cryptographic solution, side channel attacks must be carefully analysed. Theoretical security proofs for QKD schemes are so far based on physical models of these devices. It is in the nature of models that any real implementation will deviate from this model, creating a potential weakness for an eavesdropper to exploit. There are two solutions to this problem: the traditional path of refining the models to reduce the deviations, or the radically different approach of device-independent security proofs, in which none or only a few well controlled assumptions about the devices are made. Clearly, it is desirable to find security proofs that require only minimal or fairly general model

  16. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-01

    We derive scalar effective field theories—Lagrangians, symmetries, and all—from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist.

  17. Theory and phenomenology of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2015-07-15

    We review the theory and phenomenology of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). After a brief introduction, we summarize the places where CEνNS is already in use and then turn to future physics opportunities from CEνNS. CEνNS has been proposed as a way to limit or discover beyond the standard model physics, measure the nuclear-neutron radius and constrain the Weinberg angle.

  18. Hybrid theory and calculation of e-N2 scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.; Temkin, A.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering is developed which is a synthesis of close-coupling and adiabatic-nuclei theories. Specifically, the theory is close-coupling with respect to vibrational degrees of freedom and adiabatic-nuclei with respect to rotation. It can be applied to any number of partial waves required; the remaining ones can be calculated purely in one or the other approximation. A theoretical criterion based on fixed-nuclei calculations is given which indicates those partial waves and energy domains requiring the various approximations. The theory allows all cross sections (pure rotational, vibrational, simultaneous vibration-rotation, differential, and total) to be calculated, and explicit formulas for all these cross sections are given. The theory is applied to low-energy e-N2 scattering. The fixed-nuclei results are such that the criterion shows clearly that vibrational close coupling is necessary, but only for the Pi sub g partial wave. It is found that the close-coupling calculation for this wave gives rise to the substructure as well as the gross structure of the 2.4-eV resonance and that vibrational excitation cross sections are about twice as large as previously inferred.

  19. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Naureen

    Reaction physics involving composite objects with internal degrees of freedom is an important subject since it is encountered in the context of nuclear processes like fusion, fission, particle decay, as well as many other branches of science. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object are explored in this work. A few model Hamiltonians are chosen as examples where a two-particle system interacts, in one dimension, with a target that poses a delta-potential or an infinite wall potential. It is assumed that only one of the two components interacts with the target. The study includes the harmonic oscillator and the infinite square well as examples of intrinsic Hamiltonians that do not allow the projectile to break up, and a finite square well and a delta-well as examples of Hamiltonians that do. The Projection Method and the Variable Phase Method are applied with the aim of an exact solution to the relevant scattering problems. These methods are discussed in the context of the pertinent convergence issues related thereto, and of their applicability. Virtual excitations of the projectile into the classically forbidden energy-domain are found to play a dominant and non-perturbative role in shaping reaction observables, giving rise to enhanced or reduced tunneling in various situations. Cusps and discontinuities are found to appear in observables as manifestations of unitarity and redistribution of flux at the thresholds. The intrinsic structure gives rise to resonancelike behavior in tunneling probabilities. It is also shown that there is charge asymmetry in the scattering of a composite object, unlike in the case of a structureless particle.

  20. Quantum waveguide theory of the Josephson effect in multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappi, C.; Romeo, F.; Sarnelli, E.; Citro, R.

    2015-12-01

    We formulate a quantum waveguide theory of the Josephson effect in multiband superconductors, with special emphasis on iron-based materials. By generalizing the boundary conditions of the scattering problem, we first determine the Andreev levels spectrum and then derive an explicit expression for the Josephson current which generalizes the formula of the single-band case. In deriving the results, we provide a second quantization field theory, allowing us to evaluate the current-phase relation and the Josephson current fluctuations in multiband systems. We present results for two different order parameter symmetries, namely s± and s++, which are relevant in multiband systems. The obtained results show that the s± symmetry can support π states which are absent in the s++ case. We also argue that there is a certain fragility of the Josephson current against phase fluctuations in the s++ case. The temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current is also analyzed and we find, for both the order parameter symmetries, remarkable violations of the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation. The results are relevant in view of possible experiments aimed at investigating the order parameter symmetry of multiband superconductors using mesoscopic Josephson junctions.

  1. Ultracold quantum gases and lattice systems: quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-11-01

    Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories are of central importance in many areas of physics. In condensed matter physics, Abelian U(1) lattice gauge theories arise in the description of certain quantum spin liquids. In quantum information theory, Kitaev's toric code is a Z(2) lattice gauge theory. In particle physics, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the non-Abelian SU(3) gauge theory of the strong interactions between quarks and gluons, is non-perturbatively regularized on a lattice. Quantum link models extend the concept of lattice gauge theories beyond the Wilson formulation, and are well suited for both digital and analog quantum simulation using ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices. Since quantum simulators do not suffer from the notorious sign problem, they open the door to studies of the real-time evolution of strongly coupled quantum systems, which are impossible with classical simulation methods. A plethora of interesting lattice gauge theories suggests itself for quantum simulation, which should allow us to address very challenging problems, ranging from confinement and deconfinement, or chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration at finite baryon density, to color superconductivity and the real-time evolution of heavy-ion collisions, first in simpler model gauge theories and ultimately in QCD.

  2. An effective field theory for forward scattering and factorization violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Ira Z.; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-08-01

    Starting with QCD, we derive an effective field theory description for forward scattering and factorization violation as part of the soft-collinear effective field theory (SCET) for high energy scattering. These phenomena are mediated by long distance Glauber gluon exchanges, which are static in time, localized in the longitudinal distance, and act as a kernel for forward scattering where | t| ≪ s. In hard scattering, Glauber gluons can induce corrections which invalidate factorization. With SCET, Glauber exchange graphs can be calculated explicitly, and are distinct from graphs involving soft, collinear, or ultrasoft gluons. We derive a complete basis of operators which describe the leading power effects of Glauber exchange. Key ingredients include regulating light-cone rapidity singularities and subtractions which prevent double counting. Our results include a novel all orders gauge invariant pure glue soft operator which appears between two collinear rapidity sectors. The 1-gluon Feynman rule for the soft operator coincides with the Lipatov vertex, but it also contributes to emissions with ≥ 2 soft gluons. Our Glauber operator basis is derived using tree level and one-loop matching calculations from full QCD to both SCETII and SCETI. The one-loop amplitude's rapidity renormalization involves mixing of color octet operators and yields gluon Reggeization at the amplitude level. The rapidity renormalization group equation for the leading soft and collinear functions in the forward scattering cross section are each given by the BFKL equation. Various properties of Glauber gluon exchange in the context of both forward scattering and hard scattering factorization are described. For example, we derive an explicit rule for when eikonalization is valid, and provide a direct connection to the picture of multiple Wilson lines crossing a shockwave. In hard scattering operators Glauber subtractions for soft and collinear loop diagrams ensure that we are not sensitive to

  3. Quantum Computation: Theory, Practice, and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Isaac

    2000-03-01

    Information is physical, and computation obeys physical laws. Ones and zeros -- elementary classical bits of information -- must be represented in physical media to be stored and processed. Traditionally, these objects are well described by classical physics, but increasingly, as we edge towards the limits of semiconductor technology, we reach a new regime where the laws of quantum physics become dominant. Strange new phenomena, like entanglement and quantum coherence, become available as new resources. How can such resources be utilized for computation? What physical systems allow construction and control of quantum phenomena? How is this relevant to future directions in information technology? The theoretical promise of quantum computation is polynomial speedup of searches, and exponentially speedups for other certain problems such as factoring. But the experimental challenge to realize such algorithms in practice is enormous: to date, quantum computers with only a handful of quantum bits have been realized in the laboratory, using electromagnetically trapped ions, and with magnetic resonance techniques. On the other hand, quantum information has been communicated over long distances using single photons. The future of quantum computation is currently subject to intense scrutiny. It may well be that these machines will not be practical. More quantum algorithms must be discovered, and new physical implementations must be realized. Quantum computation and quantum information are young fields with major issues to be overcome, but already, they have forever changed the way we think of the physical world and what can be computed with it.

  4. Quantum game theory and open access publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Bernius, Steffen; Dugall, Berndt

    2007-08-01

    The digital revolution of the information age and in particular the sweeping changes of scientific communication brought about by computing and novel communication technology, potentiate global, high grade scientific information for free. The arXiv, for example, is the leading scientific communication platform, mainly for mathematics and physics, where everyone in the world has free access on. While in some scientific disciplines the open access way is successfully realized, other disciplines (e.g. humanities and social sciences) dwell on the traditional path, even though many scientists belonging to these communities approve the open access principle. In this paper we try to explain these different publication patterns by using a game theoretical approach. Based on the assumption, that the main goal of scientists is the maximization of their reputation, we model different possible game settings, namely a zero sum game, the prisoners’ dilemma case and a version of the stag hunt game, that show the dilemma of scientists belonging to “non-open access communities”. From an individual perspective, they have no incentive to deviate from the Nash equilibrium of traditional publishing. By extending the model using the quantum game theory approach it can be shown, that if the strength of entanglement exceeds a certain value, the scientists will overcome the dilemma and terminate to publish only traditionally in all three settings.

  5. Microscopic nonlinear relativistic quantum theory of absorption of powerful x-ray radiation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Avetissian, H K; Ghazaryan, A G; Matevosyan, H H; Mkrtchian, G F

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic quantum theory of plasma nonlinear interaction with the coherent shortwave electromagnetic radiation of arbitrary intensity is developed. The Liouville-von Neumann equation for the density matrix is solved analytically considering a wave field exactly and a scattering potential of plasma ions as a perturbation. With the help of this solution we calculate the nonlinear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption rate for a grand canonical ensemble of electrons. The latter is studied in Maxwellian, as well as in degenerate quantum plasma for x-ray lasers at superhigh intensities and it is shown that one can achieve the efficient absorption coefficient in these cases. PMID:26565352

  6. Interpretation neutrality in the classical domain of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaler, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    I show explicitly how concerns about wave function collapse and ontology can be decoupled from the bulk of technical analysis necessary to recover localized, approximately Newtonian trajectories from quantum theory. In doing so, I demonstrate that the account of classical behavior provided by decoherence theory can be straightforwardly tailored to give accounts of classical behavior on multiple interpretations of quantum theory, including the Everett, de Broglie-Bohm and GRW interpretations. I further show that this interpretation-neutral, decoherence-based account conforms to a general view of inter-theoretic reduction in physics that I have elaborated elsewhere, which differs from the oversimplified picture that treats reduction as a matter of simply taking limits. This interpretation-neutral account rests on a general three-pronged strategy for reduction between quantum and classical theories that combines decoherence, an appropriate form of Ehrenfest's Theorem, and a decoherence-compatible mechanism for collapse. It also incorporates a novel argument as to why branch-relative trajectories should be approximately Newtonian, which is based on a little-discussed extension of Ehrenfest's Theorem to open systems, rather than on the more commonly cited but less germane closed-systems version. In the Conclusion, I briefly suggest how the strategy for quantum-classical reduction described here might be extended to reduction between other classical and quantum theories, including classical and quantum field theory and classical and quantum gravity.

  7. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Water and Aqueous Systems: Experiment, Theory, and Current Challenges.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Fang, Wei; Kusalik, Peter G; McKenzie, Ross H; Michaelides, Angelos; Morales, Miguel A; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-07-13

    Nuclear quantum effects influence the structure and dynamics of hydrogen-bonded systems, such as water, which impacts their observed properties with widely varying magnitudes. This review highlights the recent significant developments in the experiment, theory, and simulation of nuclear quantum effects in water. Novel experimental techniques, such as deep inelastic neutron scattering, now provide a detailed view of the role of nuclear quantum effects in water's properties. These have been combined with theoretical developments such as the introduction of the principle of competing quantum effects that allows the subtle interplay of water's quantum effects and their manifestation in experimental observables to be explained. We discuss how this principle has recently been used to explain the apparent dichotomy in water's isotope effects, which can range from very large to almost nonexistent depending on the property and conditions. We then review the latest major developments in simulation algorithms and theory that have enabled the efficient inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in molecular simulations, permitting their combination with on-the-fly evaluation of the potential energy surface using electronic structure theory. Finally, we identify current challenges and future opportunities in this area of research. PMID:27049513

  8. Subband Quantum Scattering Times for Algaas/GaAs Obtained Using Digital Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haughland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we investigate both the transport and quantum scattering times as a function of the carrier concentration for a modulation doped Al(0.3)Ga(0.7)As/GaAs structure. Carriers in the well are generated as a result of the persistent photoconductivity effect. When more than one subband becomes populated, digital filtering is used to separate the components for each of the excited subbands. We find that the quantum scattering time for the ground subband increases initially as the carrier concentration is increased. However, once the second subband becomes populated, the ground subband scattering time begins to decrease. The quantum scattering time for the excited subband is also observed to decrease as the concentration is increased. From the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times, it is seen that the transport in the well becomes more isotropic also as the concentration is increased.

  9. Some aspects of the theory of quantum groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, E. E.

    1993-12-01

    CONTENTSIntroductionChapter I. Basic constructions § 1. Definition of a Hopf algebra § 2. Two constructions of quantum semigroups § 3. Universal coacting and R-matrix algebras § 4. The quantum determinant and antipode § 5. The dimension of quantum semigroupsChapter II. Representation theory § 6. Basic concepts of representation theory § 7. The quantum flag space of \\operatorname{GL}_{P, \\mathcal Q, c}(n) § 8. The Schur algebra and complete reducibility § 9. Representations of \\operatorname{SL}_J(2) §10. The Frobenius morphismChapter III. Non-commutative differential calculus §11. The non-commutative de Rham complex of an n-dimensional vector space §12. Quantum Weyl algebras §13. The de Rham complex of a quantum groupReferences

  10. The Physical Renormalization of Quantum Field Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Binger, Michael William.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2007-02-20

    The profound revolutions in particle physics likely to emerge from current and future experiments motivates an improved understanding of the precise predictions of the Standard Model and new physics models. Higher order predictions in quantum field theories inevitably requires the renormalization procedure, which makes sensible predictions out of the naively divergent results of perturbation theory. Thus, a robust understanding of renormalization is crucial for identifying and interpreting the possible discovery of new physics. The results of this thesis represent a broad set of investigations in to the nature of renormalization. The author begins by motivating a more physical approach to renormalization based on gauge-invariant Green's functions. The resulting effective charges are first applied to gauge coupling unification. This approach provides an elegant formalism for understanding all threshold corrections, and the gauge couplings unify in a more physical manner compared to the usual methods. Next, the gauge-invariant three-gluon vertex is studied in detail, revealing an interesting and rich structure. The effective coupling for the three-gluon vertex, {alpha}(k{sub 1}{sup 2}, k{sub 2}{sup 2}, k{sub 3}{sup 2}), depends on three momentum scales and gives rise to an effective scale Q{sub eff}{sup 2}(k{sub 1}{sup 2}, k{sub 2}{sup 2}, k{sub 3}{sup 2}) which governs the (sometimes surprising) behavior of the vertex. The effects of nonzero internal masses are important and have a complicated threshold and pseudo-threshold structure. The pinch-technique effective charge is also calculated to two-loops and several applications are discussed. The Higgs boson mass in Split Supersymmetry is calculated to two-loops, including all one-loop threshold effects, leading to a downward shift in the Higgs mass of a few GeV. Finally, the author discusses some ideas regarding the overall structure of perturbation theory. This thesis lays the foundation for a comprehensive multi

  11. Effective field theory of gravity: Leading quantum gravitational corrections to Newton's and Coulomb's laws

    SciTech Connect

    Faller, Sven

    2008-06-15

    In this paper we consider general relativity and its combination with scalar quantum electrodynamics (QED) as an effective quantum field theory at energies well below the Planck scale. This enables us to compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the Newton and Coulomb potentials induced by the combination of graviton and photon fluctuations. We derive the relevant Feynman rules and compute the nonanalytical contributions to the one-loop scattering matrix for charged scalars in the nonrelativistic limit. In particular, we derive the post-Newtonian corrections of order Gm/c{sup 2}r from general relativity and the genuine quantum corrections of order G({Dirac_h}/2{pi})/c{sup 3}r{sup 2}.

  12. Quantum Hamilton Mechanics and the Theory of Quantization Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    A formulation of quantum mechanics in terms of complex canonical variables is presented. It is seen that these variables are governed by Hamilton's equations. It is shown that the action variables need to be quantized. By formulating a quantum Hamilton equation for the momentum variable, the energies for two different systems are determined. Quantum canonical transformation theory is introduced and the geometrical significance of a set of generalized quantization conditions which are obtained is discussed.

  13. Lorentz symmetry breaking as a quantum field theory regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Matt

    2009-07-15

    Perturbative expansions of quantum field theories typically lead to ultraviolet (short-distance) divergences requiring regularization and renormalization. Many different regularization techniques have been developed over the years, but most regularizations require severe mutilation of the logical foundations of the theory. In contrast, breaking Lorentz invariance, while it is certainly a radical step, at least does not damage the logical foundations of the theory. I shall explore the features of a Lorentz symmetry breaking regulator in a simple polynomial scalar field theory and discuss its implications. In particular, I shall quantify just 'how much' Lorentz symmetry breaking is required to fully regulate the quantum theory and render it finite. This scalar field theory provides a simple way of understanding many of the key features of Horava's recent article [Phys. Rev. D 79, 084008 (2009)] on 3+1 dimensional quantum gravity.

  14. Lorentz symmetry breaking as a quantum field theory regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2009-07-01

    Perturbative expansions of quantum field theories typically lead to ultraviolet (short-distance) divergences requiring regularization and renormalization. Many different regularization techniques have been developed over the years, but most regularizations require severe mutilation of the logical foundations of the theory. In contrast, breaking Lorentz invariance, while it is certainly a radical step, at least does not damage the logical foundations of the theory. I shall explore the features of a Lorentz symmetry breaking regulator in a simple polynomial scalar field theory and discuss its implications. In particular, I shall quantify just “how much” Lorentz symmetry breaking is required to fully regulate the quantum theory and render it finite. This scalar field theory provides a simple way of understanding many of the key features of Hořava’s recent article [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 084008 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.084008] on 3+1 dimensional quantum gravity.

  15. Quantum theory and human perception of the macro-world.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the question of 'why customary macroscopic entities appear to us humans as they do, i.e., as bounded entities occupying space and persisting through time', starting from our knowledge of quantum theory, how it affects the behavior of such customary macroscopic entities, and how it influences our perception of them. For this purpose, we approach the question from three perspectives. Firstly, we look at the situation from the standard quantum angle, more specifically the de Broglie wavelength analysis of the behavior of macroscopic entities, indicate how a problem with spin and identity arises, and illustrate how both play a fundamental role in well-established experimental quantum-macroscopical phenomena, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. Secondly, we analyze how the question is influenced by our result in axiomatic quantum theory, which proves that standard quantum theory is structurally incapable of describing separated entities. Thirdly, we put forward our new 'conceptual quantum interpretation', including a highly detailed reformulation of the question to confront the new insights and views that arise with the foregoing analysis. At the end of the final section, a nuanced answer is given that can be summarized as follows. The specific and very classical perception of human seeing-light as a geometric theory-and human touching-only ruled by Pauli's exclusion principle-plays a role in our perception of macroscopic entities as ontologically stable entities in space. To ascertain quantum behavior in such macroscopic entities, we will need measuring apparatuses capable of its detection. Future experimental research will have to show if sharp quantum effects-as they occur in smaller entities-appear to be ontological aspects of customary macroscopic entities. It remains a possibility that standard quantum theory is an incomplete theory, and hence incapable of coping ultimately with separated entities, meaning that a more general theory will be needed

  16. Quantum Theory of Hyperfine Structure Transitions in Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klempt, E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in which radio-frequency transitions between molecular hyperfine structure states may be observed. Aspects of the quantum theory applied to the analysis of this physical system, are discussed. (Authors/BT)

  17. Strategic leadership: a view from quantum and chaos theories.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, R R

    1997-01-01

    Viewing health care from the perspective of chaos and quantum theories offers new insights into management techniques for effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This article introduces these concepts and gives specific prescriptions for managerial action. PMID:9058085

  18. Information Theory Density Matrix for a Simple Quantum System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, William J.

    1979-01-01

    Derives the density matrix that best describes, according to information theory, a one-dimensional single particle quantum system when the only information available is the values for the linear and quadratic position-momentum moments. (Author/GA)

  19. Quantum mechanical generalization of the balistic electron wind theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacina, A.

    1980-06-01

    The Fiks' quasiclassical theory of the electron wind force is quantum mechanically generalized. Within the framework of this generalization the space dependence of the electron wind force is calculated in the vicinity of an interface between two media. It is found that quantum corrections may be comparable with or even greater than corresponding quasiclassical values.

  20. Noncommuting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1971-01-01

    In quantum detection theory, the optimum detection operators must commute; admitting simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables cannot yield a lower Bayes cost. In addition, the lower bounds on mean square errors of parameter estimates, predicted by the quantum mechanical Cramer-Rao inequality, cannot be reduced by such means.

  1. Noncommunting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1971-01-01

    In quantum detection theory the optimum detection operators must commute; admitting simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables cannot yield a lower Bayes cost. The lower bounds on mean square errors of parameter estimates predicted by the quantum-mechanical Cramer-Rao inequality can also not be reduced by such means.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Decoherence and the Appearance of a Classical World in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, R.

    2004-02-01

    In the last decade decoherence has become a very popular topic mainly due to the progress in experimental techniques which allow monitoring of the process of decoherence for single microscopic or mesoscopic systems. The other motivation is the rapid development of quantum information and quantum computation theory where decoherence is the main obstacle in the implementation of bold theoretical ideas. All that makes the second improved and extended edition of this book very timely. Despite the enormous efforts of many authors decoherence with its consequences still remains a rather controversial subject. It touches on, namely, the notoriously confusing issues of quantum measurement theory and interpretation of quantum mechanics. The existence of different points of view is reflected by the structure and content of the book. The first three authors (Joos, Zeh and Kiefer) accept the standard formalism of quantum mechanics but seem to reject orthodox Copenhagen interpretation, Giulini and Kupsch stick to both while Stamatescu discusses models which go beyond the standard quantum theory. Fortunately, most of the presented results are independent of the interpretation and the mathematical formalism is common for the (meta)physically different approaches. After a short introduction by Joos followed by a more detailed review of the basic concepts by Zeh, chapter 3 (the longest chapter) by Joos is devoted to the environmental decoherence. Here the author considers mostly rather `down to earth' and well-motivated mechanisms of decoherence through collisions with atoms or molecules and the processes of emission, absorption and scattering of photons. The issues of decoherence induced superselection rules and localization of objects including the possible explanation of the molecular structure are discussed in details. Many other topics are also reviewed in this chapter, e.g., the so-called Zeno effect, relationships between quantum chaos and decoherence, the role of

  3. Theory of high-energy electron scattering by composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of these expository lectures is on the role of relativistic invariance and the unity of the theory for medium and high energies. Sec. 2 introduces the kinematic notation and provides an elementary derivation of the general cross section. The relevant properties of the Poincare group and the transformation properties of current operators and target states are described in Sec 3. In Sec. 4 representations of target states with kinematic light-front symmetry are briefly discussed. The focus is on two applications. An impulse approximation of inclusive electron nucleus scattering at both medium and high energies. A parton model of the proton applied to deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by polarized protons. 19 refs.

  4. A Matter of Principle: The Principles of Quantum Theory, Dirac's Equation, and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2015-10-01

    This article is concerned with the role of fundamental principles in theoretical physics, especially quantum theory. The fundamental principles of relativity will be addressed as well, in view of their role in quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory, specifically Dirac's work, which, in particular Dirac's derivation of his relativistic equation of the electron from the principles of relativity and quantum theory, is the main focus of this article. I shall also consider Heisenberg's earlier work leading him to the discovery of quantum mechanics, which inspired Dirac's work. I argue that Heisenberg's and Dirac's work was guided by their adherence to and their confidence in the fundamental principles of quantum theory. The final section of the article discusses the recent work by D'Ariano and coworkers on the principles of quantum information theory, which extend quantum theory and its principles in a new direction. This extension enabled them to offer a new derivation of Dirac's equations from these principles alone, without using the principles of relativity.

  5. Theory and Applications of Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deible, Michael John

    With the development of peta-scale computers and exa-scale only a few years away, the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method, with favorable scaling and inherent parrallelizability, is poised to increase its impact on the electronic structure community. The most widely used variation of QMC is the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method. The accuracy of the DMC method is only limited by the trial wave function that it employs. The effect of the trial wave function is studied here by initially developing correlation-consistent Gaussian basis sets for use in DMC calculations. These basis sets give a low variance in variance Monte Carlo calculations and improved convergence in DMC. The orbital type used in the trial wave function is then investigated, and it is shown that Brueckner orbitals result in a DMC energy comparable to a DMC energy with orbitals from density functional theory and significantly lower than orbitals from Hartree-Fock theory. Three large weakly interacting systems are then studied; a water-16 isomer, a methane clathrate, and a carbon dioxide clathrate. The DMC method is seen to be in good agreement with MP2 calculations and provides reliable benchmarks. Several strongly correlated systems are then studied. An H4 model system that allows for a fine tuning of the multi-configurational character of the wave function shows when the accuracy of the DMC method with a single Slater-determinant trial function begins to deviate from multi-reference benchmarks. The weakly interacting face-to-face ethylene dimer is studied with and without a rotation around the pi bond, which is used to increase the multi-configurational nature of the wave function. This test shows that the effect of a multi-configurational wave function in weakly interacting systems causes DMC with a single Slater-determinant to be unable to achieve sub-chemical accuracy. The beryllium dimer is studied, and it is shown that a very large determinant expansion is required for DMC to predict a binding

  6. Vibronic Raman Scattering at the Quantum Limit of Plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-07-09

    We record sequences of Raman spectra at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated with 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS). A 2D correlation analysis of the recorded trajectories reveals that the observable vibrational states can be divided into sub-sets. The first set comprises the totally symmetric vibrations of DMS (ag) that are neither correlated with each other nor to the fluctuating background, which is assigned to the signature of charge transfer plasmons tunneling through DMS. The second set consists of bu vibrations, which are correlated both with each other and with the continuum. Our findings are rationalized on the basis of the charge-transfer theory of Raman scattering, and illustrate how the tunneling plasmons modulate the vibronic coupling term from which the intensities of the bu states are derived.

  7. WLWL scattering in Higgsless models: Identifying better effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander S.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2009-09-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgsless models. In this paper we analyze how well the three-site model performs as a general exemplar of Higgsless models in describing WLWL scattering, and which modifications can make it more representative. We employ general sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgsless models as a way to compare the different theories. We show that the size of the four-point vertex for the (unphysical) Nambu-Goldstone modes and the degree to which the sum rules are saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying Kaluza-Klein resonances both provide good measures of the extent to which a highly deconstructed theory can accurately describe the low-energy physics of a continuum 5D Higgsless model. After comparing the three-site model to flat and warped continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear moose with an additional U(1) group and to a ring (“breaking electroweak symmetry strongly” or “hidden local symmetry”) model with three sites and three links. Both cases may be readily analyzed in the framework of the general sum rules. We demonstrate that WLWL scattering in the ring model can very closely approximate scattering in the continuum models, provided that the hidden local symmetry parameter a is chosen to mimic ρ-meson dominance of ππ scattering in QCD. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is briefly discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from precision measurements of the Z' line shape and ZWW coupling at a high-energy lepton collider.

  8. Quantum theory and human perception of the macro-world

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the question of ‘why customary macroscopic entities appear to us humans as they do, i.e., as bounded entities occupying space and persisting through time’, starting from our knowledge of quantum theory, how it affects the behavior of such customary macroscopic entities, and how it influences our perception of them. For this purpose, we approach the question from three perspectives. Firstly, we look at the situation from the standard quantum angle, more specifically the de Broglie wavelength analysis of the behavior of macroscopic entities, indicate how a problem with spin and identity arises, and illustrate how both play a fundamental role in well-established experimental quantum-macroscopical phenomena, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. Secondly, we analyze how the question is influenced by our result in axiomatic quantum theory, which proves that standard quantum theory is structurally incapable of describing separated entities. Thirdly, we put forward our new ‘conceptual quantum interpretation’, including a highly detailed reformulation of the question to confront the new insights and views that arise with the foregoing analysis. At the end of the final section, a nuanced answer is given that can be summarized as follows. The specific and very classical perception of human seeing—light as a geometric theory—and human touching—only ruled by Pauli's exclusion principle—plays a role in our perception of macroscopic entities as ontologically stable entities in space. To ascertain quantum behavior in such macroscopic entities, we will need measuring apparatuses capable of its detection. Future experimental research will have to show if sharp quantum effects—as they occur in smaller entities—appear to be ontological aspects of customary macroscopic entities. It remains a possibility that standard quantum theory is an incomplete theory, and hence incapable of coping ultimately with separated entities, meaning that a more general

  9. Quantum trajectories in complex space: one-dimensional stationary scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-04-21

    One-dimensional time-independent scattering problems are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The equation for the local approximate quantum trajectories near the stagnation point of the quantum momentum function is derived, and the first derivative of the quantum momentum function is related to the local structure of quantum trajectories. Exact complex quantum trajectories are determined for two examples by numerically integrating the equations of motion. For the soft potential step, some particles penetrate into the nonclassical region, and then turn back to the reflection region. For the barrier scattering problem, quantum trajectories may spiral into the attractors or from the repellers in the barrier region. Although the classical potentials extended to complex space show different pole structures for each problem, the quantum potentials present the same second-order pole structure in the reflection region. This paper not only analyzes complex quantum trajectories and the total potentials for these examples but also demonstrates general properties and similar structures of the complex quantum trajectories and the quantum potentials for one-dimensional time-independent scattering problems. PMID:18433189

  10. Analysis of the scatter effect on detective quantum efficiency of digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiwoong; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Dong Woon; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Youn, Hanbean; Jeon, Hosang; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-03-01

    The scatter effect on detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital mammography is investigated using the cascaded-systems model. The cascaded-systems model includes a scatter-reduction device as a binomial selection stage. Quantum-noise-limited operation approximates the system DQE into the multiplication form of the scatter-reduction device DQE and the conventional detector DQE. The developed DQE model is validated in comparisons with the measured results using a CMOS flat-panel detector under scatter environments. For various scatter-reduction devices, the slot-scan method shows the best scatter-cleanup performance in terms of DQE, and the scatter-cleanup performance of the conventional one-dimensional grid is rather worse than the air gap. The developed model can also be applied to general radiography and will be very useful for a better design of imaging chain.

  11. A model of the measurement process in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diel, H. H.

    2015-07-01

    The so-called measurement problem of quantum theory (QT) is still lacking a satisfactory, or at least widely agreed upon, solution. A number of theories, known as interpretations of quantum theory, have been proposed and found differing acceptance among physicists. Most of the proposed theories try to explain what happens during a QT measurement using a modification of the declarative equations that define the possible results of a measurement of QT observables or by making assumptions outside the scope of falsifiable physics. This paper proposes a solution to the QT measurement problem in terms of a model of the process for the evolution of two QT systems that interact in a way that represents a measurement. The model assumes that the interactions between the measured QT object and the measurement apparatus are ’’normal” interactions which adhere to the laws of quantum field theory.

  12. Forward scattering approximation and bosonization in integer quantum Hall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenau da Costa, M. Westfahl, H.; Caldeira, A.O.

    2008-03-15

    In this work, we present a model and a method to study integer quantum Hall (IQH) systems. Making use of the Landau levels structure we divide these two-dimensional systems into a set of interacting one-dimensional gases, one for each guiding center. We show that the so-called strong field approximation, used by Kallin and Halperin and by MacDonald, is equivalent, in first order, to a forward scattering approximation and analyze the IQH systems within this approximation. Using an appropriate variation of the Landau level bosonization method we obtain the dispersion relations for the collective excitations and the single-particle spectral functions. For the bulk states, these results evidence a behavior typical of non-normal strongly correlated systems, including the spin-charge splitting of the single-particle spectral function. We discuss the origin of this behavior in the light of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and the bosonization of two-dimensional electron gases.

  13. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Dimensional Quantum Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Collin

    1997-03-01

    I review three neutron scattering experiments which have uncovered unusual magnetic phenomena in non-metallic low dimensional quantum antiferromagnets. (Work done in collaboration with M. Adams, G. Aeppli, C. Carlile, S.-W. Cheong, D. Davidović), D. C. Dender, J. F. DiTusa, P. R. Hammar, B. Hessen, T. Ito, S. H. Lee, K. Lefmann, K. Oka, T. G. Perring, A. P. Ramirez, Daniel H. Reich, H. Takagi, A. Taylor, and Guangyong Xu. I present evidence that the low temperature short-range ordered spin configuration in the kagomé bi-layer system SrCr_9pGa_12-9pO_19 is composed of small groups of spins whose dipole moments cancel. I report the first observation of field induced incommensurate spin correlations in the uniform spin 1/2 antiferromagnetic chain copper benzoate, and I discuss new results concerning sub-gap excitations in a spin 1 antiferromagnetic chain with impurity bonds, (Y_1-xCa_x)_2BaNiO_5.

  14. Resonances in Coupled πK-ηK Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  15. Oblique Alfvén Solitons and Inverse Scattering Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, H. R., IV; Reynolds, M. A.; Hamilton, R.

    2014-12-01

    Solitary wave structures observed by the Ulysses spacecraft in the solar wind were analyzed using both inverse scattering theory as well as direct numerical integration of the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation. Several of these structures were found to be consistent with soliton solutions of the DNLS equation. Such solitary structures have been commonly observed in the space plasma environment and may, in fact, be long-lived solitons. While the generation of these solitons may be due to an instability mechanism, e.g., the mirror instability, they may be observable far from the source region due to their coherent nature.

  16. Cosmology from group field theory formalism for quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2013-07-19

    We identify a class of condensate states in the group field theory (GFT) formulation of quantum gravity that can be interpreted as macroscopic homogeneous spatial geometries. We then extract the dynamics of such condensate states directly from the fundamental quantum GFT dynamics, following the procedure used in ordinary quantum fluids. The effective dynamics is a nonlinear and nonlocal extension of quantum cosmology. We also show that any GFT model with a kinetic term of Laplacian type gives rise, in a semiclassical (WKB) approximation and in the isotropic case, to a modified Friedmann equation. This is the first concrete, general procedure for extracting an effective cosmological dynamics directly from a fundamental theory of quantum geometry. PMID:23909305

  17. Can decoherence make quantum theories unfalsifiable? Understanding the quantum-to-classical transition without it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriols, X.

    2016-03-01

    Exact predictions for most quantum systems are computationally inaccessible. This is the so-called many body problem, which is present in most common interpretations of quantum mechanics. Therefore, predictions of natural quantum phenomena have to rely on some approximations (assumptions or simplifications). In the literature, there are different types of approximations, ranging from those whose justification is basically based on theoretical developments to those whose justification lies on the agreement with experiments. This last type of approximations can convert a quantum theory into an “unfalsifiable” quantum theory, true by construction. On the practical side, converting some part of a quantum theory into an “unfalsifiable” one ensures a successful modeling (i.e. compatible with experiments) for quantum engineering applications. An example of including irreversibility and dissipation in the Bohmian modeling of open systems is presented. On the ontological level, however, the present-day foundational problems related to controversial quantum phenomena have to avoid (if possible) being contaminated by the unfalsifiability originated from the many body problem. An original attempt to show how the Bohmian theory itself (minimizing the role of many body approximations) explains the transitions from a microscopic quantum system towards a macroscopic classical one is presented.

  18. Progesterone and testosterone studies by neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance methods and quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2004-05-01

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra of progesterone and testosterone measured at 20 and 290 K were compared with the IR spectra measured at 290 K. The Phonon Density of States spectra display well resolved peaks of low frequency internal vibration modes up to 1200 cm -1. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed by semiempirical PM3 method and by the density functional theory method with different basic sets for isolated molecule, as well as for the dimer system of testosterone. The proposed assignment of internal vibrations of normal modes enable us to conclude about the sequence of the onset of the torsion movements of the CH 3 groups. These conclusions were correlated with the results of proton molecular dynamics studies performed by NMR method. The GAUSSIAN program had been used for calculations.

  19. Molecular beams entwined with quantum theory: A bouquet for Max Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, D.

    2001-01-01

    In an era when the fledgling quantum theory was uncertain and even gave contradictory answers, Otto Stern undertook to employ molecular beams to test directly fundamental aspects of the theory. During 1921-1935, this led to five decisive experiments reviewed here, resulting in the discovery or demonstration of space quantization, de Broglie matter waves, anomalous magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, recoil of an atom on emission of a photon, and the limitation of scattering cross-sections for molecular collisions imposed by the uncertainty principle.

  20. Quantum theory of an electron waiting time clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasenbrook, David; Flindt, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The electron waiting time is the time that passes between two subsequent charge transfers in an electronic conductor. Recently, theories of electron waiting times have been devised for quantum transport in Coulomb-blockade structures and for mesoscopic conductors; however, so far a proper description of a detector has been missing. Here we develop a quantum theory of a waiting time clock capable of measuring the distribution of waiting times between electrons above the Fermi sea in a mesoscopic conductor. The detector consists of a mesoscopic capacitor coupled to a quantum two-level system whose coherent precession we monitor. Under ideal operating conditions our waiting time clock recovers the results of earlier theories without a detector. We investigate possible deviations due to an imperfect waiting time clock. As specific applications we consider a quantum point contact with a constant voltage and Lorentzian voltage pulses applied to an electrode.

  1. Application of a scattering theory of VHF transequatorial propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. A.

    1984-08-01

    Numerical application is made of the theory of scattering by long, curved, field-aligned irregularities of ionization density in the F-region developed by Ferguson and Booker (1983). Using an intermediate-scale regime of irregularities with an outer scale equal to the scale height of the F-region and an inner scale equal to the ion gyroradius, combined with a small-scale regime with an outer scale equal to the ionic gyroradius and an inner scale equal to the electron gyroradius, calculations are made corresponding to (1) equatorial spread-F in the VHF and UHF bands, (2) long-range transequatorial propagation of the type observed by Nielson, and (3) short-range transequatorial propagation of the type observed by Cohen and Bowles. The same ionospheric model yields field-strengths of the right order of magnitude in all three cases. The theory also predicts a focusing phenomenon that should be looked for experimentally.

  2. Classical theory of rotational rainbow scattering from uncorrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Averbukh, Ilya Sh; Pollak, Eli

    2010-08-01

    A classical perturbation theory is developed to study rotational rainbow scattering of molecules from uncorrugated frozen surfaces. Considering the interaction of the rigid rotor with the translational motion towards the surface to be weak allows for a perturbative treatment, in which the known zeroth order motion is that of a freely rotating molecule hitting a surface. Using perturbation theory leads to explicit expressions for the angular momentum deflection function with respect to the initial orientational angle of the rotor that are valid for any magnitude of the initial angular momentum. The rotational rainbows appear as peaks both in the final angular momentum and rotational energy distributions, as well as peaks in the angular distribution, although the surface is assumed to be uncorrugated. The derived analytic expressions are compared with numerical simulation data. Even when the rotational motion is significantly coupled to the translational motion, the predictions of the perturbative treatment remain qualitatively correct. PMID:21399336

  3. Review of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of solution of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are presented. Scattering experiments of a beam of particles at a nonrelativisitic energy by a target made up of particles are analyzed. The Schroedinger equation is used to develop the quantum mechanical description of the system and one of several functions depending on the relative distance of the particles. The inverse problem is the construction of the potentials from experimental measurements.

  4. Reality, Causality, and Probability, from Quantum Mechanics to Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2015-10-01

    These three lectures consider the questions of reality, causality, and probability in quantum theory, from quantum mechanics to quantum field theory. They do so in part by exploring the ideas of the key founding figures of the theory, such N. Bohr, W. Heisenberg, E. Schrödinger, or P. A. M. Dirac. However, while my discussion of these figures aims to be faithful to their thinking and writings, and while these lectures are motivated by my belief in the helpfulness of their thinking for understanding and advancing quantum theory, this project is not driven by loyalty to their ideas. In part for that reason, these lectures also present different and even conflicting ways of thinking in quantum theory, such as that of Bohr or Heisenberg vs. that of Schrödinger. The lectures, most especially the third one, also consider new physical, mathematical, and philosophical complexities brought in by quantum field theory vis-à-vis quantum mechanics. I close by briefly addressing some of the implications of the argument presented here for the current state of fundamental physics.

  5. Optimization through quantum annealing: theory and some applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, D. A.; Stella, L.

    2006-08-01

    Quantum annealing is a promising tool for solving optimization problems, similar in some ways to the traditional (classical) simulated annealing of Kirkpatrick et al. Simulated annealing takes advantage of thermal fluctuations in order to explore the optimization landscape of the problem at hand, whereas quantum annealing employs quantum fluctuations. Intriguingly, quantum annealing has been proved to be more effective than its classical counterpart in many applications. We illustrate the theory and the practical implementation of both classical and quantum annealing highlighting the crucial differences between these two methods by means of results recently obtained in experiments, in simple toy-models, and more challenging combinatorial optimization problems (namely, Random Ising model and Travelling Salesman Problem). The techniques used to implement quantum and classical annealing are either deterministic evolutions, for the simplest models, or Monte Carlo approaches, for harder optimization tasks. We discuss the pro and cons of these approaches and their possible connections to the landscape of the problem addressed.

  6. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  7. Application and development of the Schwinger multichannel scattering theory and the partial differential equation theory of electron-molecule scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherford, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    One version of the multichannel theory for electron-target scattering based on the Schwinger variational principle, the SMC method, requires the introduction of a projection parameter. The role of the projection parameter a is investigated and it is shown that the principal-value operator in the SMC equation is Hermitian regardless of the value of a as long as it is real and nonzero. In a basis that is properly orthonormalizable, the matrix representation of this operator is also Hermitian. The use of such basis is consistent with the Schwinger variational principle because the Lippmann-Schwinger equation automatically builds in the correct boundary conditions. Otherwise, an auxiliary condition needs to be introduced, and Takatsuka and McKoy's original value of a is one of the three possible ways to achieve Hermiticity. In all cases but one, a can be uncoupled from the Hermiticity condition and becomes a free parameter. An equation for a based on the variational stability of the scattering amplitude is derived; its solution has an interesting property that the scattering amplitude from a converged SMC calculation is independent of the choice of a even though the SMC operator itself is a-dependent. This property provides a sensitive test of the convergence of the calculation. For a static-exchange calculation, the convergence requirement only depends on the completeness of the one-electron basis, but for a general multichannel case, the a-invariance in the scattering amplitude requires both the one-electron basis and the N plus 1-electron basis to be complete. The role of a in the SMC equation and the convergence property are illustrated using two examples: e-CO elastic scattering in the static-exchange approximation, and a two-state treatment of the e-H2 Chi(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(+) yields b(sup 3)Sigma(sub u)(+) excitation.

  8. Quantum metrology from an information theory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Boixo, Sergio; Datta, Animesh; Davis, Matthew J.; Flammia, Steven T.; Shaji, Anil; Tacla, Alexandre B.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2009-04-13

    Questions about quantum limits on measurement precision were once viewed from the perspective of how to reduce or avoid the effects of quantum noise. With the advent of quantum information science came a paradigm shift to proving rigorous bounds on measurement precision. These bounds have been interpreted as saying, first, that the best achievable sensitivity scales as 1/n, where n is the number of particles one has available for a measurement and, second, that the only way to achieve this Heisenberg-limited sensitivity is to use quantum entanglement. We review these results and show that using quadratic couplings of n particles to a parameter to be estimated, one can achieve sensitivities that scale as 1/n{sup 2} if one uses entanglement, but even in the absence of any entanglement at any time during the measurement protocol, one can achieve a super-Heisenberg scaling of 1/n{sup 3/2}.

  9. Quantum decision-maker theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Michail; Meyers, Ronald E.; Deacon, Keith S.

    2000-07-01

    A quantum device simulating the human decision making process is introduced. It consists of quantum recurrent nets generating stochastic processes which represent the motor dynamics, and of classical neural nets describing the evolution of probabilities of these processes which represent the mental dynamics. The autonomy of the decision making process is achieved by a feedback from the mental to motor dynamics which changes the stochastic matrix based upon the probability distribution. This feedback replaces unavailable external information by an internal knowledge- base stored in the mental model in the form of probability distributions. As a result, the coupled motor-mental dynamics is described by a nonlinear version of Markov chains which can decrease entropy without an external source of information. Applications to common sense based decisions as well as to evolutionary games are discussed. An example exhibiting self-organization is computed using quantum computer simulation. Force on force and mutual aircraft engagements using the quantum decision maker dynamics are considered.

  10. Spin Kinetic Models of Plasmas - Semiclassical and Quantum Mechanical Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, Gert; Marklund, Mattias; Zamanian, Jens

    2009-11-10

    In this work a recently published semiclassical spin kinetic model, generalizing those of previous authors are discussed. Some previously described properties are reviewed, and a new example illustrating the theory is presented. The generalization to a fully quantum mechanical description is discussed, and the main features of such a theory is outlined. Finally, the main conclusions are presented.

  11. Electron Scattering from Neon Via Effective Range Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2014-12-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross-sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227 a 0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared.

  12. Black hole entropy in canonical quantum gravity and superstring theory

    SciTech Connect

    Susskind, L.; Uglum, J. )

    1994-08-15

    In this paper the entropy of an eternal Schwarzschild black hole is studied in the limit of an infinite black hole mass. The problem is addressed from the point of view of both canonical quantum gravity and superstring theory. The entropy per unit area of a free scalar field propagating in a fixed black hole background is shown to be quadratically divergent near the horizon. It is shown that such quantum corrections to the entropy per unit area are equivalent to the quantum corrections to the gravitational coupling. Unlike field theory, superstring theory provides a set of identifiable configurations which give rise to the classical contribution to the entropy per unit area. These configurations can be understood as open superstrings with both ends attached to the horizon. The entropy per unit area is shown to be finite to all orders in superstring perturbation theory. The importance of these conclusions to the resolution of the problem of black hole information loss is reiterated.

  13. Lorentz symmetric quantum field theory for symplectic fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Dean J.; Kapit, Eliot; LeClair, Andre

    2009-11-15

    A free quantum field theory with Lorentz symmetry is derived for spin-half symplectic fermions in 2+1 dimensions. In particular, we show that fermionic spin-half fields may be canonically quantized in a free theory with a Klein-Gordon Lagrangian. This theory is shown to have all the required properties of a consistent free quantum field theory, namely, causality, unitarity, adherence to the spin-statistics theorem, CPT symmetry, and the Hermiticity and positive definiteness of the Hamiltonian. The global symmetry of the free theory is Sp(4){approx_equal}SO(5). Possible interacting theories of both the pseudo-Hermitian and Hermitian variety are then examined briefly.

  14. Negative differential conductivity in quantum well with complex potential profile for electron-phonon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figarova, S. R.; Hasiyeva, G. N.; Figarov, V. R.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of phonon scattering on electrical conductivity (EC) of 2D electron gas in quantum well (QW) systems with a complicated potential profile is described. Dependence of QW electrical conductivity on QW parameters (such as QW width, Fermi level positions etc.) when phonon scattering is employed has been calculated. NDC in EC when it varies with width of the QW has been found.

  15. Quantum Theory for Cold Avalanche Ionization in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H. X.; Zu, X. T.; Xiang, X.; Sun, K.

    2010-09-10

    A theory of photon-assisted impact ionization in solids is presented. Our theory makes a quantum description of the new impact ionization--cold avalanche ionization recently reported by P. P. Rajeev, M. Gertsvolf, P. B. Corkum, and D. M. Rayner [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 083001 (2009)]. The present theory agrees with the experiments and can be reduced to the traditional impact ionization expression in the absence of a laser.

  16. Stochastic quantum Zeno by large deviation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherardini, Stefano; Gupta, Shamik; Saverio Cataliotti, Francesco; Smerzi, Augusto; Caruso, Filippo; Ruffo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quantum measurements are crucial for observing the properties of a quantum system, which, however, unavoidably perturb its state and dynamics in an irreversible way. Here we study the dynamics of a quantum system being subjected to a sequence of projective measurements applied at random times. In the case of independent and identically distributed intervals of time between consecutive measurements, we analytically demonstrate that the survival probability of the system to remain in the projected state assumes a large deviation (exponentially decaying) form in the limit of an infinite number of measurements. This allows us to estimate the typical value of the survival probability, which can therefore be tuned by controlling the probability distribution of the random time intervals. Our analytical results are numerically tested for Zeno-protected entangled states, which also demonstrate that the presence of disorder in the measurement sequence further enhances the survival probability when the Zeno limit is not reached (as it happens in experiments). Our studies provide a new tool for protecting and controlling the amount of quantum coherence in open complex quantum systems by means of tunable stochastic measurements.

  17. Bragg scattering as a probe of atomic wave functions and quantum phase transitions in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Puentes, Graciana; Pritchard, David E; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Weld, David M

    2011-10-21

    We have observed Bragg scattering of photons from quantum degenerate ^{87}Rb atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Bragg scattered light directly probes the microscopic crystal structure and atomic wave function whose position and momentum width is Heisenberg limited. The spatial coherence of the wave function leads to revivals in the Bragg scattered light due to the atomic Talbot effect. The decay of revivals across the superfluid to Mott insulator transition indicates the loss of superfluid coherence. PMID:22107532

  18. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  19. Diffraction limit of the theory of multiple small-angle neutron scattering by a dense system of scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple small-angle neutron scattering by a high-density system of inhomogeneities has been considered. A combined approach to the analysis of multiple small-angle neutron scattering has been proposed on the basis of the synthesis of the Zernike-Prince and Moliére formulas. This approach has been compared to the existing multiple small-angle neutron scattering theory based on the eikonal approximation. This comparison has shown that the results in the diffraction limit coincide, whereas differences exist in the refraction limit because the latter theory includes correlations between successive scattering events. It has been shown analytically that the existence of correlations in the spatial position of scatterers results in an increase in the number of unscattered neutrons. Thus, the narrowing of spectra of multiple small-angle neutron scattering observed experimentally and in numerical simulation has been explained.

  20. On the theory of quantum measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, Hermann A.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    1994-01-01

    Many so called paradoxes of quantum mechanics are clarified when the measurement equipment is treated as a quantized system. Every measurement involves nonlinear processes. Self consistent formulations of nonlinear quantum optics are relatively simple. Hence optical measurements, such as the quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of photon number, are particularly well suited for such a treatment. It shows that the so called 'collapse of the wave function' is not needed for the interpretation of the measurement process. Coherence of the density matrix of the signal is progressively reduced with increasing accuracy of the photon number determination. If the QND measurement is incorporated into the double slit experiment, the contrast ratio of the fringes is found to decrease with increasing information on the photon number in one of the two paths.

  1. Theory Of Alkyl Terminated Silicon Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-08-19

    We have carried out a series of ab-initio calculations to investigate changes in the optical properties of Si quantum dots as a function of surface passivation. In particular, we have compared hydrogen passivated dots with those having alkyl groups at the surface. We find that, while on clusters with reconstructed surfaces a complete alkyl passivation is possible, steric repulsion prevents full passivation of Si dots with unreconstructed surfaces. In addition, our calculations show that steric repulsion may have a dominant effect in determining the surface structure, and eventually the stability of alkyl passivated clusters, with results dependent on the length of the carbon chain. Alkyl passivation weakly affects optical gaps of silicon quantum dots, while it substantially decreases ionization potentials and electron affinities and affect their excited state properties. On the basis of our results we propose that alkyl terminated quantum dots may be size selected taking advantage of the change in ionization potential as a function of the cluster size.

  2. Neutrino oscillations: Quantum mechanics vs. quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, Evgeny Kh.; Kopp, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    A consistent description of neutrino oscillations requires either the quantum-mechanical (QM) wave packet approach or a quantum field theoretic (QFT) treatment. We compare these two approaches to neutrino oscillations and discuss the correspondence between them. In particular, we derive expressions for the QM neutrino wave packets from QFT and relate the free parameters of the QM framework, in particular the effective momentum uncertainty of the neutrino state, to the more fundamental parameters of the QFT approach. We include in our discussion the possibilities that some of the neutrino's interaction partners are not detected, that the neutrino is produced in the decay of an unstable parent particle, and that the overlap of the wave packets of the particles involved in the neutrino production (or detection) process is not maximal. Finally, we demonstrate how the properly normalized oscillation probabilities can be obtained in the QFT framework without an ad hoc normalization procedure employed in the QM approach.

  3. One-loop calculations in quantum field theory: from Feynman diagrams to unitarity cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R. Keith; Kunszt, Zoltan; Melnikov, Kirill; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    The success of the experimental program at the Tevatron re-inforced the idea that precision physics at hadron colliders is desirable and, indeed, possible. The Tevatron data strongly suggests that one-loop computations in QCD describe hard scattering well. Extrapolating this observation to the LHC, we conclude that knowledge of many short-distance processes at next-to-leading order may be required to describe the physics of hard scattering. While the field of one-loop computations is quite mature, parton multiplicities in hard LHC events are so high that traditional computational techniques become inefficient. Recently new approaches based on unitarity have been developed for calculating one-loop scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. These methods are especially suitable for the description of multi-particle processes in QCD and are amenable to numerical implementations. We present a systematic pedagogical description of both conceptual and technical aspects of the new methods.

  4. Computation of electromagnetic scattering parameters for lognormal distributions of magnetic spheres: Theory and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milham, Merrill E.

    1994-10-01

    In this report, relevant parts of the scattering theory for magnetic spheres are presented. Mass extinction coefficients, and the lognormal size distribution are defined. The theory and algorithms for integrating scattering parameters over size distributions are developed. The integrations are carried out in terms of dimensionless scattering, and size distribution parameters, which are simply related to the usual mass scattering coefficients. Fortran codes, which implement the algorithmic design, are presented, and examples of code use are given. Code listings are included.

  5. Quantum theory of Ur-objects as a theory of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyre, Holger

    1995-08-01

    The quantum theory of ur-objects proposed by C. F. von Weizsäcker has to be interpreted as a quantum theory of information. Ur-objects, or urs, are thought to be the simplest objects in quantum theory. Thus an ur is represented by a two-dimensional Hilbert space with the universal symmetry group SU(2), and can only be characterized as one bit of potential information. In this sense it is not a spatial but an information atom. The physical structure of the ur theory is reviewed, and the philosophical consequences of its interpretation as an information theory are demonstrated by means of some important concepts of physics such as time, space, entropy, energy, and matter, which in ur theory appear to be directly connected with information as “the” fundamental substance. This hopefully will help to provide a new understanding of the concept of information.

  6. Quantum Uncertainty and Decision-Making in Game Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Ohya, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Khrennikov, A.; Basieva, I.

    2011-01-01

    Recently a few authors pointed to a possibility to apply the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to cognitive psychology, in particular, to games of the Prisoners Dilemma (PD) type.6_18 In this paper, we discuss the problem of rationality in game theory and point out that the quantum uncertainty is similar to the uncertainty of knowledge, which a player feels subjectively in his decision-making.

  7. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Katz, S. D.; Lellouch, L.; Portelli, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Toth, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  8. Quantum correlations of magnetic impurities by a multiple electron scattering in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa Angulo, Didier; Cordourier Maruri, Guillermo; de Coss Gómez, Romeo

    In this work we analyze the quantum correlations and polarizations states of magnetic impurities spins, when a multiple electron scattering was taken place. A sequence of non-correlated electrons interacts through scattering producing quantum correlation which will have an impact on the electronic transmission. We consider a short range Heisenberg interaction between ballistic electron and static impurities. We analyze the cases when the electron scattering is produce by one and two impurities, obtaining the electronic transmission rates. Concurrence and fidelity calculations are performed to obtain the level of quantum entanglement and polarization correlations. We also discuss the possible application of this model to metallic and semiconductor carbon nanotubes, which could have important implications on spintronics and quantum information devices.

  9. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in 103 channels in opaque scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Uppu, Ravitej; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Boller, Klaus-J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports a large number of transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase modulation of the incident wave fronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From 103 experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable 2 ×2 beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be nonunitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and physical-key-based authentication.

  10. Investigating Puzzling Aspects of the Quantum Theory by Means of Its Hydrodynamic Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Bohmian mechanics, a hydrodynamic formulation of the quantum theory, constitutes a useful tool to understand the role of the phase as the mechanism responsible for the dynamical evolution displayed by quantum systems. This role is analyzed and discussed here in the context of quantum interference, considering to this end two well-known scenarios, namely Young's two-slit experiment and Wheeler's delayed choice experiment. A numerical implementation of the first scenario is used to show how interference in a coherent superposition of two counter-propagating wave packets can be seen and explained in terms of an effective model consisting of a single wave packet scattered off an attractive hard wall. The outcomes from this model are then applied to the analysis of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment, also recreated by means of a reliable realistic simulation. Both examples illustrate quite well how the Bohmian formulation helps to explain in a natural way (and therefore to demystify) aspects of the quantum theory typically regarded as paradoxical. In other words, they show that a proper understanding of quantum phase dynamics immediately removes any trace of unnecessary artificial wave-particle arguments.

  11. Quantum theory and Aquinas's doctrine on matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Stanley F.

    The Aristotelian conception of the material principle, deepened by Aquinas, is today widely misunderstood and largely alien to modern mathematical physics, despite the latter's preoccupation with matter and the spatiotemporal. The present dissertation seeks to develop a coherent understanding of matter in the Aristotelian-Thomistic sense, and to apply it to some key interpretive issues in quantum physics. I begin with a brief historical analysis of the Aristotelian, Newtonian ("classical"), and modern (quantum) approaches to physics, in order to highlight their commonality as well as their differences. Next, matter---especially prime matter---is investigated, in an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective, under several rationes: as principle of individuation, as principle of extension or spatiality, as principle of corruptibility, as related to essence and existence, and as ground of intelligibility. An attempt is made to order these different rationes according to primordiality. A number of topics concerning the formal structure of hylomorphic being are then addressed: elementarity, virtual presence, the "dispositions of matter," entia vialia, natural minima, atomism, the nature of local motion, the plenum and instantaneous action at a distance---all with a view to their incorporation in a unified account of formed matter at or near the elementary level. Finally I take up several interpretive problems in quantum physics which were introduced early in the dissertation, and show how the material and formal principles expounded in the central chapters can render these problems intelligible. Thus I propose that wave and particle aspects in the quantum realm are related substantially rather than accidentally, and that characteristics of substantial (prime) matter and substantial form are therefore being evidenced directly at this level---in the reversibility of the wave-particle transition, in the spatial and temporal instantaneity of quantum events, and in the probabilism

  12. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  13. Unified connected theory of few-body reaction mechanisms in N-body scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyzou, W. N.; Redish, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    A unified treatment of different reaction mechanisms in nonrelativistic N-body scattering is presented. The theory is based on connected kernel integral equations that are expected to become compact for reasonable constraints on the potentials. The operators T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) are approximate transition operators that describe the scattering proceeding through an arbitrary reaction mechanism A. These operators are uniquely determined by a connected kernel equation and satisfy an optical theorem consistent with the choice of reaction mechanism. Connected kernel equations relating T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) to the full T/sub +-//sup ab/ allow correction of the approximate solutions for any ignored process to any order. This theory gives a unified treatment of all few-body reaction mechanisms with the same dynamic simplicity of a model calculation, but can include complicated reaction mechanisms involving overlapping configurations where it is difficult to formulate models.

  14. "Evaluations" of Observables Versus Measurements in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, Giuseppe; Sestito, Angela

    2016-03-01

    In Quantum Physics there are circumstances where the direct measurement of a given observable encounters difficulties; in some of these cases, however, its value can be "evaluated", i.e. it can be inferred by measuring another observable characterized by perfect correlation with the observable of interest. Though an evaluation is often interpreted as a measurement of the evaluated observable, we prove that the two concepts cannot be identified in Quantum Physics, because the identification yields contradictions. Then, we establish the conceptual status of evaluations in Quantum Theory and how they are related to measurements.

  15. Towards a K-theory description of quantum hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Compeán, H.; Loaiza-Brito, O.

    2012-08-01

    The first steps towards a proposal for a description of the quantum hair in 4D supersymmetric black holes in string Calabi-Yau (CY) compactifications are given. The quantum hair consisting of electric and magnetic fractional charges in black holes are derived from periods of the CY's torsion cycles. In the process a K-theory interpretation of the quantum hair in terms of the Atiyah-Hirzebruch spectral sequence is carried out. Finally, the same procedure is considered for torsion cycles of certain generalized CY's threefolds such as half-flat manifolds.

  16. Towards a K-theory description of quantum hair

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Compean, H.; Loaiza-Brito, O.

    2012-08-24

    The first steps towards a proposal for a description of the quantum hair in 4D supersymmetric black holes in string Calabi-Yau (CY) compactifications are given. The quantum hair consisting of electric and magnetic fractional charges in black holes are derived from periods of the CY's torsion cycles. In the process a K-theory interpretation of the quantum hair in terms of the Atiyah-Hirzebruch spectral sequence is carried out. Finally, the same procedure is considered for torsion cycles of certain generalized CY's threefolds such as half-flat manifolds.

  17. Quantum theory of multiwave mixing - Squeezed-vacuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sunghyuck; Sargent, Murray, III

    1989-12-01

    The present paper combines a Langevin quantum-regression method with a denisty-operator approach to derive the master equation for the quantum theory of multiwave mixing in a very efficient way. The approach is quite general and is particularly valuable for analyzing complicated media such as semiconductors. It is used in the present paper to derive the quantum multiwave-mixing equations in a squeezed vacuum. Improved formulas are found for resonance fluorescence in a squeezed vacuum as well as the squeezing coefficients in a squeezed vacuum. Comparing squeezing spectra in squeezed and ordinary vacuums, significantly enhanced squeezing for the appropriate pump-vacuum relative phase is found.

  18. The method of unitary clothing transformations in the theory of nucleon-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, I.; Shebeko, A.

    2010-04-01

    The clothing procedure, put forward in quantum field theory (QFT) by Greenberg and Schweber, is applied for the description of nucleon-nucleon (N -N) scattering. We consider pseudoscalar (π and η), vector (ρ and ω) and scalar (δ and σ) meson fields interacting with 1/2 spin (N and N) fermion ones via the Yukawa-type couplings to introduce trial interactions between “bare” particles. The subsequent unitary clothing transformations (UCTs) are found to express the total Hamiltonian through new interaction operators that refer to particles with physical (observable) properties, the so-called clothed particles. In this work, we are focused upon the Hermitian and energy-independent operators for the clothed nucleons, being built up in the second order in the coupling constants. The corresponding analytic expressions in momentum space are compared with the separate meson contributions to the one-boson-exchange potentials in the meson theory of nuclear forces. In order to evaluate the T matrix of the N-N scattering we have used an equivalence theorem that enables us to operate in the clothed particle representation (CPR) instead of the bare particle representation (BPR) with its huge amount of virtual processes. We have derived the Lippmann-Schwinger(LS)-type equation for the CPR elements of the T-matrix for a given collision energy in the two-nucleon sector of the Hilbert space H of hadronic states and elaborated a code for its numerical solution in momentum space.

  19. The Method of Unitary Clothing Transformations in the Theory of Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, I.; Shebeko, O.

    2010-12-01

    The clothing procedure, put forward in quantum field theory (QFT) by Greenberg and Schweber, is applied for the description of nucleon-nucleon ( N- N) scattering. We consider pseudoscalar ( π and η), vector ( ρ and ω) and scalar ( δ and σ) meson fields interacting with 1/2 spin ( N and {bar{N}}) fermion ones via the Yukawa-type couplings to introduce trial interactions between “bare” particles. The subsequent unitary clothing transformations are found to express the total Hamiltonian through new interaction operators that refer to particles with physical (observable) properties, the so-called clothed particles. In this work, we are focused upon the Hermitian and energy-independent operators for the clothed nucleons, being built up in the second order in the coupling constants. The corresponding analytic expressions in momentum space are compared with the separate meson contributions to the one-boson-exchange potentials in the meson theory of nuclear forces. In order to evaluate the T matrix of the N- N scattering we have used an equivalence theorem that enables us to operate in the clothed particle representation (CPR) instead of the bare particle representation with its large amount of virtual processes. We have derived the Lippmann-Schwinger type equation for the CPR elements of the T-matrix for a given collision energy in the two-nucleon sector of the Hilbert space {mathcal{H}} of hadronic states.

  20. Spectra and scattering of light lattice nuclei from effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, J.; Barnea, N.; Gazit, D.; Pederiva, F.; van Kolck, U.

    2015-11-01

    An effective field theory is used to describe light nuclei, calculated from quantum chromodynamics on a lattice at unphysically large pion masses. The theory is calibrated at leading order to two available data sets on two- and three-body nuclei for two pion masses. At those pion masses we predict the quartet and doublet neutron-deuteron scattering lengths, and the α -particle binding energy. For mπ=510 MeV we obtain, respectively, 4anD=2.3 ±1.3 fm, 2anD=2.2 ±2.1 fm, and Bα=35 ±22 MeV, while for mπ=805 MeV 4anD=1.6 ±1.3 fm, 2anD=0.62 ±1.0 fm, and Bα=94 ±45 MeV are found. Phillips- and Tjon-like correlations to the triton binding energy are established. We find the theoretical uncertainty in the respective correlation bands to be independent of the pion mass. As a benchmark, we present results for the physical pion mass, using experimental two-body scattering lengths and the triton binding energy as input. Hints of subtle changes in the structure of the triton and α particle are discussed.

  1. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, Stefan L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.

    2012-04-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  2. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; et al

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discussmore » the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  3. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  4. Imaging Internal Structure of Long Bones Using Wave Scattering Theory.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rui; Le, Lawrence H; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Lou, Edmond

    2015-11-01

    An ultrasonic wavefield imaging method is developed to reconstruct the internal geometric properties of long bones using zero-offset data acquired axially on the bone surface. The imaging algorithm based on Born scattering theory is implemented with the conjugate gradient iterative method to reconstruct an optimal image. In the case of a multilayered velocity model, ray tracing through a smooth medium is used to calculate the traveled distance and traveling time. The method has been applied to simulated and real data. The results indicate that the interfaces of the top cortex are accurately imaged and correspond favorably to the original model. The reconstructed bottom cortex below the marrow is less accurate mainly because of the low signal-to-noise ratio. The current imaging method has successfully recovered the top cortical layer, providing a potential tool to investigate the internal structures of long bone cortex for osteoporosis assessment. PMID:26299684

  5. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  7. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  8. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, T.R.; Holstein, B.R.; Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the spin-independent part of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) amplitude off the nucleon within the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a consistent calculation to third order in external momenta according to Weinberg`s power counting. With this calculation we can determine the second- and fourth-order structure-dependent coefficients of the general low-energy expansion of the spin-averaged VCS amplitude based on gauge invariance, crossing symmetry, and the discrete symmetries. We discuss the kinematical regime to which our calculation can be applied and compare our expansion with the multipole expansion by Guichon, Liu, and Thomas. We establish the connection of our calculation with the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon where it is possible. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Isoscalar interaction currents

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz L.

    2014-06-01

    Using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST), one boson exchange (OBE) models have been found that give precision fits to low energy $np$ scattering and the deuteron binding energy. The boson-nucleon vertices used in these models contain a momentum dependence that requires a new class of interaction currents for use with electromagnetic interactions. Current conservation requires that these new interaction currents satisfy a two-body Ward-Takahashi (WT), and using principals of {\\it simplicity\\/} and {\\it picture independence\\/}, these currents can be uniquely determined. The results lead to general formulae for a two-body current that can be expressed in terms of relativistic $np$ wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}$, and two convenient truncated wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}^{(2)}$ and $\\widehat {\\it \\Psi}$, which contain all of the information needed for the explicit evaluation of the contributions from the interaction current. These three wave functions can be calculated from the CST bound or scattering state equations (and their off-shell extrapolations). A companion paper uses this formalism to evaluate the deuteron magnetic moment.

  10. Quantum scattering calculations for ro-vibrational de-excitation of CO by hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lei; Avoird, Ad van der; Karman, Tijs; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-05-28

    We present quantum-mechanical scattering calculations for ro-vibrational relaxation of carbon monoxide (CO) in collision with hydrogen atoms. Collisional cross sections of CO ro-vibrational transitions from v = 1, j = 0 − 30 to v′ = 0, j′ are calculated using the close coupling method for collision energies between 0.1 and 15 000 cm{sup −1} based on the three-dimensional potential energy surface of Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7571 (2013)]. Cross sections of transitions from v = 1, j ≥ 3 to v′ = 0, j′ are reported for the first time at this level of theory. Also calculations by the more approximate coupled states and infinite order sudden (IOS) methods are performed in order to test the applicability of these methods to H–CO ro-vibrational inelastic scattering. Vibrational de-excitation rate coefficients of CO (v = 1) are presented for the temperature range from 100 K to 3000 K and are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. All of these results and additional rate coefficients reported in a forthcoming paper are important for including the effects of H–CO collisions in astrophysical models.

  11. Quantum scattering calculations for ro-vibrational de-excitation of CO by hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Balakrishnan, N.; van der Avoird, Ad; Karman, Tijs; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2015-05-01

    We present quantum-mechanical scattering calculations for ro-vibrational relaxation of carbon monoxide (CO) in collision with hydrogen atoms. Collisional cross sections of CO ro-vibrational transitions from v = 1, j = 0 - 30 to v' = 0, j' are calculated using the close coupling method for collision energies between 0.1 and 15 000 cm-1 based on the three-dimensional potential energy surface of Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7571 (2013)]. Cross sections of transitions from v = 1, j ≥ 3 to v' = 0, j' are reported for the first time at this level of theory. Also calculations by the more approximate coupled states and infinite order sudden (IOS) methods are performed in order to test the applicability of these methods to H-CO ro-vibrational inelastic scattering. Vibrational de-excitation rate coefficients of CO (v = 1) are presented for the temperature range from 100 K to 3000 K and are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. All of these results and additional rate coefficients reported in a forthcoming paper are important for including the effects of H-CO collisions in astrophysical models.

  12. Universal Impedance, Admittance and Scattering Fluctuations in Quantum-chaotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmady, Sameer

    2006-03-01

    We experimentally investigate fluctuations in the eigenvalues of the impedance, admittance and scattering matrices of wave chaotic systems using a microwave analog of a quantum chaotic infinite square well potential. We consider a 2-D, time-reversal symmetric chaotic microwave resonator driven by two non-ideally coupled ports. The system-specific coupling effects are removed using the measured radiation impedance matrix (3pt<->Z Rad) [1] of the two ports. A normalized impedance matrix (3pt<->z ) is thus obtained, and the Probability Density Function (PDF) of its eigenvalues is predicted to be universal depending only on the cavity loss. We observe remarkable agreement between the statistical properties of 3pt<->z and 3pt<->y =3pt<->z -1 for all degrees of loss, which is in accordance with [1, 2] and Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We compare the joint PDF of the eigenphases of the normalized scattering matrix (3pt<->s ) with that obtained from RMT for varying degrees of loss. We study the joint PDF of the eigenvalues of 3pt<->s 3pt<->s ^ and find good agreement with [3]. [1] X. Zheng, et al., -- Electromagnetics (in press); condmat/0408317; S. Hemmady, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 014102 (2005).[2] Y. V. Fyodorov, et al.,-- condmat/0507016.[3] P. W. Brouwer and C. W. J Beenakker -- PRB 55, 4695 (1997). Work supported by DOD MURI AFOSR Grant F496200110374, DURIP Grants FA95500410295 and FA95500510240.

  13. Universal Impedance, Admittance and Scattering Fluctuations in Quantum-chaotic Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2006-03-01

    We experimentally investigate fluctuations in the eigenvalues of the impedance, admittance and scattering matrices of wave chaotic systems using a microwave analog of a quantum chaotic infinite square well potential. We consider a 2-D, time-reversal symmetric chaotic microwave resonator driven by two non-ideally coupled ports. The system-specific coupling effects are removed using the measured radiation impedance matrix (3pt<->Z Rad) [1] of the two ports. A normalized impedance matrix (3pt<->z ) is thus obtained, and the Probability Density Function (PDF) of its eigenvalues is predicted to be universal depending only on the cavity loss. We observe remarkable agreement between the statistical properties of 3pt<->z and 3pt<->y =3pt<->z -1 for all degrees of loss, which is in accordance with [1, 2] and Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We compare the joint PDF of the eigenphases of the normalized scattering matrix (3pt<->s ) with that obtained from RMT for varying degrees of loss. We study the joint PDF of the eigenvalues of 3pt<->s 3pt<->s ^ and find good agreement with [3]. [1] X. Zheng, et al., -- Electromagnetics (in press); condmat/0408317; S. Hemmady, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 014102 (2005).[2] Y. V. Fyodorov, et al.,-- condmat/0507016.[3] P. W. Brouwer and C. W. J Beenakker -- PRB 55, 4695 (1997). Work supported by DOD MURI AFOSR Grant F496200110374, DURIP Grants FA95500410295 and FA95500510240.

  14. Topos quantum theory on quantization-induced sheaves

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Kunji

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we construct a sheaf-based topos quantum theory. It is well known that a topos quantum theory can be constructed on the topos of presheaves on the category of commutative von Neumann algebras of bounded operators on a Hilbert space. Also, it is already known that quantization naturally induces a Lawvere-Tierney topology on the presheaf topos. We show that a topos quantum theory akin to the presheaf-based one can be constructed on sheaves defined by the quantization-induced Lawvere-Tierney topology. That is, starting from the spectral sheaf as a state space of a given quantum system, we construct sheaf-based expressions of physical propositions and truth objects, and thereby give a method of truth-value assignment to the propositions. Furthermore, we clarify the relationship to the presheaf-based quantum theory. We give translation rules between the sheaf-based ingredients and the corresponding presheaf-based ones. The translation rules have “coarse-graining” effects on the spaces of the presheaf-based ingredients; a lot of different proposition presheaves, truth presheaves, and presheaf-based truth-values are translated to a proposition sheaf, a truth sheaf, and a sheaf-based truth-value, respectively. We examine the extent of the coarse-graining made by translation.

  15. Hidden Variable Theories and Quantum Nonlocality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We clarify the meaning of Bell's theorem and its implications for the construction of hidden variable theories by considering an example system consisting of two entangled spin-1/2 particles. Using this example, we present a simplified version of Bell's theorem and describe several hidden variable theories that agree with the predictions of…

  16. Double Exponential Relativity Theory Coupled Theoretically with Quantum Theory?

    SciTech Connect

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    Here the problem of special relativity is analyzed into the context of a new theoretical formulation: the Double Exponential Theory of Special Relativity with respect to which the current Special or Restricted Theory of Relativity (STR) turns to be a particular case only.

  17. Scattering from a two-dimensional array of flux tubes: A study of the validity of mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Weiss, Nathan

    1994-02-01

    Mean field theory has been extensively used in the study of systems of anyons in two spatial dimensions. In this paper we study the physical grounds for the validity of this approximatoion by considering the quantum mechanical scattering of a charged particle from a two-dimensional array of magnetic flux tubes. The flux tubes are arranged on a regular lattice which is infinitely long in the y direction but which has a (small) finite number of columns in the x direction. Their physical size is assumed to be infinitesimally small. We develop a method for computing the scattering angle as well as the reflection and transmission coefficients to lowest order in the Aharonov-Bohm interaction. The results of our calculation are compared to the scattering of the same particle from a region of constant magnetic field whose magnitude is equal to the mean field of all the flux tubes. For an incident plane wave, the mean field approximation is shown to be valid provided the flux in each tube is much less than a single flux quantum. This is precisely the regime in which mean field theory for anyons is expected to be valid. When the flux per tube becomes of order 1, mean field theory is no longer valid.

  18. Electron-interface-phonon scattering in graded quantum wells of Ga1-xAlxAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wenhui; Zhu, Jia-Lin; Gu, Bing-Lin

    1994-05-01

    Using the method of series expansion, interface-phonon vibrational modes are calculated in the dielectric continuum model for the graded quantum well of Ga1-xAlxAs with a Ga0.6Al0.4As barrier. The intrasubband and intersubband scattering rates are obtained as functions of quantum-well width. The results reveal that the behavior of interface phonon modes is very different from that in a square quantum-well structure. It is found that the electron-interface-phonon scattering rates can be changed remarkably in a graded quantum-well structure compared with those in a square quantum-well structure, which is useful for some device applications.

  19. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  20. Symmetries of history quantum theories and decoherence functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Oliver

    1998-11-01

    Recently, Schreckenberg investigated symmetries in the context of history quantum theories. In the case that the space of histories is given by the set of projectors on some finite dimensional Hilbert space he obtained, first, a complete characterization of all physical symmetries of history quantum theories — an analog of Wigner's theorem — and, second, a complete mathematical characterization of symmetries of single decoherence functionals. In this paper we extend Schreckenberg's results to the case where the underlying space of histories is given by the set of projectors on some infinite dimensional Hilbert space.

  1. Theory of microwave-assisted supercurrent in quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Bergeret, F S; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T; Cuevas, J C

    2010-09-10

    We present a microscopic theory of the effect of a microwave field on the supercurrent through a quantum point contact of arbitrary transmission. Our theory predicts that (i) for low temperatures and weak fields, the supercurrent is suppressed at certain values of the superconducting phase, (ii) at strong fields, the current-phase relation is strongly modified and the current can even reverse its sign, and (iii) at finite temperatures, the microwave field can enhance the critical current of the junction. Apart from their fundamental interest, our findings are also important for the description of experiments that aim at the manipulation of the quantum state of atomic point contacts. PMID:20867598

  2. QED (quantum-electrodynamical) theory of excess spontaneous emission noise

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a quantum-electrodynamical theory of excess spontaneous emission noise in lossy resonators will be presented. The Petermann K factor'' does not enter into the spontaneous emission rate of a single atom in the cavity. The QED theory allows different interpretations of the K factor, and we use this fact to justify semiclassical analyses and to provide in one example a simple derivation of K in terms of the amplification of the quantum vacuum field entering the resonator through its mirrors. 17 refs.

  3. Quantum Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieve, William C.; Horwitz, Lawrence P.

    2009-04-01

    1. Foundations of quantum statistical mechanics; 2. Elementary examples; 3. Quantum statistical master equation; 4. Quantum kinetic equations; 5. Quantum irreversibility; 6. Entropy and dissipation: the microscopic theory; 7. Global equilibrium: thermostatics and the microcanonical ensemble; 8. Bose-Einstein ideal gas condensation; 9. Scaling, renormalization and the Ising model; 10. Relativistic covariant statistical mechanics of many particles; 11. Quantum optics and damping; 12. Entanglements; 13. Quantum measurement and irreversibility; 14. Quantum Langevin equation: quantum Brownian motion; 15. Linear response: fluctuation and dissipation theorems; 16. Time dependent quantum Green's functions; 17. Decay scattering; 18. Quantum statistical mechanics, extended; 19. Quantum transport with tunneling and reservoir ballistic transport; 20. Black hole thermodynamics; Appendix; Index.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Quantum field theory has evolved from its early beginnings as a tool for understanding the interaction of light with matter into a rather formidable technical paradigm, one that has successfully provided the mathematical underpinnings of all non-gravitational interactions. Over the eight decades since it was first contemplated the methods have become increasingly more streamlined and sophisticated, yielding new insights into our understanding of the subatomic world and our abilities to make clear and precise predictions. Some of the more elegant methods have to do with non-perturbative and semiclassical approaches to the subject. The chief players here are solitons, instantons, and anomalies. Over the past three decades there has been a steady rise in our understanding of these objects and of our ability to calculate their effects and implications for the rest of quantum field theory. This book is a welcome contribution to this subject. In 12 chapters it provides a clear synthesis of the key developments in these subjects at a level accessible to graduate students that have had an introductory course to quantum field theory. In the author's own words it provides both 'a survey and an overview of this field'. The first half of the book concentrates on solitons--kinks, vortices, and magnetic monopoles--and their implications for the subject. The reader is led first through the simplest models in one spatial dimension, into more sophisticated cases that required more advanced topological methods. The author does quite a nice job of introducing the various concepts as required, and beginning students should be able to get a good grasp of the subject directly from the text without having to first go through the primary literature. The middle part of the book deals with the implications of these solitons for both cosmology and for duality. While the cosmological discussion is quite nice, the discussion on BPS solitons, supersymmetry and duality is rather condensed. It is

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of neutron-alpha scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Nollett, K. M.; Pieper, S. C.; Wiringa, R. B.; Carlson, J.; Hale, G. M.; Physics

    2007-07-13

    We describe a new method to treat low-energy scattering problems in few-nucleon systems, and we apply it to the five-body case of neutron-alpha scattering. The method allows precise calculations of low-lying resonances and their widths. We find that a good three-nucleon interaction is crucial to obtain an accurate description of neutron-alpha scattering.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Neutron-{alpha} Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Wiringa, R. B.; Carlson, J.; Hale, G. M.

    2007-07-13

    We describe a new method to treat low-energy scattering problems in few-nucleon systems, and we apply it to the five-body case of neutron-alpha scattering. The method allows precise calculations of low-lying resonances and their widths. We find that a good three-nucleon interaction is crucial to obtain an accurate description of neutron-alpha scattering.

  7. Theory and Measurement of Partially Correlated Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series methods can effectively estimate temporal surface changes induced by geophysical phenomena. However, such methods are susceptible to decorrelation due to spatial and temporal baselines (radar pass separation), changes in orbital geometries, atmosphere, and noise. These effects limit the number of interferograms that can be used for differential analysis and obscure the deformation signal. InSAR decorrelation effects may be ameliorated by exploiting pixels that exhibit phase stability across the stack of interferograms. These so-called persistent scatterer (PS) pixels are dominated by a single point-like scatterer that remains phase-stable over the spatial and temporal baseline. By identifying a network of PS pixels for use in phase unwrapping, reliable deformation measurements may be obtained even in areas of low correlation, where traditional InSAR techniques fail to produce useful observations. PS identification is challenging in natural terrain, due to low reflectivity and few corner reflectors. Shanker and Zebker [1] proposed a PS pixel selection technique based on maximum-likelihood estimation of the associated signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). In this study, we further develop the underlying theory for their technique, starting from statistical backscatter characteristics of PS pixels. We derive closed-form expressions for the spatial, rotational, and temporal decorrelation of PS pixels as a function of baseline and signal-to-clutter ratio. We show that previous decorrelation and critical baseline expressions [2] are limiting cases of our result. We then describe a series of radar scattering simulations and show that the simulated decorrelation matches well with our analytic results. Finally, we use our decorrelation expressions with maximum-likelihood SCR estimation to analyze an area of the Hayward Fault Zone in the San Francisco Bay Area. A series of 38 images of the area were obtained from C

  8. Theory of a quantum noncanonical field in curved spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Indurain, Javier; Liberati, Stefano

    2009-08-15

    Much attention has been recently devoted to the possibility that quantum gravity effects could lead to departures from special relativity in the form of a deformed Poincare algebra. These proposals go generically under the name of doubly or deformed special relativity (DSR). In this article we further explore a recently proposed class of quantum field theories, involving noncanonically commuting complex scalar fields, which have been shown to entail a DSR-like symmetry. An open issue for such theories is whether the DSR-like symmetry has to be taken as a physically relevant symmetry, or if in fact the 'true' symmetries of the theory are just rotations and translations while boost invariance has to be considered broken. Here we analyze this issue by extending the known results to curved spacetime under both of the previous assumptions. We show that if the symmetry of the free theory is taken to be a DSR-like realization of the Poincare symmetry, then it is not possible to render such a symmetry a gauge symmetry of the curved physical spacetime. However, it is possible to introduce an auxiliary spacetime which allows one to describe the theory as a standard quantum field theory in curved spacetime. Alternatively, taking the point of view that the noncanonical commutation of the fields actually implies a breakdown of boost invariance, the physical spacetime manifold has to be foliated in surfaces of simultaneity, and the field theory can be coupled to gravity by making use of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner prescription.

  9. Microscopic quantum superpotential in Script N = 1 gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2007-10-01

    We consider the Script N = 1 super Yang-Mills theory with gauge group U(N), adjoint chiral multiplet X and tree-level superpotential Tr W(X). We compute the quantum effective superpotential Wmic as a function of arbitrary off-shell boundary conditions at infinity for the scalar field X. This effective superpotential has a remarkable property: its critical points are in one-to-one correspondence with the full set of quantum vacua of the theory, providing in particular a unified picture of solutions with different ranks for the low energy gauge group. In this sense, Wmic is a good microscopic effective quantum superpotential for the theory. This property is not shared by other quantum effective superpotentials commonly used in the literature, like in the strong coupling approach or the glueball superpotentials. The result of this paper is a first step in extending Nekrasov's microscopic derivation of the Seiberg-Witten solution of Script N = 2 super Yang-Mills theories to the realm of Script N = 1 gauge theories.

  10. Light-scattering detection of quantum phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jinwu; Zhang, J. M.; Liu, W. M.; Zhang Keye; Li Yan; Zhang Weiping

    2011-05-15

    Ultracold atoms loaded on optical lattices can provide unprecedented experimental systems for the quantum simulations and manipulations of many quantum phases. However, so far, how to detect these quantum phases effectively remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we show that the optical Bragg scattering of cold atoms loaded on optical lattices can be used to detect many quantum phases, which include not only the conventional superfluid and Mott insulating phases, but also other important phases, such as various kinds of charge density wave (CDW), valence bond solid (VBS), CDW supersolid (CDW-SS) and Valence bond supersolid (VB-SS).

  11. Effect of an electric field on electron-interface-phonon scattering in a graded quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jia-Lin; Duan, Wenhui; Gu, Bing-Lin; Wu, Jian

    1996-02-01

    Within the dielectric continuum model, the effect of an applied longitudinal electric field on electron-interface-phonon scattering is studied for the graded quantum well of Ga 1- xAl xAs with a Ga 0.6Al 0.4As barrier, and compared with that in a staircase-like square quantum well structure. The electron subband and interface phonon modes are calculated using the method of series expansion. The intrasubband and intersubband scattering rates are obtained as functions of the applied electric field, and the influence of the composition gradient of a graded quantum well on the scattering rates is shown. It is found that the variation of the interface-phonon scattering rates with the applied electric field in a graded quantum well structure is significantly different from that in a staircase-like square quantum well structure. However, there is much less difference in the variation of the total scattering rates between the two structures.

  12. On the quantum geometry of string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Bietenholz, W.; Hofheinz, F.; Nishimura, J.

    The IKKT or IIB matrix model has been proposed as a non-perturbative definition of type IIB superstring theories. It has the attractive feature that space-time appears dynamically. It is possible that lower dimensional universes dominate the theory, therefore providing a dynamical solution to the reduction of space-time dimensionality. We summarize recent works that show the central role of the phase of the fermion determinant in the possible realization of such a scenario.

  13. On the quantum geometry of string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Bietenholz, W.; Hofheinz, F.; Nishimura, J.

    2002-03-01

    The IKKT or IIB matrix model has been proposed as a non-perturbative definition of type IIB superstring theories. It has the attractive feature that space-time appears dynamically. It is possible that lower dimensional universes dominate the theory, therefore providing a dynamical solution to the reduction of space-time dimensionality. We summarize recent works that show the central role of the phase of the fermion determinant in the possible realization of such a scenario.

  14. Quantum field theories on algebraic curves. I. Additive bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takhtajan, Leon A.

    2013-04-01

    Using Serre's adelic interpretation of cohomology, we develop a `differential and integral calculus' on an algebraic curve X over an algebraically closed field k of constants of characteristic zero, define algebraic analogues of additive multi-valued functions on X and prove the corresponding generalized residue theorem. Using the representation theory of the global Heisenberg algebra and lattice Lie algebra, we formulate quantum field theories of additive and charged bosons on an algebraic curve X. These theories are naturally connected with the algebraic de Rham theorem. We prove that an extension of global symmetries (Witten's additive Ward identities) from the k-vector space of rational functions on X to the vector space of additive multi-valued functions uniquely determines these quantum theories of additive and charged bosons.

  15. The Misapplication of Probability Theory in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racicot, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    This article is a revision of two papers submitted to the APS in the past two and a half years. In these papers, arguments and proofs are summarized for the following: (1) The wrong conclusion by EPR that Quantum Mechanics is incomplete, perhaps requiring the addition of ``hidden variables'' for completion. Theorems that assume such ``hidden variables,'' such as Bell's theorem, are also wrong. (2) Quantum entanglement is not a realizable physical phenomenon and is based entirely on assuming a probability superposition model for quantum spin. Such a model directly violates conservation of angular momentum. (3) Simultaneous multiple-paths followed by a quantum particle traveling through space also cannot possibly exist. Besides violating Noether's theorem, the multiple-paths theory is based solely on probability calculations. Probability calculations by themselves cannot possibly represent simultaneous physically real events. None of the reviews of the submitted papers actually refuted the arguments and evidence that was presented. These analyses should therefore be carefully evaluated since the conclusions reached have such important impact in quantum mechanics and quantum information theory.

  16. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-15

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  17. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  18. Quantum theory and chemistry: Two propositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Two propositions concerning quantum chemistry are proposed. First, it is proposed that the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation, where the Hamiltonian operator is associated with an assemblage of nuclei and electrons, can never be arranged to yield specific molecules in the chemists' sense. It is argued that this result is a necessary condition if the Schroedinger has relevancy to chemistry. Second, once a system is in a particular state with regard to interactions among its components (the assemblage of nuclei and electrons), it cannot spontaneously eliminate any of those interactions. This leads to a subtle form of irreversibility.

  19. Quantum theory of the complex dielectric constant of free carriers in polar semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.

    1982-09-01

    The optical constants and reflectivity of a semiconductor are known as functions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric constant. The imaginary part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 2/ is proportional to the optical conductivity, which has recently been calculated from the quantum density matrix equation of motion. The expression obtained for e/sub 2/ reduces to the Drude result, as obtained from the quasi-classical Boltzmann transport equation, in the limit of low frequencies and elastic scattering mechanisms, and to the quantum result found using time dependent perturbation theory in the limit of high frequencies. This paper derives the real part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 1/ for a III-V or II-VI semiconductor with the band structure of the Kane theory, using the quantum density matrix method. The relation of e/sub 1/ to the second order perturbation energy of the system is shown, and the reflectivity is a minimum when the second order perturbation energy vanishes. The quantum calculation for e/sub 1/ gives approximately the same result as the Drude theory, except near the fundamental absorption edge, and reduces to the Drude result at low frequencies. Using the complex dielectric constant, the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index, the skin depth, and surface impedance, and the reflectivity are found. The plasma resonance is examined. The surface impedance and the skin depth are shown to reduce to the usual classical result in the limit that e/sub 1/ = 0 and w tau << 1, where w is the angular frequency of the applied field and tau is the electron scattering time.

  20. A condensed matter field theory for quantum plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballout, Fouad; Hess, Ortwin

    In recent years plasmonics has advanced to ever decreasing length scales reaching dimensions comparable to the de broglie wavelength of an electron, which has a manifest influence on the plasmon dispersion relation. The associated phenomenology lies beyond the reach of the classical drude free electron theory or its nonlocal extension and adequate models are needed to address the quantum matter aspects of light-matter interaction that are responsible for plasmonicquantum size effects. We present on the basis of the jellium model a quantum field theory of surface-plasmon polaritons in which they emerge as extended objects as a result of an inhomogeneous condensation of bosons around a topological singularity describing the surface. The benefit of this approach lies in relating the electromagnetic fields belonging to such a macroscopic quantum state with the surface topology and nonlocal responsefunction (expressed in terms of the retarded photon self-energy) of the delimited electron gas sustaining that state.

  1. Quantum theory as the most robust description of reproducible experiments

    SciTech Connect

    De Raedt, Hans; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Michielsen, Kristel

    2014-08-15

    It is shown that the basic equations of quantum theory can be obtained from a straightforward application of logical inference to experiments for which there is uncertainty about individual events and for which the frequencies of the observed events are robust with respect to small changes in the conditions under which the experiments are carried out. - Highlights: • It is shown that logical inference, that is, inductive reasoning, provides a rational explanation for the success of quantum theory. • The Schrödinger equation is obtained through logical inference applied to robust experiments. • The singlet and triplet states follow from logical inference applied to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiment. • Robustness also leads to the quantum theoretical description of the Stern-Gerlach experiment.

  2. Communication theory of quantum systems. Ph.D. Thesis, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Communication theory problems incorporating quantum effects for optical-frequency applications are discussed. Under suitable conditions, a unique quantum channel model corresponding to a given classical space-time varying linear random channel is established. A procedure is described by which a proper density-operator representation applicable to any receiver configuration can be constructed directly from the channel output field. Some examples illustrating the application of our methods to the development of optical quantum channel representations are given. Optimizations of communication system performance under different criteria are considered. In particular, certain necessary and sufficient conditions on the optimal detector in M-ary quantum signal detection are derived. Some examples are presented. Parameter estimation and channel capacity are discussed briefly.

  3. Description of a primitive valley scattering unit cell to understand anisotropic inter-valley scattering in AlAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, S.; Grayson, M.

    2011-03-01

    Valley degenerate systems have an extra scattering channel not present in single valley systems, namely inter-valley scattering. To help classify anisotropic inter-valley scattering in degenerate multi-valley systems, such as AlAs quantum wells (QWs), we define a valley scattering primitive unit cell in momentum space which allows one to distinguish purely in-plane momentum scattering from scattering requiring an out-of-plane momentum component. The standard depiction of a 2D Brillouin zone of a quantum confined valley-degenerate system projects all valleys to a single plane and this depiction loses information about the momentum scattering component that was projected out. Because QW confinement potentials are inherently anisotropic, the disorder potential characteristic of quantum confinement can create anisotropic short-wavelength inter- valley scattering potentials favoring in-plane momentum scattering. We demonstrate that the valley scattering cell for AlAs QWs grown along various orientations is particularly useful in identifying relevant scattering vectors. Initial estimates will be shown of the role of strong electron-electron interactions in AlAs QWs on inter-valley scattering parameters such as inter-valley scattering time, probabilities and rates.

  4. Development of Concepts in the History of Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisenberg, Werner

    1975-01-01

    Traces the development of quantum theory from the concept of the discrete stationary states, to the generalized concept of state, to the search for the elementary particle. States that the concept of the elementary particle should be replaced by the concept of a fundamental symmetry. (MLH)

  5. On the Interpretation of Measurement Within the Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Leon N.; Van Vechten, Deborah

    1969-01-01

    In interpretation of the process of measurement is proposed which can be placed wholly within the quantum theory. The entire system including the apparatus and even the mind of the observer can be considered to develop according to the Schrodinger equation. (RR)

  6. Quantum Theory from Observer's Mathematics Point of View

    SciTech Connect

    Khots, Dmitriy; Khots, Boris

    2010-05-04

    This work considers the linear (time-dependent) Schrodinger equation, quantum theory of two-slit interference, wave-particle duality for single photons, and the uncertainty principle in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics, see [1]. Certain theoretical results and communications pertaining to these theorems are also provided.

  7. Category of trees in representation theory of quantum algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, N. M.; Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2013-10-15

    New applications of categorical methods are connected with new additional structures on categories. One of such structures in representation theory of quantum algebras, the category of Kuznetsov-Smorodinsky-Vilenkin-Smirnov (KSVS) trees, is constructed, whose objects are finite rooted KSVS trees and morphisms generated by the transition from a KSVS tree to another one.

  8. Finite temperature quantum field theory in the functional Schroedinger picture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. ); Na, K.; Yee, J.H. )

    1995-03-15

    We calculate the finite temperature Gaussian effective potential of scalar [phi][sup 4] theory in the functional Schroedinger picture. Our method is the direct generalization of the variational method proposed by Eboli, Jackiw, and Pi for quantum-mechanical systems, and gives the same result as that of Amelino-Camelia and Pi who used the self-consistent composite operator method.

  9. EDITORIAL: Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza; Tannor, David

    2011-08-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling the dynamics of realistic open quantum systems has emerged in recent years as a key challenge across contemporary quantum sciences and technologies, with implications ranging from physics, chemistry and applied mathematics to quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum engineering. Quantum control theory aims to provide both a general dynamical-system framework and a constructive toolbox to meet this challenge. The purpose of this special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is to present a state-of-the-art account of recent advances and current trends in the field, as reflected in two international meetings that were held on the subject over the last summer and which motivated in part the compilation of this volume—the Topical Group: Frontiers in Open Quantum Systems and Quantum Control Theory, held at the Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (ITAMP) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA), from 1-14 August 2010, and the Safed Workshop on Quantum Decoherence and Thermodynamics Control, held in Safed (Israel), from 22-27 August 2010. Initial developments in quantum control theory date back to (at least) the early 1980s, and have been largely inspired by the well-established mathematical framework for classical dynamical systems. As the above-mentioned meetings made clear, and as the burgeoning body of literature on the subject testifies, quantum control has grown since then well beyond its original boundaries, and has by now evolved into a highly cross-disciplinary field which, while still fast-moving, is also entering a new phase of maturity, sophistication, and integration. Two trends deserve special attention: on the one hand, a growing emphasis on control tasks and methodologies that are specifically motivated by QIP, in addition and in parallel to applications in more traditional areas where quantum coherence is nevertheless vital (such as, for instance

  10. High-energy scatterings in infinite-derivative field theory and ghost-free gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaganis, Spyridon; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we will consider scattering diagrams in the context of infinite-derivative theories. First, we examine a finite-order, higher-derivative scalar field theory and find that we cannot eliminate the growth of scattering diagrams for large external momenta. Then, we employ an infinite-derivative scalar toy model and obtain that the external momentum dependence of scattering diagrams is convergent as the external momenta become very large. In order to eliminate the external momentum growth, one has to dress the bare vertices of the scattering diagrams by considering renormalised propagator and vertex loop corrections to the bare vertices. Finally, we investigate scattering diagrams in the context of a scalar toy model which is inspired by a ghost-free and singularity-free infinite-derivative theory of gravity, where we conclude that infinite derivatives can eliminate the external momentum growth of scattering diagrams and make the scattering diagrams convergent in the ultraviolet.

  11. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Friction is a desired property in quantum dynamics as it allows for localization, prevents backscattering, and is essential in the description of multistage transfer. Practical approaches for friction generally involve memory functionals or interactions with system baths. Here, we start by requiring that a friction term will always reduce the energy of the system; we show that this is automatically true once the Hamiltonian is augmented by a term of the form ∫a(q ;n0)[∂j(q,t)/∂t]ṡJ(q)dq, which includes the current operator times the derivative of its expectation value with respect to time, times a local coefficient; the local coefficient will be fitted to experiment, to more sophisticated theories of electron-electron interaction and interaction with nuclear vibrations and the nuclear background, or alternately, will be artificially constructed to prevent backscattering of energy. We relate this term to previous results and to optimal control studies, and generalize it to further operators, i.e., any operator of the form ∫a(q ;n0)[∂c(q,t)/∂t]ṡC(q)dq (or a discrete sum) will yield friction. Simulations of a small jellium cluster, both in the linear and highly nonlinear excitation regime, demonstrate that the friction always reduces energy. The energy damping is essentially double exponential; the long-time decay is almost an order of magnitude slower than the rapid short-time decay. The friction term stabilizes the propagation (split-operator propagator here), therefore increasing the time-step needed for convergence, i.e., reducing the overall computational cost. The local friction also allows the simulation of a metal cluster in a uniform jellium as the energy loss in the excitation due to the underlying corrugation is accounted for by the friction. We also relate the friction to models of coupling to damped harmonic oscillators, which can be used for a more sophisticated description of the coupling, and to memory functionals. Our results open the

  12. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-09-25

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Robert M.

    2011-04-01

    Few, if any, issues in physics have engendered as much discussion as the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. It is generally agreed that the `normal' dynamical evolution of the state vector in quantum mechanics is given by a unitary map. The linearity of this map implies that the state vector will, in general, be found in a superposition of eigenstates of a given observable (or, similarly, that the density matrix describing a subsystem will not correspond to a definite value of this observable). However, when we make a measurement of an observable, we always obtain a define value—although it is impossible to predict with certainty which value will be obtained. The traditional response to this issue is to postulate that when a measurement is made, the wavefunction `collapses' to an eigenstate of the observable being measured, perhaps due to the inherent classicality of the measuring apparatus (Bohr), or to the consciousness of the observer (Wigner), or possibly to some modification of quantum dynamics that occurs even when observations are not being made. The main motivation for the Everett (`many worlds') interpretation is to avoid introducing any such collapse postulate. This volume commemorates the 50th anniversary of the publication of Everett's paper in 1957 and contains 20 original articles as well as the transcripts of several discussions that took place at meetings devoted to the Everett interpretation at Oxford University and the Perimeter Institute. The attractiveness of the Everett interpretation is very succinctly summarized by a sentence from Vaidman's contribution (p 582): `The collapse, with its randomness, non-locality and the lack of a well-defined moment of occurrence, is such an ugly scar on quantum theory, that I, along with many others, am ready to follow Everett and deny its existence.' But the main drawback of the interpretation is then equally succinctly stated in the next sentence: `The price is the many worlds interpretation, i

  14. Local State and Sector Theory in Local Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Izumi; Okamura, Kazuya; Saigo, Hayato

    2016-06-01

    We define a new concept of local states in the framework of algebraic quantum field theory (AQFT). Local states are a natural generalization of states and give a clear vision of localization in the context of QFT. In terms of them, we can find a condition from which follows automatically the famous DHR selection criterion in DHR-DR theory. As a result, we can understand the condition as consequences of physically natural state preparations in vacuum backgrounds. Furthermore, a theory of orthogonal decomposition of completely positive (CP) maps is developed. It unifies a theory of orthogonal decomposition of states and order structure theory of CP maps. Using it, localized version of sectors is formulated, which gives sector theory for local states with respect to general reference representations.

  15. Local State and Sector Theory in Local Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Izumi; Okamura, Kazuya; Saigo, Hayato

    2016-04-01

    We define a new concept of local states in the framework of algebraic quantum field theory (AQFT). Local states are a natural generalization of states and give a clear vision of localization in the context of QFT. In terms of them, we can find a condition from which follows automatically the famous DHR selection criterion in DHR-DR theory. As a result, we can understand the condition as consequences of physically natural state preparations in vacuum backgrounds. Furthermore, a theory of orthogonal decomposition of completely positive (CP) maps is developed. It unifies a theory of orthogonal decomposition of states and order structure theory of CP maps. Using it, localized version of sectors is formulated, which gives sector theory for local states with respect to general reference representations.

  16. Experimental evaluation of the twofold electromagnetic enhancement theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-02-15

    We examined an electromagnetic (EM) theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) using single Ag nanoaggregates. The SERRS-EM theory is characterized by twofold EM enhancement induced by the coupling of plasmon resonance with both excitation and emission of Raman scattering plus fluorescence. The total emission cross-section spectra of enhanced Raman scattering and enhanced fluorescence were calculated using the following parameters: the spectrum of enhancement factor induced by plasmon resonance, resonance Raman scattering overlapped with fluorescence, and excitation wavelengths. The calculations well agreed with experimental total emission cross-section spectra, thus providing strong indications that the SERRS-EM theory is quantitatively correct.

  17. Quantum theory for the nanoscale propagation of light through stacked thin film layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kayn A.; Williams, Mathew D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-04-01

    Stacked multi-layer films have a range of well-known applications as optical elements. The various types of theory commonly used to describe optical propagation through such structures rarely take account of the quantum nature of light, though phenomena such as Anderson localization can be proven to occur under suitable conditions. In recent and ongoing work based on quantum electrodynamics, it has been shown possible to rigorously reformulate, in photonic terms, the fundamental mechanisms that are involved in reflection and optical transmission through stacked nanolayers. Accounting for sum-over-pathway features in the quantum mechanical description, this theory treats the sequential interactions of photons with material boundaries in terms of individual scattering events. The study entertains an arbitrary number of reflections in systems comprising two or three internally reflective surfaces. Analytical results are secured, without recourse to FTDT (finite-difference time-domain) software or any other finite-element approximations. Quantum interference effects can be readily identified. The new results, which cast the optical characteristics of such structures in terms of simple, constituent-determined properties, are illustrated by model calculations.

  18. Quantum Computing Without Wavefunctions: Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, David G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  19. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  20. Resonances in positron-hydrogen scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zishi; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Kar, Sabyasachi

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the S-wave resonance states in positron-hydrogen system embedded in dense quantum plasmas using Hylleraas-type wave functions within the framework of the stabilization method. The effect of quantum plasmas has been incorporated using the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb (modified Yukawa-type) potential. Resonance parameters (both position and width) below the Ps n = 2 threshold are reported as functions of plasma screening parameters.

  1. Massive gravity as a quantum gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.; Scharf, G.

    2005-06-01

    We present a new point of view on the quantization of the massive gravitational field, namely we use exclusively the quantum framework of the second quantization. The Hilbert space of the many-gravitons system is a Fock space F+ (Hgraviton) where the one-particle Hilbert space Hgraviton carries the direct sum of two unitary irreducible representations of the Poincaré group corresponding to two particles of mass m > 0 and spins 2 and 0, respectively. This Hilbert space is canonically isomorphic to a space of the type Ker(Q)/Im(Q) where Q is a gauge charge defined in an extension of the Hilbert space Hgraviton generated by the gravitational field hμν and some ghosts fields uμ, ũμ (which are vector Fermi fields) and vμ (which is a vector Bose field).

  2. Polarization State of Light Scattered from Quantum Plasmonic Dimer Antennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longkun; Wang, Hancong; Fang, Yan; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic antennas are able to concentrate and re-emit light in a controllable manner through strong coupling between metallic nanostructures. Only recently has it found that quantum mechanical effects can drastically change the coupling strength as the feature size approaches atomic scales. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the evolution of the resonance peak and its polarization state as the dimer-antenna gap narrows to subnanometer scale. We clearly can identify the classical plasmonic regime, a crossover regime where nonlocal screening plays an important role, and the quantum regime where a charge transfer plasmon appears due to interparticle electron tunneling. Moreover, as the gap decreases from tens of to a few nanometers, the bonding dipole mode tends to emit photons with increasing polarizability. When the gap narrows to quantum regime, a significant depolarization of the mode emission is observed due to the reduction of the charge density of coupled quantum plasmons. These results would be beneficial for the understanding of quantum effects on emitting-polarization of nanoantennas and the development of quantum-based photonic nanodevices. PMID:26700823

  3. Exact scattering matrix of graphs in magnetic field and quantum noise

    SciTech Connect

    Caudrelier, Vincent; Mintchev, Mihail; Ragoucy, Eric

    2014-08-15

    We consider arbitrary quantum wire networks modelled by finite, noncompact, connected quantum graphs in the presence of an external magnetic field. We find a general formula for the total scattering matrix of the network in terms of its local scattering properties and its metric structure. This is applied to a quantum ring with N external edges. Connecting the external edges of the ring to heat reservoirs, we study the quantum transport on the graph in ambient magnetic field. We consider two types of dynamics on the ring: the free Schrödinger and the free massless Dirac equations. For each case, a detailed study of the thermal noise is performed analytically. Interestingly enough, in presence of a magnetic field, the standard linear Johnson-Nyquist law for the low temperature behaviour of the thermal noise becomes nonlinear. The precise regime of validity of this effect is discussed and a typical signature of the underlying dynamics is observed.

  4. Towards inclusion of excited vibrational states in ultracold molecule-molecule quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticknor, Christopher; Kendrick, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We report progress towards including excited vibrational states in quantum scattering calculations of NaK-NaK at ultracold temperatures. We systematically use all pair potentials to build a complete 4 body potential energy surface. We study this 4-body potential and the asymptotic ro-vibrational 2-body basis. This allows for a more complete interaction as two molecules approach each other. We study where and how vibrationally excited states influence the asymptotic 2-body ro-vibrational scattering potentials. This work is an intermediate step in performing the complete scattering calculations as we develop tools to bring together the long range, ultracold 2-body scattering problem and the short range 4-body quantum chemistry problem.

  5. Creation of wormholes by quantum tunnelling in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lavrelashvili, George; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    We study the process of quantum tunnelling in scalar-tensor theories in which the scalar field is nonminimally coupled to gravity. In these theories gravitational instantons can deviate substantially from sphericity and can in fact develop a neck—a feature prohibited in theories with minimal coupling. Such instantons with necks lead to the materialization of bubble geometries containing a wormhole region. We clarify the relationship of neck geometries to violations of the null energy condition, and also derive a bound on the size of the neck relative to that of the instanton.

  6. Foundations for proper-time relativistic quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Tepper L.; Morris, Trey; Kurtz, Stewart K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is a progress report on the foundations for the canonical proper-time approach to relativistic quantum theory. We first review the the standard square-root equation of relativistic quantum theory, followed by a review of the Dirac equation, providing new insights into the physical properties of both. We then introduce the canonical proper-time theory. For completeness, we give a brief outline of the canonical proper-time approach to electrodynamics and mechanics, and then introduce the canonical proper-time approach to relativistic quantum theory. This theory leads to three new relativistic wave equations. In each case, the canonical generator of proper-time translations is strictly positive definite, so that it represents a particle. We show that the canonical proper-time extension of the Dirac equation for Hydrogen gives results that are consistently closer to the experimental data, when compared to the Dirac equation. However, these results are not sufficient to account for either the Lamb shift or the anomalous magnetic moment.

  7. Theory of weak scattering of stochastic electromagnetic fields from deterministic and random media

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2010-09-15

    The theory of scattering of scalar stochastic fields from deterministic and random media is generalized to the electromagnetic domain under the first-order Born approximation. The analysis allows for determining the changes in spectrum, coherence, and polarization of electromagnetic fields produced on their propagation from the source to the scattering volume, interaction with the scatterer, and propagation from the scatterer to the far field. An example of scattering of a field produced by a {delta}-correlated partially polarized source and scattered from a {delta}-correlated medium is provided.

  8. Cavity-Enhanced Light Scattering in Optical Lattices to Probe Atomic Quantum Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-03-09

    Different quantum states of atoms in optical lattices can be nondestructively monitored by off-resonant collective light scattering into a cavity. Angle resolved measurements of photon number and variance give information about atom-number fluctuations and pair correlations without single-site access. Observation at angles of diffraction minima provides information on quantum fluctuations insensitive to classical noise. For transverse probing, no photon is scattered into a cavity from a Mott insulator phase, while the photon number is proportional to the atom number for a superfluid.

  9. Quantum entanglement of local operators in conformal field theories.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Numasawa, Tokiro; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-03-21

    We introduce a series of quantities which characterize a given local operator in any conformal field theory from the viewpoint of quantum entanglement. It is defined by the increased amount of (Rényi) entanglement entropy at late time for an excited state defined by acting the local operator on the vacuum. We consider a conformal field theory on an infinite space and take the subsystem in the definition of the entanglement entropy to be its half. We calculate these quantities for a free massless scalar field theory in two, four and six dimensions. We find that these results are interpreted in terms of quantum entanglement of a finite number of states, including Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states. They agree with a heuristic picture of propagations of entangled particles. PMID:24702348

  10. Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Alexander; Contreras, Iván.; Reyes-Lega, Andrés. F.

    2013-05-01

    Introduction; 1. A brief introduction to Dirac manifolds Henrique Bursztyn; 2. Differential geometry of holomorphic vector bundles on a curve Florent Schaffhauser; 3. Paths towards an extension of Chern-Weil calculus to a class of infinite dimensional vector bundles Sylvie Paycha; 4. Introduction to Feynman integrals Stefan Weinzierl; 5. Iterated integrals in quantum field theory Francis Brown; 6. Geometric issues in quantum field theory and string theory Luis J. Boya; 7. Geometric aspects of the standard model and the mysteries of matter Florian Scheck; 8. Absence of singular continuous spectrum for some geometric Laplacians Leonardo A. Cano García; 9. Models for formal groupoids Iván Contreras; 10. Elliptic PDEs and smoothness of weakly Einstein metrics of Hölder regularity Andrés Vargas; 11. Regularized traces and the index formula for manifolds with boundary Alexander Cardona and César Del Corral; Index.

  11. Quantum mechanical model in gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losyakov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a model of a real massive scalar field defined as homogeneous on a d-dimensional sphere such that the sphere radius, time scale, and scalar field are related by the equations of the general theory of relativity. We quantize this system with three degrees of freedom, define the observables, and find dynamical mean values of observables in the regime where the scalar field mass is much less than the Planck mass.

  12. Molecular cavity optomechanics as a theory of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelli, Philippe; Galland, Christophe; Piro, Nicolas; Kippenberg, Tobias J.

    2016-02-01

    The exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering by localized plasmonic resonances in the near field of metallic nanoparticles, surfaces or tips (SERS, TERS) has enabled spectroscopic fingerprinting down to the single molecule level. The conventional explanation attributes the enhancement to the subwavelength confinement of the electromagnetic field near nanoantennas. Here, we introduce a new model that also accounts for the dynamical nature of the plasmon-molecule interaction. We thereby reveal an enhancement mechanism not considered before: dynamical backaction amplification of molecular vibrations. We first map the system onto the canonical Hamiltonian of cavity optomechanics, in which the molecular vibration and the plasmon are parametrically coupled. We express the vacuum optomechanical coupling rate for individual molecules in plasmonic ‘hot-spots’ in terms of the vibrational mode's Raman activity and find it to be orders of magnitude larger than for microfabricated optomechanical systems. Remarkably, the frequency of commonly studied molecular vibrations can be comparable to or larger than the plasmon's decay rate. Together, these considerations predict that an excitation laser blue-detuned from the plasmon resonance can parametrically amplify the molecular vibration, leading to a nonlinear enhancement of Raman emission that is not predicted by the conventional theory. Our optomechanical approach recovers known results, provides a quantitative framework for the calculation of cross-sections, and enables the design of novel systems that leverage dynamical backaction to achieve additional, mode-selective enhancements. It also provides a quantum mechanical framework to analyse plasmon-vibrational interactions in terms of molecular quantum optomechanics.

  13. Quantum critical behavior of semisimple gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbensen, Jacob Kamuk; Ryttov, Thomas A.; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    We study the perturbative phase diagram of semisimple fermionic gauge theories resembling the Standard Model. We investigate an S U (N ) gauge theory with M Dirac flavors where we gauge first an S U (M )L and then an S U (2 )L⊂S U (M )L of the original global symmetry S U (M )L×S U (M )R×U (1 ) of the theory. To avoid gauge anomalies we add leptonlike particles. At the two-loop level an intriguing phase diagram appears. We uncover phases in which one, two or three fixed points exist and discuss the associated flows of the coupling constants. We discover a phase featuring complete asymptotic freedom and simultaneously an interacting infrared fixed point in both couplings. The analysis further reveals special renormalization group trajectories along which one coupling displays asymptotic freedom and the other asymptotic safety, while both flowing in the infrared to an interacting fixed point. These are safety free trajectories. We briefly sketch out possible phenomenological implications, among which an independent way to generate near-conformal dynamics à la walking is investigated.

  14. Quantum equivalence of noncommutative and Yang-Mills gauge theories in 2D and matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ydri, Badis

    2007-05-15

    We construct noncommutative U(1) gauge theory on the fuzzy sphere S{sub N}{sup 2} as a unitary 2Nx2N matrix model. In the quantum theory the model is equivalent to a non-Abelian U(N) Yang-Mills theory on a two-dimensional lattice with two plaquettes. This equivalence holds in the 'fuzzy sphere' phase where we observe a 3rd order phase transition between weak-coupling and strong-coupling phases of the gauge theory. In the matrix phase we have a U(N) gauge theory on a single point.

  15. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of laser radiation in a piezoelectric semiconductor: Quantum effect

    SciTech Connect

    Uzma, Ch.; Zeba, I.; Shah, H. A.; Salimullah, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using quantum-hydrodynamic model, the phenomenon of the stimulated Brillouin scattering of a laser radiation in an unmagnetized piezoelectric semiconductor has been examined in detail. It is noticed that the Bohm potential in the electron dynamics of the semiconductor plasma enhances drastically the growth rate of the stimulated Brillouin scattering at higher values of the electron number density of the semiconductor plasma and the wave number of the electron-acoustic wave in the semiconductor.

  16. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun.

    1990-01-01

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun

    1990-12-31

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Theory of deep inelastic neutron scattering. II. Application to normal and superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Richard N.

    1989-03-01

    The hard-core perturbation theory (HCPT) predictions for high-momentum-transfer neutron scattering from liquid 4He are numerically evaluated. The input to the calculations are Monte Carlo and variational momentum distributions, the radial distribution function, and the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin phase shifts for the He potential. Consistent with the ω2 sum rule, the Gaussian width of the dynamic structure function S(Q,ω) is the same in HCPT and in the impulse approximation (IA). However, where the IA predicts structure in S(Q,ω) below Tλ due to the Bose condensate, HCPT predicts that S(Q,ω) is smoothed by final-state broadening. The final-state effects are negligible for the normal fluid above Tλ. The approach to the IA at high Q is shown to be O(logQ) for the He-He potential, which implies that S(Q,ω) satisfies approximate Y scaling and that final-state broadening is significant for all feasible experiments. Extensions of HCPT to lower Q and to other systems are qualitatively discussed. The problem of extracting momentum distributions in quantum fluids and solids from high-Q neutron scattering is addressed.

  19. Theory of deep inelastic neutron scattering. II. Application to normal and superfluid /sup 4/He

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.

    1989-03-01

    The hard-core perturbation theory (HCPT) predictions for high-momentum-transfer neutron scattering from liquid /sup 4/He are numerically evaluated. The input to the calculations are Monte Carlo and variational momentum distributions, the radial distribution function, and the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin phase shifts for the He potential. Consistent with the ..omega../sup 2/ sum rule, the Gaussian width of the dynamic structure function S(Q,..omega..) is the same in HCPT and in the impulse approximation (IA). However, where the IA predicts structure in S(Q,..omega..) below T/sub lambda/ due to the Bose condensate, HCPT predicts that S(Q,..omega..) is smoothed by final-state broadening. The final-state effects are negligible for the normal fluid above T/sub lambda/. The approach to the IA at high Q is shown to be O(logQ) for the He-He potential, which implies that S(Q,..omega..) satisfies approximate Y scaling and that final-state broadening is significant for all feasible experiments. Extensions of HCPT to lower Q and to other systems are qualitatively discussed. The problem of extracting momentum distributions in quantum fluids and solids from high-Q neutron scattering is addressed.

  20. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Sieberer, L M; Buchhold, M; Diehl, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas-ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays-move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems. PMID:27482736

  1. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Buchhold, M.; Diehl, S.

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas—ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays—move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven–dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    work done to date relates to point-to-point links. Another recent advance has been the development of trusted networks for QKD. This is important for further increasing the range of the technology, and for overcoming denial-of-service attacks on an individual link. It is interesting to see that the optimization of QKD devices differs for point-to-point and network applications. Network operation is essential for widespread adoption of the technology, as it can dramatically reduce the deployment costs and allow connection flexibility. Also important is the multiplexing of the quantum signals with conventional network traffic. For the future, quantum repeaters should be developed for longer range links. On the theoretical side, different approaches to security proofs have recently started to converge, offering several paradigms of the same basic idea. Our improved theoretical understanding places more stringent demands on the QKD devices. We are aware by now that finite size effects in key generation arise not only from parameter estimation. It will not be possible to generate a key from just a few hundred received signals. It is a stimulating challenge for the theory of security proofs to develop lean proof strategies that work with finite signal block sizes. As QKD advances to a real-world cryptographic solution, side channel attacks must be carefully analysed. Theoretical security proofs for QKD schemes are so far based on physical models of these devices. It is in the nature of models that any real implementation will deviate from this model, creating a potential weakness for an eavesdropper to exploit. There are two solutions to this problem: the traditional path of refining the models to reduce the deviations, or the radically different approach of device-independent security proofs, in which none or only a few well controlled assumptions about the devices are made. Clearly, it is desirable to find security proofs that require only minimal or fairly general model

  3. Quantum theory of cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaenko, Sergei A.

    A long standing and central problem in cholesteric liquid crystals is to relate the macroscopic pitch to the underlying microscopic interactions. These interactions are of two types which we call quantum (dispersion) and classical. Here we show that, contrary to common belief, intermolecular biaxial correlations usually play an important role for dispersion forces. To understand the microscopic picture of cholesteric liquid crystal we first analyze the effective chiral interaction between molecules arising front long-range quantum interactions between fluctuating charge moments in terms of a simple model of a chiral molecule. This model is based on the approximations that (a) the dominant excited states of a molecule form a band whose width is small compared to the average energy of excitation above the ground state and (b) biaxial orientational correlation between adjacent molecules can be neglected. We consider a system consisted of elongated molecules and, although we invoke the expansion in terms of coordinates transverse to the long axis of constituent molecules, we treat the longitudinal coordinate exactly. We identify two distinct physical limits depending on whether one or both of the interacting molecules are excited in the virtual state. The two-molecule interaction can be interpreted in terms of a superposition of pairwise interactions between individual atoms (or local chiral centers) on a chiral molecule and centers of anisotropic part of polarizability on the other molecule, while the one-molecule term involves three-body interactions between two local dipole moments of a chiral molecule and centers of anisotropic part of polarizability on the other, possibly nonchiral molecule. The numerical estimates of the pitch appeared from the above mechanism even without the Taylor expansion of the potential turns out to be considerably larger than experimental results and so it appears that the mean field treatment of these interactions can be used only in

  4. What the Philosophical Interpretation of Quantum Theory Can Accomplish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Martin

    I argue that philosophical reflection can contribute to a better understanding of physical theories by performing conceptual clarification, epistemological analysis and ontological exploration. I begin by reconstructing early ontological interpretations of quantum theory, i.e., by explaining Copenhagen instrumentalism and the shift toward a quantum realism. I turn to entanglement, whose chief philosophical challenge is to understand which deeper property of nature it reveals. The trouble is that the EPR-correlations it gives rise to are not produced by common causation. Conceptual analysis shows that this failure is due to the violation of separability in quantum theory. In entangled states, it is the composite state that is primary since it cannot be neatly divided into two states that unambiguously pertain to the partial systems. As a result, total states are not produced by an interaction among the parts. This feature can be interpreted in ontological terms as suggesting a holist picture of nature. Another question of philosophical import concerns the quantum measurement problem and the contribution decoherence makes to its solution. The conceptual point is what, precisely, this problem amounts to and what we require considering it settled. The issue that divides the philosophical factions is whether a solution needs to show that superpositions are actually destroyed or whether it suffices to demonstrate that superpositions become unobservable.

  5. Light scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices as an optical probe of quantum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-11-15

    We study off-resonant collective light scattering from ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the spatial intensity distribution, quadrature variances, photon statistics, or spectral measurements. In particular, angle-resolved intensity measurements reflect global statistics of atoms (total number of radiating atoms) as well as local statistical quantities (single-site statistics even without optical access to a single site) and pair correlations between different sites. As a striking example we consider scattering from transversally illuminated atoms into an optical cavity mode. For the Mott-insulator state, similar to classical diffraction, the number of photons scattered into a cavity is zero due to destructive interference, while for the superfluid state it is nonzero and proportional to the number of atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that light scattering into a standing-wave cavity has a nontrivial angle dependence, including the appearance of narrow features at angles, where classical diffraction predicts zero. The measurement procedure corresponds to the quantum nondemolition measurement of various atomic variables by observing light.

  6. Perturbative quantum field theory in the framework of the fermionic projector

    SciTech Connect

    Finster, Felix

    2014-04-15

    We give a microscopic derivation of perturbative quantum field theory, taking causal fermion systems and the framework of the fermionic projector as the starting point. The resulting quantum field theory agrees with standard quantum field theory on the tree level and reproduces all bosonic loop diagrams. The fermion loops are described in a different formalism in which no ultraviolet divergences occur.

  7. Theory of biexcitons and biexciton-exciton cascade in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozfidan, Isil; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2015-03-01

    We present a microscopic theory of biexcitons in colloidal graphene quantum dots, and we discuss the possibility of a biexciton-exciton cascade generation. Assuming a pz orbital on each carbon atom, the single-particle properties are described in the tight-binding model. The screened direct, exchange, and scattering matrix elements of the Coulomb matrix are calculated using Slater pz orbitals. The many-body ground and excited states are constructed as a linear combination of a finite number of electron-hole pair excitations from the Hartree-Fock ground state by exact diagonalization techniques. The exciton and biexciton states are constructed exploiting the degeneracy of the valence- and conduction-band edges. The two degenerate exciton (X ) states and a corresponding biexciton (X X ) state are identified for generation of the X X -X cascade in threefold-symmetric quantum dots. Finally, the Auger coupling of the X X state with the excited X states is predicted.

  8. Quantum field theory constrains traversable wormhole geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, L.H. |; Roman, T.A. |

    1996-05-01

    Recently a bound on negative energy densities in four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime was derived for a minimally coupled, quantized, massless, scalar field in an arbitrary quantum state. The bound has the form of an uncertainty-principle-type constraint on the magnitude and duration of the negative energy density seen by a timelike geodesic observer. When spacetime is curved and/or has boundaries, we argue that the bound should hold in regions small compared to the minimum local characteristic radius of curvature or the distance to any boundaries, since spacetime can be considered approximately Minkowski on these scales. We apply the bound to the stress-energy of static traversable wormhole spacetimes. Our analysis implies that either the wormhole must be only a little larger than Planck size or that there is a large discrepancy in the length scales which characterize the wormhole. In the latter case, the negative energy must typically be concentrated in a thin band many orders of magnitude smaller than the throat size. These results would seem to make the existence of macroscopic traversable wormholes very improbable. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. The Quantum Theory of Optical Parametric Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, N. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the effect of parametric amplification on various forms of light. In particular we shall consider number and coherent states, but many of the calculations hold for those states whose operators satisfy the properties, < {a}^+{a}^+ >=<{a}{a }> = < {a}^+>=<{a }>=0 e.g. chaotic light. The first chapter lays down the fundamental preliminaries necessary for our calculations and reviews linear amplifier theory. We consider the phase sensitive and insensitive forms of amplifiers modelling the former on the degenerate parametric amplifier and the latter on the non-degenerate and inverted population amplifiers. Chapter 2 deals with balanced homodyne detection of a narrow band coherent state before and after degenerate parametric amplification. In chapter 3 we consider a continuous mode number state produced by atomic emission and parametrically amplified using the formalism of Collett and Gardiner. We give general results for the output flux intensity and also consider the simpler case where the atomic decay rate is much smaller than the parametric cavity decay rate. Also we consider the degree of second order coherence using this simplified theory. Chapters 4 and 5 consider the double amplifier interferometer, using single and continuous mode theories, and enable us to determine the form of amplifier which produces the best visibility and hence lowest noise figures. The travelling-wave parametric amplifier is discussed in chapter 6 and is contrasted with the cavity parametric amplifier discussed in chapters 1 and 2. Finally we consider the much contemplated idea of using amplifiers to boost signals in fibre optic transmission lines using our model of the parametric amplifier and examining the degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio. We consider both coherent and squeezed inputs and our results hold for both cavity and travelling -wave amplifiers.

  10. Theory of Energy Level Tuning in Quantum Dots by Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Besides quantum confinement that provides control of the quantum dot (QD) band gap, surface ligands allow control of the absolute energy levels. We theoretically investigate energy level tuning in PbS QD by surfactant exchange. We perform direct calculations of real-size QD with various surfactants within the frame of the density functional theory and explicitly analyze the influence of the surfactants on the electronic properties of the QD. This work provides a hint for predictable control of the absolute energy levels and their fine tuning within 3 eV range by modification of big and small surfactants that simultaneously passivate the QD surface.

  11. The structure of classical extensions of quantum probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stulpe, Werner; Busch, Paul

    2008-03-01

    On the basis of a suggestive definition of a classical extension of quantum mechanics in terms of statistical models, we prove that every such classical extension is essentially given by the so-called Misra-Bugajski reduction map. We consider how this map enables one to understand quantum mechanics as a reduced classical statistical theory on the projective Hilbert space as phase space and discuss features of the induced hidden-variable model. Moreover, some relevant technical results on the topology and Borel structure of the projective Hilbert space are reviewed.

  12. The theory of variational hybrid quantum-classical algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod R.; Romero, Jonathan; Babbush, Ryan; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-02-01

    Many quantum algorithms have daunting resource requirements when compared to what is available today. To address this discrepancy, a quantum-classical hybrid optimization scheme known as ‘the quantum variational eigensolver’ was developed (Peruzzo et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 4213) with the philosophy that even minimal quantum resources could be made useful when used in conjunction with classical routines. In this work we extend the general theory of this algorithm and suggest algorithmic improvements for practical implementations. Specifically, we develop a variational adiabatic ansatz and explore unitary coupled cluster where we establish a connection from second order unitary coupled cluster to universal gate sets through a relaxation of exponential operator splitting. We introduce the concept of quantum variational error suppression that allows some errors to be suppressed naturally in this algorithm on a pre-threshold quantum device. Additionally, we analyze truncation and correlated sampling in Hamiltonian averaging as ways to reduce the cost of this procedure. Finally, we show how the use of modern derivative free optimization techniques can offer dramatic computational savings of up to three orders of magnitude over previously used optimization techniques.

  13. Quantum field theory of interacting plasmon-photon-phonon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of the quantum field theory of the interacting system of plasmons, photons and phonons on the basis of general fundamental principles of electrodynamics and quantum field theory of many-body systems. Since a plasmon is a quasiparticle appearing as a resonance in the collective oscillation of the interacting electron gas in solids, the starting point is the total action functional of the interacting system comprising electron gas, electromagnetic field and phonon fields. By means of the powerful functional integral technique, this original total action is transformed into that of the system of the quantum fields describing plasmons, transverse photons, acoustic as well as optic longitudinal and transverse phonons. The collective oscillations of the electron gas is characterized by a real scalar field φ(x) called the collective oscillation field. This field is split into the static background field φ0(x) and the fluctuation field ζ(x). The longitudinal phonon fields {{{Q}}al}(x), {{{Q}}ol}(x) are also split into the background fields {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) and dynamical fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x) while the transverse phonon fields {{{Q}}at}(x), {{{Q}}ot}(x) themselves are dynamical fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) without background fields. After the canonical quantization procedure, the background fields φ0(x), {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) remain the classical fields, while the fluctuation fields ζ(x) and dynamical phonon fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) become quantum fields. In quantum theory, a plasmon is the quantum of Hermitian scalar field σ(x) called the plasmon field, longitudinal phonons as complex spinless quasiparticles are the quanta of the effective longitudinal phonon Hermitian scalar fields {{θ }a}(x), {{θ }0}(x), while transverse phonons are the quanta of the original Hermitian transverse phonon vector fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x). By means of the functional integral

  14. Negative-frequency modes in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Robert; Forshaw, Jeff; Millington, Peter

    2015-07-01

    We consider a departure from standard quantum field theory, constructed so as to permit momentum eigenstates of both positive and negative energy. The resulting theory is intriguing because it brings about the cancellation of leading ultra-violet divergences and the absence of a zero-point energy. The theory gives rise to tree-level source-to-source transition amplitudes that are manifestly causal and consistent with standard S-matrix elements. It also leads to the usual result for the oblique corrections to the standard electroweak theory. Remarkably, the latter agreement relies on the breakdown of naive perturbation theory due to resonance effects. It remains to be shown that there are no problems with perturbative unitarity.

  15. Pilot-Wave Quantum Theory with a Single Bohm's Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, Francesco; Fresch, Barbara; Moro, Giorgio J.

    2016-05-01

    The representation of a quantum system as the spatial configuration of its constituents evolving in time as a trajectory under the action of the wave-function, is the main objective of the de Broglie-Bohm theory (or pilot wave theory). However, its standard formulation is referred to the statistical ensemble of its possible trajectories. The statistical ensemble is introduced in order to establish the exact correspondence (the Born's rule) between the probability density on the spatial configurations and the quantum distribution, that is the squared modulus of the wave-function. In this work we explore the possibility of using the pilot wave theory at the level of a single Bohm's trajectory, that is a single realization of the time dependent configuration which should be representative of a single realization of the quantum system. The pilot wave theory allows a formally self-consistent representation of quantum systems as a single Bohm's trajectory, but in this case there is no room for the Born's rule at least in its standard form. We will show that a correspondence exists between the statistical distribution of configurations along the single Bohm's trajectory and the quantum distribution for a subsystem interacting with the environment in a multicomponent system. To this aim, we present the numerical results of the single Bohm's trajectory description of the model system of six confined planar rotors with random interactions. We find a rather close correspondence between the coordinate distribution of one rotor, the others representing the environment, along its trajectory and the time averaged marginal quantum distribution for the same rotor. This might be considered as the counterpart of the standard Born's rule when the pilot wave theory is applied at the level of single Bohm's trajectory. Furthermore a strongly fluctuating behavior with a fast loss of correlation is found for the evolution of each rotor coordinate. This suggests that a Markov process might

  16. Quantum mechanics and reality: An interpretation of Everett's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Christoph Albert

    The central part of Everett's formulation of quantum mechanics is a quantum mechanical model of memory and of observation as the recording of information in a memory. To use this model as an answer to the measurement problem, Everett has to assume that a conscious observer can be in a superposition of such memory states and be unaware of it. This assumption has puzzled generations of readers. The fundamental aim of this dissertation is to find a set of simpler assumptions which are sufficient to show that Everett's model is empirically adequate. I argue that Everett's model needs three assumptions to account for the process of observation: an assumption of decoherence of observers as quantum mechanical systems; an assumption of supervenience of mental states (qualities) over quantum mechanical properties; and an assumption about the interpretation of quantum mechanical states in general: quantum mechanical states describe ensembles of states of affairs coexisting in the same system. I argue that the only plausible understanding of such ensembles is as ensembles of possibilities, and that all standard no-collapse interpretations agree in this reading of quantum mechanical states. Their differences can be understood as different theories about what marks the real state within this ensemble, and Everett's theory as the claim that no additional 'mark of reality' is necessary. Using the three assumptions, I argue that introspection cannot determine the objective quantum mechanical state of an observer. Rather, the introspective qualities of a quantum mechanical state can be represented by a (classical) statistical ensemble of subjective states. An analysis of these subjective states and their dynamics leads to the conclusion that they suffice to give empirically correct predictions. The argument for the empirical adequacy of the subjective state entails that knowledge of the objective quantum mechanical state is impossible in principle. Empirical reality for a conscious

  17. Dirac quantum cellular automaton in one dimension: Zitterbewegung and scattering from potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Tosini, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of a quantum cellular automaton which reproduces the Dirac dynamics in the limit of small wave vectors and masses. We present analytical evaluations along with computer simulations, showing that the automaton exhibits typical Dirac dynamical features, such as the Zitterbewegung and, considering the scattering from potential, the so-called Klein paradox. The motivation is to show concretely how pure processing of quantum information can lead to particle mechanics as an emergent feature, an issue that has been the focus of solid-state, optical, and atomic-physics quantum simulators.

  18. Physical theories, eternal inflation, and the quantum universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2011-11-01

    Infinities in eternal inflation have long been plaguing cosmology, making any predictions highly sensitive to how they are regulated. The problem exists already at the level of semi-classical general relativity, and has a priori nothing to do with quantum gravity. On the other hand, we know that certain problems in semi-classical gravity, for example physics of black holes and their evaporation, have led to understanding of surprising, quantum natures of spacetime and gravity, such as the holographic principle and horizon complementarity. In this paper, we present a framework in which well-defined predictions are obtained in an eternally inflating multiverse, based on the principles of quantum mechanics. We propose that the entire multiverse is described purely from the viewpoint of a single "observer," who describes the world as a quantum state defined on his/her past light cones bounded by the (stretched) apparent horizons. We find that quantum mechanics plays an essential role in regulating infinities. The framework is "gauge invariant," i.e. predictions do not depend on how spacetime is parametrized, as it should be in a theory of quantum gravity. Our framework provides a fully unified treatment of quantum measurement processes and the multiverse. We conclude that the eternally inflating multiverse and many worlds in quantum mechanics are the same. Other important implications include: global spacetime can be viewed as a derived concept; the multiverse is a transient phenomenon during the world relaxing into a supersymmetric Minkowski state. We also present a model of "initial conditions" for the multiverse. By extrapolating our framework to the extreme, we arrive at a picture that the entire multiverse is a fluctuation in the stationary, fractal "mega-multiverse," in which an infinite sequence of multiverse productions occurs. The framework discussed here does not suffer from problems/paradoxes plaguing other measures proposed earlier, such as the youngness

  19. Interference Swapping in Scattering from a Nonlocal Quantum Target

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrlich, Daniel; Neiman, Yakov; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2006-05-05

    We describe a new and distinctive interferometry in which a probe particle scatters off a superposition of locations of a single free target particle. Probe particles scattering off a single free 'mirror' (in one dimension) or a single free 'slit' (in two dimensions) can 'swap' interference with the superposed target states. The condition for interference is loss of orthogonality of the target states and reduces, in simple examples, to transfer of orthogonality from target to probe states. We analyze experimental parameters and conditions necessary for interference to be observed.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Decoherence and the Appearance of a Classical World in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, R.

    2004-02-01

    In the last decade decoherence has become a very popular topic mainly due to the progress in experimental techniques which allow monitoring of the process of decoherence for single microscopic or mesoscopic systems. The other motivation is the rapid development of quantum information and quantum computation theory where decoherence is the main obstacle in the implementation of bold theoretical ideas. All that makes the second improved and extended edition of this book very timely. Despite the enormous efforts of many authors decoherence with its consequences still remains a rather controversial subject. It touches on, namely, the notoriously confusing issues of quantum measurement theory and interpretation of quantum mechanics. The existence of different points of view is reflected by the structure and content of the book. The first three authors (Joos, Zeh and Kiefer) accept the standard formalism of quantum mechanics but seem to reject orthodox Copenhagen interpretation, Giulini and Kupsch stick to both while Stamatescu discusses models which go beyond the standard quantum theory. Fortunately, most of the presented results are independent of the interpretation and the mathematical formalism is common for the (meta)physically different approaches. After a short introduction by Joos followed by a more detailed review of the basic concepts by Zeh, chapter 3 (the longest chapter) by Joos is devoted to the environmental decoherence. Here the author considers mostly rather `down to earth' and well-motivated mechanisms of decoherence through collisions with atoms or molecules and the processes of emission, absorption and scattering of photons. The issues of decoherence induced superselection rules and localization of objects including the possible explanation of the molecular structure are discussed in details. Many other topics are also reviewed in this chapter, e.g., the so-called Zeno effect, relationships between quantum chaos and decoherence, the role of

  1. Stimulated scattering of electromagnetic waves carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B; Stenflo, L

    2012-07-01

    We investigate stimulated scattering instabilities of coherent circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) in dense quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons and nondegenerate ions. For this purpose, we employ the coupled equations for the CPEM wave vector potential and the driven (by the ponderomotive force of the CPEM waves) equations for the electron and ion plasma oscillations. The electrons are significantly affected by the quantum forces (viz., the quantum statistical pressure, the quantum Bohm potential, as well as the electron exchange and electron correlations due to electron spin), which are included in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamical description of the electrons. Furthermore, our investigation of the stimulated Brillouin instability of coherent CPEM waves uses the generalized ion momentum equation that includes strong ion coupling effects. The nonlinear equations for the coupled CPEM and quantum plasma waves are then analyzed to obtain nonlinear dispersion relations which exhibit stimulated Raman, stimulated Brillouin, and modulational instabilities of CPEM waves carrying OAM. The present results are useful for understanding the origin of scattered light off low-frequency density fluctuations in high-energy density plasmas where quantum effects are eminent. PMID:23005546

  2. Noncommutative Gravity and Quantum Field Theory on Noncommutative Curved Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    The focus of this PhD thesis is on applications, new developments and extensions of the noncommutative gravity theory proposed by Julius Wess and his group. In part one we propose an extension of the usual symmetry reduction procedure to noncommutative gravity. We classify in the case of abelian Drinfel'd twists all consistent deformations of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies and of the Schwarzschild black hole. The deformed symmetry structure allows us to obtain exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations in many of our models. In part two we develop a new formalism for quantum field theory on noncommutative curved spacetimes by combining methods from the algebraic approach to quantum field theory with noncommutative differential geometry. We also study explicit examples of deformed wave operators and find that there can be noncommutative corrections even on the level of free field theories. The convergent deformation of simple toy models is investigated and it is found that these theories have an improved behaviour at short distances, i.e. in the ultraviolet. In part three we study homomorphisms between and connections on noncommutative vector bundles. We prove that all homomorphisms and connections of the deformed theory can be obtained by applying a quantization isomorphism to undeformed homomorphisms and connections. The extension of homomorphisms and connections to tensor products of bimodules is clarified. As a nontrivial application of the new mathematical formalism we extend our studies of exact noncommutative gravity solutions to more general deformations.

  3. Quantum statistical correlations in thermal field theories: Boundary effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bessa, A.; Brandt, F. T.; Carvalho, C. A. A. de; Fraga, E. S.

    2010-09-15

    We show that the one-loop effective action at finite temperature for a scalar field with quartic interaction has the same renormalized expression as at zero temperature if written in terms of a certain classical field {phi}{sub c}, and if we trade free propagators at zero temperature for their finite-temperature counterparts. The result follows if we write the partition function as an integral over field eigenstates (boundary fields) of the density matrix element in the functional Schroedinger field representation, and perform a semiclassical expansion in two steps: first, we integrate around the saddle point for fixed boundary fields, which is the classical field {phi}{sub c}, a functional of the boundary fields; then, we perform a saddle-point integration over the boundary fields, whose correlations characterize the thermal properties of the system. This procedure provides a dimensionally reduced effective theory for the thermal system. We calculate the two-point correlation as an example.

  4. Rotationally Inelastic Scattering of Quantum-State-Selected ND3 with Ar.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Saha, Ashim K; Loreau, Jérôme; Parker, David H; van der Avoird, Ad; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-06-11

    Rotationally inelastic scattering of ND3 with Ar is studied at mean collision energies of 410 and 310 cm(–1). In the experimental component of the study, ND3 molecules are prepared by supersonic expansion and subsequent hexapole state selection in the ground electronic and vibrational levels and in the jk(±) = 1(1) rotational level. A beam of state-selected ND3 molecules is crossed with a beam of Ar, and scattered ND3 molecules are detected in single final j′k′(±) quantum states using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. State-to-state differential cross sections for rotational-level changing collisions are obtained by velocity map imaging. The experimental measurements are compared with close-coupling quantum-mechanical scattering calculations performed using an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed DCSs agree well with the experimental measurements, confirming the high quality of the potential energy surface. The angular distributions are dominated by forward scattering for all measured final rotational and vibrational inversion symmetry states. This outcome is in contrast to our recent results for inelastic scattering of ND3 with He, where we observed significant amount of sideways and backward scattering for some final rotational levels of ND3. The differences between He and Ar collision partners are explained by differences in the potential energy surfaces that govern the scattering dynamics. PMID:25532415

  5. How quantum impenetrability affects Aharonov-Bohm scattering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasev, G. N.; Shilov, V. M.

    It is shown that different forms of quantum impenetrability lead to different physical consequences. This should be kept in mind in analyzing experimental data. The relativistic impenetrability conditions are considered and the corresponding relativistic Aharonov-Bohm cross-sections are obtained. The possibility of the AB effect occurrence in simply-connected space regions is discussed.

  6. Quantum and classical dynamics of reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Díaz, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    We review the state-of-the art in dynamics calculations on the reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces, which is an important model system of an elementary reaction that is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis. In many applications, quantum dynamics and classical trajectory calculations are performed within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model. However, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is finding increased use in applications aimed at modeling the effect of surface phonons on the dynamics. Molecular dynamics with electronic friction has been used to model the effect of electron-hole pair excitation. Most applications are still based on potential energy surfaces (PESs) or forces computed with density functional theory (DFT), using a density functional within the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation energy. A new development is the use of a semi-empirical version of DFT (the specific reaction parameter (SRP) approach to DFT). We also discuss the accurate methods that have become available to represent electronic structure data for the molecule-surface interaction in global PESs. It has now become possible to describe highly activated H2 + metal surface reactions with chemical accuracy using the SRP-DFT approach, as has been shown for H2 + Cu(111) and Cu(100). However, chemical accuracy with SRP-DFT has yet to be demonstrated for weakly activated systems like H2 + Ru(0001) and non-activated systems like H2 + Pd(111), for which SRP DFs are not yet available. There is now considerable evidence that electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation does not need to be modeled to achieve the (chemically) accurate calculation of dissociative chemisorption and scattering probabilities. Dynamics calculations show that phonons can be safely neglected in the chemically accurate calculation of sticking probabilities on cold metal surfaces for activated systems, and in the calculation of a number of other observables. However, there is now sufficient

  7. Average wavefunction method for multiple scattering theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approximation scheme, the average wavefunction approximation (AWM), applicable to scattering of atoms and molecules off multi-center targets, is proposed. The total potential is replaced by a sum of nonlocal, separable interactions. Each term in the sum projects the wave function onto a weighted average in the vicinity of a given scattering center. The resultant solution is an infinite order approximation to the true solution, and choosing the weighting function as the zeroth order solution guarantees agreement with the Born approximation to second order. In addition, the approximation also becomes increasingly more accurate in the low energy long wave length limit. A nonlinear, nonperturbative literature scheme for the wave function is proposed. An extension of the scheme to multichannel scattering suitable for treating inelastic scattering is also presented. The method is applied to elastic scattering of a gas off a solid surface. The formalism is developed for both periodic as well as disordered surfaces. Numerical results are presented for atomic clusters on a flat hard wall with a Gaussian like potential at each atomic scattering site. The effect of relative lateral displacement of two clusters upon the scattering pattern is shown. The ability of AWM to accommodate disorder through statistical averaging over cluster configuration is illustrated. Enhanced uniform back scattering is observed with increasing roughness on the surface. Finally, the AWM is applied to atom-molecule scattering.

  8. John von Neumann's mathematical "Utopia" in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Giovanni

    This paper surveys John von Neumann's work on the mathematical foundations of quantum theories in the light of Hilbert's Sixth Problem concerning the geometrical axiomatization of physics. We argue that in von Neumann's view geometry was so tied to logic that he ultimately developed a logical interpretation of quantum probabilities. That motivated his abandonment of Hilbert space in favor of von Neumann algebras, specifically the type II1 factors, as the proper limit of quantum mechanics in infinite dimensions. Finally, we present the reasons why his axiomatic program remained an "unsolved problem" in mathematical physics. A recent unpublished result by Huzimiro Araki, proving that no algebra with a tracial state defined on it, such as the type II1 factors, can support any (regular) representation of the canonical commutation relations, is also reviewed and its consequences for von Neumann's projects are discussed.

  9. Decoherence in an interacting quantum field theory: Thermal case

    SciTech Connect

    Koksma, Jurjen F.; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2011-04-15

    We study the decoherence of a renormalized quantum field theoretical system. We consider our novel correlator approach to decoherence where entropy is generated by neglecting observationally inaccessible correlators. Using out-of-equilibrium field theory techniques at finite temperatures, we show that the Gaussian von Neumann entropy for a pure quantum state asymptotes to the interacting thermal entropy. The decoherence rate can be well described by the single particle decay rate in our model. Connecting to electroweak baryogenesis scenarios, we moreover study the effects on the entropy of a changing mass of the system field. Finally, we compare our correlator approach to existing approaches to decoherence in the simple quantum mechanical analogue of our field theoretical model. The entropy following from the perturbative master equation suffers from physically unacceptable secular growth.

  10. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, David

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss how the theorems of TDDFT can be applied to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, I will discuss how TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions.

  11. Revising Vegetation Scattering Theories: Adding A Rotated Dihedral Double Bounce Scattering To Explain Cross-Polarimetric SAR Observations Over Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sang-Hoon; Wdowinski, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Common vegetation scattering theories indicate that short wavelength Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations (X- and C-band) measure mainly vegetation canopies as the short-wavelength radar signal interacts mostly with upper sections of the vegetation. Furthermore, these theories also suggest that SAR cross- polarization (cross-pol) observations reflect only volume scattering. Consequently most SAR decomposition techniques assume that the cross-pol signal represents solely volume scattering. However, short-wavelength and cross-pol observations from the Everglades wetlands, south Florida, suggest that a significant portion of the SAR signal scatters from the surface and not only from the upper sections of the vegetation. The indication for surface scattering in wetland environment is derived from phase observable processed using interferometric techniques. The interferometric SAR (InSAR) observations reveal coherent phase signal in all polarizations and all wavelengths, reflecting water level changes beneath the vegetation. This coherent phase signal cannot be explained by neither volume scattering nor radar signal interaction with the upper sections of the vegetations, because canopies and branches are frequently move by wind. The only way that such coherent signal can be maintained and represents surface water level changes is when a multiple bounce from the vegetation and surface occurs. The simplest multi-bounce scattering mechanism that generate cross-pol signal occurs by rotated dihedrals. Thus, we use the rotated dihedral mechanism to explain the InSAR wetland observations and to revise the current vegetation scattering theories to accounts also for double bounce component in cross-pol observations.

  12. Theory of classical and quantum transport in monolayers of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Shaffique

    From the family of new van der Waals materials, the class of layered transition metal dichalcogenides has emerged as a particularly interesting system due to the inherent spin and valley degrees of freedom. In this talk we focus on the interplay between these degrees of freedom and the different types of disorder in monolayers of molybdenum disulphide. Within the semiclassical Drude-Boltzmann formalism, treating the screening of impurities with the random phase approximation, we demonstrate that different scattering mechanisms such as charged impurity scattering, intervalley scattering, and phonons provide different signatures in electronic transport. This allows us to conclude, for example, that in CVD-grown monolayers of MoS2, intervalley scattering dominates over other mechanisms at low temperatures. Interestingly, charged impurities generate spatial inhomogeneity in the carrier density that results in a classical disorder-induced magnetoresistance that can be observed at room temperature. However, at lower temperatures, in this regime of strong intervalley scattering, we predict that the quantum phase-coherent corrections to the conductivity results in a one-parameter crossover from weak localization to weak anti-localization as a function of magnetic field, where this crossover is determined only by the spin lifetime. By comparing with available experimental data, we show that this combined framework allows for a novel way to measure the spin-relaxation in monolayers of MoS2. We find that the spin scattering arises from the Dyakonov-Perel spin-orbit scattering mechanism with a conduction band spin-splitting of about 4 meV, consistent with calculations using density functional theory. Work done in collaboration with Indra Yudhistira and the experimental groups of Goki Eda (NUS), Michael Fuhrer (Monash) and Roland Kawakami (Ohio State), and funded by Singapore National Research Foundation and Ministry of Education.

  13. Exact integrability in quantum field theory and statistical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    The properties of exactly integrable two-dimensional quantum systems are reviewed and discussed. The nature of exact integrability as a physical phenomenon and various aspects of the mathematical formalism are explored by discussing several examples, including detailed treatments of the nonlinear Schroedinger (delta-function gas) model, the massive Thirring model, and the six-vertex (ice) model. The diagonalization of a Hamiltonian by Bethe's Ansatz is illustrated for the nonlinear Schroedinger model, and the integral equation method of Lieb for obtaining the spectrum of the many-body system from periodic boundary conditions is reviewed. Similar methods are applied to the massive Thirring model, where the fermion-antifermion and bound-state spectrum are obtained explicitly by the integral equation method. After a brief review of the classical inverse scattering method, the quantum inverse method for the nonlinear Schroedinger model is introduced and shown to be an algebraization of the Bethe Ansatz technique. In the quantum inverse method, an auxiliary linear problem is used to define nonlocal operators which are functionals of the original local field on a fixed-time string of arbitrary length. The particular operators for which the string is infinitely long (free boundary conditions) or forms a closed loop around a cylinder (periodic boundary conditions) correspond to the quantized scattering data and have a special significance. One of them creates the Bethe eigenstates, while the other is the generating function for an infinite number of conservation laws. The analogous operators on a lattice are constructed for the symmetric six-vertex model, where the object which corresponds to a solution of the auxiliary linear problem is a string of vertices contracted over horizontal links (arrows). The relationship between the quantum inverse method and the transfer matrix formalism is exhibited.

  14. Are quantum spin Hall edge modes more resilient to disorder, sample geometry and inelastic scattering than quantum Hall edge modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-04-01

    On the surface of 2D topological insulators, 1D quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge modes occur with Dirac-like dispersion. Unlike quantum Hall (QH) edge modes, which occur at high magnetic fields in 2D electron gases, the occurrence of QSH edge modes is due to spin-orbit scattering in the bulk of the material. These QSH edge modes are spin-dependent, and chiral-opposite spins move in opposing directions. Electronic spin has a larger decoherence and relaxation time than charge. In view of this, it is expected that QSH edge modes will be more robust to disorder and inelastic scattering than QH edge modes, which are charge-dependent and spin-unpolarized. However, we notice no such advantage accrues in QSH edge modes when subjected to the same degree of contact disorder and/or inelastic scattering in similar setups as QH edge modes. In fact we observe that QSH edge modes are more susceptible to inelastic scattering and contact disorder than QH edge modes. Furthermore, while a single disordered contact has no effect on QH edge modes, it leads to a finite charge Hall current in the case of QSH edge modes, and thus a vanishing of the pure QSH effect. For more than a single disordered contact while QH states continue to remain immune to disorder, QSH edge modes become more susceptible—the Hall resistance for the QSH effect changes sign with increasing disorder. In the case of many disordered contacts with inelastic scattering included, while quantization of Hall edge modes holds, for QSH edge modes a finite charge Hall current still flows. For QSH edge modes in the inelastic scattering regime we distinguish between two cases: with spin-flip and without spin-flip scattering. Finally, while asymmetry in sample geometry can have a deleterious effect in the QSH case, it has no impact in the QH case.

  15. Solution of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering in the presence of complex potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Jan

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present a method to compute solutions of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering problems in the presence of a complex potential. We show how the elastic and absorption cross sections can be obtained from the numerical solution of these equations in the asymptotic region at large radial distances.

  16. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. I. Formal developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Baranov, M.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a quantum field theoretical framework to analytically study the three-body constrained Bose-Hubbard model beyond mean field and noninteracting spin wave approximations. It is based on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory with two coupled bosonic degrees of freedom with polynomial interactions, which have a natural interpretation as single particles and two-particle states. The procedure can be seen as a proper quantization of the Gutzwiller mean field theory. The theory is conveniently evaluated in the framework of the quantum effective action, for which the usual symmetry principles are now supplemented with a “constraint principle” operative on short distances. We test the theory via investigation of scattering properties of few particles in the limit of vanishing density, and we address the complementary problem in the limit of maximum filling, where the low-lying excitations are holes and diholes on top of the constraint-induced insulator. This is the first of a sequence of two papers. The application of the formalism to the many-body problem, which can be realized with atoms in optical lattices with strong three-body loss, is performed in a related work [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064510 (2010)10.1103/PhysRevB.82.064510].

  17. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. I. Formal developments

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.; Baranov, M.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a quantum field theoretical framework to analytically study the three-body constrained Bose-Hubbard model beyond mean field and noninteracting spin wave approximations. It is based on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory with two coupled bosonic degrees of freedom with polynomial interactions, which have a natural interpretation as single particles and two-particle states. The procedure can be seen as a proper quantization of the Gutzwiller mean field theory. The theory is conveniently evaluated in the framework of the quantum effective action, for which the usual symmetry principles are now supplemented with a ''constraint principle'' operative on short distances. We test the theory via investigation of scattering properties of few particles in the limit of vanishing density, and we address the complementary problem in the limit of maximum filling, where the low-lying excitations are holes and diholes on top of the constraint-induced insulator. This is the first of a sequence of two papers. The application of the formalism to the many-body problem, which can be realized with atoms in optical lattices with strong three-body loss, is performed in a related work [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064510 (2010)].

  18. Aspects of nonlocality in quantum field theory, quantum gravity and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of essays on nonlocal phenomena in quantum field theory, gravity and cosmology. Mechanisms of nonlocal contributions to the quantum effective action are discussed within the covariant perturbation expansion in field strengths and spacetime curvatures. Euclidean version of the Schwinger-Keldysh technique for quantum expectation values is presented as a special rule of obtaining the nonlocal effective equations of motion for the mean quantum field from the Euclidean effective action. This rule is applied to a new model of ghost free nonlocal cosmology which can generate the de Sitter (dS) cosmological evolution at an arbitrary value of Λ — a model of dark energy with the dynamical scale selected by a kind of a scaling symmetry breaking mechanism. This model is shown to interpolate between the superhorizon phase of a scalar mediated gravity and the short distance general relativistic limit in a special metric frame related by a nonlocal conformal transformation to the original metric.

  19. Introduction to the Quantum Theory of Elementary Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, Donatello

    Elementary Cycles Theory (ECT) is a novel exact formulation of quantum-relativistic mechanics. Here, we present an introduction to its basic quantum aspects. On the one hand, Newton's law of inertia states that every isolated particle has persistent motion, i.e. constant energy and momentum. On the other hand, undulatory mechanics associates, by means of the Planck constant, a recurrence in time and space to the energy and the momentum of an elementary particle, respectively. Paraphrasing these two fundamental principles of modern physics, ECT postulates that every elementary constituent of nature (every elementary particle) is characterized by persistent intrinsic periodicity (as long it does not interact) whose space-time duration determines its kinematical state (energy and momentum). In other words, undulatory mechanics is imposed as constraint "overdetermining" relativistic mechanics, with fundamental motivations on Einstein's proposal of unification of quantum and relativistic theories. Every free particle is a (de Broglie) "periodic phenomenon" which can also be regarded as a reference clock and every system is decomposable in modulated elementary cycles. Indeed, ECT introduces a cyclic nature to the ordinary relativistic space-time coordinates. The resulting classical-relativistic mechanics turns out to be fully consistent with relativity and, at the same time, reproduces exactly all the fundamental aspects of ordinary quantum-relativistic mechanics (without any explicit quantisation). Relativity only fixes the differential structure of space-time without giving any prescription about the boundary of space-time, and the constraint of covariant periodicity (or similar relativistic boundary conditions) is allowed by the variational principle for relativistic theories. The constraint of intrinsic periodicity enforces the local nature of relativistic space-time and the wave-particle duality. Besides such unified description of relativistic and quantum dynamics

  20. General theory of scalar wave scattering by a composite particle, one particle imbedded in another

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byong Chon; Kim, Jin Seung

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of scalar wave scattering by a composite particle, consisting of a smaller particle completely imbedded in a larger particle, is developed to give the coefficients of scattering and transmission in the form of recurrence formulae. Iterative application of the formulae yields the coefficients in the forms of power series of the coefficients obtained in single particle scattering theories, and each term of the power series can be interpreted as a multiple scattering of the wave between the two component particles in increasingly higher order.