Science.gov

Sample records for quantum theoretical calculations

  1. Theoretical study of small sodium-potassium alloy clusters through genetic algorithm and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mateus X; Galvão, Breno R L; Belchior, Jadson C

    2014-05-21

    Genetic algorithm is employed to survey an empirical potential energy surface for small Na(x)K(y) clusters with x + y ≤ 15, providing initial conditions for electronic structure methods. The minima of such empirical potential are assessed and corrected using high level ab initio methods such as CCSD(T), CR-CCSD(T)-L and MP2, and benchmark results are obtained for specific cases. The results are the first calculations for such small alloy clusters and may serve as a reference for further studies. The validity and choice of a proper functional and basis set for DFT calculations are then explored using the benchmark data, where it was found that the usual DFT approach may fail to provide the correct qualitative result for specific systems. The best general agreement to the benchmark calculations is achieved with def2-TZVPP basis set with SVWN5 functional, although the LANL2DZ basis set (with effective core potential) and SVWN5 functional provided the most cost-effective results. PMID:24691391

  2. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  3. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  4. Theoretical study of dehydration-carbonation reaction on brucite surface based on ab initio quantum mechanic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S. V.; Parrinello, M.

    2003-04-01

    The carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) has been considered as a potential technology for cleaning industrial carbon dioxide waste. The kinetics of the reaction Mg(OH)2 + CO2 -> MgCO3 + H2O have been studied experimentally at 573°C by Bearat at al. [1]. Their experiments suggest that the carbonation of magnesium hydroxide proceeds by the reaction Mg(OH)2 -> MgO + H2O followed by the adsorption of CO2 molecules on the dehydrated brucite surface. Due to the large difference in volumes between Mg(OH)2 and MgO, dehydration causes the formation of dislocations and cracks, allowing water molecules to leave the brucite surface and facilitating the advance of the carbonation front in the bulk solid. The detailed mechanism of this process is however unknown. We used the Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics method to study the structure and dynamics of the (0001), (1-100) and (11-20) surfaces of brucit and calculated the enthalpy and activation barrier of H2O nucleation and dehydration on different surfaces. The results obtained are in agreement with previous studies of brucite dehydration by Masini and Bernasconi [2]. The reactive Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method [3] has been applied to investigate the detailed mechanism of the dehydration-carbonation reaction at the (1-100) interface of brucite with the gas phase. Based on the results of our MD simulations and the calculated enthalpy of CO2 adsorption on the dehydrated brucite surfaces we propose a mechanism for the dehydration/carbonation reaction. [1] Bearat H, McKelvy MJ, Chizmeshya AVG, Sharma R, Carpenter RW (2002) J. Amer. Ceram. Soc. 85(4):742 [2] Masini P and Bernasconi M (2001) J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 13: 1-12 [3] Iannuzzi M, Laio A and Parrinello M (2003) Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted)

  5. Theoretical modeling of large molecular systems. Advances in the local self consistent field method for mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Monari, Antonio; Rivail, Jean-Louis; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-02-19

    Molecular mechanics methods can efficiently compute the macroscopic properties of a large molecular system but cannot represent the electronic changes that occur during a chemical reaction or an electronic transition. Quantum mechanical methods can accurately simulate these processes, but they require considerably greater computational resources. Because electronic changes typically occur in a limited part of the system, such as the solute in a molecular solution or the substrate within the active site of enzymatic reactions, researchers can limit the quantum computation to this part of the system. Researchers take into account the influence of the surroundings by embedding this quantum computation into a calculation of the whole system described at the molecular mechanical level, a strategy known as the mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The accuracy of this embedding varies according to the types of interactions included, whether they are purely mechanical or classically electrostatic. This embedding can also introduce the induced polarization of the surroundings. The difficulty in QM/MM calculations comes from the splitting of the system into two parts, which requires severing the chemical bonds that link the quantum mechanical subsystem to the classical subsystem. Typically, researchers replace the quantoclassical atoms, those at the boundary between the subsystems, with a monovalent link atom. For example, researchers might add a hydrogen atom when a C-C bond is cut. This Account describes another approach, the Local Self Consistent Field (LSCF), which was developed in our laboratory. LSCF links the quantum mechanical portion of the molecule to the classical portion using a strictly localized bond orbital extracted from a small model molecule for each bond. In this scenario, the quantoclassical atom has an apparent nuclear charge of +1. To achieve correct bond lengths and force constants, we must take into account the inner shell of

  6. Quantum speed problem: Theoretical hints for control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, Alexandre Coutinho; Piqueira, José Roberto Castilho

    2016-06-01

    The transition time between states plays an important role in designing quantum devices as they are very sensitive to environmental influences. Decoherence phenomenon is responsible for possible destructions of the entanglement that is a fundamental requirement to implement quantum information processing systems. If the time between states is minimized, the decoherence effects can be reduced, thus, it is advantageous to the designer to develop expressions for time performance measures. Quantum speed limit (QSL) problem has been studied from the theoretical point of view, providing general results. Considering the implementation of quantum control systems, as the decoherence phenomenon is unavoidable, it is important to apply these general results to particular cases, developing expressions and performance measures, to assist control engineering designers. Here, a minimum time performance measure is defined for quantum control problems, for time-independent or time-dependent Hamiltonians, and applied to some practical examples, providing hints that may be useful for researchers pursuing optimization strategies for quantum control systems.

  7. Multiloop calculations in perturbative quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, Ian Richard

    This thesis deals with high-precision calculations in perturbative quantum field theory. In conjunction with detailed experimental measurements, perturbative quantum field theory provides the quantitative framework with which much of modern particle physics is understood. The results of three new theoretical calculations are presented. The first is a definitive resolution of a recent controversy involving the interaction of a muon with a magnetic field. Specifically, the light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is shown to be of positive sign, thereby decreasing the discrepancy between theory and experiment. Despite this adjustment to the theoretical prediction, the remaining discrepancy might be a subtle signature of new kinds of particles. The second calculation involves the energy levels of a bound state formed from two charged particles of arbitrary masses. By employing recently developed mass expansion techniques, new classes of solutions are obtained for problems in a field of particle physics with a very rich history. The third calculation provides an improved prediction for the decay of a top quark. In order to obtain this result, a large class of multiloop integrals has been solved for the first time. Top quark decay is just one member of a family of interesting physical processes to which these new results apply. Since specialized calculational techniques are essential ingredients in all three calculations, they are motivated and explained carefully in this thesis. These techniques, once automated with symbolic computational software, have recently opened avenues of solution to a wide variety of important problems in particle physics.

  8. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  9. Hybrid quantum teleportation: A theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Mizuta, Takahiro; Fuwa, Maria; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-04

    Hybrid quantum teleportation – continuous-variable teleportation of qubits – is a promising approach for deterministically teleporting photonic qubits. We propose how to implement it with current technology. Our theoretical model shows that faithful qubit transfer can be achieved for this teleportation by choosing an optimal gain for the teleporter’s classical channel.

  10. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  11. Theoretical studies of graphene nanoribbon quantum dot qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Yia-Chung

    Graphene nanoribbon quantum dot qubits have been proposed as promising candidates for quantum computing applications to overcome the spin-decoherence problems associated with typical semiconductor (e.g., GaAs) quantum dot qubits. We perform theoretical studies of the electronic structures of graphene nanoribbon quantum dots by solving the Dirac equation with appropriate boundary conditions. We then evaluate the exchange splitting based on an unrestricted Hartree-Fock method for the Dirac particles. The electronic wave function and long-range exchange coupling due to the Klein tunneling and the Coulomb interaction are calculated for various gate configurations. It is found that the exchange coupling between qubits can be significantly enhanced by the Klein tunneling effect. The implications of our results for practical qubit construction and operation are discussed. This work was supported in part by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, under Contract No. MOST 104-2112-M-001-009-MY2.

  12. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  13. Information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality and quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikoshi, Fumiaki

    2006-05-15

    An information-theoretic temporal Bell inequality is formulated to contrast classical and quantum computations. Any classical algorithm satisfies the inequality, while quantum ones can violate it. Therefore, the violation of the inequality is an immediate consequence of the quantumness in the computation. Furthermore, this approach suggests a notion of temporal nonlocality in quantum computation.

  14. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  15. Linear-scaling quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A J; Hood, R Q; Grossman, J C

    2001-12-10

    A method is presented for using truncated, maximally localized Wannier functions to introduce sparsity into the Slater determinant part of the trial wave function in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. When combined with an efficient numerical evaluation of these localized orbitals, the dominant cost in the calculation, namely, the evaluation of the Slater determinant, scales linearly with system size. This technique is applied to accurate total energy calculation of hydrogenated silicon clusters and carbon fullerenes containing 20-1000 valence electrons. PMID:11736525

  16. A quantum theoretical study of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Luke A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important contributions of theoretical chemistry is the correct prediction of properties of materials before any costly experimental work begins. This is especially true in the field of electrically conducting polymers. Development of the Valence Effective Hamiltonian (VEH) technique for the calculation of the band structure of polymers was initiated. The necessary VEH potentials were developed for the sulfur and oxygen atoms within the particular molecular environments and the explanation explored for the success of this approximate method in predicting the optical properties of conducting polymers.

  17. A Generalized Information Theoretical Model for Quantum Secret Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    An information theoretical model for quantum secret sharing was introduced by H. Imai et al. (Quantum Inf. Comput. 5(1), 69-80 2005), which was analyzed by quantum information theory. In this paper, we analyze this information theoretical model using the properties of the quantum access structure. By the analysis we propose a generalized model definition for the quantum secret sharing schemes. In our model, there are more quantum access structures which can be realized by our generalized quantum secret sharing schemes than those of the previous one. In addition, we also analyse two kinds of important quantum access structures to illustrate the existence and rationality for the generalized quantum secret sharing schemes and consider the security of the scheme by simple examples.

  18. Sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum measure algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Zafiris, Elias

    2006-09-15

    We construct a sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum probabilistic structures, in terms of covering systems of Boolean measure algebras. These systems coordinatize quantum states by means of Boolean coefficients, interpreted as Boolean localization measures. The representation is based on the existence of a pair of adjoint functors between the category of presheaves of Boolean measure algebras and the category of quantum measure algebras. The sheaf-theoretic semantic transition of quantum structures shifts their physical significance from the orthoposet axiomatization at the level of events, to the sheaf-theoretic gluing conditions at the level of Boolean localization systems.

  19. Theoretical Calculations of Equations of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Madappa

    2016-07-01

    The modeling of core-collapse supernovae, neutron stars from their birth to old age, and binary mergers of compact stars requires a detailed knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) of matter at finite temperature. Thermodynamic state variables such as the free energy, energy per baryon, pressure, entropy per baryon, specific heats, chemical potentials of the various species and their derivatives with respect to number densities, thermal and adiabatic indices, etc., all play distinct roles in large-scale computer simulations involving compact objects. In this talk, recent developments in the calculation of the thermal properties of dense matter will be reviewed. Recent results from beyond relativistic mean field theory will be discussed. Highlights will include the role of non-nucleonic degrees of freedom at finite temperature, and possible avenues for future investigations.

  20. Quantum Theoretical Study of KCl and LiCl Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetter, Ted; Hira, Ajit; Salazar, Justin; Jaramillo, Danelle

    2014-03-01

    This research focuses on the theoretical study of molecular clusters to examine the chemical properties of small KnClnandLinCln clusters (n = 2 - 20). The potentially important role of these molecular species in biochemical and medicinal processes is well known. This work applies the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different alkali-halide (MnHn) geometries. Of particular interest is the competition between hexagonal ring geometries and rock salt structures. Electronic energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies for these geometries are calculated. Magic numbers for cluster stability are identified and are related to the property of cluster compactness. Mapping of the singlet, triplet, and quintet, potential energy surfaces is performed. Calculations were performed to examine the interactions of these clusters with some atoms and molecules of biological interest, including O, O2, and Fe. Potential design of new medicinal drugs is explored.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.

    1998-12-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations using realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions are presented for nuclei with up to eight nucleons. We have computed the ground and a few excited states of all such nuclei with Greens function Monte Carlo (GFMC) and all of the experimentally known excited states using variational Monte Carlo (VMC). The GFMC calculations show that for a given Hamiltonian, the VMC calculations of excitation spectra are reliable, but the VMC ground-state energies are significantly above the exact values. We find that the Hamiltonian we are using (which was developed based on {sup 3}H,{sup 4}He, and nuclear matter calculations) underpredicts the binding energy of p-shell nuclei. However our results for excitation spectra are very good and one can see both shell-model and collective spectra resulting from fundamental many-nucleon calculations. Possible improvements in the three-nucleon potential are also be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, Steven C.

    1998-12-21

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations using realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions are presented for nuclei with up to eight nucleons. We have computed the ground and a few excited states of all such nuclei with Greens function Monte Carlo (GFMC) and all of the experimentally known excited states using variational Monte Carlo (VMC). The GFMC calculations show that for a given Hamiltonian, the VMC calculations of excitation spectra are reliable, but the VMC ground-state energies are significantly above the exact values. We find that the Hamiltonian we are using (which was developed based on {sup 3}H,{sup 4}He, and nuclear matter calculations) underpredicts the binding energy of p-shell nuclei. However our results for excitation spectra are very good and one can see both shell-model and collective spectra resulting from fundamental many-nucleon calculations. Possible improvements in the three-nucleon potential are also be discussed.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S. C.

    1998-08-25

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations using realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions are presented for nuclei with up to eight nucleons. We have computed the ground and a few excited states of all such nuclei with Greens function Monte Carlo (GFMC) and all of the experimentally known excited states using variational Monte Carlo (VMC). The GFMC calculations show that for a given Hamiltonian, the VMC calculations of excitation spectra are reliable, but the VMC ground-state energies are significantly above the exact values. We find that the Hamiltonian we are using (which was developed based on {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He, and nuclear matter calculations) underpredicts the binding energy of p-shell nuclei. However our results for excitation spectra are very good and one can see both shell-model and collective spectra resulting from fundamental many-nucleon calculations. Possible improvements in the three-nucleon potential are also be discussed.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.

    1998-10-23

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 40 different (J{pi}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Classical and Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian

    1995-01-01

    Two implementations of the Backward Euler method for simulating molecular fluids are compared with brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The four methods are used to compute equilibrium and time-dependent properties of a single diatomic molecule, liquid argon, a single butane molecule and liquid butane. We show that the Backward Euler simulation under-estimates the thermodynamic properties of the liquids, predicts liquid structures which are too solid-like, and incorrectly represents dynamical relaxation processes. Also, we show that any agreement between results from the Backward Euler simulation and quantum mechanics is accidental. Although the Backward Euler method allows longer time-steps to be used in simulations, the time-consuming energy minimization required at every time-step decreases significantly the overall computational efficiency. Even when time-steps more than 20 times larger than that required for energy and momentum conservation are used, neither implementation of the Backward Euler algorithm is more accurate than standard molecular dynamics calculations with the same time-step. We conclude that the new method offers no advantage over more usual methods for simulations and that it often predicts incorrect results. In particular, we see no evidence that the method will allow long-time dynamics of polymers and macromolecules to be simulated either accurately or efficiently. Neural and charged xenon in ^4 He clusters at zero temperature have been studied systematically for clusters of different size, up to a thousand particles, by employing variational and diffusion Monte Carlo methods with different choices of pairwise wave functions to describe the correlation between atoms. The static structure characterizing the atomic impurities is discussed with respect to helium density profiles and energy changes induced by adding helium atoms to a cluster one at a time. The effect of the uncertainty of the interaction potential between

  6. Quantum number theoretic transforms on multipartite finite systems.

    PubMed

    Vourdas, A; Zhang, S

    2009-06-01

    A quantum system composed of p-1 subsystems, each of which is described with a p-dimensional Hilbert space (where p is a prime number), is considered. A quantum number theoretic transform on this system, which has properties similar to those of a Fourier transform, is studied. A representation of the Heisenberg-Weyl group in this context is also discussed. PMID:19488175

  7. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations on positronium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan

    The stability of compounds containing one or more positrons in addition to electrons and nuclei has been the focus of extensive scientific investigations. Interest in these compounds stems from the important role they play in the process of positron annihilation, which has become a useful technique in material science studies. Knowledge of these compounds comes mostly from calculations which are presently less difficult than laboratory experiments. Owing to the small binding energies of these compounds, quantum chemistry methods beyond the molecular orbital approximation must be used. Among them, the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method is most appealing because it is easy to implement, gives exact results within the fixed nodes approximation, and makes good use of existing approximate wavefunctions. Applying QMC to small systems like PsH for binding energy calculation is straightforward. To apply it to systems with heavier atoms, to systems for which the center-of-mass motion needs to be separated, and to calculate annihilation rates, special techniques must be developed. In this project a detailed study and several advancements to the QMC method are carried out. Positronium compounds PsH, Ps2, PsO, and Ps2O are studied with algorithms we developed. Results for PsH and Ps2 agree with the best accepted to date. Results for PsO confirm the stability of this compound, and are in fair agreement with an earlier calculation. Results for Ps2O establish the stability of this compound and give an approximate annihilation rate for the first time. Discussions will include an introduction to QMC methods, an in-depth discussion on the QMC formalism, presentation of new algorithms developed in this study, and procedures and results of QMC calculations on the above mentioned positronium compounds.

  9. Collected Calculations in Quantum Gravity and QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhill, Bruce Kean

    In the first part of this thesis, I present a calculation of the helicity amplitudes of electron-positron double bremsstrahlung in the massless limit. Using a representation for free photon polarizations developed by a group of European physicists, helicity amplitudes for double bremsstrahlung in the massless limit are calculated for all possible combinations of helicities in the two incoming and four outgoing particle states. The calculation is made possible by the vast simplification which occurs at the amplitude level because of the gauge cancellations caused by expressing the photon polarizations in terms of the fermion momenta to which they are attached. The results of the calculation are discussed in terms of possible use as a polarization monitor for future generations of colliding beam machines in which the beams could be polarized. It is found that, although the total cross-section is easily measured experimentally, the polarization asymmetry is very difficult to measure unless the flux is very high. The possibility of using double bremsstrahlung as a means of analyzing the zed-zero is discussed. The applications for this purpose are very promising, as the shape and amplitude of the cross-section are very dependent on the chiral structure of the mediating particle. In the second part of this work, I present a calculation of the cosmological constant to two loops in matterless quantum gravity. A quantization method originally developed by 't Hooft and Veltman and later modified by M. Mueller is used. This is the standard path integral formulation of gravity modified such that it takes into account the dependence of the action functional on the fluctuating metric, an effect which is normally discarded because dimensional regularization nullifies its contributions. The purpose of the calculation was to explore more fully an intriguing result found by Mark Mueller while performing the same calculation to one-loop order; namely, the quantum corrections to the

  10. Quantum mechanical calculations to chemical accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of current molecular-structure calculations is illustrated with examples of quantum mechanical solutions for chemical problems. Two approaches are considered: (1) the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with a perturbational estimate of the contribution of connected triple excitations, or CCDS(T); and (2) the multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approach to the correlation problem. The MRCI approach gains greater applicability by means of size-extensive modifications such as the averaged-coupled pair functional approach. The examples of solutions to chemical problems include those for C-H bond energies, the vibrational frequencies of O3, identifying the ground state of Al2 and Si2, and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow and the Hermann IR system of N2. Accurate molecular-wave functions can be derived from a combination of basis-set saturation studies and full configuration-interaction calculations.

  11. Limitations on information-theoretically-secure quantum homomorphic encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2014-11-01

    Homomorphic encryption is a form of encryption which allows computation to be carried out on the encrypted data without the need for decryption. The success of quantum approaches to related tasks in a delegated computation setting has raised the question of whether quantum mechanics may be used to achieve information-theoretically-secure fully homomorphic encryption. Here we show, via an information localization argument, that deterministic fully homomorphic encryption necessarily incurs exponential overhead if perfect security is required.

  12. Linear Scaling Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    New developments to the quantum Monte Carlo approach are presented that improve the scaling of the time required to calculate the total energy of a configuration of electronic coordinates from N^3 to nearly linear[1]. The first factor of N is achieved by applying a unitary transform to the set of single particle orbitals used to construct the Slater determinant, creating a set of maximally localized Wannier orbitals. These localized functions are then truncated beyond a given cutoff radius to introduce sparsity into the Slater determinant. The second factor of N is achieved by evaluating the maximally localized Wannier orbitals on a cubic spline grid, which removes the size dependence of the basis set (e.g. plane waves, Gaussians) typically used to expand the orbitals. Application of this method to the calculation of the binding energy of carbon fullerenes and silicon nanostructures will be presented. An extension of the approach to deal with excited states of systems will also be presented in the context of the calculation of the excitonic gap of a variety of systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48. [1] A.J. Williamson, R.Q. Hood and J.C. Grossman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 246406 (2001)

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S. C.; Physics

    2008-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo are powerful tools for cal- culations of properties of light nuclei using realistic two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) potentials. Recently the GFMC method has been extended to multiple states with the same quantum numbers. The combination of the Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Illinois-2 three-nucleon potentials gives a good prediction of many energies of nuclei up to 12 C. A number of other recent results are presented: comparison of binding energies with those obtained by the no-core shell model; the incompatibility of modern nuclear Hamiltonians with a bound tetra-neutron; difficulties in computing RMS radii of very weakly bound nuclei, such as 6He; center-of-mass effects on spectroscopic factors; and the possible use of an artificial external well in calculations of neutron-rich isotopes.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Thomas; Lähde, Timo A.

    2016-04-01

    We show how lattice quantum Monte Carlo can be applied to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of strong electron-electron correlations. We employ the path-integral formalism and use methods developed within the lattice QCD community for our numerical work. Our lattice Hamiltonian is closely related to the hexagonal Hubbard model augmented by a long-range electron-electron interaction. We apply our method to the single-quasiparticle spectrum of the (3,3) armchair nanotube configuration, and consider the effects of strong electron-electron correlations. Our approach is equally applicable to other nanotubes, as well as to other carbon nanostructures. We benchmark our Monte Carlo calculations against the two- and four-site Hubbard models, where a direct numerical solution is feasible.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to Magnetic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Engelhardt

    2006-08-09

    We have calculated the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg spin systems using a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We have used some of these systems as models to describe recently synthesized magnetic molecules, and-upon comparing the results of these calculations with experimental data-have obtained accurate estimates for the basic parameters of these models. We have also performed calculations for other systems that are of more general interest, being relevant both for existing experimental data and for future experiments. Utilizing the concept of importance sampling, these calculations can be carried out in an arbitrarily large quantum Hilbert space, while still avoiding any approximations that would introduce systematic errors. The only errors are statistical in nature, and as such, their magnitudes are accurately estimated during the course of a simulation. Frustrated spin systems present a major challenge to the QMC method, nevertheless, in many instances progress can be made. In this chapter, the field of magnetic molecules is introduced, paying particular attention to the characteristics that distinguish magnetic molecules from other systems that are studied in condensed matter physics. We briefly outline the typical path by which we learn about magnetic molecules, which requires a close relationship between experiments and theoretical calculations. The typical experiments are introduced here, while the theoretical methods are discussed in the next chapter. Each of these theoretical methods has a considerable limitation, also described in Chapter 2, which together serve to motivate the present work. As is shown throughout the later chapters, the present QMC method is often able to provide useful information where other methods fail. In Chapter 3, the use of Monte Carlo methods in statistical physics is reviewed, building up the fundamental ideas that are necessary in order to understand the method that has been used in this work. With these

  16. Quantum Biological Channel Modeling and Capacity Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Ivan B.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors), and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i) storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii) replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii) transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv) translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general. PMID:25371271

  17. Density functional calculation of the structural and electronic properties of germanium quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Gopir, G.

    2015-04-24

    We apply first principles density functional computational methods to study the structures, densities of states (DOS), and higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) – lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps of selected free-standing Ge semiconductor quantum dots up to 1.8nm. Our calculations are performed using numerical atomic orbital approach where linear combination of atomic orbital was applied. The surfaces of the quantum dots was passivized by hydrogen atoms. We find that surface passivation does affect the electronic properties associated with the changes of surface state, electron localization, and the energy gaps of germanium nanocrystals as well as the confinement of electrons inside the quantum dots (QDs). Our study shows that the energy gaps of germanium quantum dots decreases with the increasing dot diameter. The size-dependent variations of the computed HOMO-LUMO gaps in our quantum dots model were found to be consistent with the effects of quantum confinement reported in others theoretical and experimental calculation.

  18. Surface Segregation Energies of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy method. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameterization. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. The ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation for the most part, but predicted relaxations from quantum approximate calculations are used in selected cases to compute approximate relaxed ab initio segregation energies. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with other quantum approximate and ab initio theoretical work, and available experimental results.

  19. Theoretical grounds of relativistic methods for calculation of spin–spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, I. L.; Rusakov, Yu Yu; Krivdin, L. B.

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical grounds of the modern relativistic methods for quantum chemical calculation of spin–spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are considered. Examples and prospects of application of relativistic calculations of these constants in the structural studies of organic and heteroorganic compounds are discussed. Practical recommendations on relativistic calculations of spin–spin coupling constants using the available software are given. The bibliography includes 622 references.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations applied to magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Larry Paul

    In this dissertation, we have implemented a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm, and have used it to perform calculations for a variety of finite Heisenberg spin systems. A detailed description of the QMC method has been provided, which is followed by applications of the method to various systems. These applications begin with a detailed analysis of the (calculated) equilibrium magnetization and magnetic susceptibility for a number of Heisenberg Hamiltonians. In particular, we have studied the dependence of these quantities on intrinsic spin s, and have quantified the approach to the classical (s → infinity) limit. These results are not specific to a particular physical system, but are potentially applicable to many systems. We have also analyzed four recently synthesized species of magnetic molecules, each of which is theoretically challenging to the methods that are normally used for such analyses. Using the QMC method, we have distinguished the microscopic (exchange) parameters that describe the interactions in each of these magnetic molecules, and, based upon these parameters, we have made predictions for future experiments. The well-known "negative sign problem" (NSP) can be problematic for QMC calculations. However, for some systems, our analysis was able to proceed despite the NSP. For other systems, this is not the cases, so we have clearly indicated when the NSP is, and is not, insurmountable for these types of calculations.

  1. Using the Chebychev expansion in quantum transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Bogdan; Rahman, Hasan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-04-21

    Irradiation by laser pulses and a fluctuating surrounding liquid environment can, for example, lead to time-dependent effects in the transport through molecular junctions. From the theoretical point of view, time-dependent theories of quantum transport are still challenging. In one of these existing transport theories, the energy-dependent coupling between molecule and leads is decomposed into Lorentzian functions. This trick has successfully been combined with quantum master approaches, hierarchical formalisms, and non-equilibrium Green’s functions. The drawback of this approach is, however, its serious limitation to certain forms of the molecule-lead coupling and to higher temperatures. Tian and Chen [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204114 (2012)] recently employed a Chebychev expansion to circumvent some of these latter problems. Here, we report on a similar approach also based on the Chebychev expansion but leading to a different set of coupled differential equations using the fact that a derivative of a zeroth-order Bessel function can again be given in terms of Bessel functions. Test calculations show the excellent numerical accuracy and stability of the presented formalism. The time span for which this Chebychev expansion scheme is valid without any restrictions on the form of the spectral density or temperature can be determined a priori.

  2. Mid-Infrared Quantum-Dot Quantum Cascade Laser: A Theoretical Feasibility Study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng; Schneider, Hans

    2016-05-13

    In the framework of a microscopic model for intersubband gain from electrically pumped quantum-dot structures we investigate electrically pumped quantum-dots as active material for a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser. Our previous calculations have indicated that these structures could operate with reduced threshold current densities while also achieving a modal gain comparable to that of quantum well active materials. We study the influence of two important quantum-dot material parameters, here, namely inhomogeneous broadening and quantum-dot sheet density, on the performance of a proposed quantum cascade laser design. In terms of achieving a positive modal net gain, a high quantum-dot density canmore » compensate for moderately high inhomogeneous broadening, but at a cost of increased threshold current density. By minimizing quantum-dot density with presently achievable inhomogeneous broadening and total losses, significantly lower threshold densities than those reported in quantum-well quantum-cascade lasers are predicted by our theory.« less

  3. Calorimetric determinations and theoretical calculations of polymorphs of thalidomide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Ochoa, F.; Pérez, G. Espinosa; Mijangos-Santiago, F.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of the thermograms of thalidomide obtained for the two reported polymorphs α and β by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows some inconsistencies that are discussed in the present work. The conception of a new polymorph form, named β ∗, allowed us to explain the observed thermal behavior more satisfactorily. This new polymorph shows enantiotropy with both α and β polymorphs, reflected in the unique endotherm obtained in the DSC-thermograms, when a heating rate of 10 °C/min is applied. Several additional experiments, such as re-melting of both polymorph forms, showed that there is indeed a new polymorph with an endotherm located between the endotherms of α and β. IR, Raman, and powder X-ray permit us to characterize the isolated compound, resulting from the re-melting of both polymorph forms. Mechanical calculations were performed to elucidate the conformations of each polymorph, and ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to determine the energy of the more stable conformers and the spatial cell energy for both polymorphs α and β. These results suggested a possible conformation for the newly discovered polymorph β ∗.

  4. Magnetic rigid rotor in the quantum regime: Theoretical toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Cosimo C.; Romero-Isart, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    We describe the quantum dynamics of a magnetic rigid rotor in the mesoscopic scale where the Einstein-De Haas effect is predominant. In particular, we consider a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle with uniaxial anisotropy in a magnetic trap. Starting from the basic Hamiltonian of the system under the macrospin approximation, we derive a bosonized Hamiltonian describing the center-of-mass motion, the total angular momentum, and the macrospin degrees of freedom of the particle treated as a rigid body. This bosonized Hamiltonian can be approximated by a simple quadratic Hamiltonian that captures the rich physics of a nanomagnet tightly confined in position, nearly not spinning, and with its macrospin antialigned to the magnetic field. The theoretical tools derived and used here can be applied to other quantum mechanical rigid rotors.

  5. Maxwell's demon. (II) A quantum-theoretic exorcism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2002-05-01

    In Part II of this two-part paper we prove that Maxwell's demon is unable to accomplish his task of sorting air molecules into swift and slow because in air in a thermodynamic equilibrium state there are no such molecules. The proof is based on the principles of a unified quantum theory of mechanics and thermodynamics. The key idea of the unified theory is that von Neumann's concept of a homogeneous ensemble of identical systems, identically prepared, is valid not only for a density operator ρ equal to a projector (every member of the ensemble is assigned the same projector, ρi=| ψi> < ψi|= ρi2, or the same wave function ψ i as any other member) but also for a density operator that is not a projector (every member of the ensemble is assigned the same density operator, ρ>ρ 2, as any other member). So, the latter ensemble is not a statistical mixture of projectors. The broadening of the validity of the homogeneous ensemble is consistent with the quantum-theoretic postulates about observables, measurement results, and value of any observable. In the context of the unified theory, among the many novel results is the theorem that each molecule of a system in a thermodynamic equilibrium state has zero value of momentum, that is, each molecule is at a standstill and, therefore, there are no molecules to be sorted as swift and slow. Said differently, if Maxwell were cognizant of quantum theory, he would not have conceived of the idea of the demon. It is noteworthy that the zero value of momentum is not the result of averaging over different momenta of many molecules. Under the specified conditions, it is the quantum-theoretic value of the momentum of any one molecule, and the same result is valid even if the system consists of only one molecule.

  6. Theoretical Investigations of Optical Origins of Fluorescent Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingang; Cao, Shuo; Ding, Yong; Ma, Fengcai; Lu, Wengang; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were investigated theoretically. We focused on the photoinduced charge transfer and electron-hole coherence of single-layer graphene in the electronic transitions in the visible regions. Surface functionalization with donor or acceptor groups produced a red shift in the absorption spectrum, and electrons and holes were highly delocalized. The recombination of excited, well-separated electron-hole (e–h) pairs can result in enhanced fluorescence. This fluorescence enhancement by surface functionalization occurs because of the decreased symmetry of the graphene resulting from the roughened structure of the surface-functionalized GQDs. PMID:27094439

  7. Theoretical analysis of quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Simon, D. S.; Sergienko, A. V.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Dixon, P. Ben; Howland, Gregory A.; Howell, John C.; Eberly, Joseph H.; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Rodenburg, Brandon; Boyd, Robert W.

    2011-10-15

    Atmospheric turbulence generally affects the resolution and visibility of an image in long-distance imaging. In a recent quantum ghost imaging experiment [P. B. Dixon et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 051803 (2011)], it was found that the effect of the turbulence can nevertheless be mitigated under certain conditions. This paper gives a detailed theoretical analysis to the setup and results reported in the experiment. Entangled photons with a finite correlation area and a turbulence model beyond the phase screen approximation are considered.

  8. Theoretical Investigations of Optical Origins of Fluorescent Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingang; Cao, Shuo; Ding, Yong; Ma, Fengcai; Lu, Wengang; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were investigated theoretically. We focused on the photoinduced charge transfer and electron-hole coherence of single-layer graphene in the electronic transitions in the visible regions. Surface functionalization with donor or acceptor groups produced a red shift in the absorption spectrum, and electrons and holes were highly delocalized. The recombination of excited, well-separated electron-hole (e–h) pairs can result in enhanced fluorescence. This fluorescence enhancement by surface functionalization occurs because of the decreased symmetry of the graphene resulting from the roughened structure of the surface-functionalized GQDs.

  9. Role of information theoretic uncertainty relations in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jizba, Petr; Dunningham, Jacob A.; Joo, Jaewoo

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainty relations based on information theory for both discrete and continuous distribution functions are briefly reviewed. We extend these results to account for (differential) Rényi entropy and its related entropy power. This allows us to find a new class of information-theoretic uncertainty relations (ITURs). The potency of such uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics is illustrated with a simple two-energy-level model where they outperform both the usual Robertson-Schrödinger uncertainty relation and Shannon entropy based uncertainty relation. In the continuous case the ensuing entropy power uncertainty relations are discussed in the context of heavy tailed wave functions and Schrödinger cat states. Again, improvement over both the Robertson-Schrödinger uncertainty principle and Shannon ITUR is demonstrated in these cases. Further salient issues such as the proof of a generalized entropy power inequality and a geometric picture of information-theoretic uncertainty relations are also discussed.

  10. Role of information theoretic uncertainty relations in quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jizba, Petr; Dunningham, Jacob A.; Joo, Jaewoo

    2015-04-15

    Uncertainty relations based on information theory for both discrete and continuous distribution functions are briefly reviewed. We extend these results to account for (differential) Rényi entropy and its related entropy power. This allows us to find a new class of information-theoretic uncertainty relations (ITURs). The potency of such uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics is illustrated with a simple two-energy-level model where they outperform both the usual Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty relation and Shannon entropy based uncertainty relation. In the continuous case the ensuing entropy power uncertainty relations are discussed in the context of heavy tailed wave functions and Schrödinger cat states. Again, improvement over both the Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty principle and Shannon ITUR is demonstrated in these cases. Further salient issues such as the proof of a generalized entropy power inequality and a geometric picture of information-theoretic uncertainty relations are also discussed.

  11. Macroscopic Quantum-Type Potentials in Theoretical Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Nottale, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    We review in this paper the use of the theory of scale relativity and fractal space-time as a tool particularly well adapted to the possible development of a future genuine systems theoretical biology. We emphasize in particular the concept of quantum-type potentials, since, in many situations, the effect of the fractality of space—or of the underlying medium—can be reduced to the addition of such a potential energy to the classical equations of motion. Various equivalent representations—geodesic, quantum-like, fluid mechanical, stochastic—of these equations are given, as well as several forms of generalized quantum potentials. Examples of their possible intervention in high critical temperature superconductivity and in turbulence are also described, since some biological processes may be similar in some aspects to these physical phenomena. These potential extra energy contributions could have emerged in biology from the very fractal nature of the medium, or from an evolutive advantage, since they involve spontaneous properties of self-organization, morphogenesis, structuration and multi-scale integration. Finally, some examples of applications of the theory to actual biological-like processes and functions are also provided. PMID:24709901

  12. Macroscopic quantum-type potentials in theoretical systems biology.

    PubMed

    Nottale, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We review in this paper the use of the theory of scale relativity and fractal space-time as a tool particularly well adapted to the possible development of a future genuine systems theoretical biology. We emphasize in particular the concept of quantum-type potentials, since, in many situations, the effect of the fractality of space-or of the underlying medium-can be reduced to the addition of such a potential energy to the classical equations of motion. Various equivalent representations-geodesic, quantum-like, fluid mechanical, stochastic-of these equations are given, as well as several forms of generalized quantum potentials. Examples of their possible intervention in high critical temperature superconductivity and in turbulence are also described, since some biological processes may be similar in some aspects to these physical phenomena. These potential extra energy contributions could have emerged in biology from the very fractal nature of the medium, or from an evolutive advantage, since they involve spontaneous properties of self-organization, morphogenesis, structuration and multi-scale integration. Finally, some examples of applications of the theory to actual biological-like processes and functions are also provided. PMID:24709901

  13. Theoretical model for calculation of helicity in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, P.

    We (Choudhuri, Chatterjee and Nandy, 2005) calculate helicities of solar active regions based on the idea of Choudhuri (2003) that poloidal flux lines get wrapped around a toroidal flux tube rising through the convection zone, thereby giving rise to the helicity. Rough estimates based on this idea compare favourably with the observed magnitude of helicity. We use our solar dynamo model based on the Babcock--Leighton α-effect to study how helicity varies with latitude and time. At the time of solar maximum, our theoretical model gives negative helicity in the northern hemisphere and positive helicity in the south, in accordance with observed hemispheric trends. However, we find that, during a short interval at the beginning of a cycle, helicities tend to be opposite of the preferred hemispheric trends. Next we (Chatterjee, Choudhuri and Petrovay 2006) use the above idea along with the sunspot decay model of Petrovay and Moreno-Insertis, (1997) to estimate the distribution of helicity inside a flux tube as it keeps collecting more azimuthal flux during its rise through the convection zone and as turbulent diffusion keeps acting on it. By varying parameters over reasonable ranges in our simple 1-d model, we find that the azimuthal flux penetrates the flux tube to some extent instead of being confined to a narrow sheath outside.

  14. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical calculation and molecular docking of dipfluzine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Karnica; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of dipfluzine (C27H29FN2O) were presented using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The theoretical ground state geometry and electronic structure of dipfluzine are optimized by the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) method and compared with those of the crystal data. The 1D potential energy scan was performed by varying the dihedral angle using B3LYP functional at 6-31G(d,p) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the compound were determined. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS), frontier orbital analysis and electronic reactivity descriptor were used to predict the chemical reactivity of molecule. Energies of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds in molecule and their electronic aspects were investigated by natural bond orbital (NBO). To find out the anti-apoptotic activity of the title compound molecular docking studies have been performed against protein Fas.

  15. Quantum mechanical cluster calculations of critical scintillationprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.; Weber, Marvin J.

    2000-02-22

    This paper describes the use of commercial quantum chemistrycodes to simu-late several critical scintillation processes. The crystalis modeled as a cluster of typically 50 atoms embedded in an array oftypically 5,000 point charges designed to reproduce the electrostaticfield of the infinite crystal. The Schrodinger equation is solved for theground, ionized, and excited states of the system to determine the energyand electron wavefunction. Computational methods for the followingcritical processes are described: (1) the formation and diffusion ofrelaxed holes, (2) the formation of excitons, (3) the trapping ofelectrons and holes by activator atoms, (4) the excitation of activatoratoms, and (5) thermal quenching. Examples include hole diffusion in CsI,the exciton in CsI, the excited state of CsI:Tl, the energy barrier forthe diffusion of relaxed holes in CaF2 and PbF2, and prompt hole trappingby activator atoms in CaF2:Eu and CdS:Te leading to an ultra-fast (<50ps) scintillation risetime.

  16. Theoretical calculations on the electron absorption spectra of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Ping

    1993-01-01

    As a theoretical component of the joint effort with the laboratory of Dr. Lou Allamandola to search for potential candidates for interstellar organic carbon compound that are responsible for the visible diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIB's), quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the electron absorption spectra of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives. In the completed project, 15 different species of naphthalene, its hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives, and corresponding cations and anions were studied. Using semiempirical quantum mechanical method INDO/S, the ground electronic state of each species was evaluated with restricted Hartree-Fock scheme and limited configuration interaction. The lowest energy spin state for each species was used for electron absorption calculations. Results indicate that these calculations are accurate enough to reproduce the spectra of naphthalene cation and anion observed in neon matrix. The spectral pattern of the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives predicted based on these results indicate that the electron configuration of the pi orbitals of these species is the dominant determinant. A combined list of 19 absorptions calculated from 4500 A to 10,400 A were compiled and suggested as potential candidates that are relevant for the DIB's absorptions. Continued studies on pyrene and derivatives revealed the ground state symmetries and multiplicities of its neutral, anionic, and cationic species. Spectral calculations show that the cation (B(sub 3g)-2) and the anion (A(sub u)-2) are more likely to have low energy absorptions in the regions between 10 kK and 20 kK, similar to naphthalene. These absorptions, together with those to be determined from the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives of pyrene, can be used to provide additional candidates and suggest experimental work in the search for interstellar compounds that are responsible for DIB's.

  17. Quantum Parallelism as a Tool for Ensemble Spin Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2008-09-01

    Efficient simulations of quantum evolutions of spin-1/2 systems are relevant for ensemble quantum computation as well as in typical NMR experiments. We propose an efficient method to calculate the dynamics of an observable provided that the initial excitation is “local.” It resorts to a single entangled pure initial state built as a superposition, with random phases, of the pure elements that compose the mixture. This ensures self-averaging of any observable, drastically reducing the calculation time. The procedure is tested for two representative systems: a spin star (cluster with random long range interactions) and a spin ladder.

  18. A theoretical and experimental study of λ>2 μm luminescence of quantum dots on InP substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, F.; Even, J.; Cornet, C.; Schliwa, A.; Bertru, N.; Dehaese, O.; Alghoraibi, I.; Folliot, H.; Piron, R.; Le Corre, A.; Loualiche, S.

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the electronic properties of InAs(Sb) quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on InP(100) substrate are presented. Eight-band kṡp calculations including strain and piezoelectric effects are performed on InAs/InP(100) quantum dot (QD) structure to study the influence of the quantum dot height. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy experiments show promising results. High arsine flow rate during the growth of InAs QDs makes possible long emission wavelength beyond 2 μm. Emission wavelength as long as 2.35 μm is observed with InAsSb QDs.

  19. Detailed discussions and calculations of quantum Regge calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shesheng

    2010-09-15

    This article presents detailed discussions and calculations of the recent paper 'Quantum Regge calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory' in [9]. The Euclidean space-time is discretized by a four-dimensional simplicial complex. We adopt basic tetrad and spin-connection fields to describe the simplicial complex. By introducing diffeomorphism and local Lorentz invariant holonomy fields, we construct a regularized Einstein-Cartan theory for studying the quantum dynamics of the simplicial complex and fermion fields. This regularized Einstein-Cartan action is shown to properly approach to its continuum counterpart in the continuum limit. Based on the local Lorentz invariance, we derive the dynamical equations satisfied by invariant holonomy fields. In the mean-field approximation, we show that the averaged size of 4-simplex, the element of the simplicial complex, is larger than the Planck length. This formulation provides a theoretical framework for analytical calculations and numerical simulations to study the quantum Einstein-Cartan theory.

  20. Theoretical Characterization of Visual Signatures and Calculation of Approximate Global Harmonic Frequency Scaling Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Nelson, R. G.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2016-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled harmonic frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). Calculation of approximate global harmonic frequency scaling factors for specific DFT functionals is also in progress. A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. Work supported by the ARL, DoD-HPCMP, and USMA.

  1. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  2. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multispectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/sq m, which compared to the 4 W/sq m magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/sq m estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of (In,Ga)As/GaP quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    (In,Ga)As/GaP(001) quantum dots (QDs) are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied both theoretically and experimentally. The electronic band structure is simulated using a combination of k·p and tight-binding models. These calculations predict an indirect to direct crossover with the In content and the size of the QDs. The optical properties are then studied in a low-In-content range through photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. It suggests the proximity of two optical transitions of indirect and direct types. PMID:23176537

  4. Accelerating quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Karandashev, Konstantin; Vaníček, Jiří

    2015-11-21

    Path integral implementation of the quantum instanton approximation currently belongs among the most accurate methods for computing quantum rate constants and kinetic isotope effects, but its use has been limited due to the rather high computational cost. Here, we demonstrate that the efficiency of quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects can be increased by orders of magnitude by combining two approaches: The convergence to the quantum limit is accelerated by employing high-order path integral factorizations of the Boltzmann operator, while the statistical convergence is improved by implementing virial estimators for relevant quantities. After deriving several new virial estimators for the high-order factorization and evaluating the resulting increase in efficiency, using ⋅Hα + HβHγ → HαHβ + ⋅ Hγ reaction as an example, we apply the proposed method to obtain several kinetic isotope effects on CH4 + ⋅ H ⇌ ⋅ CH3 + H2 forward and backward reactions. PMID:26590524

  5. Quantum-field-theoretic analysis of inflation dynamics in a (2+1)-dimensional universe

    SciTech Connect

    Samiullah, M. ); Eboli, O. ); Pi, S. )

    1991-10-15

    We reexamine inflationary scenarios based on slow-rollover transitions, which occur under various initial conditions of the inflation-driving scalar field. We examine inflation dynamics using a recently developed calculational technique for studying a quantum-field-theoretic system in an external environment that is itself changing with time. This method, based on the functional Schroedinger picture, uses a self-consistent Gaussian approximation that, unlike ordinary perturbation theory, reflects some of the nonlinearities of the full quantum theory. Our treatment is confined to planar universes, where the approximation techniques do not suffer from well-known problems associated with scalar field self-interactions in four-dimensional space-time. However, for these toy models we can present concrete and explicit results.

  6. Simulation of Quantum-Mechanical Measurements with Programmable Pocket Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a method for the illustration of the statistical nature of measurements in quantum physics by means of simulation with pocket calculators. The application to examples like the double-slit experiment, Mott scattering, and the demonstration of the uncertainty relation is discussed. (Author/HM)

  7. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A.; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures.In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance

  8. Theoretical calculations and vibrational potential energy surface of 4-silaspiro(3,3)heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Esther J.; Medders, Cross; Laane, Jaan; Meinander, Niklas

    2014-04-28

    Theoretical computations have been carried out on 4-silaspiro(3,3)heptane (SSH) in order to calculate its molecular structure and conformational energies. The molecule has two puckered four-membered rings with dihedral angles of 34.2° and a tilt angle of 9.4° between the two rings. Energy calculations were carried out for different conformations of SSH. These results allowed the generation of a two-dimensional ring-puckering potential energy surface (PES) of the form V = a(x{sub 1}{sup 4} + x{sub 2}{sup 4}) – b(x{sub 1}{sup 2} + x{sub 2}{sup 2}) + cx{sub 1}{sup 2}x{sub 2}{sup 2}, where x{sub 1} and x{sub 2} are the ring-puckering coordinates for the two rings. The presence of sufficiently high potential energy barriers prevents the molecule from undergoing pseudorotation. The quantum states, wave functions, and predicted spectra resulting from the PESs were calculated.

  9. Efficient hybrid-symbolic methods for quantum mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Zhang, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    We present hybrid symbolic-numerical tools to generate optimized numerical code for rapid prototyping and fast numerical computation starting from a computer algebra system (CAS) and tailored to any given quantum mechanical problem. Although a major focus concerns the quantum chemistry methods of H. Nakatsuji which has yielded successful and very accurate eigensolutions for small atoms and molecules, the tools are general and may be applied to any basis set calculation with a variational principle applied to its linear and non-linear parameters.

  10. A combined experimental and theoretical quantum chemical studies on 4-morpholinecarboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Rani, T.; Santhanalakshmi, K.; Mohan, S.

    2011-09-01

    Extensive spectroscopic investigations have been carried out by recording the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT-Raman spectra and carrying out the theoretical quantum chemical studies on 4-morpholinecarboxaldehyde (4MC). From the ab initio and DFT analysis using HF, B3LYP and B3PW91 methods with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G++(d,p) basis sets the energies, structural, thermodynamical and vibrational characteristics of the compound were determined. The energy difference between the chair equatorial and chair axial conformers of 4MC have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) method. The optimised geometrical parameters, theoretical wavenumbers and thermodynamic properties of the molecule were compared with the experimental values. The effect of carbonyl group on the characteristic frequencies of the morpholine ring has been analysed. The mixing of the fundamental modes with the help of potential energy distribution (PED) through normal co-ordinate analysis has been discussed.

  11. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  12. Information-theoretical meaning of quantum-dynamical entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Alicki, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The theories of noncommutative dynamical entropy and quantum symbolic dynamics for quantum-dynamical systems are analyzed from the point of view of quantum information theory. Using a general quantum-dynamical system as a communication channel, one can define different classical capacities depending on the character of resources applied for encoding and decoding procedures and on the type of information sources. It is shown that for Bernoulli sources, the entanglement-assisted classical capacity, which is the largest one, is bounded from above by the quantum-dynamical entropy defined in terms of operational partitions of unity. Stronger results are proved for the particular class of quantum-dynamical systems--quantum Bernoulli shifts. Different classical capacities are exactly computed and the entanglement-assisted one is equal to the dynamical entropy in this case.

  13. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures. PMID:25806486

  14. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  15. The focus of light - theoretical calculation and experimental tomographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quabis, S.; Dorn, R.; Eberler, M.; Glöckl, O.; Leuchs, G.

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical calculations on the field distribution in the focus of an optical system with high numerical aperture. The diffraction integrals which are based on the Debye approximation are derived and evaluated for a radially polarized input field with a doughnut-shaped intensity distribution. It is shown that this mode focusses down to a spot size significantly smaller as compared to the case of linear polarization. An experimental setup to measure the three-dimensional intensity distribution in the focal region is presented, which is based on the knife-edge method and on tomographic reconstruction.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations in Solids with Downfolded Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fengjie; Purwanto, Wirawan; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2015-06-01

    We present a combination of a downfolding many-body approach with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) calculations for extended systems. Many-body calculations operate on a simpler Hamiltonian which retains material-specific properties. The Hamiltonian is systematically improvable and allows one to dial, in principle, between the simplest model and the original Hamiltonian. As a by-product, pseudopotential errors are essentially eliminated using frozen orbitals constructed adaptively from the solid environment. The computational cost of the many-body calculation is dramatically reduced without sacrificing accuracy. Excellent accuracy is achieved for a range of solids, including semiconductors, ionic insulators, and metals. We apply the method to calculate the equation of state of cubic BN under ultrahigh pressure, and determine the spin gap in NiO, a challenging prototypical material with strong electron correlation effects.

  17. Theoretical calculation of spectra of dibutyl phthalate and dioctyl phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Bin; Tang, Yan-Lin; Long, Zheng-Wen; Hu, Shuang-Hui; Li, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Dibutyl phthalate DBP and dioctyl phthalate DOP are the main components of the plasticizers. In order to investigate their molecular structure, chemical bond and spectrum, the geometrical parameters of the ground state and infrared (IR) spectrum are calculated using the density functional theory B3LYP method at the level of 6-311++G( d, p). On this basis, the first twenty-six excited states and the UV-Vis absorption spectra of DBP and DOP are studied using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the same fundamental group and compared with the ultraviolet absorption peak of the molecules measured with UNICO UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The two kinds of molecular spectra are then classified and compared with that in reference. The results show that the strong absorption of IR spectra of DOP and DBP are produced by C-H bending in-plane vibration and C=O telescopic vibration producing. The most absorption of UV-Vis absorption spectra appears in the end absorption belt from n to σ* transition, and the stronger absorption in the E belt of benzene electronic transition from π to π*. There are blue shift for DOP end absorption belt from n to σ* transition and red shift for DOP E absorption belt from π to π* transition relative to that of DBP. This calculation results are better in accord with the spectral data measured by UNICO ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer.

  18. Plasmon spectroscopy: Theoretical and numerical calculations, and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Oliveros, Rogelio; Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Sánchez-Gil, José A.; Macías, Demetrio

    2016-02-01

    We present an overview of recent advances in plasmonics, mainly concerning theoretical and numerical tools required for the rigorous determination of the spectral properties of complex-shape nanoparticles exhibiting strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs). Both quasistatic approaches and full electrodynamic methods are described, providing a thorough comparison of their numerical implementations. Special attention is paid to surface integral equation formulations, giving examples of their performance in complicated nanoparticle shapes of interest for their LSPR spectra. In this regard, complex (single) nanoparticle configurations (nanocrosses and nanorods) yield a hierarchy of multiple-order LSPR s with evidence of a rich symmetric or asymmetric (Fano-like) LSPR line shapes. In addition, means to address the design of complex geometries to retrieve LSPR spectra are commented on, with special interest in biologically inspired algorithms. Thewealth of LSPRbased applications are discussed in two choice examples, single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and optical heating, and multifrequency nanoantennas for fluorescence and nonlinear optics.

  19. Accelerating quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Karandashev, Konstantin; Vaníček, Jiří

    2015-11-21

    Path integral implementation of the quantum instanton approximation currently belongs among the most accurate methods for computing quantum rate constants and kinetic isotope effects, but its use has been limited due to the rather high computational cost. Here, we demonstrate that the efficiency of quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects can be increased by orders of magnitude by combining two approaches: The convergence to the quantum limit is accelerated by employing high-order path integral factorizations of the Boltzmann operator, while the statistical convergence is improved by implementing virial estimators for relevant quantities. After deriving several new virial estimators for the high-order factorization and evaluating the resulting increase in efficiency, using ⋅H{sub α} + H{sub β}H{sub γ} → H{sub α}H{sub β} + ⋅ H{sub γ} reaction as an example, we apply the proposed method to obtain several kinetic isotope effects on CH{sub 4} + ⋅ H ⇌ ⋅ CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2} forward and backward reactions.

  20. Aryl sulfoxide radical cations. Generation, spectral properties, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2006-08-17

    Aromatic sulfoxide radical cations have been generated by pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis techniques. In water (pulse radiolysis) the radical cations showed an intense absorption band in the UV region (ca. 300 nm) and a broad less intense band in the visible region (from 500 to 1000 nm) whose position depends on the nature of the ring substituent. At very low pulse energy, the radical cations decayed by first-order kinetics, the decay rate increasing as the pH increases. It is suggested that the decay involves a nucleophilic attack of H(2)O or OH(-) (in basic solutions) to the positively charged sulfur atom to give the radical ArSO(OH)CH(3)(*). By sensitized [N-methylquinolinium tetrafluoborate (NMQ(+))] laser flash photolysis (LFP) the aromatic sulfoxide radical cations were generated in acetonitrile. In these experiments, however, only the band of the radical cation in the visible region could be observed, the UV band being covered by the UV absorption of NMQ(+). The lambda(max) values of the bands in the visible region resulted almost identical to those observed in water for the same radical cations. In the LFP experiments the sulfoxide radical cations decayed by second-order kinetics at a diffusion-controlled rate, and the decay is attributed to the back electron transfer between the radical cation and NMQ(*). DFT calculations were also carried out for a number of 4-X ring substituted (X = H, Me, Br, OMe, CN) aromatic sulfoxide radical cations (and their neutral parents). In all radical cations, the conformation with the S-O bond almost coplanar with the aromatic ring is the only one corresponding to the energy minimum. The maximum of energy corresponds to the conformation where the S-O bond is perpendicular to the aromatic ring. The rotational energy barriers are not very high, ranging from 3.9 to 6.9 kcal/mol. In all radical cations, the major fraction of charge and spin density is localized on the SOMe group. However, a substantial delocalization

  1. A Quantum Theoretical Explanation for Probability Judgment Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busemeyer, Jerome R.; Pothos, Emmanuel M.; Franco, Riccardo; Trueblood, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    A quantum probability model is introduced and used to explain human probability judgment errors including the conjunction and disjunction fallacies, averaging effects, unpacking effects, and order effects on inference. On the one hand, quantum theory is similar to other categorization and memory models of cognition in that it relies on vector…

  2. Theoretical calculation of zero field splitting parameters of Cr3+ doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Yadav, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Zero field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) D and E of Cr3+ ion doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate (AOM) are calculated with formula using the superposition model. The theoretically calculated ZFSPs for Cr3+ in AOM crystal are compared with the experimental value obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Theoretical ZFSPs are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The energy band positions of optical absorption spectra of Cr3+ in AOM crystal calculated with CFA package are in good match with the experimental values.

  3. Delay time calculation for dual-wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadou, A.; Lamari, S.; Thobel, J.-L.

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, we calculate the turn-on delay (t{sub th}) and buildup (Δt) times of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser operating simultaneously on two laser lines having a common upper level. The approach is based on the four-level rate equations model describing the variation of the electron number in the states and the photon number present within the cavity. We obtain simple analytical formulae for the turn-on delay and buildup times that determine the delay times and numerically apply our results to both the single and bimode states of a quantum cascade laser, in addition the effects of current injection on t{sub th} and Δt are explored.

  4. Ab initio quantum transport calculations using plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, A.; Vergniory, M. G.; Jiang, X. W.; Wang, L. W.

    2015-08-01

    We present an ab initio method to calculate elastic quantum transport at the nanoscale. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory using plane wave nonlocal pseudopotentials and the use of auxiliary periodic boundary conditions to obtain the scattering states. The method can be applied to any applied bias voltage and the charge density and potential profile can either be calculated self-consistently, or using an approximated self-consistent field (SCF) approach. Based on the scattering states one can straightforwardly calculate the transmission coefficients and the corresponding electronic current. The overall scheme allows us to obtain accurate and numerically stable solutions for the elastic transport, with a computational time similar to that of a ground state calculation. This method is particularly suitable for calculations of tunneling currents through vacuum, that some of the nonequilibrium Greens function (NEGF) approaches based on atomic basis sets might have difficulty to deal with. Several examples are provided using this method from electron tunneling, to molecular electronics, to electronic devices: (i) On a Au nanojunction, the tunneling current dependence on the electrode-electrode distance is investigated. (ii) The tunneling through field emission resonances (FERs) is studied via an accurate description of the surface vacuum states. (iii) Based on quantum transport calculations, we have designed a molecular conformational switch, which can turn on and off a molecular junction by applying a perpendicular electric field. (iv) Finally, we have used the method to simulate tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) based on two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), where we have studied the performance and scaling limits of such nanodevices and proposed atomic doping to enhance the transistor performance.

  5. Quantum mechanical resonance calculations using an energy selected basis in hyperspherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jason

    2007-12-01

    Scattering resonances play a key role in many chemical processes, including unimolecular and bimolecular reactions and photodissociation. A significant theoretical emphasis over the past several decades has been placed on accurate resonance calculations for polyatomic systems. In spite of such efforts, a quantum treatment of molecular systems which exhibit a high density of states and strong coordinate coupling near dissociation remains a formidable task. The research described herein employs improved quantum mechanical methods to calculate a representation of nuclear motion, both bound and unbound, which is used subsequently to calculate accurate resonance energies and lifetimes for two triatomic systems: the neon trimer and ozone. Specifically, theory and results are given regarding the construction of an optimal, L2 eigenbasis using techniques such as the discrete variable representation, the energy selected basis (ESB) method, and iterative diagonalization methods. A new energy selection method is also developed and implemented for the neon trimer. Subsequent resonance calculations are described which make use of the artificial boundary inhomogeneity (ABI) method, adapted to work with the above mentioned ESB and hyperspherical coordinates. The ABI method is used to calculate a set of linearly independent wavefunctions (LIWs) at a given energy for the representation of the scattering wavefunction. Resonance parameters are obtained by imposing scattering boundary conditions on a linear combination of LIWs and solving for the S-matrix, S, its energy derivative, dS/dE, and the Smith lifetime matrix, Q. When available, comparisons are made with previously reported calculations.

  6. The actual content of quantum theoretical kinematics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisenberg, W.

    1983-01-01

    First, exact definitions are supplied for the terms: position, velocity, energy, etc. (of the electron, for instance), such that they are valid also in quantum mechanics. Canonically conjugated variables are determined simultaneously only with a characteristic uncertainty. This uncertainty is the intrinsic reason for the occurrence of statistical relations in quantum mechanics. Mathematical formulation is made possible by the Dirac-Jordan theory. Beginning from the basic principles thus obtained, macroscopic processes are understood from the viewpoint of quantum mechanics. Several imaginary experiments are discussed to elucidate the theory.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of {Alpha} = 8 nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.; Pieper, S. C.; Carlson, J.; Pandharipande, V. R.; Physics; LANL; Univ. of Illinois

    2000-07-01

    We report quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for {Alpha}=8 nuclei using a realistic Hamiltonian containing the Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. The calculations begin with correlated eight-body wave functions that have a filled {alpha}-like core and four p-shell nucleons LS coupled to the appropriate (J{sup {pi}},T) quantum numbers for the state of interest. After optimization, these variational wave functions are used as input to a Green's function Monte Carlo calculation made with a new constrained path algorithm. We find that the Hamiltonian produces a {sup 8}Be ground state that is within 2 MeV of the experimental resonance, but the other eight-body energies are progressively worse as the neutron-proton asymmetry increases. The {sup 8}Li ground state is stable against breakup into subclusters, but the {sup 8}He ground state is not. The excited state spectra are in fair agreement with experiment, with both the single-particle behavior of {sup 8}He and {sup 8}Li and the collective rotational behavior of {sup 8}Be being reproduced. We also examine energy differences in the T=1,2 isomultiplets and isospin-mixing matrix elements in the excited states of {sup 8}Be. Finally, we present densities, momentum distributions, and studies of the intrinsic shapes of these nuclei, with {sup 8}Be exhibiting a definite 2{alpha} cluster structure.

  8. The Nature of Infinity in Quantum Field Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2011-05-01

    In many textbooks on Quantum Field Theory it has been noted that an infinity is taken a circle and the flux is calculated from the A field in that manner. There are of course many such examples of this sort of calculation using infinity as a circle. This author would like to point out that if the three dimensions of space are curved and the one dimension of time is not, in say a four space, infinity is the horizon, which is not a circle but rather a sphere; as long as space-time is curved uniformly, smoothly and has positive curvature. This author believes the math may be in error, since maps of the CMBR seem to indicate a ``Swiss-Cheese'' type of topology, wherein the Sphere at infinity (the Horizon of the Universe), has holes in it that can readily be seen. This author believes that these irregularities most certainly have a calculable effect on QED, QCD and Quantum Field Theory.

  9. Quantum chemistry calculation of resveratrol and related stilbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nero, J.; de Melo, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    We report a semiempirical investigation of the first excited states and of the spectroscopic properties of resveratrol, a phytoalexin with well-known antioxidative properties, and of structurally related stilbenes. The analysis of the calculated bond length and charge rearrangements resulting from the photoexcitation and of the corresponding theoretical spectra gives us some insight of how chemical modifications of these molecules could affect the possible physiological properties of resveratrol.

  10. Theoretical study of spin relaxation in a carbon nanotube quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Brian; Hu, Xuedong

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes offer an attractive environment for coherent spin manipulation due to the small population of nuclear spins and weak spin-orbit interaction. While a couple of specific spin relaxation mechanisms have been investigated theoretically[1][2], there is still no comprehensive study of spin lifetimes in carbon nanotubes. In the present study we calculate the spin decay rate for electrons in gate-defined quantum dots on carbon nanotubes due to the spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions. More specifically, we explore effects of magnetic field strength and orientation, tube diameter and chirality, and confinement. [1] Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 75, 045429 (2007) [2] K. M. Borysenko, Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, J. M. Zavada, arXiv 0710.3382 (2007)

  11. Importance of parametrizing constraints in quantum-mechanical variational calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kwong T.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    In variational calculations of quantum mechanics, constraints are sometimes imposed explicitly on the wave function. These constraints, which are deduced by physical arguments, are often not uniquely defined. In this work, the advantage of parametrizing constraints and letting the variational principle determine the best possible constraint for the problem is pointed out. Examples are carried out to show the surprising effectiveness of the variational method if constraints are parameterized. It is also shown that misleading results may be obtained if a constraint is not parameterized.

  12. [Large scale quantum chemical calculation for drug discovery].

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increase in computer power and the development of computational methods, it becomes possible to perform quantum mechanical calculations of very large molecules such as proteins that were previously exclusively treated with classical force field methods. We have developed the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method aimed at biomolecular applications. One of the important applications of the method is in structure-based drug design because it provides accurate descriptions of various non-bonded interactions between a protein and its ligand. In this article, the FMO method will be described as well as its applications to the analysis of protein-ligand binding. PMID:21804319

  13. The successful merger of theoretical thermochemistry with fragment-based methods in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Quantum chemistry and electronic structure theory have proven to be essential tools to the experimental chemist, in terms of both a priori predictions that pave the way for designing new experiments and rationalizing experimental observations a posteriori. Translating the well-established success of electronic structure theory in obtaining the structures and energies of small chemical systems to increasingly larger molecules is an exciting and ongoing central theme of research in quantum chemistry. However, the prohibitive computational scaling of highly accurate ab initio electronic structure methods poses a fundamental challenge to this research endeavor. This scenario necessitates an indirect fragment-based approach wherein a large molecule is divided into small fragments and is subsequently reassembled to compute its energy accurately. In our quest to further reduce the computational expense associated with the fragment-based methods and overall enhance the applicability of electronic structure methods to large molecules, we realized that the broad ideas involved in a different area, theoretical thermochemistry, are transferable to the area of fragment-based methods. This Account focuses on the effective merger of these two disparate frontiers in quantum chemistry and how new concepts inspired by theoretical thermochemistry significantly reduce the total number of electronic structure calculations needed to be performed as part of a fragment-based method without any appreciable loss of accuracy. Throughout, the generalized connectivity based hierarchy (CBH), which we developed to solve a long-standing problem in theoretical thermochemistry, serves as the linchpin in this merger. The accuracy of our method is based on two strong foundations: (a) the apt utilization of systematic and sophisticated error-canceling schemes via CBH that result in an optimal cutting scheme at any given level of fragmentation and (b) the use of a less expensive second

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recent advances in jointed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations of biological macromolecules: schemes and applications coupled to ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Tateno, Masaru

    2010-10-01

    We review the recent research on the functional mechanisms of biological macromolecules using theoretical methodologies coupled to ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) treatments of reaction centers in proteins and nucleic acids. Since in most cases such biological molecules are large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Instead, simulations that are jointed with molecular mechanics (MM) calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. Thus, we focus our attention on the methodologies/schemes and applications of jointed QM/MM calculations, and discuss the critical issues to be elucidated in biological macromolecular systems.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiringa, R. B.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Brida, I.

    2009-10-01

    We report recent quantum Monte Carlo (variational and Green's function) calculations of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering. We are adding the cases of proton-^4He, neutron-^3H and proton-^3He scattering to a previous GFMC study of neutron-^4He scattering [1]. To do this requires generalizing our methods to include long-range Coulomb forces and to treat coupled channels. The two four-body cases can be compared to other accurate four-body calculational methods such as the AGS equations and hyperspherical harmonic expansions. We will present results for the Argonne v18 interaction alone and with Urbana and Illinois three-nucleon potentials. [4pt] [1] K.M. Nollett, S. C. Pieper, R.B. Wiringa, J. Carlson, and G.M. Hale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022502 (2007)

  16. Quantum states of confined hydrogen plasma species: Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micca Longo, G.; Longo, S.; Giordano, D.

    2015-12-01

    The diffusion Monte Carlo method with symmetry-based state selection is used to calculate the quantum energy states of \\text{H}2+ confined into potential barriers of atomic dimensions (a model for these ions in solids). Special solutions are employed, permitting one to obtain satisfactory results with rather simple native code. As a test case, {{}2}{{\\Pi}u} and {{}2}{{\\Pi}g} states of \\text{H}2+ ions under spherical confinement are considered. The results are interpreted using the correlation of \\text{H}2+ states to atomic orbitals of H atoms lying on the confining surface and perturbation calculations. The method is straightforwardly applied to cavities of any shape and different hydrogen plasma species (at least one-electron ones, including H) for future studies with real crystal symmetries.

  17. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Raimund; Spoerl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Glaser, Steffen J.; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Myers, John M.

    2010-03-15

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for a small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots.

  18. Self-consistent calculations of optical properties of type I and type II quantum heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvayev, Vladimir A.

    In this Thesis the self-consistent computational methods are applied to the study of the optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures with one- and two-dimensional quantum confinements. At first, the self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations is applied to the cylindrical core-shell structure with type II band alignment without direct Coulomb interaction between carriers. The electron and hole states and confining potential are obtained from a numerical solution of this system. The photoluminescence kinetics is theoretically analyzed, with the nanostructure size dispersion taken into account. The results are applied to the radiative recombination in the system of ZnTe/ZnSe stacked quantum dots. A good agreement with both continuous wave and time-resolved experimental observations is found. It is shown that size distribution results in the photoluminescence decay that has essentially non-exponential behavior even at the tail of the decay where the carrier lifetime is almost the same due to slowly changing overlap of the electron and hole wavefunctions. Also, a model situation applicable to colloidal core-shell nanowires is investigated and discussed. With respect to the excitons in type I quantum wells, a new computationally efficient and flexible approach of calculating the characteristics of excitons, based on a self-consistent variational treatment of the electron-hole Coulomb interaction, is developed. In this approach, a system of self-consistent equations describing the motion of an electron-hole pair is derived. The motion in the growth direction of the quantum well is separated from the in-plane motion, but each of them occurs in modified potentials found self-consistently. This approach is applied to a shallow quantum well with the delta-potential profile, for which analytical expressions for the exciton binding energy and the ground state eigenfunctions are obtained, and to the quantum well with the square potential profile with several

  19. Quantum cognition: a new theoretical approach to psychology.

    PubMed

    Bruza, Peter D; Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-07-01

    What type of probability theory best describes the way humans make judgments under uncertainty and decisions under conflict? Although rational models of cognition have become prominent and have achieved much success, they adhere to the laws of classical probability theory despite the fact that human reasoning does not always conform to these laws. For this reason we have seen the recent emergence of models based on an alternative probabilistic framework drawn from quantum theory. These quantum models show promise in addressing cognitive phenomena that have proven recalcitrant to modeling by means of classical probability theory. This review compares and contrasts probabilistic models based on Bayesian or classical versus quantum principles, and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. PMID:26058709

  20. Theoretical simulation of carrier capture and relaxation rates in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunhu; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Ling; Qi, Guoqun; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-06-14

    Based on Auger scattering mechanism, carrier-carrier scattering dynamics between the two-dimensional carrier reservoir (also called wetting layer, i.e., WL) and the confined quantum dot ground and first excited state in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) are investigated theoretically in this paper. The scattering rates for independent electron and hole densities are calculated. The results show an ultra-fast carrier capture (relaxation) rate up to 1 ps{sup −1}, and there is a complex dependence of the Coulomb scattering rates on the WL electron and hole densities. In addition, due to the different effective mass and the level distribution, the scattering rates for electron and hole are very different. Finally, in order to provide a direction to control (increase or decrease) the input current in realistic QD-SOA systems, a simple method is proposed to determine the trends of the carrier recovery rates with the WL carrier densities in the vicinity of the steady-state.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of A=8 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.; Pieper, Steven C.; Carlson, J.; Pandharipande, V. R.

    2000-07-01

    We report quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for A=8 nuclei using a realistic Hamiltonian containing the Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. The calculations begin with correlated eight-body wave functions that have a filled {alpha}-like core and four p-shell nucleons LS coupled to the appropriate (J{sup {pi}};T) quantum numbers for the state of interest. After optimization, these variational wave functions are used as input to a Green's function Monte Carlo calculation made with a new constrained path algorithm. We find that the Hamiltonian produces a {sup 8}Be ground state that is within 2 MeV of the experimental resonance, but the other eight-body energies are progressively worse as the neutron-proton asymmetry increases. The {sup 8}Li ground state is stable against breakup into subclusters, but the {sup 8}He ground state is not. The excited state spectra are in fair agreement with experiment, with both the single-particle behavior of {sup 8}He and {sup 8}Li and the collective rotational behavior of {sup 8}Be being reproduced. We also examine energy differences in the T=1,2 isomultiplets and isospin-mixing matrix elements in the excited states of {sup 8}Be. Finally, we present densities, momentum distributions, and studies of the intrinsic shapes of these nuclei, with {sup 8}Be exhibiting a definite 2{alpha} cluster structure. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Number-theoretic nature of communication in quantum spin systems.

    PubMed

    Godsil, Chris; Kirkland, Stephen; Severini, Simone; Smith, Jamie

    2012-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed substantial interest in protocols for transferring information on networks of quantum mechanical objects. A variety of control methods and network topologies have been proposed, on the basis that transfer with perfect fidelity-i.e., deterministic and without information loss-is impossible through unmodulated spin chains with more than a few particles. Solving the original problem formulated by Bose [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 207901 (2003)], we determine the exact number of qubits in unmodulated chains (with an XY Hamiltonian) that permit transfer with a fidelity arbitrarily close to 1, a phenomenon called pretty good state transfer. We prove that this happens if and only if the number of nodes is n = p - 1, 2p - 1, where p is a prime, or n = 2(m) - 1. The result highlights the potential of quantum spin system dynamics for reinterpreting questions about the arithmetic structure of integers and, in this case, primality. PMID:23006153

  3. A quantum theoretical approach to information processing in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona da Fonseca, José; Barahona da Fonseca, Isabel; Suarez Araujo, Carmen Paz; Simões da Fonseca, José

    2000-05-01

    A reinterpretation of experimental data on learning was used to formulate a law on data acquisition similar to the Hamiltonian of a mechanical system. A matrix of costs in decision making specifies values attributable to a barrier that opposed to hypothesis formation about decision making. The interpretation of the encoding costs as frequencies of oscillatory phenomena leads to a quantum paradigm based in the models of photoelectric effect as well as of a particle against a potential barrier. Cognitive processes are envisaged as complex phenomena represented by structures linked by valence bounds. This metaphor is used to find some prerequisites to certain types of conscious experience as well as to find an explanation for some pathological distortions of cognitive operations as they are represented in the context of the isolobal model. Those quantum phenomena are understood as representing an analogue programming for specific special purpose computations. The formation of complex chemical structures within the context of isolobal theory is understood as an analog quantum paradigm for complex cognitive computations.

  4. Variational quantum Monte Carlo calculations for solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bahnsen, R.; Eckstein, H.; Schattke, W.; Fitzer, N.; Redmer, R.

    2001-06-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proven to predict atomic and bulk properties of light and nonlight elements with high accuracy. Here we report on variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) calculations for solid surfaces. Taking the boundary condition for the simulation from a finite-layer geometry, the Hamiltonian, including a nonlocal pseudopotential, is cast in a layer-resolved form and evaluated with a two-dimensional Ewald summation technique. The exact cancellation of all jellium contributions to the Hamiltonian is ensured. The many-body trial wave function consists of a Slater determinant with parametrized localized orbitals and a Jastrow factor with a common two-body term plus an additional confinement term representing further variational freedom to take into account the existence of the surface. We present results for the ideal (110) surface of gallium arsenide for different system sizes. With the optimized trial wave function, we determine some properties related to a solid surface to illustrate that VMC techniques provide reasonable results under full inclusion of many-body effects at solid surfaces.

  5. Determination of absolute configuration of natural products: theoretical calculation of electronic circular dichroism as a tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of absolute configuration (AC) is one of the most challenging features in the structure elucidation of chiral natural products, especially those with complex structures. With revolutionary advancements in the area of quantum chemical calculations of chiroptical spectroscopy over the pa...

  6. Performance of quantum Monte Carlo for calculating molecular bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Deidre M.; Per, Manolo C.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the accuracy of real-space quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods for calculating molecular geometries. We present the equilibrium bond lengths of a test set of 30 diatomic molecules calculated using variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. The effect of different trial wavefunctions is investigated using single determinants constructed from Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) orbitals with LDA, PBE, and B3LYP functionals, as well as small multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) multi-determinant expansions. When compared to experimental geometries, all DMC methods exhibit smaller mean-absolute deviations (MADs) than those given by HF, DFT, and MCSCF. The most accurate MAD of 3 ± 2 × 10-3 Å is achieved using DMC with a small multi-determinant expansion. However, the more computationally efficient multi-determinant VMC method has a similar MAD of only 4.0 ± 0.9 × 10-3 Å, suggesting that QMC forces calculated from the relatively simple VMC algorithm may often be sufficient for accurate molecular geometries.

  7. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care. PMID:27136117

  8. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo calculations of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron; Santana, Juan; Kent, Paul; Reboredo, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major electronic structure codes, e.g. by not being overly hard in the standard planewave basis. Following insight gained from recent GW calculations, a set of neon core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii have been created for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of DFT. The pseudopotentials have been tested for energy consistency within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (TM) atoms and the binding curve of each TM-O dimer. The vast majority of the ionization potentials fall within 0.3 eV of the experimental values, with exceptions occurring mainly for atoms with multiple unpaired d electrons where multireference effects are the strongest. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 1% of experimental values and the binding energy errors are typically less than 0.3 eV. Given the uniform treatment of the core, the larger deviations occasionally observed may primarily reflect the limitations of a Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction. This work is supported by the Materials Sciences & Engineering Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE. Research by PRCK was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  9. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed. PMID:27573182

  10. Vibrational spectra and quantum mechanical calculations of antiretroviral drugs: Nevirapine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, A. P.; Siesler, H. W.; Wardell, S. M. S. V.; Boechat, N.; Dabbene, V.; Cuffini, S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Nevirapine (11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'e][1,4]diazepin-6-one) is an antiretroviral drug belonging to the class of the non-nucleoside inhibitors of the HIV-1 virus reverse transcriptase. As most of this kind of antiretroviral drugs, nevirapine displays a butterfly-like conformation which is preserved in complexes with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. In this work, we present a detailed vibrational spectroscopy investigation of nevirapine by using mid-infrared, near-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies. These data are supported by quantum mechanical calculations, which allow us to characterize completely the vibrational spectra of this compound. Based on these results, we discuss the correlation between the vibrational modes and the crystalline structure of the most stable form of nevirapine.

  11. QTAIM Analysis in the Context of Quasirelativistic Quantum Calculations.

    PubMed

    Pilmé, Julien; Renault, Eric; Bassal, Fadel; Amaouch, Mohamed; Montavon, Gilles; Galland, Nicolas

    2014-11-11

    Computational chemistry currently lacks ad hoc tools for probing the nature of chemical bonds in heavy and superheavy-atom systems where the consideration of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects is mandatory. We report an implementation of the Quantum Theory of Atoms-In-Molecules in the framework of two-component relativistic calculations. Used in conjunction with the topological analysis of the Electron Localization Function, we show for astatine (At) species that SOC significantly lowers At electronegativity and boosts its propensity to make charge-shift bonds. Relativistic spin-dependent effects are furthermore able to change some bonds from mainly covalent to charge-shift type. The implication of the disclosed features regarding the rationalization of the labeling protocols used in nuclear medicine for (211)At radioisotope nicely illustrates the potential of the introduced methodology for investigating the chemistry of (super)heavy elements. PMID:26584370

  12. Crystal structure and theoretical calculations of Julocrotine, a natural product with antileishmanial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Rafael Y. O.; Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Santos, Lourivaldo S.; Arruda, Mara S. P.; Müller, Adolfo H.; Barbosa, Patrícia S.; Abreu, Alcicley S.; Silva, Edilene O.; Rumjanek, Victor M.; Souza, Jaime, Jr.; da Silva, Albérico B. F.; Santos, Regina H. De A.

    Julocrotine, N-(2,6-dioxo-1-phenethyl-piperidin-3-yl)-2-methyl-butyramide, is a potent antiproliferative agent against the promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis (L.). In this work, the crystal structure of Julocrotine was solved by X-ray diffraction, and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP and HF level of theory. IR and NMR spectra also have been obtained and compared with theoretical calculations. IR absorptions calculated with the B3LYP level of theory employed together with the 6-311G+(d,p) basis set, are close to those observed experimentally. Theoretical NMR calculations show little deviation from experimental results. The results show that the theory is in accordance with the experimental data.0

  13. Fragment quantum mechanical calculation of proteins and its applications.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, John Z H

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus The desire to study molecular systems that are much larger than what the current state-of-the-art ab initio or density functional theory methods could handle has naturally led to the development of novel approximate methods, including semiempirical approaches, reduced-scaling methods, and fragmentation methods. The major computational limitation of ab initio methods is the scaling problem, because the cost of ab initio calculation scales nth power or worse with system size. In the past decade, the fragmentation approach based on chemical locality has opened a new door for developing linear-scaling quantum mechanical (QM) methods for large systems and for applications to large molecular systems such as biomolecules. The fragmentation approach is highly attractive from a computational standpoint. First, the ab initio calculation of individual fragments can be conducted almost independently, which makes it suitable for massively parallel computations. Second, the electron properties, such as density and energy, are typically combined in a linear fashion to reproduce those for the entire molecular system, which makes the overall computation scale linearly with the size of the system. In this Account, two fragmentation methods and their applications to macromolecules are described. They are the electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (EE-GMFCC) method and the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach. The EE-GMFCC method is developed from the MFCC approach, which was initially used to obtain accurate protein-ligand QM interaction energies. The main idea of the MFCC approach is that a pair of conjugate caps (concaps) is inserted at the location where the subsystem is divided by cutting the chemical bond. In addition, the pair of concaps is fused to form molecular species such that the overcounted effect from added concaps can be properly removed. By introducing the electrostatic

  14. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  15. Double Exponential Relativity Theory Coupled Theoretically with Quantum Theory?

    SciTech Connect

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    Here the problem of special relativity is analyzed into the context of a new theoretical formulation: the Double Exponential Theory of Special Relativity with respect to which the current Special or Restricted Theory of Relativity (STR) turns to be a particular case only.

  16. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the molybdenum dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Chemical accuracy is difficult to achieve for systems with transition metal atoms. Third row transition metal atoms are particularly challenging due to strong electron-electron correlation in localized d-orbitals. The Cr2 molecule is an outstanding example, which we previously treated with highly accurate auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) calculations [W. Purwanto et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064302 (2015)]. Somewhat surprisingly, computational description of the isoelectronic Mo2 dimer has also, to date, been scattered and less than satisfactory. We present high-level theoretical benchmarks of the Mo2 singlet ground state (X1Σg+) and first triplet excited state (a3Σu+), using the phaseless AFQMC calculations. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit is performed. Excellent agreement with experimental spectroscopic constants is obtained. We also present a comparison of the correlation effects in Cr2 and Mo2.

  17. The information-theoretical entropy of some quantum oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, D. Pop, N.; Popov, M.

    2014-11-24

    The Wehrl entropy or the 'classical' entropy associated with a quantum system is the entropy of the probability distribution in phase space, corresponding to the Husimi Q-function in terms of coherent states. In the present paper, we shall focus our attention on the examination of the Wehrl entropy for both the pure and the mixed (thermal) states of the pseudoharmonic oscillator (PHO). The choice of the PHO is interesting because this oscillator is an intermediate between the ideal one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO-1D) and the more practical anharmonicone.

  18. Theoretical approach of the electroluminescence quenching in (polymer-CdSe quantum dot) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastour, N.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical approach based on the rate equation of exciton density for the electroluminescence quenching in (polymers-quantum dots) nanocomposite is developed. It is shown that the light intensity observed in the nanocomposite depends respectively on the quantum dots concentration, the injected charge carriers, the exciton density, and the Förster energy transfer between polymer and quantum dots. We have found that the significant reduction of the light intensity is related to the exciton density profiles which exhibit a monotonic decrease with the increase of Förster transfer mechanism. Our theoretical approach for the electroluminescence agrees with experimental results observed in hybrid structure (MEH-PPV) with CdSe quantum dots. The maximum of exciton density is also estimated and we have obtained a value for the exciton diffusion length of 10 nm which is consistent with the available experimental results.

  19. Calculated quantum yield of photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the Marine Light-Mixed Layers (59 deg N, 21 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Lee, Z. P.; Marra, John; Steward, R. G.; Perry, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C/mol photons) was calculated at six depths for the waters of the Marine Light-Mixed Layer (MLML) cruise of May 1991. As there were photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) but no spectral irradiance measurements for the primary production incubations, three ways are presented here for the calculation of the absorbed photons (AP) by phytoplankton for the purpose of calculating phi. The first is based on a simple, nonspectral model; the second is based on a nonlinear regression using measured PAR values with depth; and the third is derived through remote sensing measurements. We show that the results of phi calculated using the nonlinear regreesion method and those using remote sensing are in good agreement with each other, and are consistent with the reported values of other studies. In deep waters, however, the simple nonspectral model may cause quantum yield values much higher than theoretically possible.

  20. Theoretical Model for the Calculation of Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-García, A.; Romero-Depablos, A.; Ortega, M. A.; Paz, J. L.; Echevarría, L.

    We have developed an analytical method to describe the optical properties of nanoparticles, whose results are in agreement with the observed experimental behavior according to the size of the nanoparticle under analysis. Our considerations to describe plasmonic absorption and dispersion are based on the combination of the two-level molecular system and the two-dimensional quantum box models. Employing the optical stochastic Bloch equations, we have determined the system's coherence, from which we have calculated expressions for the absorption coefficient and refractive index. The innovation of this methodology is that it allows us to take into account the solvent environment, which induce quantum effects not considered by classical treatments.

  1. Classical and Quantum Conditioning:. Mathematical and Information Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The different notions of stochastic independences, introduced in quantum probability open new fascinating possibilities to deepen our intuition on what a composite system. In the present note we propose a general mathematical definition of composite system which emphasizes the fact that the naive idea, that a physical system is composed of a multiplicity of sub-systems, can be substantiated by a multiplicity of inequivalent mathematical models. This wealth of possibilities can considerably enrich the present approach to the theory of open systems, with potential implications for the theory of measurement and the theory of complex systems, such as biological or economical ones. The standard approach to composite system strongly privileges the tensor product construction and the corresponding notion of stochastic independence. But there are a multiplicity of other possibilities whose mathematical and physical investigation is only at the beginning. In particular, to any notion of statistical independence it is canonically associated a corresponding notion of entanglement.

  2. Theoretical calculation of light-induced forces and torques on complex microrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang; Zhu, Anding; Huang, Wenhao

    2004-12-01

    In this letter, we propose the new theoretical investigation on the optical forces and torques on complex microrotors. On the basis of R. C. Gauthier"s hybrid ray-wave model, the optical forces and toques on two complex asymmetric micro-objects, the conical microrotor and the helical microrotor, are analyzed. The viscous drag torque is estimated by Stokes flow to obtain the rotational speed. The results of our computation agree well with the previously published experimental results, which indicates that our approach of the optical torque calculation is suitable for other complex microrotors and that the theoretical calculation is very helpful to optimum design of light-driven microrotors.

  3. The absolute configuration of (+)-oxopropaline D by theoretical calculation of specific rotation and asymmetric synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, Takeshi; Fukui, Miyako; Hata, Toshiyuki; Choshi, Tominari; Nobuhiro, Junko; Ono, Yukio; Hibino, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    The specific optical rotations of (R)-oxopropaline D calculated by two ab initio MO methods were +52+/-31 degrees and +61+/-29 degrees, respectively, and (+)-oxopropaline D (3) was presumed to have an R-configuration. On the basis of this theoretical result, the reaction of 1-litio-beta-carboline with (R)-glyceraldehyde acetonide followed by oxidation with MnO(2) gave (R)-oxopropaline D acetonide (4a), which was consistent with the previously synthesized (+)-oxopropaline D acetonide (4) in all respects. From the results of theoretical calculations and the experimental synthesis, we determined that natural (+)-oxopropaline D (3) has an R-configuration. PMID:12520122

  4. The comparison of measured deformation indicators of mining area with theoretical values calculated using Knothe's formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orwat, Justyna; Mielimaka, Ryszard

    2016-06-01

    The article demonstrates the comparison of prognosed values of deformation indicators with their values obtained from geodetic measurements. The value of correlation coefficient R between its theoretical and practical values was calculated for each indicator. Following the measured values as basic ones, the evaluation of efficiency of prognosis via the use of Knothe`s theory (a mathematical model, in which lowering of point is calculated as a double integral from Gauss error function with adequate parameters).

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for point defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Point defects in silicon have been studied extensively for many years. Nevertheless the mechanism for self diffusion in Si is still debated. Direct experimental measurements of the selfdiffusion in silicon are complicated by the lack of suitable isotopes. Formation energies are either obtained from theory or indirectly through the analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments. Density functional calculations predict formation energies ranging from 3 to 5 eV depending on the approximations used for the exchange-correlation functional [1]. Analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments result in similar broad range of diffusion activation energies of 4.95 [2], 4.68 [3], 2.4 eV [4]. Assuming a migration energy barrier of 0.1-0.3 eV [5], the resulting experimental interstitial formation energies range from 2.1 - 4.9 eV. To answer the question of the formation energy of Si interstitials we resort to a many-body description of the wave functions using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. Previous QMC calculations resulted in formation energies for the interstitials of around 5 eV [1,6]. We present a careful analysis of all the controlled and uncontrolled approximations that affect the defect formation energies in variational and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We find that more accurate trial wave functions for QMC using improved Jastrow expansions and most importantly a backflow transformation for the electron coordinates significantly improve the wave functions. Using zero-variance extrapolation, we predict interstitial formation energies in good agreement with hybrid DFT functionals [1] and recent GW calculations [7]. [4pt] [1] E. R. Batista, J. Heyd, R. G. Hennig, B. P. Uberuaga, R. L. Martin, G. E. Scuseria, C. J. Umrigar, and J. W. Wilkins. Phys. Rev. B 74, 121102(R) (2006).[0pt] [2] H. Bracht, E. E. Haller, and R. Clark-Phelps, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 393 (1998). [0pt] [3] A. Ural, P. B. Griffin, and J. D. Plummer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3454 (1999). [0pt

  6. Synthesis, structure, theoretical calculations and biological activity of sulfonate active ester new derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazzali, Mohamed; Khattab, Sherine A. N.; Elnakady, Yasser A.; Al-Mekhlafi, Fahd A.; Al-Farhan, Khalid; El-Faham, Ayman

    2013-08-01

    A series of naphthyl and tolyl sulfonate ester were synthesized and characterized by H NMR. X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments established the molecular structure of three new sulfonate esters derivatives, and spectral data agree with these in solution. The observed hydrogen bonding is discussed on the basis of crystal structural analyses and DFT/MP2 geometry optimization quantum calculations. Antimicrobial activities were screened for selected compounds against three human cancer cell lines and Mosquito Culex pipiens larvae.

  7. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  8. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Algorithms for Diagrammatic Vibrational Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Matthew; Hirata, So

    2015-06-01

    Convergent hierarchies of theories for calculating many-body vibrational ground and excited-state wave functions, such as Møller-Plesset perturbation theory or coupled cluster theory, tend to rely on matrix-algebraic manipulations of large, high-dimensional arrays of anharmonic force constants, tasks which require large amounts of computer storage space and which are very difficult to implement in a parallel-scalable fashion. On the other hand, existing quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods for vibrational wave functions tend to lack robust techniques for obtaining excited-state energies, especially for large systems. By exploiting analytical identities for matrix elements of position operators in a harmonic oscillator basis, we have developed stochastic implementations of the size-extensive vibrational self-consistent field (MC-XVSCF) and size-extensive vibrational Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MC-XVMP2) theories which do not require storing the potential energy surface (PES). The programmable equations of MC-XVSCF and MC-XVMP2 take the form of a small number of high-dimensional integrals evaluated using Metropolis Monte Carlo techniques. The associated integrands require independent evaluations of only the value, not the derivatives, of the PES at many points, a task which is trivial to parallelize. However, unlike existing vibrational QMC methods, MC-XVSCF and MC-XVMP2 can calculate anharmonic frequencies directly, rather than as a small difference between two noisy total energies, and do not require user-selected coordinates or nodal surfaces. MC-XVSCF and MC-XVMP2 can also directly sample the PES in a given approximation without analytical or grid-based approximations, enabling us to quantify the errors induced by such approximations.

  10. Charge transport in conjugated materials: insight from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beljonne, David; Cornil, J. P.; Calbert, J. P.; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2001-06-01

    The electronic structure of neutral and singly charged conjugated molecular clusters is investigated by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We first assess the influence of interchain interactions on the nature of the singly charged species (polarons) in organic conjugated polymers. In a two- chain model aggregate, the polaron is found to be delocalized over the two conjugated chains for short interchain separation. Such a delocalization strongly affects the geometric and electronic relaxation phenomena induced by charge injection, which in turn lead to a dramatic spectral redistribution of the linear absorption cross section. We then consider pentacene clusters built from the experimental crystal structure and compute the HOMO and LUMO bandwidths, which are decisive parameters for charge transport in the limiting case of band-like motion (i.e., complete delocalization of the excess charge over a large number of interacting molecules). Very large bandwidths are obtained, in agreement with the remarkable electron and hole charge-carrier mobilities reported recently for ultrahigh purity pentacene single crystals.

  11. Theoretical Calculation of Electronic Circular Dichroism of a Hexahydroxydiphenoyl-Containing Flavanone Glycoside

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was employed for theoretical calculation of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) of a hexahydroxydiphenoyl (HHDP)-containing flavanone glycoside, mattucinol-7-O-[4'',6''-O-(aS)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl]-ß-d-glucopyranoside (2). It identified the roles of t...

  12. Microcomputer Calculation of Theoretical Pre-Exponential Factors for Bimolecular Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1991-01-01

    Described is the application of microcomputers to predict reaction rates based on theoretical atomic and molecular properties taught in undergraduate physical chemistry. Listed is the BASIC program which computes the partition functions for any specific bimolecular reactants. These functions are then used to calculate the pre-exponential factor of…

  13. Invariant-theoretic method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space groups

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, A.Ya.; Gufan, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01

    A new invariant-theoretic method to directly calculate Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space and point groups representations is proposed. The method is exemplified with the space groups O{sub h}{sup 5} and D{sub 6h}{sup 1}. 34 refs.

  14. Efficiency and power loss in d. c. chopper circuits. [Theoretical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this paper was to investigate the efficiency and source of power losses of various classes of dc chopper circuits. The study involved a theoretical calculation of the power losses, supported by a considerable amount of practical work on full power-rated traction motor test bed. 3 refs.

  15. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit heats of segregation for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent LMTO-based parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation, while the ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of a segregation model driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  16. Theoretical basis for two-phase disengagement and vapor fraction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews the theoretical basis for disengagement calculations. That is the assumptions of pseudo-steady-state, volumetric gas production and applicable drift-flux correlations. Using these an axial void fraction profile can be calculated. The use of graphical, analytical, and simplified-equation-based correlations for vertical cylinders, horizontal cylinders, and spheres are covered. Before disengagement occurs the vent stream void fraction can be estimated using the coupling equation. The implications of the converging cross-sectional area of horizontal cylinders and spheres are discussed for both disengagement and two-phase flow calculations. 22 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Theoretical methods for the calculation of Bragg curves and 3D distributions of proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, W.; Matsinos, E.

    2010-12-01

    The well-known Bragg-Kleeman rule RCSDA = A ṡ E has become a pioneer work in radiation physics of charged particles and is still a useful tool to estimate the range RCSDA of approximately monoenergetic protons with initial energy E0 in a homogeneous medium. The rule is based on the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA). It results from a generalized (nonrelativistic) Langevin equation and a modification of the phenomenological friction term. The complete integration of this equation provides information about the residual energy E(z) and dE(z)/dz at each position z(0 ≦ z ≦ RCSDA). A relativistic extension of the generalized Langevin equation yields the formula RCSDA = A ṡ (E0 + E/2M ṡ c2)p. The initial energy of therapeutic protons satisfies E0 ≪ 2M ṡ c2(M ṡ c2 = 938.276 MeV), which enables us to consider the relativistic contributions as correction terms. Besides this phenomenological starting-point, a complete integration of the Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE) is developed, which also provides the determination of RCSDA, E(z) and dE(z)/dz and uses only those parameters given by the BBE itself (i.e., without further empirical parameters like modification of friction). The results obtained in the context of the aforementioned methods are compared with Monte-Carlo calculations (GEANT4); this Monte-Carlo code is also used with regard to further topics such as lateral scatter, nuclear interactions, and buildup effects. In the framework of the CSDA, the energy transfer from protons to environmental atomic electrons does not account for local fluctuations. Based on statistical quantum mechanics, an analysis of the Gaussian convolution and the Landau-Vavilov distribution function is carried out to describe these fluctuations. The Landau tail is derived as Hermite polynomial corrections of a Gaussian convolution. It is experimentally confirmed that proton Bragg curves with E0 ≧ 120 MeV show a buildup, which increases with the proton energy. This

  18. Theoretical analysis of on-chip linear quantum optical information processing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hach, Edwin E.; Preble, Stefan F.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a quantum optical analysis of waveguides directionally coupled to ring resonators, an architecture realizable using silicon nanophotonics. The innate scalability of the silicon platform allows for the possibility of "on-chip" quantum computation and information processing. In this paper, we briefly review a comprehensive method for analyzing the quantum mechanical output of such a network for an arbitrary input state of the quantized, traveling electromagnetic field in the continuous wave (cw) limit. Specifically, we briefly review a recent theoretical result identifying a particular device topology that yields, via Passive Quantum Optical Feedback (PQOF), dramatic and unexpected enhancements of the Hong-Ou-Mandel Effect, an effect central to the operation of many quantum information processing systems. Next, we extend the analysis to our proposal for a scalable, on-chip realization of the Nonlinear Sign (NS) shifter essential for implementation of the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn (KLM) protocol for Linear Optical Quantum Computing (LOQC). Finally, we discuss generalizations to arbitrary networks of directionally coupled ring resonators along with possible applications is the areas of quantum metrology and sensitive photon detection.

  19. Hyperon Puzzle: Hints from Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The onset of hyperons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions and recent astrophysical observations of neutron stars are the grounds for the so-called hyperon puzzle. We calculate the equation of state and the neutron star mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and Λ particles by using the auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that the three-body hyperon-nucleon interaction plays a fundamental role in the softening of the equation of state and for the consequent reduction of the predicted maximum mass. We have considered two different models of three-body force that successfully describe the binding energy of medium mass hypernuclei. Our results indicate that they give dramatically different results on the maximum mass of neutron stars, not necessarily incompatible with the recent observation of very massive neutron stars. We conclude that stronger constraints on the hyperon-neutron force are necessary in order to properly assess the role of hyperons in neutron stars.

  20. Hyperon puzzle: hints from quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The onset of hyperons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions and recent astrophysical observations of neutron stars are the grounds for the so-called hyperon puzzle. We calculate the equation of state and the neutron star mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and Λ particles by using the auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that the three-body hyperon-nucleon interaction plays a fundamental role in the softening of the equation of state and for the consequent reduction of the predicted maximum mass. We have considered two different models of three-body force that successfully describe the binding energy of medium mass hypernuclei. Our results indicate that they give dramatically different results on the maximum mass of neutron stars, not necessarily incompatible with the recent observation of very massive neutron stars. We conclude that stronger constraints on the hyperon-neutron force are necessary in order to properly assess the role of hyperons in neutron stars. PMID:25793808

  1. Rotational isomerism of some chloroacetamides: Theoretical and experimental studies through calculations, infrared and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Marcela F.; Braga, Carolyne B.; Rozada, Thiago C.; Basso, Ernani A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.

    2014-08-01

    The geometries involved in the conformational equilibria of 2,2-dichloro-N-cyclohexyl-N-methyl-acetamide (DCCMA) and 2-chloro-N,N-dicyclohexylacetamide (CDCA) were investigated. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory showed that gauche forms (Clsbnd Csbnd Cdbnd O) are the most stable and the predominant conformers in isolated phase. Both compounds had the conformational behavior in solvents of different polarities estimated from theoretical calculations with the PCM (Polarizable Continuum Model), at the same level of theory, using infrared data from deconvolution of the carbonyl absorption bands and 13C NMR spectra. Their IR spectra showed two carbonyl absorptions and that the conformer with the highest dipole moment had its population increased when the most polar solvents were used, in accordance with the theoretical calculation in solution. 1JCH coupling constants were obtained from their NMR spectra, and revealed that there was population variation of conformers with solvent exchange. Experimental data (NMR and IR) as well as calculations including the solvent effects followed the same trend.

  2. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  3. Theoretical calculation of the interannual variability of the Earth's insolation with daily resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Based on the astronomical ephemerides DE-406, theoretical calculations have been performed of the interannual variability of the Earth's insolation related to celestial-mechanical processes for 365 points of a tropical year in the time period from 1900 to 2050. It has been determined that the average amplitude of variations of the interannual insolation is 0.310 W/m2 (0.023% of the solar constant). The calculated variations are characterized by strict periodicity that corresponds with the length of a synodic month. Connection between the extreme values of the calculated insolation variability and syzygies has been defined. The average amplitude of the calculated variability exceeds by 1.7 times (0.01% of the solar constant) the amplitude of the interannual variability in the 11-year variation of the total Earth's insolation.

  4. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  5. Structural studies of homoisoflavonoids: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Elina; Toušek, Jaromír; Lunerová, Kamila; Marek, Jaromír; Jankovská, Dagmar; Dvorská, Margita; Marek, Radek

    2010-08-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for five homoisoflavonoids, molecules important from the pharmacological point of view. For studying the electron distribution as well as its influence on the physicochemical properties, NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations have been used. Nuclear magnetic shieldings obtained by using DFT calculations for optimized molecular geometries are correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The theoretical data are well in agreement with the experimental values. The single crystal X-ray structures of homoisoflavonoid derivatives 1, 3, and 4 have been solved. The molecular geometries and crystal packing determined by X-ray diffraction are used for characterizing the intermolecular interactions. Electron distribution is crucial for the stability of radicals and hence the antioxidant efficiency of flavonoid structures. The hydrogen bonding governs the formation of complexes of homoisoflavonoids with biological targets.

  6. An analysis of states in the phase space: a possible approach to calculate the energy of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosto, Sebastiano

    1997-04-01

    The presentation aims to show the basic features of an "ab initio" approach to calculate the energy levels of quantum systems. The purpose of the model is not to furtherly increase the accuracy of some already existing computational method or to develop a new mathematical algorithm but rather to examine the consequences of introducing since the beginning the quantum uncertainty in the energy equations of atoms and molecules. Without any hypothesis on the state of motion of the electrons but merely concerning the number of states allowed in the phase space as a function of momentum and space uncertainty ranges, one obtains simple formulae enabling to calculate the enegy levels of multielectron atoms in a good agreement with the experimental data. The same theoretical approach has been also utilized to describe the diatomic molecules in terms of anharmonic oscillators. Also in this case, simple formulae enable to correlate dissociation energy, vibrational frequency and bond length in a good agreement with the experimental data

  7. Theoretical calculation of plane wave speeds for alkali metals under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Macdonald, D. E.; Arkilic, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the variation with pressure of small amplitude plane wave speeds are performed for sodium and potassium at zero temperature. The results obtained for wave speeds associated with volume dependent second-order elastic coefficients show better agreement with experimental data than for wave speeds associated with shear dependent coefficients. This result is believed to be due to omission of the band structure correction to the strain energy density.

  8. Toward extending photosynthetic biosignatures: quantum dynamics calculation of light harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    For detecting life from reflectance spectra on extrasolar planets, several indicators called surface biosignatures have been proposed. One of them is the vegetation red edge (VRE) which derives from surface vegetation. VRE is observed in 700-750 nm on the Earth, but there is no guarantee that exovegetation show the red edge in this wavelength. Therefore it is necessary to check the validity of current standards of VRE as the signatures. In facts, M stars (cooler than Sun) will be the main targets in future missions, it is significantly important to know on the fundamental mechanisms in photosynthetic organism such as purple bacteria which absorb longer wavelength radiation. We investigated light absorptions and excitation energy transfers (EETs) in light harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2s) by using quantum dynamics simulations. In LH2, effective EET is accomplished by corporative electronic excitation of the pigments. In our theoretical model, a dipole-dipole approximation was used for the electronic interactions between pigment excitations. Quantum dynamics simulations were performed according to Liouville equation to examine the EET process. The calculated oscillator strength and the transfer time between LH2 were good agreement with the experimental values. As the system size increases, the absorption bands shifted longer and the transfer velocities became larger. When two pigments in a LHC were exchanged to another pigments with lower excitation energy, faster and intensive light collection were observed.

  9. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vinit; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, P. R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    One of the critical scientific challenges of contemporary research is to obtain an accurate theoretical description of the electronic properties of strongly correlated systems such as transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds, since state-of-art ab-initio methods based on approximate density functionals are not always sufficiently accurate. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods, which use statistical sampling to evaluate many-body wave functions, have the potential to answer this challenge. Owing to the few fundamental approximations made and the direct treatment of electron correlation, QMC methods are among the most accurate electronic structure methods available to date. We assess the accuracy of the diffusion Monte Carlo method in the case of rocksalt manganese oxide (MnO). We study the electronic properties of this strongly-correlated oxide, which has been identified as a suitable candidate for many applications ranging from catalysts to electronic devices. ``This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.'' Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides.

  10. Quantum scattering calculations for ro-vibrational de-excitation of CO by hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lei; Avoird, Ad van der; Karman, Tijs; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-05-28

    We present quantum-mechanical scattering calculations for ro-vibrational relaxation of carbon monoxide (CO) in collision with hydrogen atoms. Collisional cross sections of CO ro-vibrational transitions from v = 1, j = 0 − 30 to v′ = 0, j′ are calculated using the close coupling method for collision energies between 0.1 and 15 000 cm{sup −1} based on the three-dimensional potential energy surface of Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7571 (2013)]. Cross sections of transitions from v = 1, j ≥ 3 to v′ = 0, j′ are reported for the first time at this level of theory. Also calculations by the more approximate coupled states and infinite order sudden (IOS) methods are performed in order to test the applicability of these methods to H–CO ro-vibrational inelastic scattering. Vibrational de-excitation rate coefficients of CO (v = 1) are presented for the temperature range from 100 K to 3000 K and are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. All of these results and additional rate coefficients reported in a forthcoming paper are important for including the effects of H–CO collisions in astrophysical models.

  11. Quantum scattering calculations for ro-vibrational de-excitation of CO by hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Balakrishnan, N.; van der Avoird, Ad; Karman, Tijs; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2015-05-01

    We present quantum-mechanical scattering calculations for ro-vibrational relaxation of carbon monoxide (CO) in collision with hydrogen atoms. Collisional cross sections of CO ro-vibrational transitions from v = 1, j = 0 - 30 to v' = 0, j' are calculated using the close coupling method for collision energies between 0.1 and 15 000 cm-1 based on the three-dimensional potential energy surface of Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7571 (2013)]. Cross sections of transitions from v = 1, j ≥ 3 to v' = 0, j' are reported for the first time at this level of theory. Also calculations by the more approximate coupled states and infinite order sudden (IOS) methods are performed in order to test the applicability of these methods to H-CO ro-vibrational inelastic scattering. Vibrational de-excitation rate coefficients of CO (v = 1) are presented for the temperature range from 100 K to 3000 K and are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. All of these results and additional rate coefficients reported in a forthcoming paper are important for including the effects of H-CO collisions in astrophysical models.

  12. A combined study based on experimental analyses and theoretical calculations on properties of poly (lactic acid) under annealing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loued, W.; Wéry, J.; Dorlando, A.; Alimi, K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the significance of annealing, in two different atmospheres (air and vacuum), on the surface characteristics of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) films was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements correlated to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of the cast PLA films show that thermal treatment under air atmosphere is responsible for a significant increase of crystallinity with the increase of temperature. However, band gap energy of the title compound is slightly affected by annealing at different temperatures. As for the untreated PLA, the molecular geometry was optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-31g (d) basis set in ground state. From the optimized geometry, HOMO and LUMO energies and quantum chemical parameters were performed at B3LYP/6-31g (d). The theoretical results, applied to simulated optical spectra of the compound, were compared to the observed ones. On the basis of theoretical vibrational analyses, the thermodynamic properties were calculated at different temperatures, revealing the correlation between internal energy (U), enthalpy (H), entropy (S), Free energy (G) and temperatures.

  13. A formula for calculating theoretical photoelectron fluxes resulting from the He/+/ 304 A solar spectral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified method for the evaluation of theoretical photoelectron fluxes in the upper atmosphere resulting from the solar radiation at 304 A is presented. The calculation is based on considerations of primary and cascade (secondary) photoelectron production in the two-stream model, where photoelectron transport is described by two electron streams, one moving up and one moving down, and of loss rates due to collisions with neutral gases and thermal electrons. The calculation is illustrated for the case of photoelectrons at an energy of 24.5 eV, and it is noted that the 24.5-eV photoelectron flux may be used to monitor variations in the solar 304 A flux. Theoretical calculations based on various ionization and excitation cross sections of Banks et al. (1974) are shown to be in generally good agreement with AE-E measurements taken between 200 and 235 km, however the use of more recent, larger cross sections leads to photoelectron values a factor of two smaller than observations but in agreement with previous calculations. It is concluded that a final resolution of the photoelectron problem may depend on a reevaluation of the inelastic electron collision cross sections.

  14. Evolution of Black Carbon Optical Properties during Atmospheric Aging: Comparison Between Theoretical Calculations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Li, Q.; Yang, P.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    The optical properties of black carbon (BC) are significantly affected by its aging process in the atmosphere. We have built a conceptual model defining three BC aging stages, including freshly emitted BC aggregates, coating by soluble material and hygroscopic growth. We apply an improved geometric-optics surface-wave approach (Liou et al., 2011; Takano et al., 2013) to calculate the absorption and scattering properties of BC at each stage and compare the theoretical results with those obtained from laboratory experiments (Zhang et al., 2008; Khalizov et al., 2009). Preliminary results show a general agreement between calculated and measured BC absorption cross sections (bias < 10%) and scattering cross sections (bias < 30%) for BC aerosols with mobility diameters of 155, 245 and 320 nm at Stages 1 and 2, where BC is coated by sulfuric acid and its water solution, respectively. We find that the calculated scattering and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates (Stage 0) with different sizes are invariably larger than experimental results partly because of the uncertainty in theoretical calculations for BC with size parameters less than 1. It appears that the uncertainty in the experiment could also contribute to the discrepancy, considering that the measuring instrument missed some scattering in certain angles (0-7° and 170-180°). Finally, we will apply the conceptual model and the single-scattering results to assess the effects of BC aging processes on direct radiative forcing using observed BC vertical profiles.

  15. Theoretical Analysis About Quantum Noise Squeezing of Optical Fields From an Intracavity Frequency-Doubled Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kuanshou; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    1996-01-01

    The dependence of the quantum fluctuation of the output fundamental and second-harmonic waves upon cavity configuration has been numerically calculated for the intracavity frequency-doubled laser. The results might provide a direct reference for the design of squeezing system through the second-harmonic-generation.

  16. Evaluation of steam sterilization processes: comparing calculations using temperature data and biointegrator reduction data and calculation of theoretical temperature difference.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Gunnel

    2007-01-01

    When calculating of the physical F121.1 degrees c-value by the equation F121.1 degrees C = t x 10(T-121.1/z the temperature (T), in combination with the z-value, influences the F121.1 degrees c-value exponentially. Because the z-value for spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus often varies between 6 and 9, the biological F-value (F(Bio) will not always correspond to the F0-value based on temperature records from the sterilization process calculated with a z-value of 10, even if the calibration of both of them are correct. Consequently an error in calibration of thermocouples and difference in z-values influences the F121.1 degrees c-values logarithmically. The paper describes how results from measurements with different z-values can be compared. The first part describes the mathematics of a calculation program, which makes it easily possible to compare F0-values based on temperature records with the F(BIO)-value based on analysis of bioindicators such as glycerin-water-suspension sensors. For biological measurements, a suitable bioindicator with a high D121-value can be used (such a bioindicator can be manufactured as described in the article "A Method of Increasing Test Range and Accuracy of Bioindicators-Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores"). By the mathematics and calculations described in this macro program it is possible to calculate for every position the theoretical temperature difference (deltaT(th)) needed to explain the difference in results between the thermocouple and the biointegrator. Since the temperature difference is a linear function and constant all over the process this value is an indication of the magnitude of an error. A graph and table from these calculations gives a picture of the run. The second part deals with product characteristics, the sterilization processes, loading patterns. Appropriate safety margins have to be chosen in the development phase of a sterilization process to achieve acceptable safety limits. Case studies are

  17. Theoretical performance of solar cell based on mini-bands quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Abou El-Maaty M. E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com; Nasr, A. E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com

    2014-03-21

    The tremendous amount of research in solar energy is directed toward intermediate band solar cell for its advantages compared with the conventional solar cell. The latter has lower efficiency because the photons have lower energy than the bandgap energy and cannot excite mobile carriers from the valence band to the conduction band. On the other hand, if mini intermediate band is introduced between the valence and conduction bands, then the smaller energy photons can be used to promote charge carriers transfer to the conduction band and thereby the total current increases while maintaining a large open circuit voltage. In this article, the influence of the new band on the power conversion efficiency for structure of quantum dots intermediate band solar cell is theoretically investigated and studied. The time-independent Schrödinger equation is used to determine the optimum width and location of the intermediate band. Accordingly, achievement of a maximum efficiency by changing the width of quantum dots and barrier distances is studied. Theoretical determination of the power conversion efficiency under the two different ranges of QD width is presented. From the obtained results, the maximum power conversion efficiency is about 70.42%. It is carried out for simple cubic quantum dot crystal under fully concentrated light. It is strongly dependent on the width of quantum dots and barrier distances.

  18. Raman and infrared spectra and theoretical calculations of dipicolinic acid, dinicotinic acid, and their dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

    2008-11-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and dinicotinic acid (DNic) and their salts (CaDPA, Na 2DPA, and CaDNic) have been recorded and the spectra have been assigned. Ab initio and DFT calculations were carried out to predict the structures and vibrational spectra and were compared to the experimental results. Because of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystals of these molecules, the calculated structures and spectra for the individual molecules agree only moderately well with the experimental values. Theoretical calculations were also carried out for DPA dimers and DPA·2H 2O to better understand the intermolecular interactions. The spectra do show that DPA and its calcium salt, which are present in anthrax spores, can be distinguished from the very similar DNic and CaDNic.

  19. The calculation of theoretical chromospheric models and the interpretation of solar spectra from rockets and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    Models and spectra of sunspots were studied, because they are important to energy balance and variability discussions. Sunspot observations in the ultraviolet region 140 to 168 nn was obtained by the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph. Extensive photometric observations of sunspot umbrae and prenumbrae in 10 chanels covering the wavelength region 387 to 3800 nm were made. Cool star opacities and model atmospheres were computed. The Sun is the first testcase, both to check the opacity calculations against the observed solar spectrum, and to check the purely theoretical model calculation against the observed solar energy distribution. Line lists were finally completed for all the molecules that are important in computing statistical opacities for energy balance and for radiative rate calculations in the Sun (except perhaps for sunspots). Because many of these bands are incompletely analyzed in the laboratory, the energy levels are not well enough known to predict wavelengths accurately for spectrum synthesis and for detailed comparison with the observations.

  20. Application of a new theoretical procedure for calculating Kirkwood correlation factors in alkanol + hexane and alkanol + pentane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vasiltsova, Tatiana; Heintz, Andreas

    2007-12-21

    A recently developed statistical mechanical model for calculating Kirkwood correlation factors gK in self associating liquids and liquid mixtures has been applied for the simultaneous description of gK, the molar enthalpy of mixing HEM and the infrared absorption of monomer alcoholic species as function of the composition in alkanol + hexane and alkanol + pentane mixtures (alkanol: butan-1-ol, pentan-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, heptan-1-ol, sec-butanol, tert-butanol). The majority of parameters involved into the theory are obtained by independent quantum mechanical ab initio calculations of molecular clusters consisting of up to four alcohol molecules. As a consequence only two parameters have to be adjusted freely to each binary system, a third parameter responsible for the non specific intermolecular dispersion interaction has been adjusted within a limited range of possible values given by physical arguments. Excellent agreement between theory and experimental data of gK, HEM and IR absorbance is obtained covering the whole range of concentration including the temperature dependence of these properties without adjusting further parameters. The Kirkwood correlation factor gK turns out to be a sensitive response to peculiarities of the molecular structure of hydrogen bonded systems in the condensed liquid state. The successful application of the theoretical model opens a new way of a deeper and more reliable understanding of such liquid structures. PMID:18046469

  1. Quantum entanglement of identical particles by standard information-theoretic notions.

    PubMed

    Lo Franco, Rosario; Compagno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Quantum entanglement of identical particles is essential in quantum information theory. Yet, its correct determination remains an open issue hindering the general understanding and exploitation of many-particle systems. Operator-based methods have been developed that attempt to overcome the issue. Here we introduce a state-based method which, as second quantization, does not label identical particles and presents conceptual and technical advances compared to the previous ones. It establishes the quantitative role played by arbitrary wave function overlaps, local measurements and particle nature (bosons or fermions) in assessing entanglement by notions commonly used in quantum information theory for distinguishable particles, like partial trace. Our approach furthermore shows that bringing identical particles into the same spatial location functions as an entangling gate, providing fundamental theoretical support to recent experimental observations with ultracold atoms. These results pave the way to set and interpret experiments for utilizing quantum correlations in realistic scenarios where overlap of particles can count, as in Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum dots and biological molecular aggregates. PMID:26857475

  2. Quantum entanglement of identical particles by standard information-theoretic notions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Franco, Rosario; Compagno, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Quantum entanglement of identical particles is essential in quantum information theory. Yet, its correct determination remains an open issue hindering the general understanding and exploitation of many-particle systems. Operator-based methods have been developed that attempt to overcome the issue. Here we introduce a state-based method which, as second quantization, does not label identical particles and presents conceptual and technical advances compared to the previous ones. It establishes the quantitative role played by arbitrary wave function overlaps, local measurements and particle nature (bosons or fermions) in assessing entanglement by notions commonly used in quantum information theory for distinguishable particles, like partial trace. Our approach furthermore shows that bringing identical particles into the same spatial location functions as an entangling gate, providing fundamental theoretical support to recent experimental observations with ultracold atoms. These results pave the way to set and interpret experiments for utilizing quantum correlations in realistic scenarios where overlap of particles can count, as in Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum dots and biological molecular aggregates.

  3. Quantum entanglement of identical particles by standard information-theoretic notions

    PubMed Central

    Lo Franco, Rosario; Compagno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Quantum entanglement of identical particles is essential in quantum information theory. Yet, its correct determination remains an open issue hindering the general understanding and exploitation of many-particle systems. Operator-based methods have been developed that attempt to overcome the issue. Here we introduce a state-based method which, as second quantization, does not label identical particles and presents conceptual and technical advances compared to the previous ones. It establishes the quantitative role played by arbitrary wave function overlaps, local measurements and particle nature (bosons or fermions) in assessing entanglement by notions commonly used in quantum information theory for distinguishable particles, like partial trace. Our approach furthermore shows that bringing identical particles into the same spatial location functions as an entangling gate, providing fundamental theoretical support to recent experimental observations with ultracold atoms. These results pave the way to set and interpret experiments for utilizing quantum correlations in realistic scenarios where overlap of particles can count, as in Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum dots and biological molecular aggregates. PMID:26857475

  4. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  5. Theoretical calculation of the miniband-to-acceptor magnetoluminescence of semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latgé, A.; Porras-Montenegro, N.; de Dios-Leyva, M.; Oliveira, L. E.

    1997-05-01

    The acceptor-related photoluminescence of a GaAs-(Ga,Al)As superlattice, under the influence of a magnetic field applied parallel to the interfaces, is theoretically studied following a variational procedure within the effective-mass approximation. Electron and hole magnetic Landau levels and envelope wave functions were obtained by an expansion in terms of sine functions, whereas for the impurity levels the envelope functions were taken as products of sine and hydrogenic-like variational functions. Impurity binding energies and wave functions are obtained for acceptors at a general position in the superlattice and for different in-plane magnetic fields. Theoretical results corresponding to transitions from the conduction subband to states of acceptors (miniband-to-acceptor e-A0 transitions) at the edge and center positions of the GaAs quantum well compare well with available experimental data by Skromme et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 2050 (1990)] on the magnetic-field dependence of the photoluminescence peak position of conduction miniband-to-acceptor transitions for different temperatures and values of the superlattice period.

  6. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which themore » melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.« less

  7. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which the melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.

  8. Theoretical study of the electronic structure with dipole moment calculations of barium monofluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Samir N.; Korek, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    The potential energy curves have been investigated for the 41 lowest doublet and quartet electronic states in the 2s+1Λ± representation below 55,000 cm-1 of the molecule BaF via CASSCF and MRCI (single and double excitations with Davidson correction) calculations. Twenty-five electronic states have been studied here theoretically for the first time. The crossing and avoided crossing of 20 doublet electronic states have been studied in the region 30,000-50,000 cm-1. The harmonic frequency ωe, the internuclear distance Re, the rotational constant Be, the electronic energy with respect to the ground state Te, and the permanent and transition dipole moments have been calculated in addition to static dipole polarizability of the ground state. By using the canonical functions approach, the eigenvalue Ev, the rotational constant Bv, and the abscissas of the turning points Rmin and Rmax have been calculated for the electronic states up to the vibrational level v=98. The comparison of these values with the theoretical results available in the literature shows a very good agreement.

  9. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  10. Investigation of attractive and repulsive interactions associated with ketones in supercritical CO2, based on Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-01

    Carbonyl compounds are solutes that are highly soluble in supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Their solubility governs the efficiency of chemical reactions, and is significantly increased by changing a chromophore. To effectively use scCO2 as solvent, it is crucial to understand the high solubility of carbonyl compounds, the solvation structure, and the solute-solvent intermolecular interactions. We report Raman spectroscopic data, for three prototypical ketones dissolved in scCO2, and four theoretical analyses. The vibrational Raman spectra of the C=O stretching modes of ketones (acetone, acetophenone, and benzophenone) were measured in scCO2 along the reduced temperature Tr = T/Tc = 1.02 isotherm as a function of the reduced density ρr = ρ/ρc in the range 0.05-1.5. The peak frequencies of the C=O stretching modes shifted toward lower energies as the fluid density increased. The density dependence was analyzed by using perturbed hard-sphere theory, and the shift was decomposed into attractive and repulsive energy components. The attractive energy between the ketones and CO2 was up to nine times higher than the repulsive energy, and its magnitude increased in the following order: acetone < acetophenone < benzophenone. The Mulliken charges of the three solutes and CO2 molecules obtained by using quantum chemistry calculations described the order of the magnitude of the attractive energy and optimized the relative configuration between each solute and CO2. According to theoretical calculations for the dispersion energy, the dipole-induced-dipole interaction energy, and the frequency shift due to their interactions, the experimentally determined attractive energy differences in the three solutes were attributed to the dispersion energies that depended on a chromophore attached to the carbonyl groups. It was found that the major intermolecular interaction with the attractive shift varied from dipole-induced dipole to dispersion depending on the chromophore in the ketones in

  11. A Calculation of Cosmological Scale from Quantum Coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Lindesay, J

    2004-07-23

    We use general arguments to examine the energy scales for which a quantum coherent description of gravitating quantum energy units is necessary. The cosmological dark energy density is expected to decouple from the Friedman-Lemaitre energy density when the Friedman-Robertson-Walker scale expansion becomes sub-luminal at R = c, at which time the usual microscopic interactions of relativistic quantum mechanics (QED, QCD, etc) open new degrees of freedom. We assume that these microscopic interactions cannot signal with superluminal exchanges, only superluminal quantum correlations. The expected gravitational vacuum energy density at that scale would be expected to freeze out due to the loss of gravitational coherence. We define the vacuum energy which generates this cosmological constant to be that of a zero temperature Bose condensate at this gravitational de-coherence scale. We presume a universality throughout the universe in the available degrees of freedom determined by fundamental constants during its evolution. Examining the reverse evolution of the universe from the present, long before reaching Planck scale dynamics one expects major modifications from the de-coherent thermal equations of state, suggesting that the pre-coherent phase has global coherence properties. Since the arguments presented involve primarily counting of degrees of freedom, we expect the statistical equilibrium states of causally disconnected regions of space to be independently identical. Thus, there is no horizon problem associated with the lack of causal influences between spatially separated regions in this approach. The scale of the amplitude of fluctuations produced during de-coherence of cosmological vacuum energy are found to evolve to values consistent with those observed in cosmic microwave background radiation and galactic clustering.

  12. Experimental investigation and theoretical calculation for 3He induced nuclear reactions on vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, B. M.; Al-Abyad, M.; Seddik, U.; El-Kameesy, S. U.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.

    2016-04-01

    Using stacked-foil activation technique and gamma-ray spectrometry, excitation functions for 3He induced nuclear reactions on natV were measured. Cross-sections for natV(3He, xn)52m,gMn and natV(3He, pxn)51Cr nuclear reactions were measured up to 27 MeV utilizing the MGC-20E cyclotron of ATOMKI. The measurements establish for the first time consistent excitation curves. Comparisons with results for values derived from different theoretical codes were included. Integral yield were calculated.

  13. Analytic and numerical calculations of quantum synchrotron spectra from relativistic electron distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.; Petrosian, V.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations are performed numerically and analytically of synchrotron spectra for thermal and power-law electron distributions using the single-particle synchrotron power spectrum derived from quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is proportional to temperature and independent of field strength for thermal spectra; quantum effects introduce an exponential roll-off away from the classical spectra. For power law spectra, the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength; quantum effects produce a steeper power law than is found classically. The results are compared with spectra derived from the classical power spectrum with an energy cutoff ensuring conservation of energy. It is found that an energy cutoff is generally an inadequate approximation of quantum effects for low photon energies and for thermal spectra, but gives reasonable results for high-energy emission from power-law electron distributions.

  14. Infrared, Raman and ultraviolet with circular dichroism analysis and theoretical calculations of tedizolid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Katarzyna; Mizera, Mikołaj; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2016-07-01

    Tedizolid is the newest antibacterial agent from the oxazolidinone class. For its identification, FT-IR (2000-400 cm-1) and Raman (2000-400 cm-1) analyses were proposed. Studies of the enantiomeric purity of tedizolid were conducted based on ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-311G(2df,2pd) basis set was used for support of the analysis of the FT-IR and Raman spectra. Theoretical methods made it possible to conduct HOMO and LUMO analysis, which was used to determine the charge transfer for two tedizolid enantiomers. Molecular electrostatic potential maps were calculated with the DFT method for both tedizolid enantiomers. The relationship between the results of ab initio calculations and knowledge about the chemical-biological properties of R- and S-tedizolid enantiomers is also discussed.

  15. Calculation of membrane bending rigidity using field-theoretic umbrella sampling.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Y G; Müller, M

    2015-12-28

    The free-energy change of membrane shape transformations can be small, e.g., as in the case of membrane bending. Therefore, the calculation of the free-energy difference between different membrane morphologies is a challenge. Here, we discuss a computational method - field-theoretic umbrella sampling - to compute the local chemical potential of a non-equilibrium configuration and illustrate how one can apply it to study free-energy changes of membrane transformations using simulations. Specifically, the chemical potential profile of the bent membrane and the bending rigidity of membrane are calculated for a soft, coarse-grained amphiphile model and the MARTINI model of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membrane. PMID:26723640

  16. Reaction cross-section calculations using new experimental and theoretical level structure data for deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1984-10-05

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been used to construct sets of discrete states with energy 0 to 1.5 MeV in /sup 176/Lu and /sup 236/Np. These data were used as part of the input for calculation of isomer production cross-section ratios in the /sup 175/Lu(n,..gamma..)/sup 176/Lu and /sup 237/Np(n,2n)/sup 236/Np reactions. In order to achieve agreement with experiment, it has been found necessary to include in the modeled set many rotational bands (35 to 95), which are comprised of hundreds of levels with their gamma-ray branching ratios. It is essential that enough bands be included to produce a representative selection of K quantum numbers in the de-excitation cascade. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The implementation of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations on transporters.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M D; Hillier, I H

    1991-06-01

    The RHF and geometry optimization sections of the ab initio quantum chemistry code, GAMESS, have been optimized for a network of parallel microprocessors, Inmos T800-20 transputers, using both indirect and direct SCF techniques. The results indicate great scope for implementation of such codes on small parallel computer systems, very high efficiencies having been achieved, particularly in the cases of direct SCF and geometry optimization with large basis sets. The work, although performed upon one particular parallel system, the Meiko Computing Surface, is applicable to a wide range of parallel systems with both shared and distributed memory. PMID:1919615

  18. Synthesis, characterization, optical properties and theoretical calculations of 6-fluoro coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yihui; Du, Jinyan; Weng, Xuexiang

    6-Fluoro coumarin is synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The optical properties of the title compound are investigated by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra, the results show the title compound can absorb UV-vis light at 319, 269 and 215 nm, moreover it exhibits blue-purple fluorescence emission at 416 nm. Theoretical studies on molecular structure, infrared spectra (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR, 13C NMR) chemical shifts, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission of the synthesized compound have been worked out. Most chemical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level (NMR at B3LYP/Aug-CC-Pvdz level) using Gaussian 09 program. The compared results reveal that the scaled theoretical vibrational frequencies are in good accordance with the observed spectra; computational chemical shifts are consistent with the experimental values in most parts, except for some minor deviations; the UV-vis absorption calculated matches the experimental one very well, and the fluorescence emission spectrum is in good agreement with the experimental one when the solute-solvent hydrogen-bonding interaction is considered. These good coincidences prove that the computational methods selected can be used to predict these properties of other similar materials where it is difficult to arrive at experimental results.

  19. Investigation on the Gas-Phase Decomposition of Trichlorfon by GC-MS and Theoretical Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kezhi; Zhang, Ningwen; Zhang, Hu; Wang, Jianmei; Qian, Mingrong

    2015-01-01

    The gas phase pyrolysis of trichlorfon was investigated by the on-line gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) pyrolysis and theoretical calculations. Two reaction channels were proposed in the pyrolytic reaction, by analyzing the detected pyrolytic products in the total ion chromatography, including 2,2,2-trichloroacetaldehyde, dimethyl phosphite, and dichlorvos. Theoretical calculations showed that there is an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the phosphate O atom in trichlorfon, through which the hydroxyl H atom can be easily transferred to phosphate O atom to trigger two pyrolytic channels. In path-a, migration of H atom results in direct decomposition of trichlorfon to give 2,2,2-trichloroacetaldehyde and dimethyl phosphite in one step. In path-b, migration of H atom in trichlorfon is combined with formation of the O-P bond to give an intermediate, followed by HCl elimination to afford dichlorvos. Path-a is kinetically more favorable than path-b, which is consistent with the GC-MS results. PMID:25856549

  20. Quantum-field-theoretical approach to phase-space techniques: Generalizing the positive-P representation

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Fleischhauer, M.; Olsen, M.K.; Collett, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an introduction to phase-space techniques (PST) based on a quantum-field-theoretical (QFT) approach. In addition to bridging the gap between PST and QFT, our approach results in a number of generalizations of the PST. First, for problems where the usual PST do not result in a genuine Fokker-Planck equation (even after phase-space doubling) and hence fail to produce a stochastic differential equation (SDE), we show how the system in question may be approximated via stochastic difference equations (S{delta}E). Second, we show that introducing sources into the SDE's (or S{delta}E's) generalizes them to a full quantum nonlinear stochastic response problem (thus generalizing Kubo's linear reaction theory to a quantum nonlinear stochastic response theory). Third, we establish general relations linking quantum response properties of the system in question to averages of operator products ordered in a way different from time normal. This extends PST to a much wider assemblage of operator products than are usually considered in phase-space approaches. In all cases, our approach yields a very simple and straightforward way of deriving stochastic equations in phase space.

  1. Quantum chemical calculations for polymers and organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, J.; Yang, C.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic effects of the orbiting electrons on a model compound were calculated. The computational method used was based on 'Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap' (MNDO). The compound tetracyanoplatinate was used since empirical measurement and calculations along "classical" lines had yielded many known properties. The purpose was to show that for large molecules relativity effects could not be ignored and that these effects could be calculated and yield data in closer agreement to empirical measurements. Both the energy band structure and molecular orbitals are depicted.

  2. Theoretical study of polarization insensitivity of carrier-induced refractive index change of multiple quantum well.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingyuan; Zhou, Qunjie; Cui, Jun; He, Ping-An; Huang, Dexiu

    2014-12-29

    Characteristics of polarization insensitivity of carrier-induced refractive index change of 1.55 μm tensile-strained multiple quantum well (MQW) are theoretically investigated. A comprehensive MQW model is proposed to effectively extend the application range of previous models. The model considers the temperature variation as well as the nonuniform distribution of injected carrier in MQW. Tensile-strained MQW is expected to achieve polarization insensitivity of carrier-induced refractive index change over a wide wavelength range as temperature varies from 0°C to 40°C, while the magnitude of refractive index change keeps a large value (more than 3 × 10-3). And that the polarization insensitivity of refractive index change can maintain for a wide range of carrier concentration. Multiple quantum well with different material and structure parameters is anticipated to have the similar polarization insensitivity of refractive index change, which shows the design flexibility. PMID:25607157

  3. Thermochemical properties and contribution groups for ketene dimers and related structures from theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro

    2009-07-30

    This research's main goals were to analyze ketene dimers' relative stability and expand group additivity value (GAV) methodology for estimating the thermochemical properties of high-weight ketene polymers (up to tetramers). The CBS-Q multilevel procedure and statistical thermodynamics were used for calculating the thermochemical properties of 20 cyclic structures, such as diketenes, cyclobutane-1,3-diones, cyclobut-2-enones and pyran-4-ones, as well as 57 acyclic base compounds organized into five groups. According to theoretical heat of formation predictions, diketene was found to be thermodynamically favored over cyclobutane-1,3-dione and its enol-tautomeric form (3-hydroxycyclobut-2-enone). This result did not agree with old combustion experiments. 3-Hydroxycyclobut-2-enone was found to be the least stable dimer and its reported experimental detection in solution may have been due to solvent effects. Substituted diketenes had lower stability than substituted cyclobutane-1,3-diones with an increased number of methyl substituents, suggesting that cyclobutane-1,3-dione type dimers are the major products because of thermodynamic control of alkylketene dimerization. Missing GAVs for the ketene dimers and related structures were calculated through linear regression on the 57 acyclic base compounds. Corrections for non next neighbor interactions (such as gauche, eclipses, and internal hydrogen bond) were needed for obtaining a highly accurate and precise regression model. To the best of our knowledge, the hydrogen bond correction for GAV methodology is the first reported in the literature; this correction was correlated to MP2/6-31Gdagger and HF/6-31Gdagger derived geometries to facilitate its application. GAVs assessed by the linear regression model were able to reproduce acyclic compounds' theoretical thermochemical properties and experimental heat of formation for acetylacetone. Ring formation and substituent position corrections were calculated by consecutively

  4. Experimentation and Theoretic Calculation of a BODIPY Sensor Based on Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Ions Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, Shushu; Liu, Hanzhuang; Wang, Yanwei; Shen, Zhen; Liu, Chungen; You, Xiaozeng

    2009-12-01

    A boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based fluorescence probe with a N,N'-(pyridine-2, 6-diylbis(methylene))-dianiline substituent (1) has been prepared by condensation of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde with 8-(4-amino)-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene and reduction by NaBH4. The sensing properties of compound 1 toward various metal ions are investigated via fluorometric titration in methanol, which show highly selective fluorescent turn-on response in the presence of Hg2+ over the other metal ions, such as Li+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Pb2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ag+, and Mn2+. Computational approach has been carried out to investigate the mechanism why compound 1 provides different fluorescent signal for Hg2+ and other ions. Theoretic calculations of the energy levels show that the quenching of the bright green fluorescence of boradiazaindacene fluorophore is due to the reductive photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the aniline subunit to the excited state of BODIPY fluorophore. In metal complexes, the frontier molecular orbital energy levels changes greatly. Binding Zn2+ or Cd2+ ion leads to significant decreasing of both the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the receptor, thus inhibit the reductive PET process, whereas an oxidative PET from the excited state fluorophore to the receptor occurs, vice versa, which also quenches the fluorescence. However, for 1-Hg2+ complex, both the reductive and oxidative PETs are prohibited; therefore, strong fluorescence emission from the fluorophore can be observed experimentally. The agreement of the experimental results and theoretic calculations suggests that our calculation method can be applicable as guidance for the design of new chemosensors for other metal ions.

  5. Molecular structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of carbimazole with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasambandan, T.; Gunasekaran, S.; Seshadri, S.

    2013-11-01

    The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of carbimazole (CBZ) was carried out using the experimental FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis data and quantum chemical studies. The observed vibrational data were compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically for the optimized geometry of the compound from the DFT-B3LYP gradient calculations employing 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and enthalpy have been calculated for the molecule. HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis. Important non-linear properties such as electric dipole moment and first hyperpolarizability of CBZ have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. Finally, the Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges of the title compound has been calculated.

  6. Bounces and the calculation of quantum tunneling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiu-Qing; Müller-Kirsten, H. J. W.

    1992-04-01

    The imaginary part of the energy of the metastable ground state for the inverted double-well potential is calculated by using the path-integral method. The tunneling process is dominated by bounces. It is shown that the evaluation of the determinant of the second variation of the action at the bounce can be avoided, and that the imaginary part of the energy results directly from characteristic properties of the bounce itself, namely, the antisymmetry of its first time derivative under time reversal. The imaginary part of the result is in exact agreement with that of the well-known WKB calculation of Bender and Wu.

  7. Calculation of Zeeman splitting and Zeeman transition energies of spherical quantum dot in uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, Bekir; Atav, Ülfet; Yakar, Yusuf; Özmen, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    In this study we report a detailed theoretical investigation of the effect of an external magnetic field on the 1s-, 2p-, 3d- and 4f-energy states of a spherical quantum dot. We treat the contribution of the diamagnetic term as a perturbation and discuss the effect of the diamagnetic term on the 1s-, 2p-, 3d- and 4f-energy states. We also have calculated the Zeeman transition energies between 2p → 1s and 3d → 2p states with m = 0, ±1 and 0, ±1, ±2 as a function of dot radius and the magnetic field strength. The results show that the magnetic field, impurity charge and dot radius have a strong influence on the energy states and the Zeeman transitions. It is found that the energies of the electronic states with m < 0 addition of the diamagnetic term firstly decrease toward a minimum, and then increase with the increasing magnetic field strength. We have seen that as magnetic field intensity is adjusted, frequency of the emitted light can be changed for Zeeman transitions.

  8. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  9. Conformational and stereoeletronic investigations of muscarinic agonists of acetylcholine by NMR and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Julio Cesar A.; Ducati, Lucas C.; Rittner, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    NMR solvent effects and theoretical calculations showed muscarinic agonists present a large stability for their near synclinal conformations, indicating the presence of significant stabilization factors. Analysis of the results clearly indicated that this stability is not determined by the dihedral around the substituted C-C ethane bond, as stated by some authors, but a consequence of the geometry adopted in order to maximize N+/O interactions in this type of molecules. It can be assumed that acetylcholine and its muscarinic agonists exhibit their biologic activity when the positively charged nitrogen and the oxygen atoms are in the same side of the molecule within an interatomic distance ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 Å.

  10. Theoretical calculations of a compound formed by Fe(+3) and tris(catechol).

    PubMed

    Kara, İzzet; Kara, Yeşim; Öztürk Kiraz, Aslı; Mammadov, Ramazan

    2015-10-01

    Phenolic compounds generally have special smell, easily soluble in water, organic solvents (alcohols, esters, chloroform, ethyl acetate), in aqueous solutions of bases, colorless or colorful, crystalline and amorphous materials. Phenols form colorful complexes when they form compounds with heavy metals. In this study, the structural properties of a compound formed by catechol and Fe(+3) are investigated theoretically. The electronic and thermodynamic properties of the complex were also investigated in gas phase and organic solvents at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The formation of Fe-tris(catechol) complex compound is exothermic, and it is difficult to obtain the complex as the temperature increases. The observed and calculated FT-IR and geometric parameters spectra are in good agreement with empirical. PMID:25983060

  11. Theoretical and practical aspects of chemical functionalization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs): DFT calculations and adsorption study.

    PubMed

    Rokhina, Ekaterina V; Lahtinen, Manu; Makarova, Katerina; Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Virkutyte, Jurate

    2012-06-01

    The nitric acid-functionalized commercial carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were comprehensively studied by instrumental (XRD, BET, SEM, TGA) and theoretical (DFT calculations) methods. The detailed surface study revealed the variation in the characteristics of functionalized CNFs, such as a decreased (up to 34%) surface area and impacted structural, electronic and chemical properties. The effects of functional groups were studied by comparison with pristine nanofibers. The results showed that the C-C bond lengths of the modified CNFs varied significantly. Chemical functionalization altered the frontier orbitals of the pristine material, and therefore altered the nature of their interactions with other substances. Moreover, the pristine and modified CNFs were tested for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. It was observed that surface modification tuned the adsorption capacity of carbon nanofibers (up to 0.35 mmol g(-1)), whereas original fibers did not demonstrate any adsorption capacity of phenol. PMID:22209137

  12. Isodesmic reaction for accurate theoretical pKa calculations of amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Sastre, S; Casasnovas, R; Muñoz, F; Frau, J

    2016-04-20

    Theoretical and quantitative prediction of pKa values at low computational cost is a current challenge in computational chemistry. We report that the isodesmic reaction scheme provides semi-quantitative predictions (i.e. mean absolute errors of 0.5-1.0 pKa unit) for the pKa1 (α-carboxyl), pKa2 (α-amino) and pKa3 (sidechain groups) of a broad set of amino acids and peptides. This method fills the gaps of thermodynamic cycles for the computational pKa calculation of molecules that are unstable in the gas phase or undergo proton transfer reactions or large conformational changes from solution to the gas phase. We also report the key criteria to choose a reference species to make accurate predictions. This method is computationally inexpensive and makes use of standard density functional theory (DFT) and continuum solvent models. It is also conceptually simple and easy to use for researchers not specialized in theoretical chemistry methods. PMID:27052591

  13. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  14. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of neutron-alpha scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Nollett, K. M.; Pieper, S. C.; Wiringa, R. B.; Carlson, J.; Hale, G. M.; Physics

    2007-07-13

    We describe a new method to treat low-energy scattering problems in few-nucleon systems, and we apply it to the five-body case of neutron-alpha scattering. The method allows precise calculations of low-lying resonances and their widths. We find that a good three-nucleon interaction is crucial to obtain an accurate description of neutron-alpha scattering.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Neutron-{alpha} Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Wiringa, R. B.; Carlson, J.; Hale, G. M.

    2007-07-13

    We describe a new method to treat low-energy scattering problems in few-nucleon systems, and we apply it to the five-body case of neutron-alpha scattering. The method allows precise calculations of low-lying resonances and their widths. We find that a good three-nucleon interaction is crucial to obtain an accurate description of neutron-alpha scattering.

  17. A 3-D Theoretical Model for Calculating Plasma Effects in Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenzhao; Liu, Jing; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoil with Ge detectors, the main background source is the electron recoil produced by natural radioactivity. The capability of discriminating nuclear recoil (n) from electron recoil (γ) is crucial to WIMP searches. Digital pulse shape analysis is an encouraging approach to the discrimination of nuclear recoil from electron recoil since nucleus is much heavier than electron and heavier particle generates ionization more densely along its path, which forms a plasma-like cloud of charge that shields the interior from the influence of the electric field. The time needed for total disintegration of this plasma region is called plasma time. The plasma time depends on the initial density and radius of the plasma-like cloud, diffusion constant for charge carriers, and the strength of electric field. In this work, we developed a 3-D theoretical model for calculating the plasma time in Ge detectors. Using this model, we calculated the plasma time for both nuclear recoils and electron recoils to study the possibility for Ge detectors to realize n/ γ discrimination and improve detector sensitivity in detecting low-mass WIMPs. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  18. Theoretical study of light-emission properties of amorphous silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Kengo; Kōga, Junichiro; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Yonezawa, Fumiko

    2003-05-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of the photoluminescence (PL) from amorphous silicon quantum dots (a-Si QDs), we calculate, in the tight-binding scheme, the emission spectra and the radiative recombination rate P of the direct band-to-band recombination process. For a-Si QDs smaller than 2.4 nm in diameter, our calculations beautifully reproduce the peak energy EPL of the experimental PL peak [N.-M. Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 1355 (2001)]. Our analysis also show that (i) the emission energy can be tuned into the visible range of light from red to blue by controlling the sizes of a-Si QDs, and that (ii) P calculated for a-Si QDs is higher by two to three orders of magnitude than that for crystalline Si QDs. From these results, we assert that a-Si QDs are promising candidates for visible, tunable, and high-performance light-emitting devices.

  19. A theoretical analysis of the optical absorption properties in one-dimensional InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Birner, Stefan; Lugli, Paolo; Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2014-04-14

    We present theoretical investigations of miniband structures and optical properties of InAs/GaAs one-dimensional quantum dot superlattices (1D-QDSLs). The calculation is based on the multi-band k·p theory, including the conduction and valence band mixing effects, the strain effect, and the piezoelectric effect; all three effects have periodic boundary conditions. We find that both the electronic and optical properties of the 1D-QDSLs show unique states which are different from those of well known single quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wires. We predict that the optical absorption spectra of the 1D-QDSLs strongly depend on the inter-dot spacing because of the inter-dot carrier coupling and changing strain states, which strongly influence the conduction and valence band potentials. The inter-miniband transitions form the absorption bands. Those absorption bands can be tuned from almost continuous (closely stacked QD case) to spike-like shape (almost isolated QD case) by changing the inter-dot spacing. The polarization of the lowest absorption peak for the 1D-QDSLs changes from being parallel to the stacking direction to being perpendicular to the stacking direction as the inter-dot spacing increases. In the case of closely stacked QDs, in-plane anisotropy, especially [110] and [11{sup ¯}0] directions also depend on the inter-dot spacing. Our findings and predictions will provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of QD-based optoelectronic devices.

  20. Nitrogen-broadened lineshapes in the oxygen A-band: Experimental results and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Holladay, Christopher; Heung, Henry; Bouanich, Jean-Pierre; Mellau, Georg Ch.; Keller, Reimund; Hurtmans, Daniel R.

    2008-09-01

    We report measurements for N 2-broadening, pressure-shift and line mixing coefficients for 55 oxygen transitions in the A-band retrieved using a multispectrum fitting technique. Nineteen laboratory absorption spectra were recorded at 0.02 cm -1 resolution using a multi-pass absorption cell with path length of 1636.9 cm and the IFS 120 Fourier transform spectrometer located at Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen, Germany. The total sample pressures ranged from 8.8 to 3004.5 Torr with oxygen volume mixing ratios in nitrogen ranging between 0.057 and 0.62. An Exponential Power Gap (EPG) scaling law was used to calculate the N 2-broadening and N 2-line mixing coefficients. The line broadening and shift coefficients for the A-band of oxygen self-perturbed and perturbed by N 2 are modeled using semiclassical calculations based on the Robert-Bonamy formalism and two intermolecular potentials. These potentials involve electrostatic contributions including the hexadecapole moment of the molecules and (a) a simple dispersion contribution with one adjustable parameter to fit the broadening coefficients or (b) the atom-atom Lennard-Jones model without such adjustable parameters. The first potential leads to very weak broadening coefficients for high J transitions whereas the second potential gives much more improved results at medium and large J values, in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For the line shifts which mainly arise in our calculation from the electronic state dependence of the isotropic potential, their general trends with increasing J values can be well predicted, especially from the first potential. From the theoretical results, we have derived air-broadening and air-induced shift coefficients with an agreement comparable to that obtained for O 2-O 2 and O 2-N 2.

  1. Theoretical calculating the thermodynamic properties of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Yuhua

    2012-11-02

    Since current technologies for capturing CO{sub 2} to fight global climate change are still too energy intensive, there is a critical need for development of new materials that can capture CO{sub 2} reversibly with acceptable energy costs. Accordingly, solid sorbents have been proposed to be used for CO{sub 2} capture applications through a reversible chemical transformation. By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The calculated thermodynamic properties of different classes of solid materials versus temperature and pressure changes were further used to evaluate the equilibrium properties for the CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption cycles. According to the requirements imposed by the pre- and post- combustion technologies and based on our calculated thermodynamic properties for the CO{sub 2} capture reactions by the solids of interest, we were able to screen only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are expected at the desired pressure and temperature conditions. Only those selected CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates were further considered for experimental validations. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of identifying thermodynamic properties of CO{sub 2} capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. Such methodology not only can be used to search for good candidates from existing database of solid materials, but also can provide some guidelines for synthesis new materials. In this presentation, we first introduce our screening methodology and the results on a testing set of solids with known thermodynamic properties to validate our methodology. Then, by applying our computational method

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the properties of atomic carbon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, S.; Wang, X.W.; Louie, S.G.

    1988-06-01

    A new method of calculating total energies of solids using non-local pseudopotentials in conjunction with the variational quantum Monte Carlo approach is presented. By using pseudopotentials, the large fluctuations of the energies in the core region of the atoms which occur in quantum Monte Carlo all-electron schemes are avoided. The method is applied to calculate the cohesive energy and structural properties of diamond and the first ionization energy and electron affinity of the carbon atom. Results are in excellent agreement with experiment. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in experiments of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter and in neutron star observations yield important new insights on the equation of state of neutron matter at nuclear densities. In this regime the EOS of neutron matter plays a critical role in determining the mass-radius relationship for neutron stars. We show how microscopic calculations of neutron matter, based on realistic two- and three-nucleon forces, make clear predictions for the relation between the isospin-asymmetry energy of nuclear matter and its density dependence, and the maximum mass and radius for a neutron star. We will also discuss the recent extension of the Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo method to study the equation of state of nuclear matter using two-body nucleon interactions. The equation of state of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter will also be discussed.

  4. Theoretical Study of Shocked Formic Acid: Born-Oppenheimer MD Calculations of the Shock Hugoniot and Early-Stage Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rice, Betsy M; Byrd, Edward F C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum and classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore whether chemical reactivity of shocked formic acid occurs at pressures greater than 15 GPa, a question arising from results of different shock compression experiments. The classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed using a quantum-based nonreactive pair additive interaction potential whereas the full resolution quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations allow chemical reactions. Although the shock Hugoniot curve calculated using nonreactive classical MD for formic acid is in reasonable agreement with one set of experimental results, shock Hugoniot points calculated using Born-Oppenheimer MD at 30 GPa are in agreement with the set of experimental data that suggests chemical reactivity at these elevated temperatures and pressures. Examination of atomic positions throughout the Born-Oppenheimer MD trajectories clearly indicates extensive and complex chemical reaction, chiefly involving hydrogen-atom transfer and intermolecular complexation. PMID:26654191

  5. Accuracy of theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the F2-layer of the daytime ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Sitnov, Iu. S.

    1985-10-01

    Pavlov's (1984) method is used to determine the relative errors (due to errors in measuring the input parameters of the model) in theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the daytime F2-layer under quiet conditions. The parameters calculated are the height of the F2-layer maximum and the electron density.

  6. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  7. Path integral calculation of free energies: quantum effects on the melting temperature of neon.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, R; Herrero, C P; Antonelli, A; Hernández, E R

    2008-08-14

    The path integral formulation has been combined with several methods to determine free energies of quantum many-body systems, such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. These techniques are alternatives to the standard thermodynamic integration method. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of these free energy methods in quantum simulations. Our main interest focuses on the calculation of the melting temperature of Ne at ambient pressure, taking into account quantum effects in the atomic dynamics. The free energy of the solid was calculated by considering a quantum Einstein crystal as reference state, while for the liquid, the reference state was defined by the classical limit of the fluid. Our findings indicate that, while quantum effects in the melting temperature of this system are small, they still amount to about 6% of the melting temperature, and are therefore not negligible. The particle density as well as the melting enthalpy and entropy of the solid and liquid phases at coexistence is compared to results obtained in the classical limit and also to available experimental data. PMID:18715054

  8. Quantum-Chemical Calculation of Carbododecahedron Formation in Carbon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Poklonski, Nikolai A; Ratkevich, Sergey V; Vyrko, Sergey A

    2015-08-27

    The ground state of the molecule consisting of 10 carbon atoms in C10(rg) "ring" conformation and the energy of its metastable C10(st) "star" conformation are reported. The reaction coordinate for the isomeric transition C10(st) → C10(rg) was calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with UB3LYP/6-31G(d,p). It was established that a 5-fold symmetry axis is conserved in this isomeric transition. The total energy of the ring isomer is by 10.33 eV (9.16 eV as zero-point energy corrected) lower than that of the star isomer. The energy barrier for the transition from the metastable star state to the ring state is 2.87 eV (3.57 eV as zero-point energy corrected). An analysis of possible chemical reactions in carbon plasma involving C10(st) and C10(rg) and leading to the formation of C20 fullerenes was performed. It was revealed that the presence of the C10(st) conformation in the reaction medium is a necessary condition for C20 fullerene formation. It was shown that the presence of hydrogen atoms in carbon plasma and UV radiation accelerate the C10(st) → C10(rg) transition and thus suppress the C20 fullerene formation. PMID:26267290

  9. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jingtian; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ˜66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ˜2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  10. Theoretical calculations of nonlinear refraction and absorption coefficients of doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we present the first theoretical predictions concerning the nonlinear refractive and absorptive properties of the doped graphene in which the Fermi energy {{E}F} of charge carriers (noninteracting massless Dirac fermions) is controlled by an external gate voltage. We base our study on the original perturbation theory technique developed by Genkin and Mednis (1968 Sov. Phys. JETP 27 609) for calculating the nonlinear-optical (NLO) response coefficients of bulk crystalline semiconductors with partially filled bands. Using a simple tight-binding model for the π-electron energy bands of graphene, we obtain analytic expressions for the nonlinear refractive index {{n}2}(ω ) and the nonlinear absorption coefficient {{α }2}(ω ) of the doped graphene at photon energies above twice the value of the Fermi energy (\\hbar ω \\gt 2{{E}F}). We show that in this spectral region, both the nonlinear refraction ant the nonlinear absorption are determined predominantly by the combined processes which simultaneously involve intraband and interband motion of π-electrons. Our calculations indicate that extremely large negative values of n2 (of the order of -{{10}-6} cm2 W-1) can be achieved in the graphene at a relatively low doping level (of about 1012 cm-2) provided that the excitation frequency slightly exceeds the threshold frequency corresponding to the onset of interband transitions. With a further increase of the radiation frequency, the {{n}2}(ω ) becomes positive and begins to decrease in its absolute magnitude. The peculiar frequency dispersion of n2 and a negative sign of the {{α }2} (absorption bleaching), as predicted by our theory, suggest that the doped graphene is a prospective NLO material to be used in practical optical switching applications.

  11. Elucidating the interaction of H2O2 with polar amino acids - Quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Tarak; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2014-10-01

    Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out to investigate the interaction motifs of H2O2 with polar amino acid residues. Binding energies obtained from gas phase and continuum solvent phase calculations range between 2 and 30 kcal/mol. H2O2 interacts with the side chain of polar amino acids chiefly through the formation of hydrogen bonds. The sbnd CH group in side chains of a few residues provides additional stabilization to H2O2.

  12. Low frequency internal vibrations of norbornane and its derivatives studied by IINS and quantum chemistry calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Holderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.; Khavryutchenko, V. D.

    1999-06-15

    The observed and calculated INS vibrational densities of states for globular molecules of norbornane, norborneole and borneole are compared in the frequency range up to 600 cm{sup -1}. Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) spectra were measured at ca. 20 K on the high resolution NERA spectrometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. The IINS intensities were calculated by semi-empirical quantum chemistry method and the assignments of the low-frequency internal modes were proposed.

  13. Postseismic viscoelastic surface deformation and stress. Part 1: Theoretical considerations, displacement and strain calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A model of viscoelastic deformations associated with earthquakes is presented. A strike-slip fault is represented by a rectangular dislocation in a viscoelastic layer (lithosphere) lying over a viscoelastic half-space (asthenosphere). Deformations occur on three time scales. The initial response is governed by the instantaneous elastic properties of the earth. A slower response is associated with viscoelastic relaxation of the lithosphere and a yet slower response is due to viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere. The major conceptual contribution is the inclusion of lithospheric viscoelastic properties into a dislocation model of earthquake related deformations and stresses. Numerical calculations using typical fault parameters reveal that the postseismic displacements and strains are small compared to the coseismic ones near the fault, but become significant further away. Moreover, the directional sense of the deformations attributable to the elastic response, the lithospheric viscoelastic softening, and the asthenospheric viscoelastic flow may differ and depend on location and model details. The results and theoretical arguments suggest that the stress changes accompanying lithospheric relaxation may also be in a different sense than and be larger than the strain changes.

  14. Aqueous photodegradation of 4-tert-butylphenol: By-products, degradation pathway and theoretical calculation assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanlin; Shi, Jin; Chen, Hongche; Zhao, Jianfu; Dong, Wenbo

    2016-10-01

    4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), an endocrine disrupting chemical, is widely distributed in natural bodies of water but is difficult to biodegrade. In this study, we focused on the transformation of 4-t-BP in photo-initiated degradation processes. The steady-state photolysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP) experiments were conducted in order to elucidate its degradation mechanism. Identification of products was performed using the GC-MS, LC-MS and theoretical calculation techniques. The oxidation pathway of 4-t-BP by hydroxyl radical (HO) was also studied and H2O2 was added to produce HO. 4-tert-butylcatechol and 4-tert-butylphenol dimer were produced in 4-t-BP direct photolysis. 4-tert-butylcatechol and hydroquinone were produced by the oxidation of HO. But the formation mechanism of 4-tert-butylcatechol in the two processes was different. The benzene ring was fractured in 4-t-BP oxidation process and 29% of TOC was degraded after 16h irradiation. PMID:27213674

  15. Young’s modulus calculations for cellulose Iß by MM3 and quantum mechanics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM) calculations were performed to elucidate Young’s moduli for a series of cellulose Iß models. Computations using the second generation empirical force field MM3 with a disaccharide cellulose model, 1,4'-O-dimethyl-ß-cellobioside (DMCB), and an analo...

  16. Quantum Humor: The Playful Side of Physics at Bohr's Institute for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2012-09-01

    From the 1930s to the 1950s, a period of pivotal developments in quantum, nuclear, and particle physics, physicists at Niels Bohr's Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen took time off from their research to write humorous articles, letters, and other works. Best known is the Blegdamsvej Faust, performed in April 1932 at the close of one of the Institute's annual conferences. I also focus on the Journal of Jocular Physics, a humorous tribute to Bohr published on the occasions of his 50th, 60th, and 70th birthdays in 1935, 1945, and 1955. Contributors included Léon Rosenfeld, Victor Weisskopf, George Gamow, Oskar Klein, and Hendrik Casimir. I examine their contributions along with letters and other writings to show that they offer a window into some issues in physics at the time, such as the interpretation of complementarity and the nature of the neutrino, as well as the politics of the period.

  17. Theoretical studies for experimental implementation of quantum computing with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Bryce T.

    Certain quantum many-body physics problems, such as the transverse field Ising model are intractable on a classical computer, meaning that as the number of particles grows, or spins, the amount of memory and computational time required to solve the problem exactly increases faster than a polynomial behavior. However, quantum simulators are being developed to efficiently solve quantum problems that are intractable via conventional computing. Some of the most successful quantum simulators are based on ion traps. Their success depends on the ability to achieve long coherence time, precise spin control, and high fidelity in state preparation. In this work, I present calculations that characterizes the oblate Paul trap that creates two-dimensional Coulomb crystals in a triangular lattice and phonon modes. We also calculate the spin-spin Ising-like interaction that can be generated in the oblate Paul trap using the same techinques as the linear radiofrequency Paul trap. In addition, I discuss two possible challenges that arise in the Penning trap: the effects of defects ( namely when Be+ → BeH+) and the creation of a more uniform spin-spin Ising-like interaction. We show that most properties are not significantly influenced by the appearance of defects, and that by adding two potentials to the Penning trap a more uniform spin-spin Ising-like interaction can be achieved. Next, I discuss techniques tfor preparing the ground state of the Ising-like Hamiltonian. In particular, we explore the use of the bang-bang protocol to prepare the ground state and compare optimized results to conventional adiabatic ramps ( the exponential and locally adiabatic ramp ). The bang-bang optimization in general outperforms the exponential; however the locally adiabatic ramp consistently is somewhat better. However, compared to the locally adiabatic ramp, the bang-bang optimization is simpler to implement, and it has the advantage of providingrovide a simple procedure for estimating the

  18. Molecular structure and nicotinic activity of arecoline. A gas electron diffraction study combined with theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2005-01-01

    The molecular structure of arecoline (methyl 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylnicotinate, ? has been determined by gas electron diffraction. Diffraction patterns were taken at about 370 K. Structural constraints for the data analysis were obtained from MP2/6-31G** calculations. Vibrational mean amplitudes and shrinkage corrections were calculated from the force constants obtained from the gas-phase vibrational frequencies and the B3LYP/6-31G** calculations. The electron diffraction data were well reproduced by assuming the mixture of four conformers. The determined structural parameters ( rg (Å) and ∠ (°)) for the main conformer with 3 σ in parentheses are as follows: < rg(N-C ring)>=1.456(4); rg(N-C methyl)=1.451 (d.p.); rg(C dbnd6 C)=1.339(9); < rg(C-C)>=1.512(3); rg(O-C methyl)=1.434(5); rg(C(O)-O)=1.355 (d.p.); rg(C dbnd6 O)=1.209(4); the out-of-plane angle of the methyl group=50.3(23); ∠C ringN ringC ring=112.8(30); ∠N ringC ringC ring(H 2)=110.5(16); <∠C ringC ringC ring>=118.4(5); ∠C dbnd6 CC(O)=116.8(7); ∠CC dbnd6 O=127.6(9); ∠CC-O=109.8(8), where the angle brackets denote averaged values and d.p. denotes dependent parameters. Fixing the abundances of the minor conformers, Ax-s- cis and Ax-s- trans, at the theoretical values (13% in total), those of the Eq-s- cis and Eq-s- trans conformers were determined to be 46(16) and 41(16)%, respectively. Here Ax and Eq denote the axial and equatorial directions of the N-CH 3 bond and s- cis and s- trans show the orientation of the methoxycarbonyl group expressed by the configuration of the C dbnd6 O and C dbnd6 C bonds. The N⋯O carbonyl distances of the Eq-s- cis and Ax-s- cis conformers are 4.832(13) and 4.874(16) Å, respectively. They are close to the N⋯N distance of the most abundant conformer of nicotine, 4.885(6) Å, suggesting that the Eq-s- cis and Ax-s- cis conformers have nicotinic activity.

  19. Semiclassical and quantum field theoretic bounds for traversable Lorentzian stringy wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-09-15

    A lower bound on the size of a Lorentzian wormhole can be obtained by semiclassically introducing the Planck cutoff on the magnitude of tidal forces (Horowitz-Ross constraint). Also, an upper bound is provided by the quantum field theoretic constraint in the form of the Ford-Roman Quantum Inequality for massless minimally coupled scalar fields. To date, however, exact static solutions belonging to this scalar field theory have not been worked out to verify these bounds. To fill this gap, we examine the wormhole features of two examples from the Einstein frame description of the vacuum low energy string theory in four dimensions which is the same as the minimally coupled scalar field theory. Analyses in this paper support the conclusion of Ford and Roman that wormholes in this theory can have sizes that are indeed only a few order of magnitudes larger than the Planck scale. It is shown that the two types of bounds are also compatible. In the process, we point out a 'wormhole' analog of naked black holes.

  20. Methacrolein in the IR Atmospheric Window: Mm-Wave and FTIR Spectroscopies Complemented by Quantum Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Imane, Haykal; Motiyenko, R. A.; Huet, T. R.; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Methacrolein, CH_2=C(CH_3)CHO or MAC, is an important atmospheric molecule because it is a major product of the isoprene-OH reaction. Meanwhile the spectroscopic information on MAC is very scarse. On the theoretical side, we have performed quantum calculations at different levels of theory (DFT and ab initio) to model the structure of the two conformers, the large amplitude motion associated with the methyl top, and the anharmonic vibrational structure. On the experimental side, we have at first characterized the millimeter-wave spectrum of MAC in the 150-465 GHz range using the Lille frequency multiplication chain spectrometer. In particular the ground state has been analyzed up to J, K_a = 37, 17 and the first excited states are currently investigated. Secondly, FTIR spectra have been recorded on the AILES beamline of SOLEIL using a long path cell, between 30 and 3500 wn at medium resolution (0.5 wn). A few bands of atmospheric interest have also been recorded at higher resolution (0.001 wn). We will report the details of the vibrational analysis, as well as the molecular parameters derived from the analysis of the high resolution spectrum of the c-type band located around 930 wn. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. The experiment on the AILES beam-line of the synchrotron SOLEIL was performed under project number 20130192. M. Suzuki and K. Kozima, J. Molec. Spectrosc. 38 (1971) 314 J. R. Durig, J. Qiu, B. Dehoff and T. S. Little, Spectrochimica Acta 42A (1986) 89

  1. The potential, limitations, and challenges of divide and conquer quantum electronic structure calculations on energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jon R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2012-02-01

    High explosives are an important class of energetic materials used in many weapons applications. Even with modern computers, the simulation of the dynamic chemical reactions and energy release is exceedingly challenging. While the scale of the detonation process may be macroscopic, the dynamic bond breaking responsible for the explosive release of energy is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Thus, any method that does not adequately describe bonding is destined to lack predictive capability on some level. Performing quantum mechanics calculations on systems with more than dozens of atoms is a gargantuan task, and severe approximation schemes must be employed in practical calculations. We have developed and tested a divide and conquer (DnC) scheme to obtain total energies, forces, and harmonic frequencies within semi-empirical quantum mechanics. The method is intended as an approximate but faster solution to the full problem and is possible due to the sparsity of the density matrix in many applications. The resulting total energy calculation scales linearly as the number of subsystems, and the method provides a path-forward to quantum mechanical simulations of millions of atoms.

  2. Roaming dynamics in the MgH + H→Mg + H 2 reaction: Quantum dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomokazu

    2011-03-01

    Reaction mechanisms of the MgH + H→Mg + H 2 reaction have been investigated using quantum reactive scattering methods on a global ab initio potential energy surface. There exist two microscopic mechanisms in the dynamics of this reaction. One is a direct hydrogen abstraction reaction and the other proceeds via initial formation of a HMgH complex in the deep potential well. The result of the present quantum dynamics calculations suggests that the HMgH complex formed in the reaction mainly decays into the Mg + H 2 channel via a 'roaming mechanism' without going through the saddle point region.

  3. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J. P.; Maris, P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, J.; Shirokov, A. M.; Brodsky, S. J.; Harindranath, A.

    2009-12-17

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually, we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  4. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Honkanen, H.; li, J.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; Teramond, G.F.de; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-08-03

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually,we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  5. Systematic study of finite-size effects in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of real metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Sam Foulkes, W. M. C.

    2015-09-14

    We present a systematic and comprehensive study of finite-size effects in diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations of metals. Several previously introduced schemes for correcting finite-size errors are compared for accuracy and efficiency, and practical improvements are introduced. In particular, we test a simple but efficient method of finite-size correction based on an accurate combination of twist averaging and density functional theory. Our diffusion quantum Monte Carlo results for lithium and aluminum, as examples of metallic systems, demonstrate excellent agreement between all of the approaches considered.

  6. [Improvement in the calculation of anti-Stokes energy transfer between rare earth ions. 1. Experiment and theoretical basis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-bo; Wang, Ce; Li, Song; Naruhito, Sawanobori; Kang, Dong-guo

    2010-07-01

    A photonic phenomenon of fluorescence intensity reverse between red and green fluorescence was studied theoretically and experimentally in the present article. It was found by experiment that Er(0.5) Yb(9.5) : FOV oxyfluoride vitroceramics exhibits strong fluorescence intensity reverse phenomenon. The range of the intensity reverse of Er(0.5) Yb(9.5) : FOV was measured to be 877. Moreover, all basic spectroscopic parameters were calculated. The theoretical basis of numerical calculation for dynamics processes of all levels was established. PMID:20827959

  7. A Theoretical Mechanism of Szilard Engine Function in Nucleic Acids and the Implications for Quantum Coherence in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Mihelic, F.

    2010-12-22

    Nucleic acids theoretically possess a Szilard engine function that can convert the energy associated with the Shannon entropy of molecules for which they have coded recognition, into the useful work of geometric reconfiguration of the nucleic acid molecule. This function is logically reversible because its mechanism is literally and physically constructed out of the information necessary to reduce the Shannon entropy of such molecules, which means that this information exists on both sides of the theoretical engine, and because information is retained in the geometric degrees of freedom of the nucleic acid molecule, a quantum gate is formed through which multi-state nucleic acid qubits can interact. Entangled biophotons emitted as a consequence of symmetry breaking nucleic acid Szilard engine (NASE) function can be used to coordinate relative positioning of different nucleic acid locations, both within and between cells, thus providing the potential for quantum coherence of an entire biological system. Theoretical implications of understanding biological systems as such 'quantum adaptive systems' include the potential for multi-agent based quantum computing, and a better understanding of systemic pathologies such as cancer, as being related to a loss of systemic quantum coherence.

  8. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions. PMID:27232936

  9. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water. PMID:23005275

  10. Theoretical Study of All-Electrical Quantum Wire Valley Filters in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lue, Ning-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Chun; Jiang, Jia-Huei; Chou, Mei-Yin

    Graphene electrons carry valley pseudospin, due to the double valley degeneracy in graphene band structure. In gapped graphene, the pseudospin is coupled to an in-plane electric field, through the mechanism of valley-orbit interaction (VOI), Based on the VOI, a family of electrically-controlled valleytronic devices have been proposed. Here, we report the theoretical study of a recently proposed valley filter consisting of a Q1D channel in bilayer graphene defined and controlled by electrical gates. We discuss two types of calculations - those of energy subband structure in the channel and electron transmission through a valley valve consisting of two proposed filters. For the former, we have developed a tight binding formulation in the continuum limit. For the latter, we employ the recursive Green's function method. Results from the calculations will be presented. Financial support by MoST, Taiwan, ROC is acknowledged.

  11. Theoretical studies of excitons in type II CdSe/CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloszewski, Jacek M.; Tomić, Stanko; Binks, David

    2014-06-01

    We present a method for calculating exciton and bi-exciton energies in type-II colloidal quantum dots. Our methodology is based on an 8-band k · p Hamiltonian of the zinc- blend structure, which incorporates the effects of spin-orbit interaction, strain between the core and the shell and piezoelectric potentials. Exciton states are found using the configuration interaction (CI) method that explicitly includes the effects of Coulomb interaction, as well as exchange and correlation between many-electron configurations. We pay particular attention to accurate modelling of the electrostatic interaction between quasiparticles. The model includes surface polarization and self-polarization effects due to the large difference in dielectric constants at the boundary of the QD.

  12. Scaled Quantum Mechanical scale factors for vibrational calculations using alternate polarized and augmented basis sets with the B3LYP density functional calculation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, C. R.; Brown, N. R.; Dunbar, R. A.; Harness, M. D.; Nguyen, K.; Oyewole, O.; Collier, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The Scaled Quantum Mechanical (SQM) method of scaling calculated force constants to predict theoretically calculated vibrational frequencies is expanded to include a broad array of polarized and augmented basis sets based on the split valence 6-31G and 6-311G basis sets with the B3LYP density functional. Pulay's original choice of a single polarized 6-31G(d) basis coupled with a B3LYP functional remains the most computationally economical choice for scaled frequency calculations. But it can be improved upon with additional polarization functions and added diffuse functions for complex molecular systems. The new scale factors for the B3LYP density functional and the 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-31G+(d,p), 6-31G++(d,p), 6-311G, 6-311G(d), 6-311G(d,p), 6-311G+(d,p), 6-311G++(d,p), 6-311G(2d,p), 6-311G++(2d,p), 6-311G++(df,p) basis sets are shown. The double d polarized models did not perform as well and the source of the decreased accuracy was investigated. An alternate system of generating internal coordinates that uses the out-of plane wagging coordinate whenever it is possible; makes vibrational assignments via potential energy distributions more meaningful. Automated software to produce SQM scaled vibrational calculations from different molecular orbital packages is presented.

  13. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites. PMID:26963288

  14. Theoretical oxidation state analysis of Ru-(bpy){sub 3}: Influence of water solvation and Hubbard correction in first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2014-07-14

    Oxidation state is a powerful concept that is widely used in chemistry and materials physics, although the concept itself is arguably ill-defined quantum mechanically. In this work, we present impartial comparison of four, well-recognized theoretical approaches based on Lowdin atomic orbital projection, Bader decomposition, maximally localized Wannier function, and occupation matrix diagonalization, for assessing how well transition metal oxidation states can be characterized. Here, we study a representative molecular complex, tris(bipyridine)ruthenium. We also consider the influence of water solvation through first-principles molecular dynamics as well as the improved electronic structure description for strongly correlated d-electrons by including Hubbard correction in density functional theory calculations.

  15. Theoretical oxidation state analysis of Ru-(bpy)3: Influence of water solvation and Hubbard correction in first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2014-07-01

    Oxidation state is a powerful concept that is widely used in chemistry and materials physics, although the concept itself is arguably ill-defined quantum mechanically. In this work, we present impartial comparison of four, well-recognized theoretical approaches based on Lowdin atomic orbital projection, Bader decomposition, maximally localized Wannier function, and occupation matrix diagonalization, for assessing how well transition metal oxidation states can be characterized. Here, we study a representative molecular complex, tris(bipyridine)ruthenium. We also consider the influence of water solvation through first-principles molecular dynamics as well as the improved electronic structure description for strongly correlated d-electrons by including Hubbard correction in density functional theory calculations.

  16. Quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized, orthogonal Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets with a phase space truncation scheme. III. Representations and calculations.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Bill; Salam, A

    2004-07-22

    In a previous paper [J. Theo. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003)], one of the authors (B.P.) presented a method for solving the multidimensional Schrodinger equation, using modified Wilson-Daubechies wavelets, and a simple phase space truncation scheme. Unprecedented numerical efficiency was achieved, enabling a ten-dimensional calculation of nearly 600 eigenvalues to be performed using direct matrix diagonalization techniques. In a second paper [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004)], and in this paper, we extend and elaborate upon the previous work in several important ways. The second paper focuses on construction and optimization of the wavelength functions, from theoretical and numerical viewpoints, and also examines their localization. This paper deals with their use in representations and eigenproblem calculations, which are extended to 15-dimensional systems. Even higher dimensionalities are possible using more sophisticated linear algebra techniques. This approach is ideally suited to rovibrational spectroscopy applications, but can be used in any context where differential equations are involved. PMID:15260721

  17. Molecular structure of cotinine studied by gas electron diffraction combined with theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2007-09-01

    The molecular structure of cotinine (( S)-1-methyl-5-(3-pyridinyl)-2-pyrrolidinone), the major metabolite of nicotine, has been determined at about 182 °C by gas electron diffraction combined with MP2 and DFT calculations. The diffraction data are consistent with the existence of the (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers, where ax and eq indicate the configuration of the pyrrolidinone ring by means of the position (axial and equatorial) of the pyridine ring, and sc, sp and ap distinguish the isomers arising from the internal rotation around the bond connecting the two rings. The (CH 3)NCCC(N) dihedral angles, ϕ, of the (ax, sc) and (eq, sp) conformers were determined independently to be 158(12)° and 129(13)°, respectively, where the numbers in parentheses are three times the standard errors, 3 σ. According to the MP2 calculations, the corresponding dihedral angles for the (ax, ap) and (eq, ap) conformers were assumed to differ by 180° from their syn counterparts. The ratios x(ax, sc)/ x(ax, ap) and x(eq, sp)/ x(eq, ap) were taken from the theoretically estimated free energy differences, Δ G, where x is the abundance of the conformer. The resultant abundances of (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers are 34(6)%, 21% (d.p.), 28% (d.p.), and 17% (d.p.), respectively, where d.p. represents dependent parameters. The determined structural parameters ( rg (Å) and ∠ α (°)) of the most abundant conformer, (ax, sc), are as follows: r(N sbnd C) pyrrol = 1.463(5); r(N sbnd C methyl) = 1.457(←); r(N sbnd C( dbnd O)) = 1.384(12); r(C dbnd O) = 1.219(5); < r(C sbnd C) pyrrol> = 1.541(3); r(C pyrrolsbnd C pyrid) = 1.521(←); < r(C sbnd C) pyrid> = 1.396(2); < r(C sbnd N) pyrid> = 1.343(←); ∠(CNC) pyrrol = 113.9(11); ∠CCC pyrrol(-C pyrid) = 103.6(←); ∠NCO = 124.1(13); ∠NC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.1(12); ∠C pyrrolC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.3(←); ∠(CNC) pyrid = 117.1(2); <∠(NCC) pyrid> = 124.4(←); ∠C methylNC( dbnd O) =

  18. Towards inclusion of excited vibrational states in ultracold molecule-molecule quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticknor, Christopher; Kendrick, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We report progress towards including excited vibrational states in quantum scattering calculations of NaK-NaK at ultracold temperatures. We systematically use all pair potentials to build a complete 4 body potential energy surface. We study this 4-body potential and the asymptotic ro-vibrational 2-body basis. This allows for a more complete interaction as two molecules approach each other. We study where and how vibrationally excited states influence the asymptotic 2-body ro-vibrational scattering potentials. This work is an intermediate step in performing the complete scattering calculations as we develop tools to bring together the long range, ultracold 2-body scattering problem and the short range 4-body quantum chemistry problem.

  19. Artificial Bee Colony Optimization of Capping Potentials for Hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Christoph; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2011-05-10

    We present an algorithmic extension of a numerical optimization scheme for analytic capping potentials for use in mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical, QM/MM) ab initio calculations. Our goal is to minimize bond-cleavage-induced perturbations in the electronic structure, measured by means of a suitable penalty functional. The optimization algorithm-a variant of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, which relies on swarm intelligence-couples deterministic (downhill gradient) and stochastic elements to avoid local minimum trapping. The ABC algorithm outperforms the conventional downhill gradient approach, if the penalty hypersurface exhibits wiggles that prevent a straight minimization pathway. We characterize the optimized capping potentials by computing NMR chemical shifts. This approach will increase the accuracy of QM/MM calculations of complex biomolecules. PMID:26610125

  20. Amorphous Solid Simulation and Trial Fabrication of the Organic Field-Effect Transistor of Tetrathienonaphthalenes Prepared by Using Microflow Photochemical Reactions: A Theoretical Calculation-Inspired Investigation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Matsui, Yasunori; Asada, Toshio; Kumeda, Motoki; Takagi, Kenichiro; Suenaga, Yu; Nagae, Kunihiko; Ohta, Eisuke; Sato, Hiroyasu; Koseki, Shiro; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-15

    The p-type organic semiconductor (OSC) material tetrathieno[2,3-a:3',2'-c:2″,3″-f:3‴,2‴-h]naphthalene (2TTN) and its alkyl-substituted derivatives Cn-2TTNs (n = 6, 8, and 10) have been developed based on the results of theoretical calculation-inspired investigation. A hole mobility for amorphous Cn-2TTNs (10(-2)-10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) was accurately predicted by using a novel statistical method in which the geometric mean of the mobilities for many individual small molecular flocks in an amorphous solid was obtained by using molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations. The simulation also suggests that upon increasing the length of alkyl chains in Cn-2TTNs the mobilities become smaller as a consequence of a decrease in transfer integral values. Cn-2TTNs are synthesized in a microflow reactor through photoreactions of the corresponding precursors. Cn-2TTNs are then utilized in the fabrication of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Although spin-coated thin films of Cn-2TTNs are crystalline, the hole mobilities (10(-2)-10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) of trial OFETs decrease upon elongation of the alkyl chains. This finding parallels the results of theoretical simulation. The simulation method for amorphous solids developed in this effort should become a useful tool in studies aimed at designing new OSC materials. PMID:27010327

  1. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl + CH3 from T = 202 - 298 K.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Walter A.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Stief, Louis J.; Parker, James F. , 1925-; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.

    2004-10-01

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl + CH{sub 3} association reaction at T = 202, 250, and 298 K and P = 0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH{sub 3} were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH{sub 4}, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F{sub 2} in He. The decay of CH{sub 3} was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH{sub 3} concentration ([Cl]{sub 0}/[CH{sub 3}]{sub 0} = 9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T = 202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4 x 10{sup -12} at P = 0.30 Torr He to 1.8 x 10{sup -11} at P = 2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k{sub 2} = 6.0 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K.

  2. Emissivity and reflection model for calculating unpolarized isotropic water surface-leaving radiance in the infrared. I: Theoretical development and calculations.

    PubMed

    Nalli, Nicholas R; Minnett, Peter J; van Delst, Paul

    2008-07-20

    Although published sea surface infrared (IR) emissivity models have gained widespread acceptance for remote sensing applications, discrepancies have been identified against field observations obtained from IR Fourier transform spectrometers at view angles approximately > 40 degrees. We therefore propose, in this two-part paper, an alternative approach for calculating surface-leaving IR radiance that treats both emissivity and atmospheric reflection in a systematic yet practical manner. This first part presents the theoretical basis, development, and computations of the proposed model. PMID:18641735

  3. Quantum calculations of the carrier mobility: Methodology, Matthiessen's rule, and comparison with semi-classical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Niquet, Yann-Michel Nguyen, Viet-Hung; Duchemin, Ivan; Nier, Olivier; Rideau, Denis

    2014-02-07

    We discuss carrier mobilities in the quantum Non-Equilibrium Green's Functions (NEGF) framework. We introduce a method for the extraction of the mobility that is free from contact resistance contamination and with minimal needs for ensemble averages. We focus on silicon thin films as an illustration, although the method can be applied to various materials such as semiconductor nanowires or carbon nanostructures. We then introduce a new paradigm for the definition of the partial mobility μ{sub M} associated with a given elastic scattering mechanism “M,” taking phonons (PH) as a reference (μ{sub M}{sup −1}=μ{sub PH+M}{sup −1}−μ{sub PH}{sup −1}). We argue that this definition makes better sense in a quantum transport framework as it is free from long range interference effects that can appear in purely ballistic calculations. As a matter of fact, these mobilities satisfy Matthiessen's rule for three mechanisms [e.g., surface roughness (SR), remote Coulomb scattering (RCS) and phonons] much better than the usual, single mechanism calculations. We also discuss the problems raised by the long range spatial correlations in the RCS disorder. Finally, we compare semi-classical Kubo-Greenwood (KG) and quantum NEGF calculations. We show that KG and NEGF are in reasonable agreement for phonon and RCS, yet not for SR. We discuss the reasons for these discrepancies.

  4. The anharmonic oscillator at a finite temperature. Comparison of quantum and classical stochastic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, R.; Pesquera, L.; Santos, E.

    1987-08-01

    An oscillator with a small, but otherwise arbitrary, perturbing potential is considered immersed in a random cavity radiation. Classical (stochastic) calculations are done when the radiation has a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum and a complete Planck spectrum (i.e., with zero point). These are compared with the results obtained by a quantum calculation. First, a comparison is made of stationary values, in particular, the energy. Then the emission and the absorption spectra are calculated, in particular, the absorption spectrum for an arbitrary incoming radiation. Finally, a detailed comparison is made of the absorption bands when the perturbing potential has the form λx2K (K=2,3,...). In all cases, it is explicitly shown that the quantum and the classical behavior agree in the limit of high temperatures. It is also shown that the classical system immersed in a radiation with complete Planck spectrum is much closer to the quantum system than the fully classical system (with a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum).

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deible, Michael J.; Kessler, Melody; Gasperich, Kevin E.; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-01

    The accurate calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer is a challenging theoretical problem. In this study, the binding energy of Be2 is calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, using single Slater determinant and multiconfigurational trial functions. DMC calculations using single-determinant trial wave functions of orbitals obtained from density functional theory calculations overestimate the binding energy, while DMC calculations using Hartree-Fock or CAS(4,8), complete active space trial functions significantly underestimate the binding energy. In order to obtain an accurate value of the binding energy of Be2 from DMC calculations, it is necessary to employ trial functions that include excitations outside the valence space. Our best estimate DMC result for the binding energy of Be2, obtained by using configuration interaction trial functions and extrapolating in the threshold for the configurations retained in the trial function, is 908 cm-1, only slightly below the 935 cm-1 value derived from experiment.

  6. Self-consistent calculation of dephasing in quantum cascade structures within a density matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Will

    2016-05-01

    Dephasing in terahertz quantum cascade structures is studied within a density matrix formalism. We self-consistently calculate the pure dephasing time from the intrasubband interactions within the upper and lower lasing states. Interface roughness and ionized impurity scattering interactions are included in the calculation. Dephasing times are shown to be consistent with measured spontaneous emission spectra, and the lattice temperature dependence of the device output power is consistent with experiment. The importance of including multiple optical transitions when a lower miniband continuum is present and the resulting multi-longitudinal modes within the waveguide resonant cavity are also shown.

  7. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punegov, V. I.; Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green's function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  8. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  9. Finite element basis for the expansion of radial wavefunction in quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Woonglin; Sup Lee, Yoon; Park, Seung C.

    1991-11-01

    Radial wavefunctions in quantum scattering calculations are expanded in terms of two shape functions for each finite element. This approach is the R matrix version of Kohn's variational method and also directly applicable to S matrix in the log-derivative version. The linear algebra involved amounts to solving definite banded systems. In this basis set method, R matrix or log-derivative matrix is greatly simplified and the computational effort is linearly proportional to the number of radial basis functions, promising computational efficiencies for large scale calculations. Convergences for test vases are also reasonably rapid.

  10. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Punegov, V. I. Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-15

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green’s function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  11. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations for systems with long-range repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestrelli, P.L.; Baroni, S.; Car, R. Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati , via Beirut 2/4, I-34014 Trieste Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux , PHB Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne )

    1993-08-23

    We report on the first successful attempt to apply the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo technique to the calculation of ground-state properties of systems of many electrons interacting via a Coulomb potential. We have been able to substantially reduce the huge statistical fluctuations arising from the repulsive, long-range character of the interactions, which had so far hindered the application of this method to [ital realistic] Hamiltonians for atoms, molecules, and solids. Our technique is demonstrated with calculations of ground-state properties of the simplest molecular and solid-state systems, i.e., the H[sub 2] molecule and the homogeneous electron gas.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Electron Density Analysis of Copper Pyrazine Nitrate Quasi-Low-Dimensional Quantum Magnets.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Leonardo H R; Lanza, Arianna; Barton, Alyssa M; Brambleby, Jamie; Blackmore, William J A; Goddard, Paul A; Xiao, Fan; Williams, Robert C; Lancaster, Tom; Pratt, Francis L; Blundell, Stephen J; Singleton, John; Manson, Jamie L; Macchi, Piero

    2016-02-24

    The accurate electron density distribution and magnetic properties of two metal-organic polymeric magnets, the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) Cu(pyz)(NO3)2 and the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) [Cu(pyz)2(NO3)]NO3·H2O, have been investigated by high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations on the whole periodic systems and on selected fragments. Topological analyses, based on quantum theory of atoms in molecules, enabled the characterization of possible magnetic exchange pathways and the establishment of relationships between the electron (charge and spin) densities and the exchange-coupling constants. In both compounds, the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic coupling can be quantitatively explained by the Cu-Cu superexchange pathway mediated by the pyrazine bridging ligands, via a σ-type interaction. From topological analyses of experimental charge-density data, we show for the first time that the pyrazine tilt angle does not play a role in determining the strength of the magnetic interaction. Taken in combination with molecular orbital analysis and spin density calculations, we find a synergistic relationship between spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms and that both determine the bulk magnetic behavior of these Cu(II)-pyz coordination polymers. PMID:26811927

  13. Calculation of the microscopic parameters of a self-induced transparency modelocked quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisuzzaman Talukder, Muhammad; Menyuk, Curtis R.

    2013-05-01

    A model to calculate the microscopic parameters of self-induced transparency (SIT) modelocked quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is presented and the parameters are then calculated for a particular structure. These parameters are then used to calculate the gain to absorption ratio that is required to determine the required ratio of gain periods to absorbing periods that must be grown in order to obtain stable modelocked pulses. The modelocked pulse parameters, along with the stability limits are then calculated as the ratio of gain to absorption varies. For the SIT modelocked QCL design that we examined, we found that three to five gain periods must be grown for each absorbing period in order to ensure stable operation.

  14. Theoretical Calculations on Sediment Transport on Titan, and the Possible Production of Streamlined Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burr, D. M.; Emery, J. P.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science System (ISS) has been returning images of Titan, along with other Saturnian satellites. Images taken through the 938 nm methane window see down to Titan's surface. One of the purposes of the Cassini mission is to investigate possible fluid cycling on Titan. Lemniscate features shown recently and radar evidence of surface flow prompted us to consider theoretically the creation by methane fluid flow of streamlined forms on Titan. This follows work by other groups in theoretical consideration of fluid motion on Titan's surface.

  15. Theoretical Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Quantum Liquid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Michele Ann

    quantum cluster environment. We present a new Golden Rule-based method which uses Laplace transform and DMC techniques to calculate linewidths and energy differences for energy transfer processes. Results are shown for a harmonic oscillator and for impurity-to-cluster transfer in rm Cl_2He_6. This method is general and requires no explicit knowledge of final states.

  16. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  17. Using experimental studies and theoretical calculations to analyze the molecular mechanism of coumarin, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tiane-Jye; Su, Chia-Ching; Chen, Chung-Yi; Liou, Chyong-Huey; Lu, Li-Hwa

    2005-05-01

    Three natural products, Coumarin ( 1), p-hydroxybenzoic acid ( 2), trans-cinnamic acid ( 3) were isolated from the natural plant of indigenous cinnamon and the structures including relative stereochemistry were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations. Their sterochemical structures were determined by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. The p-hydroxybenzoic acid complex with water is reported to show the existence of two hydrogen bonds. The two hydrogen bonds are formed in the water molecule of two hydrogen-accepting oxygen of carbonyl group of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The intermolecular interaction two hydrogen bond of the model system of the water- p-hydroxybenzoic acid was investigated. An experimental study and a theoretical analysis using the B3LYP/6-31G* method in the GAUSSIAN-03 package program were conducted on the three natural products. The theoretical results are supplemented by experimental data. Optimal geometric structures of three compounds were also determined. The calculated molecular mechanics compared quite well with those obtained from the experimental data. The ionization potentials, highest occupied molecular orbital energy, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, energy gaps, heat of formation, atomization energies, and vibration frequencies of the compounds were also calculated. The results of the calculations show that three natural products are stable molecules with high reactive and various other physical properties. The study also provided an explicit understanding of the sterochemical structure and thermodynamic properties of the three natural products.

  18. Microscopic Model Calculations for the Magnetization Process of Layered Triangular-Lattice Quantum Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization processes of spin-1 /2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H ≈0.7 Hs, where Hs is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba3CoSb2O9 [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co2 + -based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states.

  19. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states. PMID:25635561

  20. Collective excitations in quantum Hall liquid crystals: Single-mode approximation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lapilli, Cintia M.; Wexler, Carlos

    2006-02-15

    A variety of recent experiments probing the low-temperature transport properties of quantum Hall systems have suggested an interpretation in terms of liquid crystalline mesophases dubbed quantum Hall liquid crystals. The single mode approximation (SMA) has been a useful tool for the determination of the excitation spectra of various systems such as phonons in {sup 4}He and in the fractional quantum Hall effect. In this paper we calculate (via the SMA) the spectrum of collective excitations in a quantum Hall liquid crystal by considering nematic, tetratic, and hexatic generalizations of Laughlin's trial wave function having twofold, fourfold, and sixfold broken rotational symmetry, respectively. In the limit of zero wave vector q the dispersion of these modes is singular, with a gap that is dependent on the direction along which q=0 is approached for nematic and tetratic liquid crystalline states, but remains regular in the hexatic state, as permitted by the fourth order wave-vector dependence of the (projected) oscillator strength and static structure factor.

  1. On the group-theoretic structure of a class of quantum dialogue protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Kothari, Vivek; Banerjee, Anindita; Pathak, Anirban

    2013-02-01

    A sufficient condition for implementation of the quantum dialogue protocol is obtained and it is shown that the set of unitary operators used for the purpose must form a group under multiplication. A generalized protocol of quantum dialogue is obtained using the sufficient condition. Further, several examples of possible groups of unitary operators and quantum states that may be used for implementation of quantum dialogue are systematically generated. As examples, it is shown that GHZ state, GHZ-like state, W state, 4 and 5-qubit Cluster states, Ω state, Brown state, Q4 state and Q5 state can be used to implement quantum dialogue protocol. It is also shown that if a quantum system is found to be suitable for quantum dialogue then that can provide solution of the socialist millionaire problem too.

  2. Electrostatic embedding in large-scale first principles quantum mechanical calculations on biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Malcolm, Noj; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-12-14

    Biomolecular simulations with atomistic detail are often required to describe interactions with chemical accuracy for applications such as the calculation of free energies of binding or chemical reactions in enzymes. Force fields are typically used for this task but these rely on extensive parameterisation which in cases can lead to limited accuracy and transferability, for example for ligands with unusual functional groups. These limitations can be overcome with first principles calculations with methods such as density functional theory (DFT) but at a much higher computational cost. The use of electrostatic embedding can significantly reduce this cost by representing a portion of the simulated system in terms of highly localised charge distributions. These classical charge distributions are electrostatically coupled with the quantum system and represent the effect of the environment in which the quantum system is embedded. In this paper we describe and evaluate such an embedding scheme in which the polarisation of the electronic density by the embedding charges occurs self-consistently during the calculation of the density. We have implemented this scheme in a linear-scaling DFT program as our aim is to treat with DFT entire biomolecules (such as proteins) and large portions of the solvent. We test this approach in the calculation of interaction energies of ligands with biomolecules and solvent and investigate under what conditions these can be obtained with the same level of accuracy as when the entire system is described by DFT, for a variety of neutral and charged species. PMID:22168680

  3. Structure and properties of electronic and hole centers in CsBr from theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, Matthew T.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure, geometry, diffusion barriers and optical properties of fundamental defects of CsBr are calculated using hybrid functional DFT and TD- DFT methods. The B3LYP functional with a modified exchange contribution has been used in an embedded cluster scheme to model the structure and spectroscopic properties of self-trapped triplet exciton, interstitial Br atoms and ions, self-trapped holes and Br vacancies. The calculated migration barriers and positions of maxima of optical absorption bands are in good agreement with experiment, justifying the obtained defect geometries. The o*-center triplet exciton luminescence energy is also accurately calculated.

  4. Analytical Calculation of Energy levels of mono- and bilayer Graphene Quantum Dots Used as Light Absorber in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamandani, Shahryar; Darvish, Ghafar; Faez, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper by solving Dirac equation, we present an analytical solution to calculate energy levels and wave functions of mono- and bilayer graphene quantum dots. By supposing circular quantum dots, we solve Dirac equation and obtain energy levels and band gap with relations in a new closed and practical form. The energy levels are correlated with a radial quantum number and radius of quantum dots. In addition to monolayer quantum dots, AA- and AB-stacked bilayer quantum dots are investigated and their energy levels and band gap are calculated as well. Also, we analyze the influence of the quantum dots size on their energy spectrum. It can be observed that the band gap decreases as quantum dots' radius increases. On the other hand, increase in the band gap is more in AB-stacked bilayer quantum dots. Using the obtained relations, the band gap is obtained in each state. Comparing the energy spectra obtained from the tight-binding approximation with those of our obtained relations shows that the behavior of the energies as function of the dot size is qualitatively similar, but in some cases, quantitative differences can be seen. As quantum dots radius increases, the analytical results approach to the tight-binding method results.

  5. Theoretical calculations of pressure broadening coefficients for H2O perturbed by hydrogen or helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Pollack, James B.

    1995-01-01

    Halfwidths were calculated for H2O with H2 as a broadening gas and were estimated for He as the broadening species. The calculations used the model of Robert and Bonamy with parabolic trajectories and all relevant terms in the interaction potential. The calculations investigated the dependence of the halfwidth on the order of the atom-atom expansion, the rotational states, and the temperature in the range 200 to 400K. Finally, calculations were performed for many transitions of interest in the 5 micrometer window region of the spectrum. The resulting data will be supplied to Dr. R. Freedman for extracting accurate water mixing ratios from the analysis of the thermal channels for the Net Flux experiment on the Galileo probe.

  6. Theoretical calculations of the electronic and vibrational structure of point defects in ionic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.F.; Wilson, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the Hartree-Fock one-electron equations for simple point defects in ionic crystals are discussed. The importance of polarization effects due to the diffuse nature of the wavefunctions in the relaxed excited states are emphasized, and the usefulness of an effective mass approximation indicated. Several approaches to the calculation of the electronic structure are discussed and evaluated. The connection between electronic structure calculations and phonon perturbations are pointed out through a brief discussion of localized perturbation theory.

  7. Ocean color spectrum calculations. [theoretical models relating oceanographic parameters to upwelling radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development is considered of procedures for measuring a number of subsurface oceanographic parameters using remotely sensed ocean color data. It is proposed that the first step in this effort should be the development of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. A portion of a contributory theoretical model is shown to be described by a modified single scattering approach based upon a simple treatment of multiple scattering. The resulting quasi-single scattering model can be used to predict the upwelling distribution of spectral radiance emerging from the sea. The shape of the radiance spectrum predicted by this model for clear ocean water shows encouraging agreement with measurments made at the edge of the Sargasso Sea off Cape Hatteras.

  8. Theoretical calculations of emission of wolframite and scheelite-type tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, T.; Hizhnyi, Y.; Nedilko, S.

    2009-01-21

    Tungstate crystals AWO{sub 4} (A = Zn,Cd,Pb) are well-known scintillation materials for various applications in science and technology. In recent years the optical properties of these crystals were intensively studied experimentally and theoretically. However, the origin of luminescence in lead, cadmium and zinc tungstates is still the subject of discussion. According to generally accepted view, the centers of luminescence in AWO{sub 4} crystals are in some or other way related to the tungstate anionic groups. We developed a cluster approach in theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of AWO{sub 4} tungstate crystals based on the configuration interaction (CI) computation in which the lattice vibrations were taken into account.

  9. Recombination of W19 + ions with electrons: Absolute rate coefficients from a storage-ring experiment and from theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Spruck, K.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated rate coefficients for the recombination of W19 +([Kr ] 4 d10 4 f9 ) ions with free electrons (forming W18 +) are presented. At low electron-ion collision energies, the merged-beam rate coefficient is dominated by strong, mutually overlapping, recombination resonances as already found previously for the neighboring charge-state ions W18 + and W20 +. In the temperature range where W19 + is expected to form in a collisionally ionized plasma, the experimentally derived recombination rate coefficient deviates by up to a factor of about 20 from the theoretical rate coefficient obtained from the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure database. The present calculations, which employ a Breit-Wigner redistributive partitioning of autoionizing widths for dielectronic recombination via multi-electron resonances, reproduce the experimental findings over the entire temperature range.

  10. Calculating work in weakly driven quantum master equations: Backward and forward equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    I present a technical report indicating that the two methods used for calculating characteristic functions for the work distribution in weakly driven quantum master equations are equivalent. One involves applying the notion of quantum jump trajectory [Phys. Rev. E 89, 042122 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.042122], while the other is based on two energy measurements on the combined system and reservoir [Silaev et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 022103 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.022103]. These represent backward and forward methods, respectively, which adopt a very similar approach to that of the Kolmogorov backward and forward equations used in classical stochastic theory. The microscopic basis for the former method is also clarified. In addition, a previously unnoticed equality related to the heat is also revealed.

  11. Development of a non-equilibrium quantum transport calculation method based on constrained density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium quantum transport process. Within the scheme, non-equilibrium situation and quantum transport within the open-boundary condition are described by the region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method and matrix Green's function theory, respectively. We will discuss our solutions to the technical difficulties in describing bias-dependent electron transport at complicated nanointerfaces and present several application examples. Global Frontier Program (2013M3A6B1078881), Basic Science Research Grant (2012R1A1A2044793), EDISON Program (No. 2012M3C1A6035684), and 2013 Global Ph.D fellowship program of the National Research Foundation. KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C3-021).

  12. Localization in quantum percolation: Transfer-matrix calculations in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.; Grest, Gary S.

    1987-12-01

    The quantum site percolation problem, which is defined by a disordered tight-binding Hamiltonian with a binary probability distribution, is studied using finite-size scaling methods. For the simple cubic lattice, the dependence of the mobility edge on the strength of the site energy is obtained. Exactly at the center of each subband the states appear to be always localized. The lowest value of the quantum site percolation threshold is pq=0.44+/-0.01 and occurs for an energy near the center of the subband. These numerical results are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the predictions of the potential-well analogy, based on a cluster coherent-potential approximation. The integrated density of states is also calculated numerically. A spike in the density of states exactly at the center of the subband and a gap around it are observed, in agreement with earlier work by Kirkpatrick and Eggarter.

  13. Quantum calculation of disordered length in fcc single crystals using channelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.

    2006-04-01

    Lattices of face-centred cubic crystals (fcc), due to irradiation processes, may become disordered in stable configurations like the dumb-bell configuration (DBC) or body-centred interstitial (BCI). In this work, a quantum mechanical treatment for the calculation of transmission coefficients of channelled positrons from their bound states in the normal lattice regions into the allowed bound states in the disordered regions is given as a function of the length of the disordered regions. In order to obtain more reliable results, higher anharmonic terms in the planar channelling potential are considered in the calculations by using first-order perturbation theory where new bound states have been found. The calculations were executed in the energy range 10 200 MeV of the incident positron on a copper single crystal in the planar direction (100).

  14. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  15. Application of vibrational spectroscopy supported by theoretical calculations in identification of amorphous and crystalline forms of cefuroxime axetil.

    PubMed

    Talaczyńska, Alicja; Lewandowska, Kornelia; Jelińska, Anna; Garbacki, Piotr; Podborska, Agnieszka; Zalewski, Przemysław; Oszczapowicz, Irena; Sikora, Adam; Kozak, Maciej; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-01-01

    FT-IR and Raman scattering spectra of cefuroxime axetil were proposed for identification studies of its crystalline and amorphous forms. An analysis of experimental spectra was supported by quantum-chemical calculations performed with the use of B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p) as a basis set. The geometric structure of a cefuroxime axetil molecule, HOMO and LUMO orbitals, and molecular electrostatic potential were also determined by using DFT (density functional theory). The benefits of applying FT-IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy for characterization of drug subjected to degradation were discussed. PMID:25654137

  16. Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Supported by Theoretical Calculations in Identification of Amorphous and Crystalline Forms of Cefuroxime Axetil

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Kornelia; Jelińska, Anna; Zalewski, Przemysław; Oszczapowicz, Irena; Sikora, Adam; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    FT-IR and Raman scattering spectra of cefuroxime axetil were proposed for identification studies of its crystalline and amorphous forms. An analysis of experimental spectra was supported by quantum-chemical calculations performed with the use of B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p) as a basis set. The geometric structure of a cefuroxime axetil molecule, HOMO and LUMO orbitals, and molecular electrostatic potential were also determined by using DFT (density functional theory). The benefits of applying FT-IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy for characterization of drug subjected to degradation were discussed. PMID:25654137

  17. A Modular Class of Fluorescent Difluoroboranes: Synthesis, Structure, Optical Properties, Theoretical Calculations and Applications for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bachollet, Sylvestre P J T; Volz, Daniel; Fiser, Béla; Münch, Stephan; Rönicke, Franziska; Carrillo, Jokin; Adams, Harry; Schepers, Ute; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Bräse, Stefan; Harrity, Joseph P A

    2016-08-22

    Ten borylated bipyridines (BOBIPYs) have been synthesized and selected structural modifications have been made that allow useful structure-optical property relationships to be gathered. These systems have been further investigated using DFT calculations and spectroscopic measurements, showing blue to green fluorescence with quantum yields up to 41 %. They allow full mapping of the structure to determine where selected functionalities can be implemented, to tune the optical properties or to incorporate linking groups. The best derivative was thus functionalised with an alkyne linker, which would enable further applications through click chemistry and in this optic, the stability of the fluorophores has been evaluated. PMID:27465819

  18. The Calculation of Theoretical Chromospheric Models and the Interpretation of the Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, Eugene H.

    1998-01-01

    Since the early 1970s we have been developing the extensive computer programs needed to construct models of the solar atmosphere and to calculate detailed spectra for use in the interpretation of solar observations. This research involves two major related efforts: work by Avrett and Loeser on the Pandora computer program for non-LTE modeling of the solar atmosphere including a wide range of physical processes, and work by Rurucz on the detailed synthesis of the solar spectrum based on opacity data or over 58 million atomic and molecular lines. our goals are: to determine models of the various features observed on the Sun (sunspots, different components of quiet and active regions, and flares) by means of physically realistic models, and to calculate detailed spectra at all wavelengths that match observations of those features. These two goals are interrelated: discrepancies between calculated and observed spectra are used to determine improvements in the structure of the models, and in the detailed physical processes used in both the model calculations and the spectrum calculations. The atmospheric models obtained in this way provide not only the depth variation of various atmospheric parameters, but also a description of the internal physical processes that are responsible for non-radiative heating, and for solar activity in general.

  19. Automated Routines for Calculating Whole-Stream Metabolism: Theoretical Background and User's Guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Nardi, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    In order to standardize methods and facilitate rapid calculation and archival of stream-metabolism variables, the Stream Metabolism Program was developed to calculate gross primary production, net ecosystem production, respiration, and selected other variables from continuous measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentration, water temperature, and other user-supplied information. Methods for calculating metabolism from continuous measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentration and water temperature are fairly well known, but a standard set of procedures and computation software for all aspects of the calculations were not available previously. The Stream Metabolism Program addresses this deficiency with a stand-alone executable computer program written in Visual Basic.NET?, which runs in the Microsoft Windows? environment. All equations and assumptions used in the development of the software are documented in this report. Detailed guidance on application of the software is presented, along with a summary of the data required to use the software. Data from either a single station or paired (upstream, downstream) stations can be used with the software to calculate metabolism variables.

  20. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  1. Vibrational analysis of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Çırak, Çağrı; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile were investigated. The experimental FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of the molecule in the solid phase were recorded. Theoretical vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF), density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 09 W program, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies were performed by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 program. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were compared with the corresponding experimental data, and they were seen to be in a good agreement with each other. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies were found.

  2. Theoretical calculation of the p-emitter length for snapback-free reverse-conducting IGBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liheng, Zhu; Xingbi, Chen

    2014-06-01

    A physically based equation for predicting required p-emitter length of a snapback-free reverse-conducting insulated gate bipolar transistor (RC-IGBT) with field-stop structure is proposed. The n-buffer resistances above the p-emitter region with anode geometries of linear strip, circular and annular type are calculated, and based on this, the minimum p-emitter lengths of those three geometries are given and verified by simulation. It is found that good agreement was achieved between the numerical calculation and simulation results. Moreover, the calculation results show that the annular case needs the shortest p-emitter length for RC-IGBT to be snapback-free.

  3. Path-integral virial estimator for reaction rate calculation basedon the quantum instanton aproximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sandy; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miller, William H.

    2005-11-28

    The quantum instanton approximation is a type of quantum transition state theory that calculates the chemical reaction rate using the reactive flux correlation function and its low order derivatives at time zero. Here we present several path-integral estimators for the latter quantities, which characterize the initial decay profile of the flux correlation function. As with the internal energy or heat capacity calculation, different estimators yield different variances (and therefore different convergence properties) in a Monte Carlo calculation. Here we obtain a virial(-type) estimator by using a coordinate scaling procedure rather than integration by parts, which allows more computational benefits. We also consider two different methods for treating the flux operator, i.e., local-path and global-path approaches, in which the latter achieves a smaller variance at the cost of using second-order potential derivatives. Numerical tests are performed for a one-dimensional Eckart barrier and a model proton transfer reaction in a polar solvent, which illustrates the reduced variance of the virial estimator over the corresponding thermodynamic estimator.

  4. Molecular modeling study of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, quantum mechanical calculations, and experimental corroboration.

    PubMed

    Tosso, Rodrigo D; Andujar, Sebastian A; Gutierrez, Lucas; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ricaurte; Nogueras, Manuel; Baldoni, Héctor; Suvire, Fernando D; Cobo, Justo; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2013-08-26

    A molecular modeling study on dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors was carried out. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of DHFR inhibitors interacting with the human enzyme is reported here, providing a clear picture of the binding interactions of these ligands from both structural and energetic viewpoints. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allows us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) technique. Thus, molecular aspects of the binding interactions between inhibitors and the DHFR are discussed in detail. A significant correlation between binding energies obtained from DFT calculations and experimental IC₅₀ values was obtained, predicting with an acceptable qualitative accuracy the potential inhibitor effect of nonsynthesized compounds. Such correlation was experimentally corroborated synthesizing and testing two new inhibitors reported in this paper. PMID:23834278

  5. Calculating Floquet states of large quantum systems: A parallelization strategy and its cluster implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptyeva, T. V.; Kozinov, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Ivanchenko, M. V.; Denisov, S. V.; Hänggi, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical approach to calculate non-equilibrium eigenstates of a periodically time-modulated quantum system. The approach is based on the use of a chain of single-step propagating operators. Each operator is time-specific and constructed by combining the Magnus expansion of the time-dependent system Hamiltonian with the Chebyshev expansion of an operator exponent. The construction of the unitary Floquet operator, which evolves a system state over the full modulation period, is performed by propagating the identity matrix over the period. The independence of the evolution of basis vectors makes the propagation stage suitable for realization on a parallel cluster. Once the propagation stage is completed, a routine diagonalization of the Floquet matrix is performed. Finally, an additional propagation round, now involving the eigenvectors as the initial states, allows to resolve the time-dependence of the Floquet states and calculate their characteristics. We demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of the algorithm by applying it to calculate the Floquet states of two quantum models, namely (i) a synthesized random-matrix Hamiltonian and (ii) a many-body Bose-Hubbard dimer, both of the size up to 104 states.

  6. Theoretical Calculation for the Ionization of Molecules by Short Strong Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.; Borbely, S.

    2011-10-03

    We have developed several calculation methods for the ionization of atoms and molecules by strong and ultrashort laser pulses, based on the numerical solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) in the momentum space. We have performed calculations within the strong field approximation (Volkov) and using iterative and direct methods for solving the TDSE. The investigated molecules are H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}O. In case of the ionization of diatomic molecules the interference effects in the ejected electron spectra due to the coherent addition of the waves associated to the electrons ejected from the vicinity of different nuclei were also analysed.

  7. Vibrational spectra, structure, and theoretical calculations of 2-fluoro- and 3-fluoropyridine.

    PubMed

    Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar; Laane, Jaan

    2011-09-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of liquid and vapor-phase 2-fluoropyridine and 3-fluoropyridine have been recorded and assigned. Ab initio and DFT calculations were carried out to compute the molecular structures and to verify the vibrational assignments. The observed and calculated spectra agree extremely well. The ring bond distances of the fluoropyridines are very similar to those of pyridine except for a shortening of the C-N(F) bond in 2-fluoropyridine. The C-F bond stretching frequencies are similar to that in fluorobenzene reflecting the influence of the ring π bonding. PMID:21570895

  8. Quantum-mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of magnesium glutamate glycine and magnesium glutamate arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoin, W.; Pasterny, K.; Pasterna, G.; Wrzalik, R.

    2006-07-01

    Theoretical calculations of magnesium glutamate-glycine ([Mg(glu-gly)]) and magnesium glutamate-arginine ([Mg(glu-arg)]) structures and their spectroscopic characteristics have been performed in the gas phase with the GAUSSIAN 98 software package using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3PW91 level. The 6-31+G* basis set was selected due to their reasonable quality and size. NMR and IR measurements were carried out and obtained experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts and IR spectra are compared with calculated spectral parameters.

  9. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M. L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-01

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  10. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  11. Theoretical comparison of advanced methods for calculating nitrous oxide fluxes using non-steady state chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several flux-calculation (FC) schemes are available for determining soil-to-atmosphere emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and other trace gases using data from non-steady-state flux chambers. Recently developed methods claim to provide more accuracy in estimating the true pre-deployment flux (f0) comp...

  12. Theoretical calculation of low-lying states of NaAr and NaXe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskowski, B. C.; Langhoff, S. R.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Potential curves as well as dipole moments and linking transition moments are calculated for the ground X 2 Sigma + and low lying excited A 2 Pi, B 2 Sigma +, C 2 Sigma +, (4) 2 Sigma +, (2) 2 Pi and (1) 2 Delta states of NaAr and NaXe. Calculations are performed using a self-consistent field plus configuration-interaction procedure with the core electrons replaced by an ab initio effective core potential. The potential curves obtained are found to be considerably less repulsive than the semiempirical curves of Pascale and Vandeplanque (1974) and to agree well with existing experimental data, although the binding energies of those states having potential minima due to van der Waals interactions are underestimated. Emission bands are also calculated for the X 2 Sigma + - C 2 Sigma + excimer transitions of NaAr and NaXe using the calculated transition moments and potential curves, and shown to agree well with experiment on the short-wavelength side of the maximum.

  13. Calculations of band gaps in polyaniline from theoretical studies of oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; McKee, M.L.

    2000-03-02

    Geometries and band gaps of polyaniline oligomers up to decamer have been systematically calculated and analyzed using various computational techniques such as molecular mechanics, semiempirical, and ab initio methods. On the basis of fully optimized geometries of neural and charged forms of polyaniline oligomers, excitation energies are calculated at the semiempirical ZINDO (INDO/S) level and extrapolated to the band gap value of the infinite chain. Band gaps are also approximately by extrapolating the HOMO/LUMO difference calculated at the density functional level (B3LYP/6--31G*). The SINDO//AM1 band gaps in the reduced and oxidized form of polyaniline (4.3 and 2.7 eV) are in good agreement with experimental values (3.8 {+-} 2 and 1.8 {+-} 3 eV, respectively). The doped form of polyaniline (two positive charges per four aniline units) has been computed with a spin-unrestricted method (UAM1) and the band gap approximated from an extrapolation of the tetramer and octamer. The calculated band gap of 1.3 eV (UZINDO//UAM1) is in good agreement with experiment (1.5 eV). The influence of ring torsional angle and interchain interaction on the band gap of the polyaniline system are also discussed.

  14. Diffusion Rates for Hydrogen on Pd(111) from Molecular Quantum Dynamics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Thiago; Marquardt, Roberto; Gatti, Fabien; Dong, Wei

    2014-12-18

    The van Hove formula for the dynamical structure factor (DSF) related to particle scattering at mobile adsorbates is extended to include the relaxation of the adsorbates' vibrational states. The total rate obtained from the DSF is assumed to be the sum of a diffusion and a relaxation rate. A simple kinetic model to support this assumption is presented. To illustrate its potential applicability, the formula is evaluated using wave functions, energies, and lifetimes of vibrational states obtained for H/Pd(111) from first-principle calculations. Results show that quantum effects can be expected to be important even at room temperature. PMID:26273973

  15. Forming NCO(-) in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, E; Gianturco, F A; Wester, R

    2016-07-14

    The existence of NCO(-) anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO(-) directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO(-) formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  16. Forming NCO– in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of NCO– anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO– directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO– formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  17. Path-integral calculation of the third virial coefficient of quantum gases at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Harvey, Allan H.

    2011-04-07

    We derive path-integral expressions for the second and third virial coefficients of monatomic quantum gases. Unlike previous work that considered only Boltzmann statistics, we include exchange effects (Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics). We use state-of-the-art pair and three-body potentials to calculate the third virial coefficient of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He in the temperature range 2.6-24.5561 K. We obtain uncertainties smaller than those of the limited experimental data. Inclusion of exchange effects is necessary to obtain accurate results below about 7 K.

  18. Theory of finite size effects for electronic quantum Monte Carlo calculations of liquids and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, Markus; Clay, Raymond C.; Morales, Miguel A.; Tubman, Norm M.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one- and two-body correlation functions. We introduce effective procedures, such as using the potential and wave function split up into long and short range functions to simplify the method, and we discuss how to treat backflow wave functions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  19. An approximate framework for quantum transport calculation with model order reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Quan; Li, Jun; Yam, Chiyung; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Ngai; Chen, Guanhua

    2015-04-01

    A new approximate computational framework is proposed for computing the non-equilibrium charge density in the context of the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method for quantum mechanical transport problems. The framework consists of a new formulation, called the X-formulation, for single-energy density calculation based on the solution of sparse linear systems, and a projection-based nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) approach to address the large number of energy points required for large applied biases. The advantages of the new methods are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  20. The three-fold theoretical basis of the Gravity Probe B gyro precession calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Ronald J.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) experiment is complete and the results are in agreement with the predictions of general relativity (GR) for both the geodetic precession, 6.6 arcsec yr-1 to about 0.3%, and the Lense-Thirring precession, 39 marcsec to about 19%. This note is concerned with the theoretical basis for the predictions. The predictions depend on three elements of gravity theory, firstly that macroscopic gravity is described by a metric theory such as GR, secondly that the Lense-Thirring metric provides an approximate description of the gravitational field of the spinning Earth, and thirdly that the spin axis of a gyroscope is parallel displaced in spacetime, which gives its equation of motion. We look at each of these three elements to show how each is solidly based on previous experiments and well-tested theory. The agreement of GP-B with theory strengthens our belief that all three elements are correct and increases our confidence in applying GR to astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, if GP-B had not verified the predictions a major theoretical quandary would have occurred.

  1. Quantum cryptography: Theoretical protocols for quantum key distribution and tests of selected commercial QKD systems in commercial fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Monika; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    The overview of the current status of quantum cryptography is given in regard to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, implemented both on nonentangled and entangled flying qubits. Two commercial R&D platforms of QKD systems are described (the Clavis II platform by idQuantique implemented on nonentangled photons and the EPR S405 Quelle platform by AIT based on entangled photons) and tested for feasibility of their usage in commercial TELECOM fiber metropolitan networks. The comparison of systems efficiency, stability and resistivity against noise and hacker attacks is given with some suggestion toward system improvement, along with assessment of two models of QKD.

  2. The theoretical studies of topology electronic states in HgTe Hall Bar and Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jin-Xian; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Yang, Wen

    In recent years, there is an extensive attention on the new properties of topology materials and their potential applications. Our interest is on the physics in the quantum confined systems based on topology materials. To consider two such systems, i.e., quantum dot and Hall bar constructed on the HgTe quantum well, we study the electronic properties and their dependence on various material parameters with and without an in-plane electric field. For both systems, we find that 1) the exotic edge states appear in bulk energy gap, resulting from the non-trivial topological property of quantum well system. 2) by the magnetic doping, there are tunable phase transitions, e.g., transition from trivial insulating phase to topological insulating phase or anomalous quantum Hall insulating phase. 3) the in-plane electric field can introduce effective control on the electronic states.

  3. Method and Basis Set Analysis of Oxorhenium(V) Complexes for Theoretical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Demoin, Dustin Wayne; Li, Yawen; Jurisson, Silvia S.; Deakyne, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of method and basis set combinations has been evaluated for monooxorhenium(V) complexes with N, O, P, S, Cl, and Se donor atoms. The geometries and energies obtained are compared to both high-level computations and literature structures. These calculations show that the PBE0 method outperforms the B3LYP method with respect to both structure and energetics. The combination of 6-31G** basis set on the nonmetal atoms and LANL2TZ effective core potential on the rhenium center gives reliable equilibrium structures with minimal computational resources for both model and literature compounds. Single-point energy calculations at the PBE0/LANL2TZ,6-311+G* level of theory are recommended for energetics. PMID:23087847

  4. Millimeterwave rotational spectrum and theoretical calculations of cis-propionic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaman, A. I.; Chakraborty, Shamik; Chakraborty, Rangana

    2015-01-01

    The millimeterwave rotational spectra of the cis conformer of propionic acid (C3H6O2) have been investigated in the ground vibrational state in the frequency range of 80.0-100.0 GHz. Many high J and K-1 (Jmax = 50, K-1 = 12) rotational lines have been assigned. A least-squares analysis of the measured and previously reported rotational transition frequencies resulted in the determination of an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion (CD) constants of the molecule. Detailed MP2 and DFT calculations were also carried out with various functional and basis sets to evaluate the spectroscopic constants, dipole moment, and various structural parameters of cis-propionic acid and compared with the corresponding experimental values. Potential energy surface has been calculated to identify other probable conformers in this molecule.

  5. Theoretical Calculations of Refractive Properties for Hg3Te2Cl2 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokotey, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews the optical properties, such as refractive index, optical dielectric constant, and reflection coefficient of the Hg3Te2Cl2 crystals. The applications of the Hg3X2Y2 crystals as electronic, optical, and optoelectronic devices are very much determined by the nature and magnitude of these fundamental material properties. The origin of chemical bonding in the crystals is very important for definition of the physical and chemical properties. The main structural feature of the Hg3X2Y2 crystals is the presence of covalent pyramids [XHg3] and linear X-Hg-X groups. Optical properties are calculated according to the model proposed by Harrison. The refractive index in the spectral region far from the absorption edge is determined within the generalized single-oscillator model. The calculated results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Theoretical Calculations of Refractive Properties for Hg3Te2Cl2 Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bokotey, O V

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews the optical properties, such as refractive index, optical dielectric constant, and reflection coefficient of the Hg3Te2Cl2 crystals. The applications of the Hg3X2Y2 crystals as electronic, optical, and optoelectronic devices are very much determined by the nature and magnitude of these fundamental material properties. The origin of chemical bonding in the crystals is very important for definition of the physical and chemical properties. The main structural feature of the Hg3X2Y2 crystals is the presence of covalent pyramids [XHg3] and linear X-Hg-X groups. Optical properties are calculated according to the model proposed by Harrison. The refractive index in the spectral region far from the absorption edge is determined within the generalized single-oscillator model. The calculated results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:27184964

  7. Theoretical Calculations of Photoabsorption of Several Alicyclic Molecules in the Vacuum Ultraviolet Region

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzawa, Nobuyuki; Ishitani, Akihiko; Dixon, David A.; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2001-06-13

    In order to aid in the design of transparent materials for use as photoresists for F2 lithography (157 nm), we have performed time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of the photoabsorption of molecules in the vacuum ultraviolet region. The application of this TD-DFT method to the prediction of photoabsorption was benchmarked using model molecules such as formaldehyde, and an empirical equation for correcting the calculated transition energy was obtained. The TD-DFT method with the empirical correction equation provides dramatically more accurate results than those obtained with the CIS (single-excitation configuration interaction) method, which we employed in previous studies. We used it to predict the photoabsorption of various molecules such as methanol, t-butylalcohol, acetic acid, methyl acetate, cycloalkane, norbonane, tricyclodecane, tetrahydropyrane, adamantane, maleic anhydride and their fluorinated derivatives.

  8. Theoretical calculation of a composite pulse for 2H broadband excitation by average Hamiltonian theory

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Roopchand, Rabia; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Chen, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Quadrupolar echo NMR spectroscopy of solids often requires RF pulse excitation that covers spectral widths exceeding 100 kHz. In a recent work we found out that a four pulse, composite pulse COM-II ( 90180¯90135¯45 ), provided robust broadband excitation for deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy. Moreover, when combined with an eight step phase cycle, spectral distortions arising from finite pulse widths were greatly supressed. In this paper we report on a theoretical analysis COM-II with 8-step phase cycle by average Hamiltonian theory. This treatment is combined with the fictitious spin-1 operator formalism, and the mechanism of the 8-step phase cycling that minimizes the spectral distortions is discussed. PMID:26681896

  9. Theoretical calculations of ion acceleration in the vicinity of comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, M. L.; Cravens, T. E.; Ye, G.

    1994-01-01

    Ionization of cometary neutral molecules produces ions which are picked up by the solar wind. The cometary ion pickup process for comet Giacobini-Zinner is studied in two ways: (1) with a test particle method in which trajectories are numerically calculated for several thousand ions whose initial locations were chosen randomly with probability proportional to the neutral density and (2) with a quasi-linear diffusion model. The cometary ion distribution function was calculated with the test particle model at several locations upstream of the bow shock and for several types of magnetic fluctuations (or waves). These waves were allowed to propagate in both directions along the magnetic field at the Alfven speed. Both pitch angle scattering and energy diffusion are evident in the derived ion distributions. The monochromatic waves result in less ion acceleration than turbulent fluctuations with about the same amplitude. The calculated ion distribution functions are in reasonable agreement with the distributions measured in the vicinity of comet Giacobini-Zinner in 1985 by particle detectors on the ICE spacecraft when the ratio of power in sunward propagating Alfven waves to the power in antisunward propagating waves is assumed to lie between about 20% and 50%. However, the quasi-linear diffusion model results agree best with the measured distribution functions when the power ratio is only about 3 percent.

  10. Theoretical calculations on structural and electronic properties of BGaAsBi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Metin; Yalcin, Battal G.; Ustundag, Mehmet; Bagci, Sadik

    2015-11-01

    The structural and electronic properties of cubic B x Ga1- x As1- y Bi y alloys with bismuth (Bi) concentration of 0.0625, 0.125, 0.1875 and 0.25 are studied with various boron (B) compositions by means of density functional theory (DFT) within the Wu-Cohen (WC) exchange correlation potential based on generalized gradient approximation (GGA). For all studied alloy structures, we have implemented geometric optimization before the volume optimization calculations. The obtained equilibrium lattice constants and band gap of studied quaternary alloys are investigated for the first time in literature. While the lattice constant behavior changes linearly with boron concentration, increasing small amount of bismuth concentration alter the lattice constant nonlinearly. The present calculation shows that the band gap decreases with increasing bismuth concentration and direct band gap semiconductor alloy became an indirect band gap with increasing boron concentration. From the band offset calculation we have shown that increasing B and Bi concentration in host GaAs reduced the valance band offset in a heterostructure formed by GaAs and studied alloys.

  11. Construction of environment states in quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group calculations.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2006-01-21

    The application of the quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is cumbersome for complex electronic structures with many active orbitals. The high computational cost is mainly due to the poor convergence of standard DMRG calculations. A factor which affects the convergence behavior of the calculations is the choice of the start-up procedure. In this start-up step matrix representations of operators have to be calculated in a guessed many-electron basis of the DMRG environment block. Different possibilities for the construction of these basis states exist, and we first compare four procedures to approximate the environment states using Slater determinants explicitly. These start-up procedures are applied to DMRG calculations on a sophisticated test system: the chromium dimer. It is found that the converged energies and the rate of convergence depend significantly on the choice of the start-up procedure. However, since already the most simple start-up procedure, which uses only the Hartree-Fock determinant, is comparatively good, Slater determinants, in general, appear not to be a good choice as approximate environment basis states for convergence acceleration. Based on extensive test calculations it is demonstrated that the computational cost can be significantly reduced if the number of total states m is successively increased. This is done in such a way that the environment states are built up stepwise from system states of previous truncated DMRG sweeps for slowly increasing m values. PMID:16438563

  12. Construction of environment states in quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The application of the quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is cumbersome for complex electronic structures with many active orbitals. The high computational cost is mainly due to the poor convergence of standard DMRG calculations. A factor which affects the convergence behavior of the calculations is the choice of the start-up procedure. In this start-up step matrix representations of operators have to be calculated in a guessed many-electron basis of the DMRG environment block. Different possibilities for the construction of these basis states exist, and we first compare four procedures to approximate the environment states using Slater determinants explicitly. These start-up procedures are applied to DMRG calculations on a sophisticated test system: the chromium dimer. It is found that the converged energies and the rate of convergence depend significantly on the choice of the start-up procedure. However, since already the most simple start-up procedure, which uses only the Hartree-Fock determinant, is comparatively good, Slater determinants, in general, appear not to be a good choice as approximate environment basis states for convergence acceleration. Based on extensive test calculations it is demonstrated that the computational cost can be significantly reduced if the number of total states m is successively increased. This is done in such a way that the environment states are built up stepwise from system states of previous truncated DMRG sweeps for slowly increasing m values.

  13. Calculation of theoretical and empirical nutrient N critical loads in the mixed conifer ecosystems of southern California.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Joan; Gimeno, Benjamin S; Fenn, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Edaphic, foliar, and hydrologic forest nutrient status indicators from 15 mixed conifer forest stands in the Sierra Nevada, San Gabriel Mountains, and San Bernardino National Forest were used to estimate empirical or theoretical critical loads (CL) for nitrogen (N) as a nutrient. Soil acidification response to N deposition was also evaluated. Robust empirical relationships were found relating N deposition to plant N uptake (N in foliage), N fertility (litter C/N ratio), and soil acidification. However, no consistent empirical CL were obtained when the thresholds for parameters indicative of N excess from other types of ecosystems were used. Similarly, the highest theoretical CL for nutrient N calculated using the simple mass balance steady state model (estimates ranging from 1.4-8.8 kg N/ha/year) was approximately two times lower than the empirical observations. Further research is needed to derive the thresholds for indicators associated with the impairment of these mixed conifer forests exposed to chronic N deposition within a Mediterranean climate. Further development or parameterization of models for the calculation of theoretical critical loads suitable for these ecosystems will also be an important aspect of future critical loads research. PMID:17450298

  14. A new method to calculate Berry phase in one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Based on the residue theorem and degenerate perturbation theory, we derive a new, simple and general formula for Berry phase calculation in a two-level system for which the Hamiltonian is a real symmetric matrix. The special torus topology possessed by the first Brillouin zone (1 BZ) of this kind of systems ensures the existence of a nonzero Berry phase. We verify the correctness of our formula on the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. Then the Berry phase of one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator (1DQAHI) is calculated analytically by applying our method, the result being -π/2 -π/4 sgn (B) [ sgn (Δ - 4 B) + sgn (Δ) ]. Finally, illuminated by this idea, we investigate the Chern number in the two-dimensional case, and find a very simple way to determine the parameter range of the non-trivial Chern number in the phase diagram.

  15. Progesterone and testosterone studies by neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance methods and quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2004-05-01

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra of progesterone and testosterone measured at 20 and 290 K were compared with the IR spectra measured at 290 K. The Phonon Density of States spectra display well resolved peaks of low frequency internal vibration modes up to 1200 cm -1. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed by semiempirical PM3 method and by the density functional theory method with different basic sets for isolated molecule, as well as for the dimer system of testosterone. The proposed assignment of internal vibrations of normal modes enable us to conclude about the sequence of the onset of the torsion movements of the CH 3 groups. These conclusions were correlated with the results of proton molecular dynamics studies performed by NMR method. The GAUSSIAN program had been used for calculations.

  16. Six-band kṡp calculation of strained InAs/GaAs quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Boyong; Yu, Zhongyuan; Liu, Yumin; Yao, Wenjie; Feng, Hao; Ye, Han

    2010-06-01

    In the effective mass approximation, electronic structures of InAs/GaAs quantum rings are studied by the six-band kṡp model. In the description of the Hamiltonian matrix elements, a Fourier transform method is adopted to replace analytical integral method in the literature. We demonstrate the energy levels as functions of geometric parameters of the rings and compare our results with those obtained by analytical integral. The remarkable consistency in the comparison certifies our results. The outcomes of the six-band kṡp model in this article are also compared with those of the four-band kṡp model. It is found that both the bound state energies and the transition energy are lower in six-band calculation than those in four-band calculation, which is attributed to the spin-orbit splitting in the six-band kṡp model.

  17. Parallelizing the QUDA Library for Multi-GPU Calculations in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Babich, Michael Clark, Balint Joo

    2010-11-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are having a transformational effect on numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations of importance in nuclear and particle physics. The QUDA library provides a package of mixed precision sparse matrix linear solvers for LQCD applications, supporting single GPUs based on NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). This library, interfaced to the QDP++/Chroma framework for LQCD calculations, is currently in production use on the "9g" cluster at the Jefferson Laboratory, enabling unprecedented price/performance for a range of problems in LQCD. Nevertheless, memory constraints on current GPU devices limit the problem sizes that can be tackled. In this contribution we describe the parallelization of the QUDA library onto multiple GPUs using MPI, including strategies for the overlapping of communication and computation. We report on both weak and strong scaling for up to 32 GPUs interconnected by InfiniBand, on which we sustain in excess of 4 Tflops.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of neutron matter with chiral three-body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tews, I.; Gandolfi, S.; Gezerlis, A.; Schwenk, A.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) enables a systematic description of low-energy hadronic interactions with controlled theoretical uncertainties. For strongly interacting systems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods provide some of the most accurate solutions, but they require as input local potentials. We have recently constructed local chiral nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO ). Chiral EFT naturally predicts consistent many-body forces. In this paper, we consider the leading chiral three-nucleon (3N) interactions in local form. These are included in auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) simulations. We present results for the equation of state of neutron matter and for the energies and radii of neutron drops. In particular, we study the regulator dependence at the Hartree-Fock level and in AFDMC and find that present local regulators lead to less repulsion from 3N forces compared to the usual nonlocal regulators.

  19. Accuracy of Theoretical Calculations for Electron-Impact Ionization of atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Don

    2015-09-01

    In the last two decades, there have been several close-coupling approaches developed which can accurately calculate the triply differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of effective one and two electron atoms. The agreement between experiment and theory is not particularly good for more complicated atoms and molecules. Very recently, a B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates (BSRPS) approach was used to investigate low energy electron impact ionization of neon and very good agreement with experiment was found. The perturbative 3-body distorted wave (3DW) approach which includes the exact final state electron-electron interaction (post collision interaction - PCI) gave comparably good agreement with experiment. For ionization of molecules, there have been numerous studies of high-energy electron impact. These studies are called EMS (Electron Momentum Spectroscopy) and they were very valuable in determining the accuracy of molecular wavefunctions since the measured cross sections were proportional to the momentum space molecular wavefunction. More recently, lower energy collisions have started to be measured and these cross sections are much more difficult for theory since the detailed kinematics of the experiment become important. So far, the only close coupling calculation reported for ionization of molecules is the time-dependent close-coupling calculation (TDCC) which has been developed for ionization of H2 and it yields relative good agreement with experiment. Again the molecular 3-body distorted wave (M3DW) gave equally good agreement with experiment. For polyatomic molecules, the only theory available is the M3DW. In this talk, I will show the current status of agreement between experiment and theory for low and intermediate energy single ionization of atoms and molecules. Work supported by the NSF and XSEDE.

  20. Calculation of Double-Quantum-Coherence Two-dimensional Spectra: Distance Measurements and Orientational Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sushil K.; Borbat, Peter P.; Freed, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    The double quantum coherence (DQC) echo signal for two coupled nitroxides separated by distances ≳10 Å, is calculated rigorously for the six-pulse sequence. Successive application of six pulses on the initial density matrix, with appropriate inter-pulse time evolution and coherence pathway selection leaves only the coherent pathways of interest. The amplitude of the echo signal following the last π pulse can be used to obtain a one-dimensional dipolar spectrum (Pake doublet), and the echo envelope can be used to construct the two-dimensional DQC spectrum. The calculations are carried out using the product space spanned by the two electron-spin magnetic quantum numbers m1, m2 and the two nuclear-spin magnetic quantum numbers M1, M2, describing e.g. two coupled nitroxides in bilabeled proteins. The density matrix is subjected to a cascade of unitary transformations taking into account dipolar and electron exchange interactions during each pulse and during the evolution in the absence of a pulse. The unitary transformations use the eigensystem of the effective spin-Hamiltonians obtained by numerical matrix diagonalization. Simulations are carried out for a range of dipolar interactions, D, and microwave magnetic field strength B for both fixed and random orientations of the two 14N (and 15N) nitroxides. Relaxation effects were not included. Several examples of one- and two-dimensional Fourier transforms of the time domain signals vs. dipolar evolution and spin-echo envelope time variables are shown for illustration. Comparisons are made between 1D rigorous simulations and analytical approximations. The rigorous simulations presented here provide insights into DQC ESR spectroscopy, they serve as a standard to evaluate the results of approximate theories, and they can be employed to plan future DQC experiments. PMID:20161423

  1. Critical comparison of electrode models in density functional theory based quantum transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D.; Palacios, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the performance of two different electrode models in quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory: parametrized Bethe lattices and quasi-one-dimensional wires or nanowires. A detailed account of implementation details in both the cases is given. From the systematic study of nanocontacts made of representative metallic elements, we can conclude that the parametrized electrode models represent an excellent compromise between computational cost and electronic structure definition as long as the aim is to compare with experiments where the precise atomic structure of the electrodes is not relevant or defined with precision. The results obtained using parametrized Bethe lattices are essentially similar to the ones obtained with quasi-one-dimensional electrodes for large enough cross-sections of these, adding a natural smearing to the transmission curves that mimics the true nature of polycrystalline electrodes. The latter are more demanding from the computational point of view, but present the advantage of expanding the range of applicability of transport calculations to situations where the electrodes have a well-defined atomic structure, as is the case for carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, or semiconducting nanowires. All the analysis is done with the help of codes developed by the authors which can be found in the quantum transport toolbox ALACANT and are publicly available.

  2. Ab-Initio Calculations of Electronic Properties and Quantum Transport in U-Shaped Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuong, Nguyen Tien; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Cong, Bach Thanh; Otsuka, Nobuo; Chi, Dam Hieu

    2012-09-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate as a material used in nano-scale devices because of recent developments in advanced experimental techniques. Motivated by recent successful fabrications of U-shaped graphene channel transistors by using the gallium focused ion beam technology, we have performed ab-initio calculations to investigate the electronic properties and quantum transport in U-shaped graphene nanoribbons. The electronic properties are calculated using a numerical atomic orbital basis set in the framework of the density functional theory. The transport properties are investigated using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The transmission spectra of U-shaped graphenes are analyzed in order to reveal the quantum transport of the systems. We found that the graphene nanoribbons tend to open a band gap when U-shaped structures are formed in both armchair and zigzag cases. The geometrical structures of U-shaped GNRs had enormous influences on the electron transport around the Fermi energy due to the formation of quasi-bound states at zigzag edges. The obtained results have provided valuable information for designing potential nano-scale devices based on graphenes.

  3. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. II. Pure Rotational Quenching of High Rotational Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kyle M.; Song, L.; Yang, B. H.; Groenenboom, G. C.; van der Avoird, A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide is a simple molecule present in many astrophysical environments, and collisional excitation rate coefficients due to the dominant collision partners are necessary to accurately predict spectral line intensities and extract astrophysical parameters. We report new quantum scattering calculations for rotational deexcitation transitions of CO induced by H using the three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) of Song et al. State-to-state cross sections for collision energies from 10-5 to 15,000 cm-1 and rate coefficients for temperatures ranging from 1 to 3000 K are obtained for CO (v = 0, j) deexcitation from j=1-45 to all lower j‧ levels, where j is the rotational quantum number. Close-coupling and coupled-states calculations were performed in full-dimension for j=1-5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 while scaling approaches were used to estimate rate coefficients for all other intermediate rotational states. The current rate coefficients are compared with previous scattering results using earlier PESs. Astrophysical applications of the current results are briefly discussed.

  4. The calculation of theoretical chromospheric models and the interpretation of solar spectra from rockets and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    Solar chromospheric models are described. The models included are based on the observed spectrum, and on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. The calculations depend on realistic solutions of the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations for optically thick lines and continua, and on including the effects of large numbers of lines throughout the spectrum. Although spectroheliograms show that the structure of the chromosphere is highly complex, one-dimensional models of particular features are reasonably successful in matching observed spectra. Such models were applied to the interpretation of chromospheric observations.

  5. Synthesis, spectral, optical properties and theoretical calculations on schiff bases ligands containing o-tolidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroudj, S.; Bouchouit, M.; Bouchouit, K.; Bouraiou, A.; Messaadia, L.; Kulyk, B.; Figa, V.; Bouacida, S.; Sofiani, Z.; Taboukhat, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores the synthesis, structure characterization and optical properties of two new schiff bases. These compounds were obtained by condensation of o-tolidine with salicylaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde. The obtained ligands were characterized by UV, 1H and NMR. Their third-order NLO properties were measured using the third harmonic generation technique on thin films at 1064 nm. The electric dipole moment (μ), the polarizability (α) and the first hyperpolarizability (β) were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the lanl2dz basis set. For the results, the title compound shows nonzero β value revealing second order NLO behaviour.

  6. Molecular Theoretical Calculations on Temperature Dependence of the Pitch of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidong, Zhang; Zhiguang, Li; Jingli, Liu

    The temperature-dependent pitch of a cholesteric phase is studied using both molecular field theory and the two-particle cluster theory. The interacting chiral molecules (as derived by van der Meer et al.) are placed at the sites of a three-dimensional, simple cubic lattice with orientations confined to two dimensions. The equilibrium pitch as functions of temperature is calculated and numerical results are compared with those predicted by Monte Carlo computer simulation. The two-particle cluster theory, taking into account short-range correlations between molecules, yields improved values compared with molecular field theory.

  7. Correlation of theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of damage around a shaft in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Holcomb, D.J.; DeVries, K.L.; Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cross-hole ultrasonic measurements were made in the immediate wall of the Air Intake Shaft of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility. These measurements show that compressional wave speed markedly decreases at the shaft wall and then increases with radial distance from the shaft to eventually become that of solid or undamaged salt. This behavior is indicative of deformation damage or microfractures in the salt. These in situ data are compared to both laboratory measurements of wave speed as a function of volume dilatancy and to calculations based on the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, with reasonable agreement.

  8. Proton transfer in acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters: Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization experiment and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2015-03-01

    Acetaldehyde, a probable human carcinogen and of environmental importance, upon solvation provides a test bed for understanding proton transfer pathways and catalytic mechanisms. In this study, we report on single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of small acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters. Appearance energies of protonated clusters are extracted from the experimental photoionization efficiency curves and compared to electronic structure calculations. The comparison of experimental data to computational results provides mechanistic insight into the fragmentation mechanisms of the observed mass spectra. Using deuterated water for isotopic tagging, we observe that proton transfer is mediated via acetaldehyde and not water in protonated acetaldehyde-water clusters.

  9. Theoretical maximum performance evaluation of third generation silicon solar cell consisting of nc-Si:H/a-Si:H quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Brijesh; Sircar, Ratna

    2016-09-01

    The maximum performance of nc-Si:H/a-Si:H quantum well solar cell is theoretically evaluated by studying the spectral absorption of incident radiation with respect to the number of inserted nc-Si:H quantum well layers. Fundamental intrinsic properties of a-Si:H and nc-Si:H materials reported in literature have been used to evaluate the performance parameters. Enhanced spectral absorption is recorded due to insertion of nc-Si:H quantum well layers in the intrinsic region of a-Si:H solar cell. By inserting 50 QW layers of nc-Si:H in the intrinsic region of the a-Si:H solar cell, the short-circuit current density (JSC) increases by ∼100% as compared to the baseline whereas the open-circuit voltage (VOC) decreases by ∼38%. The decrease in VOC is explained on the basis of quasi-Fermi level separation under the illuminated state of solar cell. Theoretical maximum efficiency, having the combined effect of the increase in JSC and decrease in VOC, has increased by ∼24% in comparison with the baseline due to the use of QW as calculated using ideal carrier lifetime value. With a realistic carrier lifetime of the state-of-the-art a-Si:H solar cells, the addition of QWs do not yield any significant gain. From this study, it is concluded that a high carrier lifetime is required to gain a noteworthy benefit from the nc-Si:H/a-Si:H QWs.

  10. Hybrid theory and calculation of e-N2 scattering. [quantum mechanics - nuclei (nuclear physics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.; Temkin, A.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering was developed which was a synthesis of close coupling and adiabatic-nuclei theories. The theory is shown to be a close coupling theory with respect to vibrational degrees of freedom but is a adiabatic-nuclei theory with respect to rotation. It can be applied to any number of partial waves required, and the remaining ones can be calculated purely in one or the other approximation. A theoretical criterion based on fixed-nuclei calculations and not on experiment can be given as to which partial waves and energy domains require the various approximations. The theory allows all cross sections (i.e., pure rotational, vibrational, simultaneous vibration-rotation, differential and total) to be calculated. Explicit formulae for all the cross sections are presented.

  11. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Osman A. B. S. M.; Adekoya, Olayiwola A.; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2008-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that might be possible when inhibitors bind to the enzyme cofactor complex, were constructed. The binding of the two alcohol competitive inhibitors were studied using automatic docking by the Internal Coordinate Mechanics program, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with the AMBER program package, calculation of the free energy of ligand binding by the linear interaction energy method, and the hydropathic interactions force field. The calculations indicated that deprotonated Tyr acts as a strong base in the binary enzyme-NAD+ complex. Molecular dynamic simulations for 5 ns confirmed that deprotonated Tyr is essential for anchoring and orientating the inhibitors at the active site, which might be a general trend for the family of SDRs. The findings here have implications for the development of therapeutically important SDR inhibitors. PMID:17981907

  12. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  13. The calculation of theoretical chromospheric models and the interpretation of solar spectra from rockets and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    Calculated results based on two chromospheric flare models F1 and F2 of Machado, et al., (1980) are presented. Two additional models are included: F1*, which has enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and F3 which has enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. Each model is specified by means of a given variation of the temperature as a function of column mass. The corresponding variation of particle density and the geometrical height scale are determined by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium is solved as is radiative transfer for H, H-, He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II. The overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum is determined by means of a reduced set of opacities sampled from a compilation of over 10 to the 7th power individual lines. That the white flight flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region is also shown. The radiative cooling rate calculations for our brightest flare model suggest that chromospheric overheating provides enhanced radiation that could cause significant heating deep in the flare atmosphere.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Deible, Michael J.; Kessler, Melody; Gasperich, Kevin E.; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-28

    The accurate calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer is a challenging theoretical problem. In this study, the binding energy of Be{sub 2} is calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, using single Slater determinant and multiconfigurational trial functions. DMC calculations using single-determinant trial wave functions of orbitals obtained from density functional theory calculations overestimate the binding energy, while DMC calculations using Hartree-Fock or CAS(4,8), complete active space trial functions significantly underestimate the binding energy. In order to obtain an accurate value of the binding energy of Be{sub 2} from DMC calculations, it is necessary to employ trial functions that include excitations outside the valence space. Our best estimate DMC result for the binding energy of Be{sub 2}, obtained by using configuration interaction trial functions and extrapolating in the threshold for the configurations retained in the trial function, is 908 cm{sup −1}, only slightly below the 935 cm{sup −1} value derived from experiment.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer.

    PubMed

    Deible, Michael J; Kessler, Melody; Gasperich, Kevin E; Jordan, Kenneth D

    2015-08-28

    The accurate calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer is a challenging theoretical problem. In this study, the binding energy of Be2 is calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, using single Slater determinant and multiconfigurational trial functions. DMC calculations using single-determinant trial wave functions of orbitals obtained from density functional theory calculations overestimate the binding energy, while DMC calculations using Hartree-Fock or CAS(4,8), complete active space trial functions significantly underestimate the binding energy. In order to obtain an accurate value of the binding energy of Be2 from DMC calculations, it is necessary to employ trial functions that include excitations outside the valence space. Our best estimate DMC result for the binding energy of Be2, obtained by using configuration interaction trial functions and extrapolating in the threshold for the configurations retained in the trial function, is 908 cm(-1), only slightly below the 935 cm(-1) value derived from experiment. PMID:26328827

  16. Calculation of stress intensity factors in an isotropic multicracked plate. Part 1: Theoretical development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Arnold, S. M.; Tan, H. Q.

    1992-01-01

    An essential part of describing the damage state and predicting the damage growth in a multicracked plate is the accurate calculation of stress intensity factors (SIF's). Here, a methodology and rigorous solution formulation for SIF's of a multicracked plate, with fully interacting cracks, subjected to a far-field arbitrary stress state is presented. The fundamental perturbation problem is derived, and the steps needed to formulate the system of singular integral equations whose solution gives rise to the evaluation of the SIF's are identified. This analytical derivation and numerical solution are obtained by using intelligent application of symbolic computations and automatic FORTRAN generation capabilities (described in the second part of this paper). As a result, a symbolic/FORTRAN package, named SYMFRAC, that is capable of providing accurate SIF's at each crack tip was developed and validated.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure, biological activity and theoretical calculations of novel isoxazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, R. Y.; Sun, X. H.; Liu, Y. F.; Long, W.; Chen, B.; Shen, S. Q.; Ma, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Series of isoxazole derivatives were synthesized by substituted chalcones and 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzene formaldehyde oxime with 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The target compounds were determined by melting point, IR, 1H NMR, elemental analyses and HRMS. The crystal structure of compound 3a was detected by X-ray diffraction and it crystallizes in the triclinic space group p2(1)/c with z = 4. The molecular geometry of compound 3a was optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31G+(d,p) basis set in the ground state. From the optimized geometry of the molecule, FT-IR, FT-Raman, HOMO-LUMO and natural bond orbital (NBO) were calculated at B3LYP/6-31G+(d,p) level. Finally, the antifungal activity of the synthetic compounds were evaluated against Pythium solani, Gibberella nicotiancola, Fusarium oxysporium f.sp. niveum and Gibberella saubinetii.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure, biological activity and theoretical calculations of novel isoxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jin, R Y; Sun, X H; Liu, Y F; Long, W; Chen, B; Shen, S Q; Ma, H X

    2016-01-01

    Series of isoxazole derivatives were synthesized by substituted chalcones and 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzene formaldehyde oxime with 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The target compounds were determined by melting point, IR, (1)H NMR, elemental analyses and HRMS. The crystal structure of compound 3a was detected by X-ray diffraction and it crystallizes in the triclinic space group p2(1)/c with z=4. The molecular geometry of compound 3a was optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31G+(d,p) basis set in the ground state. From the optimized geometry of the molecule, FT-IR, FT-Raman, HOMO-LUMO and natural bond orbital (NBO) were calculated at B3LYP/6-31G+(d,p) level. Finally, the antifungal activity of the synthetic compounds were evaluated against Pythium solani, Gibberella nicotiancola, Fusarium oxysporium f.sp. niveum and Gibberella saubinetii. PMID:26218917

  19. Theoretical method for calculating relative joint geometry of assembled robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Equations are developed to extract the relative joint parameters of an assembled robot arm. Specifically, the Denavit-Hartenberg parameters, which completely characterize the relative joint geometry, are calculated. These parameters are needed to control the hand of the robot arm by resolved rate. As an example, the parameter extraction equations are used with perfect simulated data (no measurement noise) obtained from a mathematical model of a six-degree-of-freedom robot arm. For an actual application, measurement data needed to estimate the relative joint parameters can be generated by moving a robot arm to different positions, measuring the location of the hand (or other extension) in base coordinates, and recording the corresponding joint angles.

  20. Calculations of Solvation Free Energy through Energy Reweighting from Molecular Mechanics to Quantum Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangyu; Wang, Meiting; Shao, Yihan; König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R; Zhang, John Z H; Mei, Ye

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the solvation free energies of 20 organic molecules from the 4th Statistical Assessment of the Modeling of Proteins and Ligands (SAMPL4) have been calculated. The sampling of phase space is carried out at a molecular mechanical level, and the associated free energy changes are estimated using the Bennett Acceptance Ratio (BAR). Then the quantum mechanical (QM) corrections are computed through the indirect Non-Boltzmann Bennett's acceptance ratio (NBB) or the thermodynamics perturbation (TP) method. We show that BAR+TP gives a minimum analytic variance for the calculated solvation free energy at the Gaussian limit and performs slightly better than NBB in practice. Furthermore, the expense of the QM calculations in TP is only half of that in NBB. We also show that defining the biasing potential as the difference of the solute-solvent interaction energy, instead of the total energy, can converge the calculated solvation free energies much faster but possibly to different values. Based on the experimental solvation free energies which have been published before, it is discovered in this study that BLYP yields better results than MP2 and some other later functionals such as B3LYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D. PMID:26731197

  1. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of band gap alignment in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kudrawiec, R. Kopaczek, J.; Polak, M. P.; Scharoch, P.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Richards, R. D.; Bastiman, F.; David, J. P. R.

    2014-12-21

    Band gap alignment in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) was studied experimentally by photoreflectance (PR) and theoretically, ab initio, within the density functional theory in which the supercell based calculations are combined with the alchemical mixing approximation applied to a single atom in a supercell. In PR spectra, the optical transitions related to the excited states in the QW (i.e., the transition between the second heavy-hole and the second electron subband) were clearly observed in addition to the ground state QW transition and the GaAs barrier transition. This observation is clear experimental evidence that this is a type I QW with a deep quantum confinement in the conduction and valence bands. From the comparison of PR data with calculations of optical transitions in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs QW performed for various band gap alignments, the best agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculations has been found for the valence band offset of 52 ± 5%. A very similar valence band offset was obtained from ab initio calculations. These calculations show that the incorporation of Bi atoms into GaAs host modifies both the conduction and the valence band. For GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} with 0 < x < 0.074, the conduction band shifts lineary at a rate of ∼33 meV per % Bi, which only slightly decreases with Bi concentration. Whereas the valance band shift is clearly non-linear. Reducing initially at a rate of ∼51 meV per % Bi for low concentrations of Bi and then at a significantly reduced rate of ∼20 meV per % Bi near the end of the studied composition range. The overall reduction rate of the band gap is parabolic and the reduction rates change from ∼84 to ∼53 meV per % Bi for lower and higher Bi concentrations, respectively. The calculated shifts of valence and conduction bands give the variation of valence (conduction) band offset between GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} and GaAs in the range of ∼60

  3. Reaction mechanism of manganese superoxide dismutase studied by combined quantum and molecular mechanical calculations and multiconfigurational methods.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Aquilante, Francesco; Ryde, Ulf; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2009-04-30

    Manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) are enzymes that convert two molecules of the poisonous superoxide radical into molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. During the reaction, the manganese ion cycles between the Mn(2+) and Mn(3+) oxidation states and accomplishes its enzymatic action in two half-cycles (corresponding to the oxidation and reduction of O(2)(-)). Despite many experimental and theoretical studies dealing with SODs, including quantum chemical active-site-model studies of numerous variants of the reaction mechanisms, several details of MnSOD enzymatic action are still unclear. In this study, we have modeled and compared four reaction pathways (one associative, one dissociative, and two second-sphere) in a protein environment using the QM/MM approach (combined quantum and molecular mechanics calculations) at the density functional theory level. The results were complemented by CASSCF/CASPT2/MM single-point energy calculations for the most plausible models to account properly for the multireference character of the various spin multiplets. The results indicate that the oxidation of O(2)(-) to O(2) most likely occurs by an associative mechanism following a two-state (quartet-octet) reaction profile. The barrier height is estimated to be less than 25 kJ.mol(-1). On the other hand, the conversion of O(2)(-) to H(2)O(2) is likely to take place by a second-sphere mechanism, that is, without direct coordination of the superoxide radical to the manganese center. The reaction pathway involves the conical intersection of two quintet states, giving rise to an activation barrier of approximately 60 kJ.mol(-1). The calculations also indicate that the associative mechanism can represent a competitive pathway in the second half-reaction with the overall activation barrier being only slightly higher than the activation barrier in the second-sphere mechanism. The activation barriers along the proposed reaction pathways are in very good agreement with the

  4. Analytical calculation of the quantum 1/f coherence parameter for HFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.; Sherif, Taher S.

    2010-03-01

    The ratio s of the coherent magnetic energy term and the incoherent mechanical kinetic energy terms of the drift motion in the hamiltonian of a current carrying system is calculated for the special cases of a HFET or FET. This ratio defines the resulting quantum 1/f noise from the coherent and conventional quantum 1/f effects. In this case of FETs and HFETs of much larger width w>>LDS>t, the kinetic energy Ek of average motion with drift velocity vd per unit length in the direction of the drain-source distance LDS in the channel of thickness t, is still given by Nmvd 2/2, but the magnetic energy Em per unit length in the direction of LDS is roughly proportional with the first power of w only, instead of w2, and can be approximated by Em = π[ln(w/2LDS)]LDS[nevS/c]2/w. Here S=wt is the cross section though which current flows this indicates field-decoherence along the large device width w. This yields a coherence ratio of s ≡ Em/Ek ~ πnrotLDSln(w/2LDS), which shows that only an effective width w=weff about equal to LDS should be used in the calculation of s in this special case; larger widths are subject to de-coherence. This favors lower, mainly conventional, quantum 1/f noise in these devices, in spite of the large values of w. It also explains for the first time why the huge widths are possible with impunity, i.e., without causing the much larger coherent quantum 1/f noise to appear. For non-uniform current distribution across t, and for piezoelectric coupling, improved forms are derived for s. Specifically, the coherence parameter, called s' for the piezo case, is given by s' = (gN'h/m*vs)( vs/u)3F(u/vs)t/12w, where F(u/vs) = (2/3)(u/vs) for small drift velocity u, much smaller than the sound velocity vs in the semiconductor. Here N'=nwt.

  5. A quantitative analysis of weak intermolecular interactions & quantum chemical calculations (DFT) of novel chalcone derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavda, Bhavin R.; Gandhi, Sahaj A.; Dubey, Rahul P.; Patel, Urmila H.; Barot, Vijay M.

    2016-05-01

    The novel chalcone derivatives have widespread applications in material science and medicinal industries. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimized the molecular structure of the three chalcone derivatives (M-I, II, III). The observed discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental (X-ray data) results attributed to different environments of the molecules, the experimental values are of the molecule in solid state there by subjected to the intermolecular forces, like non-bonded hydrogen bond interactions, where as isolated state in gas phase for theoretical studies. The lattice energy of all the molecules have been calculated using PIXELC module in Coulomb -London -Pauli (CLP) package and is partitioned into corresponding coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Lattice energy data confirm and strengthen the finding of the X-ray results that the weak but significant intermolecular interactions like C-H…O, Π- Π and C-H… Π plays an important role in the stabilization of crystal packing.

  6. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the temperature dependence of the two-dimensional electron mobility in a strained Si quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahisa; Tsuchiya, Go; Hoshi, Yusuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Shiraki, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Kohei M.

    2012-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a silicon quantum well strained by Si0.7Ge0.3 relaxed buffer layer is determined precisely by a mobility spectrum analysis. The 2DEG mobility is 2780 cm2/V s at room temperature and, upon cooling, increases continuously to reach μ2DEG=7.4×104cm2/Vs at 7 K. A back gate installed on the sample changes the 2DEG concentration n successfully to establish μ2DEG∝n1.4 at the constant temperature T =10K, implying that the scattering at such low temperature is limited solely by the remote ionized impurity scattering. Based on this finding, theoretical analysis of the temperature dependence of μ2DEG is performed based on the relaxation time approximation using 2DEG wavefunctions and subband structures determined self-consistently and including three major scatterings; by intravalley acoustic phonons, intervalley g-processes of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons, and remote ionized impurities. The calculation included only three fitting parameters, the shear deformation potential (Ξu=9.5eV), LO phonon deformation potential for g-process scattering (D0=9.0×108eV/cm), and sheet density of remote ionized impurities that have been determined by quantitative comparison with our experimental results. The temperature dependence of μ2DEG calculated theoretically show excellent agreement with experimentally determined μ2DEG.

  7. Crystalline Ice as a Cryoprotectant: Theoretical Calculation of Cooling Speed in Capillary Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally assumed that vitrification of both cells and the surrounding medium provides the best preservation of ultrastructure of biological material for study by electron microscopy. At the same time it is known that the cell cytoplasm may provide substantial cryoprotection for internal cell structure even when the medium crystallizes. Thus vitrification of the medium is not essential for good structural preservation. In contrast, a high cooling rate is an essential factor for good cryopreservation because it limits phase separation and movement of cellular components during freezing, thus preserving the native-like state. Here we present calculations of freezing rates that incorporate the effect of medium crystallization, using finite difference methods. We demonstrate that crystallization of the medium in capillary tubes may increase the cooling rate of suspended cells by a factor of 25-300 depending on the distance from the center. We conclude that crystallization of the medium, for example due to low cryoprotectant content, may actually improve cryopreservation of some samples in a near native state. PMID:21534954

  8. Theoretical Calculations of Supersonic Wave Drag at Zero Lift for a Particular Store Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Malvestuto, Frank S , Jr; Maxie, Peter J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    An analysis, based on the linearized thin-airfoil theory for supersonic speeds, of the wave drag at zero lift has been carried out for a simple two-body arrangement consisting of two wedgelike surfaces, each with a rhombic lateral cross section and emanating from a common apex. Such an arrangement could be used as two stores, either embedded within or mounted below a wing, or as auxiliary bodies wherein the upper halves could be used as stores and the lower halves for bomb or missile purposes. The complete range of supersonic Mach numbers has been considered and it was found that by orienting the axes of the bodies relative to each other a given volume may be redistributed in a manner which enables the wave drag to be reduced within the lower supersonic speed range (where the leading edge is substantially subsonic). At the higher Mach numbers, the wave drag is always increased. If, in addition to a constant volume, a given maximum thickness-chord ratio is imposed, then canting the two surfaces results in higher wave drag at all Mach numbers. For purposes of comparison, analogous drag calculations for the case of two parallel winglike bodies with the same cross-sectional shapes as the canted configuration have been included. Consideration is also given to the favorable (dragwise) interference pressures acting on the blunt bases of both arrangements.

  9. Theoretical calculations on the conformation of cyclopentadienyl coordination in Ru nitrosyl and thionitrosyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.M.; Hubbard, J.L.; McCullough, E.A. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    X-ray structural characterization of a series of CpRu(NE)LL` complexes (Cp = cyclopentadieny), C{sub 5}R{sub 5}; L, L` = ligand; E = O, S) reveals systematic trends in the coordination conformation of the cyclopentadienyl ligand. The thionitrosyl complex (C{sub 5}(CH{sub 3}){sub 5})Ru(NS)Cl{sub 2} exhibits a slipped (eta-3,eta-2 Cp ring, with the central C(skeletal)-CH{sub 3} bond of the more tightly bound eta-3 portion eclipsing the Ru-N-S vector. With NO derivatives, ring {open_quotes}slippage{close_quotes} is not significant, but ring orientation is variable depending upon the L and L` ligand set. NMR spectroscopy measurements show that the barriers to changes in ring conformation become very low in solution. For catalytic purposes, it is of interest to fix the Cp geometry with respect to rotation. Ab initio SCF and DFT calculations have been performed, using the NWChem suite of computer codes, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to explore three questions: By what mechanism does the choice of ligand affect the Cp orientation? What is the barrier to rotation of the Cp? By what mechanism does salvation affect the barriers to Cp rotation?

  10. Theoretical investigation of lead vapor adsorption on kaolinite surfaces with DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinye; Huang, Yaji; Pan, Zhigang; Wang, Yongxing; Liu, Changqi

    2015-09-15

    Kaolinite can be used as the in-furnace sorbent/additive to adsorb lead (Pb) vapor at high temperature. In this paper, the adsorptions of Pb atom, PbO molecule and PbCl2 molecule on kaolinie surfaces were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Si surface is inert to Pb vapor adsorption while Al surfaces with dehydroxylation are active for the unsaturated Al atoms and the O atoms losing H atoms. The adsorption energy of PbO is much higher than that of Pb atom and PbCl2. Considering the energy barriers, it is easy for PbO and PbCl2 to adsorb on Al surfaces but difficult to escape. The high energy barriers of de-HCl process cause the difficulties of PbCl2 to form PbO·Al2O3·2SiO2 with kaolinite. Considering the inertia of Si atoms and the activity of Al atoms after dehydroxylation, calcination, acid/alkali treatment and some other treatment aiming at amorphous silica producing and Al activity enhancement can be used as the modification measures to improve the performance of kaolinite as the in-furnace metal capture sorbent. PMID:25880048

  11. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. I - Theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The theory for calculating the absorption of laser radiation by hydrogen is outlined for the temperatures and pressures of common laboratory plasmas. Nonhydrogenic corrections for determining the absorption by helium are also included. The coefficients for the absorption of He-Ne laser radiation at the wavelengths of 0.633, 1.15, and 3.39 microns in a H plasma is presented for temperatures in the range from 10,000 to 40,000 K and electron number densities in the range from 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 18th power per cu cm. The total absorption of a H-He plasma calculated from this theory is compared with the measured absorption. The theoretical composition of the H-He absorption is analyzed with respect to the significant absorption processes, inverse bremsstrahlung, photoionization, resonance excitation, and photodetachment.

  12. Combined spectral experiment and theoretical calculation to study the interaction of 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone for metal ions in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jingjing; Huo, Fangjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone (1,4-DHA) and metal ions was studied by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopies in solution. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations confirmed complex structures. The investigation results showed 1,4-DHA can selectively respond some metal ions and can be monitored by UV-Vis, fluorescence spectra and naked-eye. So 1,4-DHA has a potential application in the design of metal ions probe. More, as typical metal ions, Hg2+ and Er3+, their reaction abilities for 1,4-DHA were studied in detailed. Experimental results showed they have better response for 1,4-DHA. And theoretical calculation concluded that Er3+ easily reacts with 1,4-DHA over Hg2+ attributed to the low reaction energy of Er3+-1,4-DHA than Hg2+-1,4-DHA.

  13. Theoretical calculations for neutrino-induced charged current reactions in sup 12 C and recent experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, S.L. ); Pourkaviani, M. )

    1989-12-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented for the reaction {nu}{sub {ital e}}+{sup 12}C{r arrow}{sup 12}N{sub g.s.} +{ital e}{sup {minus}} for {ital E}{sub {nu}} from threshold to 135 MeV, for the reaction {nu}{sub {mu}}+{sup 12}C{r arrow}{sup 12}N{sub g.s.} +{mu}{sup {minus}}, and the corresponding antineutrino reaction for {ital E}{sub {nu}} from threshold to 160 MeV. Use is made of updated form factors based on more recent data for {ital e}{sup {minus}}+{sup 12}C{r arrow}{sup 12}C{sup *}+{ital e}{prime} {minus} and {gamma}+{sup 12}C{r arrow}{sup 12}C{sup *}. The recent neutrino reaction experiments are discussed in light of these calculations.

  14. Efficient quantum calculations of vibrational states of vinylidene in full dimensionality: a scheme with combination of methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bian, Wensheng

    2008-07-14

    Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational states of C(2)H(2) and C(2)D(2) are performed in the high-energy region (above 20,400 cm(-1) relative to the acetylene minimum). The theoretical scheme is a combination of several methods. To exploit the full parity and permutation symmetry, the CC-HH diatom-diatom Jacobi coordinates are chosen; phase space optimization in combination with physical considerations is used to obtain an efficient radial discrete variable representation, whereas a basis contraction scheme is applied for angular coordinates. The preconditioned inexact spectral transform method combined with an efficient preconditioner is employed to compute eigenstates within a desired spectral window. The computation is efficient. More definite assignments on vinylidene states than previous studies are acquired using the normal mode projection; in particular, a consistent analysis of the nu(1) (symmetric CH stretch) state is provided. The computed vinylidene vibrational energy levels are in general good agreement with experiment, and several vinylidene states are reported for the first time. PMID:18624520

  15. ELECTRON-ION RECOMBINATION OF Fe XII FORMING Fe XI: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, O.; Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.

    2012-07-01

    We have measured electron-ion recombination for Fe XII forming Fe XI using a merged-beam configuration at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The measured merged-beam recombination rate coefficient (MBRRC) for collision energies from 0 to 1500 eV is presented. This work uses a new method for determining the absolute MBRRC based on a comparison of the ion beam decay rate with and without the electron beam on. For energies below 75 eV, the spectrum is dominated by dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s {yields} 3p and 3p {yields} 3d core excitations. At higher energies, we observe contributions from 3 {yields} N' and 2 {yields} N' core excitation DR. We compare our experimental results to state-of-the-art multi-configuration Breit-Pauli (MCBP) calculations and find significant differences, both in resonance energies and strengths. We have extracted the DR contributions from the measured MBRRC data and transformed them into a plasma recombination rate coefficient (PRRC) for temperatures in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 7} K. We show that the previously recommended DR data for Fe XII significantly underestimate the PRRC at temperatures relevant for both photoionized plasmas (PPs) and collisionally ionized plasmas (CPs). This is contrasted with our MCBP PRRC results, which agree with the experiment to within 30% at PP temperatures and even better at CP temperatures. We find this agreement despite the disagreement shown by the detailed comparison between our MCBP and experimental MBRRC results. Last, we present a simple parameterized form of the experimentally derived PRRC for easy use in astrophysical modeling codes.

  16. Microwave measurements and theoretical calculations on the structures of NNO-HCl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, D. J.; Roehrig, M. A.; Adamowicz, L.; Shea, J. C.; Haubrich, S. T.; Kukolich, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy was used to measure a and b dipole transitions for the N2O-H35Cl, N2O-H37Cl, N2O-D35Cl, and 15NNO-H35Cl van der Waals complexes. The observed transition frequencies were fit to determine the spectroscopic constants A-DK, B, C, DJ, DJK, eQqaa(Cl), and eQqbb(Cl). The structure of the complex appears to be a planar asymmetric top with a centers-of-mass separation Rc.m. ≊ 3.51 Å. The angle θ between Rc.m. and the HCl axis is approximately 110°. The angle φ between the N2O axis and Rc.m. is approximately 77°. The structure was fit using a weighted least squares fit to B and C isotopic rotational constants with Rc.m., θ, and φ as the adjustable parameters, and this procedure yielded three local minima with standard deviations less than 5 MHz. Principal axis coordinates for the Cl, H, and terminal N atoms in the complex were determined with single isotopic Kraitchman analysis to aid in the selection of the ``best'' structure. In a second structural analysis Rc.m. θ, and φ values were determined from the spectroscopic constants B, C, and eQqaa(Cl). The ``best fit'' structure parameters for N2O-HCl are Rc.m. =3.512(2) Å, θ =110(9)°, and φ = 77(2)°. Ab initio calculations of N2O-HCl structures using gaussian86 with MP2 yielded three energetically stable equilibrium conformations. One of the bound structures is very similar to the present experimental vibrationally averaged structure.

  17. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, III, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; et al

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximationsmore » made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals« less

  18. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, III, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; Bowers, C. R.

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximations made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals

  19. Theoretical Modeling of the Chirality Discrimination of Enantiomers by Nanotubular Cyclic Peptides using Gas-Phase Photoelectron Spectroscopy: An ONIOM Spectroscopic Calculations.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Karachi, S; Chermahini, A Najafi

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the chirality recognition of the enantiomers of a chiral molecule (1-phenyl-1-propanol) interacting with a nanotubular cyclic peptide (E-type cyclic decapeptide) was investigated by their ionization in the gas phase, theoretically. The absolute energy difference between the interaction of the S- and R-enantiomer with the cyclic peptide, calculated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, was 4.70 kcal·mol(-1). Two different schemes of "Our own N-layered Integrated molecular Orbital and molecular Mechanics (ONIOM)" method such as (quantum mechanics (QM):molecular mechanics (MM)) and (QM:QM) were employed to study the effect of the interaction on the gas-phase ionization energies of the enantiomers and cyclic peptide, separately. The symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) methodology was used for the calculation of the ionization energies. It was found that the difference between the interactions of R- and S-enantiomer with the cyclic peptide caused different changes in the photoelectron spectrum of each enantiomer so that these changes could be used for the chirality discrimination of the enantiomers in the gas phase. Similarly, the photoelectron spectrum of the cyclic peptide interacting with the R and S-enantiomer were calculated, separately, and it was observed that the difference in the interaction with the R- and S-enantiomer created different changes in the spectrum of cyclic peptide. Finally, it was shown that the difference in the interaction of cyclic peptide with the enantiomers of a chiral molecule in the gas phase can be used for the identification of enantiomers in the gas phase by the direct ionization. PMID:27500312

  20. Calculation of output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers with account for both electrons and holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolova, Z N; Tarasov, I S; Asryan, L V

    2014-09-30

    Using an extended theoretical model, which includes the rate equations for both electrons and holes, we have studied the output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers. We have found non-trivial dependences of electron and hole concentrations in the waveguide region of the laser on the capture velocities of both types of carriers from the waveguide region into the quantum well. We have obtained the dependences of the internal differential quantum efficiency and optical output power of the laser on the capture velocities of electrons and holes. An increase in the capture velocities has been shown to result in suppression of parasitic recombination in the waveguide region and therefore in a substantial increase in the quantum efficiency and output power. (lasers)

  1. Theoretical calculation and experiment of microwave electromagnetic property of Ni(C) nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan-Feng, Zhang; Zhi-Feng, Hao; Bi, Zeng; Yan-Nan, Qian; Ying-Xin, Huang; Zhen-Da, Yang

    2016-04-01

    With the combination of the dielectric loss of the carbon layer with the magnetic loss of the ferromagnetic metal core, carbon-coated nickel (Ni(C)) nanoparticles are expected to be the promising microwave absorbers. Microwave electromagnetic parameters and reflection loss in a frequency range of 2 GHz–18 GHz for paraffin-Ni(C) composites are investigated. The values of relative complex permittivity and permeability, the dielectric and magnetic loss tangent of paraffin-Ni(C) composites are measured, respectively, when the weight ratios of Ni(C) nanoparticles are equal to 10 wt%, 40 wt%, 50 wt%, 70 wt%, and 80 wt% in paraffin-Ni(C) composites. The results reveal that Ni(C) nanoparticles exhibit a peak of magnetic loss at about 13 GHz, suggesting that magnetic loss and a natural resonance could be found at that frequency. Based on the measured complex permittivity and permeability, the reflection losses of paraffin-Ni(C) composites with different weight ratios of Ni(C) nanoparticles and coating thickness values are simulated according to the transmission line theory. An excellent microwave absorption is obtained. To be proved by the experimental results, the reflection loss of composite with a coating thickness of 2 mm is measured by the Arch method. The results indicate that the maximum reflection loss reaches ‑26.73 dB at 12.7 GHz, and below ‑10 dB, the bandwidth is about 4 GHz. The fact that the measured absorption position is consistent with the calculated results suggests that a good electromagnetic match and a strong microwave absorption can be established in Ni(C) nanoparticles. The excellent Ni(C) microwave absorber is prepared by choosing an optimum layer number and the weight ratio of Ni(C) nanoparticles in paraffin-Ni(C) composites. Project supported by the Science and Technology Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant Nos. 2014B010106005, 2013B051000077, and 2015A050502047) and the Science and Technology Program of Guangzhou City, China (Grant

  2. Lead-chromium carbonyl complexes incorporated with group 8 metals: synthesis, reactivity, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Minghuey; Chu, Yen-Yi; Hsu, Miao-Hsing; Ke, Wei-Ming; Lin, Chien-Nan

    2011-01-17

    The trichromium-lead complex [Pb{Cr(CO)5}3](2-) (1) was isolated from the reaction of PbCl2 and Cr(CO)6 in a KOH/MeOH solution, and the new mixed chromium-iron-lead complex [Pb{Cr(CO)5}{Fe(CO)4}2](2-) (3) was synthesized from the reaction of PbCl2 and Cr(CO)6 in a KOH/MeOH solution followed by the addition of Fe(CO)5. X-ray crystallography showed that 3 consisted of a central Pb atom bound in a trigonal-planar environment to two Fe(CO)4 and one Cr(CO)5 fragments. When complex 1 reacted with 1.5 equiv of Mn(CO)5Br, the Cr(CO)4-bridged dimeric lead-chromium carbonyl complex [Pb2Br2Cr4(CO)18](2-) (4) was produced. However, a similar reaction of 3 or the isostructural triiron-lead complex [Pb{Fe(CO)4}3](2-) (2) with Mn(CO)5Br in MeCN led to the formation of the Fe3Pb2-based trigonal-bipyramidal complexes [Fe3(CO)9{PbCr(CO)5}2](2-) (6) and [Fe3(CO)9{PbFe(CO)4}2](2-) (5), respectively. On the other hand, the Ru3Pb2-based trigonal-bipyramidal complex [Ru3(CO)9{PbCr(CO)5}2](2-) (7) was obtained directly from the reaction of PbCl2, Cr(CO)6, and Ru3(CO)12 in a KOH/MeOH solution. X-ray crystallography showed that 5 and 6 each had an Fe3Pb2 trigonal-bipyramidal core geometry, with three Fe(CO)3 groups occupying the equatorial positions and two PbFe(CO)4 or PbCr(CO)5 units in the axial positions, while 7 displayed a Ru3Pb2 trigonal-bipyramidal geometry with three equatorial Ru(CO)3 groups and two axial PbCr(CO)5 units. The complexes 3-7 were characterized spectroscopically, and their nature, formation, and electrochemistry were further examined by molecular orbital calculations at the B3LYP level of density functional theory. PMID:21142206

  3. Analysis and calculation of electronic properties and light absorption of defective sulfur-doped silicon and theoretical photoelectric conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, He; Chen, Changshui

    2015-04-23

    Most material properties can be traced to electronic structures. Black silicon produced from SF6 or sulfur powder via irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses displays decreased infrared absorption after annealing, with almost no corresponding change in visible light absorption. The high-intensity laser pulses destroy the original crystal structure, and the doping element changes the material performance. In this work, the structural and electronic properties of several sulfur-doped silicon systems are investigated using first principle calculations. Depending on the sulfur concentration (level of doping) and the behavior of the sulfur atoms in the silicon lattice, different states or an absence of states are exhibited, compared with the undoped system. Moreover, the visible-infrared light absorption intensities are structure specific. The results of our theoretical calculations show that the conversion efficiency of sulfur-doped silicon solar cells depends on the sulfur concentrations. Additionally, two types of defect configurations exhibit light absorption characteristics that differ from the other configurations. These two structures produce a rapid increase in the theoretical photoelectric conversion efficiency in the range of the specific chemical potential studied. By controlling the positions of the atomic sulfur and the sulfur concentration in the preparation process, an efficient photovoltaic (PV) material may be obtainable. PMID:25798659

  4. Structural determination of vanillin, isovanillin and ethylvanillin by means of gas electron diffraction and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Toru; Kameyama, Akiyo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2006-08-01

    The molecular structures of vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), isovanillin (3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde) and ethylvanillin (3-ethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) were determined by means of gas electron diffraction. Among them, vanillin and ethylvanillin have a vanilla odor but isovanillin smells differently. The nozzle temperatures were 125, 173 and 146 °C, for vanillin, isovanillin and ethylvanillin, respectively. The results of MP2 and B3LYP calculations with the 6-31G** basis set were used as supporting information. The MP2 calculations predicted that vanillin and isovanillin have two stable conformers and ethylvanillin has four stable conformers. The electron diffraction data were found to be consistent with these conformational compositions. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of vanillin are as follows: < r(C-C) ring>=1.397(4) Å; r(C 1-C aldehyde)=1.471(←) Å; r(C 3-O Me)=1.374(9) Å; r(C 4-O H)=1.361(←) Å; r(O-C Me)=1.428(←) Å; r(C dbnd6 O)=1.214(8) Å; < r(C-H)>=1.110(11) Å; r(O-H)=0.991(←) Å; ∠C 6-C 1-C 2=120.6(2)°; ∠C 1-C 2-C 3=118.8(←)°; ∠C 1-C 6-C 5=120.1(←)°; ∠C 2-C 1-C aldehyde=122.7(18)°; ∠C 1-C dbnd6 O=119.4(16)°; ∠C 4-C 3-O Me=112.2(12)°; ∠C 3-C 4-O H=119.1(←)°; ∠C 3-O-C=121.7(29)°. Those of isovanillin are as follows: < r(C-C) ring>=1.402(4) Å; r(C 1-C aldehyde)=1.479(←) Å; r(C 4-O Me)=1.369(9) Å; r(C 3-O H)=1.357(←) Å; r(O-C Me)=1.422(←) Å; r(C dbnd6 O)=1.221(9) Å; < r(C-H)>=1.114(14) Å; r(O-H)=0.995(←) Å; ∠C 6-C 1-C 2=120.2(3)°; ∠C 1-C 2-C 3=119.0(←)°; ∠C 1-C 6-C 5=119.9(←)°; ∠C 2-C 1-C aldehyde=124.6(25)°; ∠C 1-C dbnd6 O=121.3(24)°; ∠C 3-C 4-O Me=114.4(12)°; ∠C 4-C 3-O H=121.2(←)°; ∠C 4-O-C=123.8(26)°. Those of ethylvanillin are as follows: < r(C-C) ring>=1.397(6) Å; r(C 1-C aldehyde)=1.471(←) Å; r(C 3-O Et)=1.365(13) Å; r(C 4-O H)=1.352(←) Å; r(O-C Et)=1.427(←) Å; r(C-C Et)=1.494(21) Å; r(C dbnd6 O)=1.206(9) Å; < r

  5. Structural studies on ethyl isovalerate by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, Halima; Jelisavac, Dragan; Sutikdja, Lilian W; Isaak, Elisabeth; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-20

    We observed the microwave spectrum of ethyl isovalerate by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of the most abundant conformer were determined. Its structure was investigated by comparison of the experimental rotational constants with those obtained by ab initio methods. In a first step, the rotational constants of various conformers were calculated at the MP2/6-311++G** level of theory. Surprisingly, no agreement with the experimental results was found. Therefore, we concluded that in the case of ethyl isovalerate more advanced quantum chemical methods are required to obtain a reliable molecular geometry. Ab initio calculations carried out at MP3/6-311++G**, MP4/6-311++G**, and CCSD/6-311++G** levels and also density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G** method gave similar results for the rotational constants, but they were clearly distinct from those obtained at the MP2/6-311++G** level. With use of these more advanced methods, the rotational constants of the lowest energy conformer were in good agreement with those obtained from the microwave spectrum. PMID:21162564

  6. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS. PMID:26295414

  7. Optimized Non-Orthogonal Localized Orbitals for Linear Scaling Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Reboredo, Fernando; Galli, Giulia

    2004-03-01

    It has been shown [1] that Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of total energies of interacting systems can be made to scale nearly linearly with the number of electrons (N), by using localized single particle orbitals to construct Slater determinants. Here we propose a new way of defining the localized orbitals required for O(N)-QMC calculation, by minimizing an appropriate cost function yielding a set of N non-orthogonal (NO) localized orbitals considerably smoother in real space than Maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWF). These NO orbitals have better localization properties than MLWFs. We show that for semiconducting systems NO orbitals can be localized in a much smaller region of space than orthogonal orbitals (typically, one eighth of the volume) and give total energies with the same accuracy, thus yielding a linear scaling QMC algorithm which is 5 times faster than the one originally proposed [1]. We also discuss the extension of O(N)-QMC with NO orbitals to the calculations of total energies of metallic systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. [1] A. J. Williamson, R.Q. Hood and J.C. Grossman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246406 (2001)

  8. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems with a Gaussian basis.

    PubMed

    Al-Saidi, W A; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-06-14

    We extend the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach to any single-particle basis and apply it to molecular systems with Gaussian basis sets. QMC methods in general scale favorably with the system size as a low power. A QMC approach with auxiliary fields, in principle, allows an exact solution of the Schrodinger equation in the chosen basis. However, the well-known sign/phase problem causes the statistical noise to increase exponentially. The phaseless method controls this problem by constraining the paths in the auxiliary-field path integrals with an approximate phase condition that depends on a trial wave function. In the present calculations, the trial wave function is a single Slater determinant from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The calculated all-electron total energies show typical systematic errors of no more than a few millihartrees compared to exact results. At equilibrium geometries in the molecules we studied, this accuracy is roughly comparable to that of coupled cluster with single and double excitations and with noniterative triples [CCSD(T)]. For stretched bonds in H(2)O, our method exhibits a better overall accuracy and a more uniform behavior than CCSD(T). PMID:16784257

  9. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems with a Gaussian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saidi, W.A.; Zhang Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-06-14

    We extend the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach to any single-particle basis and apply it to molecular systems with Gaussian basis sets. QMC methods in general scale favorably with the system size as a low power. A QMC approach with auxiliary fields, in principle, allows an exact solution of the Schroedinger equation in the chosen basis. However, the well-known sign/phase problem causes the statistical noise to increase exponentially. The phaseless method controls this problem by constraining the paths in the auxiliary-field path integrals with an approximate phase condition that depends on a trial wave function. In the present calculations, the trial wave function is a single Slater determinant from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The calculated all-electron total energies show typical systematic errors of no more than a few millihartrees compared to exact results. At equilibrium geometries in the molecules we studied, this accuracy is roughly comparable to that of coupled cluster with single and double excitations and with noniterative triples [CCSD(T)]. For stretched bonds in H{sub 2}O, our method exhibits a better overall accuracy and a more uniform behavior than CCSD(T)

  10. The optical properties and quantum chemical calculations of thienyl and furyl derivatives of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Idzik, Krzysztof R; Cywiński, Piotr J; Kuznik, Wojciech; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Licha, Tobias; Ratajczyk, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    A detailed electrochemical, photophysical and theoretical study is presented for various new thienyl and furyl derivatives of pyrene. Their optical properties are described based on UV-VIS absorption and both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. DFT and TDDFT calculations are also presented to support experimental data. The calculations results show that HOMO-LUMO orbitals are delocalized uniformly between aromatic core and aryl substituents. Good electrochemical stability of thienyl and furyl hybrids of pyrene confirm their potential application for light emitting electrochemical cells or spintronics mainly due to their beneficial optical and charge transport properties in electrochromic devices. In order to demonstrate this potential, an OLED device is presented. Synthesized compounds included in this OLED device both facilitate electron transport and act as a light emitting layer. PMID:26257127

  11. Phenylazoindole dyes - Part I: The syntheses, characterizations, crystal structures, quantum chemical calculations and antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferoğlu, Zeynel; Yalçın, Ergin; Babür, Banu; Seferoğlu, Nurgül; Hökelek, Tuncer; Yılmaz, Ebru; Şahin, Ertan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the synthesis of four new phenylazo indole dyes (dye 1-4) were carried out by diazotization of 4-aminoacetophenone and coupling with various 2- and 1,2-disubstituted indole derivatives. The dyes were characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, HRMS and X-ray single crystal diffraction methods. Azo-hydrazone tautomeric bahavior of the dyes in different solvents (DMSO, methanol, acetic acid and chloroform) was investigated by using 1H NMR and UV-vis results. The experimental results were compared with the corresponding calculated values. The results of experimental data and theoretical calculations showed that the azo tautomer is more stable than hydrazone tautomer. In addition to this, the antimicrobial activity of the dyes was also evaluated.

  12. Calculation of metamorphic two-dimensional quantum energy system: Application to wetting layer states in InAs/InGaAs metamorphic quantum dot nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Trevisi, G.; Frigeri, P.

    2013-11-14

    In this work, we calculate the two-dimensional quantum energy system of the In(Ga)As wetting layer that arises in InAs/InGaAs/GaAs metamorphic quantum dot structures. Model calculations were carried on the basis of realistic material parameters taking in consideration their dependence on the strain relaxation of the metamorphic buffer; results of the calculations were validated against available literature data. Model results confirmed previous hypothesis on the extrinsic nature of the disappearance of wetting layer emission in metamorphic structures with high In composition. We also show how, by adjusting InGaAs metamorphic buffer parameters, it could be possible: (i) to spatially separate carriers confined in quantum dots from wetting layer carriers, (ii) to create an hybrid 0D-2D system, by tuning quantum dot and wetting layer levels. These results are interesting not only for the engineering of quantum dot structures but also for other applications of metamorphic structures, as the two design parameters of the metamorphic InGaAs buffer (thickness and composition) provide additional degrees of freedom to control properties of interest.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of excited states in A=6-8 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, Steven C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Carlson, J.

    2004-11-01

    A variational Monte Carlo method is used to generate sets of orthogonal trial functions, {psi}{sub T}(J{sup {pi}};T), for given quantum numbers in various light p-shell nuclei. These {psi}{sub T} are then used as input to Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations of first, second, and higher excited (J{sup {pi}};T) states. Realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions are used. We find that if the physical excited state is reasonably narrow, the GFMC energy converges to a stable result. With the combined Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Illinois-2 three-nucleon interactions, the results for many second and higher states in A=6-8 nuclei are close to the experimental values.

  14. Model of the catalytic mechanism of human aldose reductase based on quantum chemical calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Cachau, R. C.; Howard, E. H.; Barth, P. B.; Mitschler, A. M.; Chevrier, B. C.; Lamour, V.; Joachimiak, A.; Sanishvili, R.; Van Zandt, M.; Sibley, E.; Moras, D.; Podjarny, A.; UPR de Biologie Structurale; National Cancer Inst.; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Inst. for Diabetes Discovery, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose Reductase is an enzyme involved in diabetic complications, thoroughly studied for the purpose of inhibitor development. The structure of an enzyme-inhibitor complex solved at sub-atomic resolution has been used to develop a model for the catalytic mechanism. This model has been refined using a combination of Molecular Dynamics and Quantum calculations. It shows that the proton donation, the subject of previous controversies, is the combined effect of three residues: Lys 77, Tyr 48 and His 110. Lys 77 polarises the Tyr 48 OH group, which donates the proton to His 110, which becomes doubly protonated. His 110 then moves and donates the proton to the substrate. The key information from the sub-atomic resolution structure is the orientation of the ring and the single protonafion of the His 110 in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. This model is in full agreement with all available experimental data.

  15. Wavy carbon: A new series of carbon structures explored by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroko; Iwamoto, Takeaki; Tokoyama, Hiroaki; Yamakado, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    A new carbon family adopting wavy structures has been found by quantum chemical calculations. The key motif of this family is a condensed four-membered ring. Periodically wavy-carbon sheets (wavy-Cn sheets, n = 2, 6, and 8) as well as wavy-C36 tube were found to be very similar to the previously reported prism-Cn carbon tubes (n = 5, 6, and 8) in several respects, including the relative energies per one carbon atom with respect to graphene, CC bond lengths, and CCC bond angles. Because of very high relative energies with respect to graphene (206-253 kJ mol-1), the wavy-carbons may behave as energy reserving materials.

  16. Attosecond-resolution quantum dynamics calculations for atoms and molecules in strong laser fields.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Pei-Yu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-06-01

    A parallel quantum electron and nuclei wave packet computer code, LZH-DICP, has been developed to study laser-atom-molecule interaction in the nonperturbative regime with attosecond resolution. The nonlinear phenomena occurring in that regime can be studied with the code in a rigorous way by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of electrons and nuclei. Time propagation of the wave functions is performed using a split-operator approach, and based on a sine discrete variable representation. Photoelectron spectra for hydrogen and kinetic-energy spectra for molecular hydrogen ion in linearly polarized laser fields are calculated using a flux operator scheme, which testifies to the validity and the high efficiency of LZH-DICP. PMID:18643391

  17. Quantum-mechanical calculation of carrier distribution in MOS accumulation and strong inversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2013-10-15

    We derive a statistical physics model of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and propose an accurate approximation method for calculating the quantum-mechanical effects of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure in accumulation and strong inversion regions. We use an exponential surface potential approximation in solving the quantization energy levels and derive the function of density of states in 2D to 3D transition region by applying uncertainty principle and Schrödinger equation in k-space. The simulation results show that our approximation method and theory of density of states solve the two major problems of previous researches: the non-negligible error caused by the linear potential approximation and the inconsistency of density of states and carrier distribution in 2D to 3D transition region.

  18. Variational quantum Monte Carlo calculation of electronic and structural properties of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, S.G.

    1989-09-01

    Calculation of the electronic and structural properties of solids using a variational quantum Monte Carlo nonlocal pseudopotential approach is described. Ionization potentials and electron affinities for atoms, and binding energies and structural properties for crystals are found to be in very good agreement with experiment. The approach employs a correlated many-electron wavefunction of the Jastrow-Slater form and the exact Coulomb interaction between valence electrons. One- and two-body terms in the Jastrow factor are used and found necessary for an accurate description of the electron-electron energy for the systems considered. The method has further been applied to compute various single-particle properties for solids including the single-particle orbital occupancy, electron pair correlation functions, and quasiparticle excitation energies. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. One-loop calculations in quantum field theory: from Feynman diagrams to unitarity cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R. Keith; Kunszt, Zoltan; Melnikov, Kirill; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    The success of the experimental program at the Tevatron re-inforced the idea that precision physics at hadron colliders is desirable and, indeed, possible. The Tevatron data strongly suggests that one-loop computations in QCD describe hard scattering well. Extrapolating this observation to the LHC, we conclude that knowledge of many short-distance processes at next-to-leading order may be required to describe the physics of hard scattering. While the field of one-loop computations is quite mature, parton multiplicities in hard LHC events are so high that traditional computational techniques become inefficient. Recently new approaches based on unitarity have been developed for calculating one-loop scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. These methods are especially suitable for the description of multi-particle processes in QCD and are amenable to numerical implementations. We present a systematic pedagogical description of both conceptual and technical aspects of the new methods.

  20. Fast GPU-based calculations in few-body quantum scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, V. N.; Kukulin, V. I.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Sakhiev, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    A principally novel approach towards solving the few-particle (many-dimensional) quantum scattering problems is described. The approach is based on a complete discretization of few-particle continuum and usage of massively parallel computations of integral kernels for scattering equations by means of GPU. The discretization for continuous spectrum of few-particle Hamiltonian is realized with a projection of all scattering operators and wave functions onto the stationary wave-packet basis. Such projection procedure leads to a replacement of singular multidimensional integral equations with linear matrix ones having finite matrix elements. Different aspects of the employment of multithread GPU computing for fast calculation of the matrix kernel of the equation are studied in detail. As a result, the fully realistic three-body scattering problem above the break-up threshold is solved on an ordinary desktop PC with GPU for a rather small computational time.

  1. A Theoretical Study of Bulk and Surface Diffusion Processes for Semiconductor Materials Using First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, Jason L.

    Diffusion of point defects on crystalline surfaces and in their bulk is an important and ubiquitous phenomenon affecting film quality, electronic properties and device functionality. A complete understanding of these diffusion processes enables one to predict and then control those processes. Such understanding includes knowledge of the structural, energetic and electronic properties of these native and non-native point defect diffusion processes. Direct experimental observation of the phenomenon is difficult and microscopic theories of diffusion mechanisms and pathways abound. Thus, knowing the nature of diffusion processes, of specific point defects in given materials, has been a challenging task for analytical theory as well as experiment. The recent advances in computing technology have been a catalyst for the rise of a third mode of investigation. The advent of tremendous computing power, breakthroughs in algorithmic development in computational applications of electronic density functional theory now enables direct computation of the diffusion process. This thesis demonstrates such a method applied to several different examples of point defect diffusion on the (001) surface of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and the bulk of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). All results presented in this work are ab initio, total-energy pseudopotential calculations within the local density approximation to density-functional theory. Single particle wavefunctions were expanded in a plane-wave basis and reciprocal space k-point sampling was achieved by Monkhorst-Pack generated k-point grids. Both surface and bulk computations employed a supercell approach using periodic boundary conditions. Ga adatom adsorption and diffusion processes were studied on two reconstructions of the GaAs(001) surface including the c(4x4) and c(4x4)-heterodimer surface reconstructions. On the GaAs(001)- c(4x4) surface reconstruction, two distinct sets of minima and transition sites were

  2. Development of Quantum Chemical Method to Calculate Half Maximal Inhibitory Concentration (IC50 ).

    PubMed

    Bag, Arijit; Ghorai, Pradip Kr

    2016-05-01

    Till date theoretical calculation of the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of a compound is based on different Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models which are empirical methods. By using the Cheng-Prusoff equation it may be possible to compute IC50 , but this will be computationally very expensive as it requires explicit calculation of binding free energy of an inhibitor with respective protein or enzyme. In this article, for the first time we report an ab initio method to compute IC50 of a compound based only on the inhibitor itself where the effect of the protein is reflected through a proportionality constant. By using basic enzyme inhibition kinetics and thermodynamic relations, we derive an expression of IC50 in terms of hydrophobicity, electric dipole moment (μ) and reactivity descriptor (ω) of an inhibitor. We implement this theory to compute IC50 of 15 HIV-1 capsid inhibitors and compared them with experimental results and available other QASR based empirical results. Calculated values using our method are in very good agreement with the experimental values compared to the values calculated using other methods. PMID:27492086

  3. Quantum-Mechanical Calculation of Ionization-Potential Lowering in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Thiele, Robert; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-07-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization-potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser, where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kröll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here, we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model, we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy of standard IPD models. Our model can be a useful tool for calculating atomic properties within dense plasmas with wide-ranging applications to studies on warm dense matter, shock experiments, planetary science, inertial confinement fusion, and nonequilibrium plasmas created with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  4. A new class of ensemble conserving algorithms for approximate quantum dynamics: Theoretical formulation and model problems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kyle K. G.; Poulsen, Jens Aage Nyman, Gunnar; Rossky, Peter J.

    2015-06-28

    We develop two classes of quasi-classical dynamics that are shown to conserve the initial quantum ensemble when used in combination with the Feynman-Kleinert approximation of the density operator. These dynamics are used to improve the Feynman-Kleinert implementation of the classical Wigner approximation for the evaluation of quantum time correlation functions known as Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral. As shown, both classes of dynamics are able to recover the exact classical and high temperature limits of the quantum time correlation function, while a subset is able to recover the exact harmonic limit. A comparison of the approximate quantum time correlation functions obtained from both classes of dynamics is made with the exact results for the challenging model problems of the quartic and double-well potentials. It is found that these dynamics provide a great improvement over the classical Wigner approximation, in which purely classical dynamics are used. In a special case, our first method becomes identical to centroid molecular dynamics.

  5. Concepts and their dynamics: a quantum-theoretic modeling of human thought.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    We analyze different aspects of our quantum modeling approach of human concepts and, more specifically, focus on the quantum effects of contextuality, interference, entanglement, and emergence, illustrating how each of them makes its appearance in specific situations of the dynamics of human concepts and their combinations. We point out the relation of our approach, which is based on an ontology of a concept as an entity in a state changing under influence of a context, with the main traditional concept theories, that is, prototype theory, exemplar theory, and theory theory. We ponder about the question why quantum theory performs so well in its modeling of human concepts, and we shed light on this question by analyzing the role of complex amplitudes, showing how they allow to describe interference in the statistics of measurement outcomes, while in the traditional theories statistics of outcomes originates in classical probability weights, without the possibility of interference. The relevance of complex numbers, the appearance of entanglement, and the role of Fock space in explaining contextual emergence, all as unique features of the quantum modeling, are explicitly revealed in this article by analyzing human concepts and their dynamics. PMID:24039114

  6. Derivation of the Rules of Quantum Mechanics from Information-Theoretic Axioms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivel, Daniel I.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional quantum mechanics with a complex Hilbert space and the Born Rule is derived from five axioms describing experimentally observable properties of probability distributions for the outcome of measurements. Axioms I, II, III are common to quantum mechanics and hidden variable theories. Axiom IV recognizes a phenomenon, first noted by von Neumann (in Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1955) and independently by Turing (Teuscher and Hofstadter, Alan Turing: Life and Legacy of a Great Thinker, Springer, Berlin, 2004), in which the increase in entropy resulting from a measurement is reduced by a suitable intermediate measurement. This is shown to be impossible for local hidden variable theories. Axiom IV, together with the first three, almost suffice to deduce the conventional rules but allow some exotic, alternatives such as real or quaternionic quantum mechanics. Axiom V recognizes a property of the distribution of outcomes of random measurements on qubits which holds only in the complex Hilbert space model. It is then shown that the five axioms also imply the conventional rules for any finite dimension.

  7. The Impact of Quantum Theoretical Models of Consciousness on the Study of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andris, James F.

    This paper abstracts and discusses the approaches of five educational theorists who have used quantum theory as a model for educational phenomena, sets forth and uses metatheoretical criteria to evaluate the work of these theorists, and states guidelines for further work in this domain. The paper abstracts and discusses the works of the following…

  8. Quantum Calculations on Salt Bridges with Water: Potentials, Structure, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Sing; Green, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with a guanidinium basic group, the other lysine, which is a primary amine. Only arginine is modeled here, by ethyl guanidinium, while propionic acid is used as a model for either carboxylic acid. The salt bridges are accompanied by 0-12 water molecules; for each of the 13 systems, the energy-bond distance relation, natural bond orbitals (NBO), frequency calculations allowing thermodynamic corrections to room temperature, and dielectric constant dependence, were all calculated. The water molecules were found to arrange themselves in hydrogen bonded rings anchored to the oxygens of the salt bridge components. This was not surprising in itself, but it was found that the rings lead to a periodicity in the energy, and to a 'water addition' rule. The latter shows that the initial rings, with four oxygen atoms, become five member rings when an additional water molecule becomes available, with the additional water filling in at the bond with the lowest Wiberg index, as calculated using NBO. The dielectric constant dependence is the expected hyperbola, and the fit of the energy to the inverse dielectric constant is determined. There is an energy periodicity related to ring formation upon addition of water molecules. When 10 water molecules have been added, all spaces near the salt bridge are filled, completing the first hydration shell, and a second shell starts to form. The potentials associated with salt bridges depend on their hydration, and potentials assigned without regard to local hydration are likely to cause errors as large as or larger than kBT, thus suggesting a serious problem if these

  9. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, James D; Halada, Gary P; Jha, Prashant; Phillips, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI), U(V), U(IV), U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG), and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO) with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V)- and U(IV)-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI) and U(IV) rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules) are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids. PMID:19689800

  10. Theoretical calculations for structural, elastic, and thermodynamic properties of RuN{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Bing; Zhou, Xiao-Lin E-mail: lkworld@126.com; Chang, Jing; Liu, Ke E-mail: lkworld@126.com

    2014-08-07

    The structural and elastic properties of RuN{sub 2} were investigated through the first-principles calculation using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) within the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory. The obtained equilibrium structure and mechanical properties are in excellent agreement with other theoretical results. Then we compared the elastic modulus of RuN{sub 2} with several other isomorphic noble metal nitrides. Results show that RuN{sub 2} can nearly rival with OsN{sub 2} and IrN{sub 2}, which indicate RuN{sub 2} is a potentially ultra-incompressible and hard material. By the elastic stability criteria, it is predicted that RuN{sub 2} is stable in our calculations (0–100 GPa). The calculated B/G ratios indicate that RuN{sub 2} possesses brittle nature at 0 GPa and when the pressure increases to 13.4 GPa (for LDA) or 20.8 GPa (for GGA), it begins to prone to ductility. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, we also investigated the thermodynamic properties of RuN{sub 2}.

  11. One pot synthesis of biologically active pregnane derivatives, their single crystal structures, spectroscopic characterization and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Bhatia, Akriti; Bhatia, Gitika; Shrivastava, Atul; Prakash, Rohit

    2013-11-01

    One pot allylic oxidation of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-diene-20-one (2) and nucleophilic addition at C-16 position of 3β-hydroxypregna-5,16-diene-20-one (3) yielded 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-diene-7,20-dione (4) and 3β-hydroxy-16α-(5'-hydroxypentyloxy)-pregn-5-ene-20-one (5) respectively in high yield. A detailed theoretical study supported by X-ray analysis of compounds 4 and 5 has been carried out. Conformational analysis of compounds 4 and 5 was done with the help of crystal structure, which crystallize out in orthorhombic form having P212121 space group. Structural characterization of compounds 4 and 5 was done with the aid of 1H, 13C NMR, IR, UV, ESI-MS and ESI-HRMS. The molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies for compounds 4 and 5 in the ground state were calculated using the Density functional theory (DFT) with 6-31G(d,p) basis set and compared with experimental data. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance magnetic shifts of 4 and 5 were calculated using GIAO method and compared with the experimental data. UV-Vis spectra of both the compounds were recorded and electronic properties such as HOMO-LUMO energies were calculated by time dependent TD-DFT approach. The compounds were screened for their anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-oxidant activity.

  12. Theoretical calculations of X-ray absorption spectra of a copper mixed ligand complex using computer code FEFF9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    The terms X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) refer, respectively, to the structure in the X-ray absorption spectrum at low and high energies relative to the absorption edge. Routine analysis of EXAFS experiments generally makes use of simplified models and several many-body parameters, e.g. mean free paths, many-body amplitude factors, and Debye-Waller factors, as incorporated in EXAFS analysis software packages like IFEFFIT which includes Artemis. Similar considerations apply to XANES, where the agreement between theory and experiment is often less satisfactory. The recently available computer code FEFF9 uses the real-space Green's function (RSGF) approach to calculate dielectric response over a broad spectrum including the dominant low-energy region. This code includes improved treatments of many-body effects such as inelastic losses, core-hole effects, vibrational amplitudes, and the extension to full spectrum calculations of optical constants including solid state effects. In the present work, using FEFF9, we have calculated the X-ray absorption spectrum at the K-edge of copper in a complex, viz., aqua (diethylenetriamine) (isonicotinato) copper(II), the crystal structure of which is unknown. The theoretical spectrum has been compared with the experimental spectrum, recorded by us at the XAFS beamline 11.1 at ELETTRA synchrotron source, Italy, in both XANES and EXAFS regions.

  13. Accurate experimental and theoretical comparisons between superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixers showing weak and strong quantum effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, W. R.; Richards, P. L.; Face, D. W.; Prober, D. E.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    A systematic study of the gain and noise in superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixers employing Ta based, Nb based, and Pb-alloy based tunnel junctions was made. These junctions displayed both weak and strong quantum effects at a signal frequency of 33 GHz. The effects of energy gap sharpness and subgap current were investigated and are quantitatively related to mixer performance. Detailed comparisons are made of the mixing results with the predictions of a three-port model approximation to the Tucker theory. Mixer performance was measured with a novel test apparatus which is accurate enough to allow for the first quantitative tests of theoretical noise predictions. It is found that the three-port model of the Tucker theory underestimates the mixer noise temperature by a factor of about 2 for all of the mixers. In addition, predicted values of available mixer gain are in reasonable agreement with experiment when quantum effects are weak. However, as quantum effects become strong, the predicted available gain diverges to infinity, which is in sharp contrast to the experimental results. Predictions of coupled gain do not always show such divergences.

  14. Communication: Ro-vibrational control of chemical reactivity in H+CH{sub 4}→ H{sub 2}+CH{sub 3} : Full-dimensional quantum dynamics calculations and a sudden model

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Ralph Manthe, Uwe

    2014-08-07

    The mode-selective chemistry of the title reaction is studied by full-dimensional quantum dynamics simulation on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface for vanishing total angular momentum. Using a rigorous transition state based approach and multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation, initial state-selected reaction probabilities for many ro-vibrational states of methane are calculated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental trends seen in reactions of methane. An intuitive interpretation of the ro-vibrational control of the chemical reactivity provided by a sudden model based on the quantum transition state concept is discussed.

  15. Hydrogen-bonded structures of pyrrole-solvent clusters: Infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiteru; Honma, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    The hydrogen-bonded structures of pyrrole-solvent (H2O,CH3OH,C2H5OH) binary clusters were studied by the combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. Infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy was applied to observe the NH and OH stretching vibrations of the clusters. The structures, binding energies, and normal modes of the binary clusters were obtained by quantum chemical calculations of the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels. For the 1:1 clusters of pyrrole-H2O, pyrrole-CH3OH, and pyrrole-C2H5OH, the hydrogen-bonded NH stretching vibrations were observed at 3448, 3414, and 3408 cm-1, respectively. They were redshifted from the NH stretching vibration of the pyrrole monomer, and the amounts of the redshift were proportional to the proton affinities of the solvent molecules. MP2 level calculations revealed that the σ-type (NH⋯O) hydrogen-bonded structures had 7.6-9.0 kJ/mol larger binding energies than the π-type structures (OH⋯π electron cloud of pyrrole), and that the vibrational frequencies of the σ-type structures are consistent with the observed spectra. In addition to the 1:1 clusters, the NH or OH stretching vibrations of pyrrole-CH3OH binary clusters were observed at 3432 and 3549 cm-1. Among three optimized structures of the pyrrole-(CH3OH)2, the σ-π bridge pyrrole-(CH3OH)2 provided a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated vibrational frequencies. For the pyrrole-H2O binary clusters, three new bands were observed at 3414, 3435, and 3541 cm-1. These bands are consistent with the calculated NH and OH stretching vibrations of the (pyrrole)2-H2O cluster, which has a closed cyclic hydrogen-bonded structure.

  16. Insights into the high-pressure behavior of kaolinite from infrared spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Mark D.; Montgomery, Wren; Balan, Etienne; Lerch, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The high-pressure behavior of Keokuk kaolinite has been studied to 9.5 GPa by infrared spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The kaolinite-I → kaolinite-II and kaolinite-II → kaolinite-III transformations have clear spectroscopic expression, with discontinuities coinciding with the transformation pressures bracketed by X-ray diffraction (Welch and Crichton in Am Mineral 95:651-654, 2010). The experimental spectra have been interpreted from band assignments derived from density functional theory for the structures of kaolinite-II and kaolinite-III, using as starting models the ab initio structures reported by Mercier and Le Page (Acta Crystallogr A B64:131-143, 2008, Mater Sci Technol 25:437-442, 2009) and unit-cell parameters from Welch and Crichton (Am Mineral 95:651-654, 2010). The relaxed theoretical structures are very similar to those reported by Mercier and Le Page (Acta Crystallogr A B64:131-143, 2008, Mater Sci Technol 25:437-442, 2009) in their theoretical investigation of kaolinite polytypes at high pressure. The vibrational spectra calculated from the quantum-mechanical analysis allow band assignments of the IR spectra to be made and provide insights into the behavior of different OH environments in the two high-pressure polytypes. The single perpendicular-interlayer OH group of kaolinite-III has a distinctive spectroscopic signature that is diagnostic of this polytype (ν = 3,595 cm-1 at 9.5 GPa) and is sensitive to the compression/expansion of the interlayer space. This OH group also has a distinctive signature in the calculated spectra. The spectra collected on decompression are those of kaolinite-III and persist largely unchanged to 4.6 GPa, except for a continuous blue shift of the 3,595 cm-1 band to 3,613 cm-1. Finally, kaolinite-I is recovered at 0.6 GPa, confirming the kaolinite-III → kaolinite-I transformation previously observed by X-ray diffraction, and the irreversibility of the kaolinite-II → kaolinite-III transformation. The

  17. Progesterone and testosterone studies by neutron-scattering methods and quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holderna-Natkaniec, K.; Szyczewski, A.; Natkaniec, I.; Khavryutchenko, V. D.; Pawlukojc, A.

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) and neutron diffraction spectra of progesterone and testosterone were measured simultaneously on the NERA spectrometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor in Dubna. Both studied samples do not indicate any phase transition in the temperature range from 20 to 290K. The IINS spectra have been transformed to the phonon density of states (PDS) in the one-phonon scattering approximation. The PDS spectra display well-resolved peaks of low-frequency internal vibration modes up to 600cm-1. The assignment of these modes was proposed taking into account the results of calculations of the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules of the investigated substances. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed by the semi-empirical PM3 method and at the restricted Hartree-Fock level with the 6-31* basis set. The lower internal modes assigned to torsional vibration of the androstane skeleton mix with the lattice vibrations. The intense bands in the PDS spectra in the frequency range from 150 to 300cm-1 are related to librations of structurally inequivalent methyl groups.

  18. Rovibrational bound states of neon trimer: quantum dynamical calculation of all eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Benhui; Chen, Wenwu; Poirier, Bill

    2011-09-01

    Exact quantum dynamics calculations of the eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions for all bound rovibrational states of the Ne(3) trimer (J = 0-18) have been performed using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. These codes employ a combination of highly efficient methods, including phase-space optimized discrete variable representation, optimal separable basis, and preconditioned inexact spectral transform methods, together with an effective massive parallelization scheme. The Ne(3) energy levels and wavefunctions were computed using a pair-wise Lennard-Jones potential. Jacobi coordinates were used for the calculations, but to identify just those states belonging to the totally symmetric irreducible representation of the G(12) complete nuclear permutation-inversion group, wavefunctions were plotted in hyperspherical coordinates. "Horseshoe" states were observed above the isomerization barrier, but the horseshoe localization effect is weaker than in Ar(3). The rigid rotor model is found to be applicable for only the ground and first excited vibrational states at low J; fitted rotational constant values are presented. PMID:21913762

  19. Raman spectroscopic features of the neutral vacancy in diamond from ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baima, Jacopo; Zelferino, Alessandro; Olivero, Paolo; Erba, Alessandro; Dovesi, Roberto

    2016-01-21

    Quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations are performed to elucidate the vibrational spectroscopic features of a common irradiation-induced defect in diamond, i.e. the neutral vacancy. Raman spectra are computed analytically through a Coupled-Perturbed-Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham approach as a function of both different defect spin states and defect concentration. The experimental Raman features of defective diamond located in the 400-1300 cm(-1) spectral range, i.e. below the first-order line of pristine diamond at 1332 cm(-1), are well reproduced, thus corroborating the picture according to which, at low damage densities, this spectral region is mostly affected by non-graphitic sp(3) defects. No peaks above 1332 cm(-1) are found, thus ruling out previous tentative assignments of different spectral features (at 1450 and 1490 cm(-1)) to the neutral vacancy. The perturbation introduced by the vacancy to the thermal nuclear motion of carbon atoms in the defective lattice is discussed in terms of atomic anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs), computed from converged lattice dynamics calculations. PMID:26686374

  20. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a 'weylet' basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality-the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  1. Accurate band gaps of semiconductors and insulators from Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Roman; Hood, Randolph; Morales, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations are useful tools in developing materials with targeted band gaps for semiconductor industry. Unfortunately, the main workhorse of ab initio calculations - density functional theory (DFT) in local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) underestimates band gaps. Several approaches have been proposed starting from empirical corrections to more elaborate exchange-correlation functionals to deal with this problem. But none of these work well for the entire range of semiconductors and insulators. Deficiencies of DFT as a mean field method can be overcome using many-body techniques. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods can obtain a nearly exact numerical solutions of both total energies and spectral properties. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC), the most widely used QMC method, has been shown to provide gold standard results for different material properties, including spectroscopic constants of dimers and clusters, equation of state for solids, accurate descriptions of defects in metals and insulators. To test DMC's accuracy in a wider range of semiconductors and insulators we have computed band gaps of several semiconductors and insulators. We show that DMC can provide superior agreement with experiment compared with more traditional DFT approaches including high level exchange-correlation functionals (e.g. HSE).

  2. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality--the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions). PMID:23248981

  3. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  4. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-01

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003);, 10.1142/S0219633603000380 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004);, 10.1063/1.1767511 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1704 (2004), 10.1063/1.1767512], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality—the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  5. Comparison of polynomial approximations to speed up planewave-based quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, William D.; Umrigar, C. J.; Alfè, Dario; Petruzielo, F. R.; Hennig, Richard G.; Wilkins, John W.

    2015-04-01

    The computational cost of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of realistic periodic systems depends strongly on the method of storing and evaluating the many-particle wave function. Previous work by Williamson et al. (2001) [35] and Alfè and Gillan, (2004) [36] has demonstrated the reduction of the O (N3) cost of evaluating the Slater determinant with planewaves to O (N2) using localized basis functions. We compare four polynomial approximations as basis functions - interpolating Lagrange polynomials, interpolating piecewise-polynomial-form (pp-) splines, and basis-form (B-) splines (interpolating and smoothing). All these basis functions provide a similar speedup relative to the planewave basis. The pp-splines have eight times the memory requirement of the other methods. To test the accuracy of the basis functions, we apply them to the ground state structures of Si, Al, and MgO. The polynomial approximations differ in accuracy most strongly for MgO, and smoothing B-splines most closely reproduce the planewave value for of the variational Monte Carlo energy. Using separate approximations for the Laplacian of the orbitals increases the accuracy sufficiently to justify the increased memory requirement, making smoothing B-splines, with separate approximation for the Laplacian, the preferred choice for approximating planewave-represented orbitals in QMC calculations.

  6. Theoretical basis for quantum simulation with a planar ionic crystal in a Penning trap using a triangular rotating wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Yoshimura, B.; Freericks, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the challenges with quantum simulation in ion traps is that the effective spin-spin exchange couplings are not uniform across the lattice. This can be particularly important in Penning-trap realizations where the presence of an ellipsoidal boundary at the edge of the trap leads to dislocations in the crystal. By adding an additional anharmonic potential to better control interion spacing, and a triangular-shaped rotating wall potential to reduce the appearance of dislocations, one can achieve better uniformity of the ionic positions. In this work, we calculate the axial phonon frequencies and the spin-spin interactions driven by a spin-dependent optical dipole force, and discuss what effects the more uniform ion spacing have on the spin simulation properties of Penning-trap quantum simulators. Indeed, we find that the spin-spin interactions behave more like a power law for a wide range of parameters.

  7. Spin-glass behavior of Sn0.9Fe3.1N: An experimental and quantum-theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Tanja; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Based on comprehensive experimental and quantum-theoretical investigations, we identify Sn0.9Fe3.1N as a canonical spin glass and the first ternary iron nitride with a frustrated spin ground state. Sn0.9Fe3.1N is the end member of the solid solution SnxFe4-xN (0 < x ≤ 0.9) derived from ferromagnetic γ'-Fe4N. Within the solid solution, the gradual incorporation of tin is accompanied by a drastic weakening of the ferromagnetic interactions. To explore the dilution of the ferromagnetic coupling, the highly tin-substituted Sn0.9Fe3.1N has been magnetically reinvestigated. DC magnetometry reveals diverging susceptibilities for FC and ZFC measurements at low temperatures and an unsaturated hysteretic loop even at high magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the real component of the AC susceptibility at different frequencies proves the spin-glass transition with the characteristic parameters Tg = 12.83(6) K, τ* = 10-11.8(2) s, zv = 5.6(1) and ΔTm/(Tm ṡ Δlgω) = 0.015. The time-dependent response of the magnetic spins to the external field has been studied by extracting the distribution function of relaxation times g(τ, T) up to Tg from the complex plane of AC susceptibilities. The weakening of the ferromagnetic coupling by substituting tin into γ'-Fe4N is explained by the Stoner criterion on the basis of electronic structure calculations and a quantum-theoretical bonding analysis.

  8. Electron-ion recombination of Fe{sup 12+} forming Fe{sup 11+}: Laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2014-06-10

    We have measured dielectronic recombination (DR) for Fe{sup 12+} forming Fe{sup 11+} using the heavy ion storage ring TSR located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Using our results, we have calculated a plasma rate coefficient from these data that can be used for modeling astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. For the low temperatures characteristic of photoionized plasmas, the experimentally derived rate coefficient is orders of magnitude larger than the previously recommended atomic data. The existing atomic data were also about 40% smaller than our measurements at temperatures relevant for collisionally ionized plasmas. Recent state-of-the-art theory has difficulty reproducing the detailed energy dependence of the DR spectrum. However, for the Maxwellian plasma rate coefficient, recent theoretical results agree with our measurements to within about 30% for both photoionized and collisionally ionized plasmas.

  9. Actinometric measurements and theoretical calculations of j/O3/, the rate of photolysis of ozone to O/1D/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.; Chameides, W. L.; Crutzen, P. J.; Fishman, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental technique which measures j/O3-O(1-D)/, the rate of solar photolysis of ozone to singlet oxygen atoms. It is shown that a flow actinometer carries dilute O3 in N2O into direct sunlight where the O(1D) formed reacts with N2O to form NO which chemiluminescence detects, with a time resolution of about one minute. Measurements indicate a photolysis rate of 1.2 (+ or - .2) x 10 to the -5/s for a cloudless sky, 45 deg zenith angle, 0.345 cm ozone column and zero albedo. Finally, ground level results compare with theoretical calculations based on the UV actinic flux as a function of ozone column and solar zenith angle.

  10. Structural determination of carvone, a component of spearmint, by means of gas electron diffraction augmented by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Toru; Kachi, Yukari; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2003-10-01

    The molecular structure and conformation of carvone, a compound with a minty odor, were investigated by means of gas electron diffraction supported by theoretical calculations. Electron diffraction patterns were recorded by heating the nozzle up to 128 °C to obtain enough scattering intensity. The infrared spectrum was also measured by using an absorption cell with a path length of 10 m. The obtained molecular scattering intensities were analyzed with the aid of theoretical calculations and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that carvone consists of a mixture of three conformers that have the isopropenyl group in the equatorial position and mutually differ in the torsional angle around the single bond connecting the ring and the isopropenyl group. It was also found that the puckering amplitude of the ring of carvone is close to those of menthol and isomenthol, a minty compound and its nonminty isomer. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of the most abundant conformer of carvone are as follows: < r(C-C)>=1.520(3) Å; < r(CC)>=1.360(5) Å; r(CO)=1.225(5) Å; < r(C-H)>=1.104(4)Å; <∠CC-C>=121.1(5)°; <∠C-C-C>=110.4(5)°; ∠C-CO-C=117.1(14)°; <∠C-C-H>=111.1(13)°. Angle brackets denote average values and parenthesized values are the estimated limits of error (3 σ) referring to the last significant digit.

  11. Molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and thermal properties of 4-vinylcyclohexene by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabalasubramanian, P. B.; Periandy, S.; Karabacak, Mehmet; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-06-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-vinylcyclohexene (abbreviated as 4-VCH) have been recorded in the region 4000-100 cm-1. The optimized molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 4-VCH have been precisely assigned and analyzed with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method at 6-311++G(d,p) level basis set. The theoretical frequencies were properly scaled and compared with experimentally obtained FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. Also, the effect due the substitution of vinyl group on the ring vibrational frequencies was analyzed and a detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated total energy distribution (TED). The time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method was employed to predict its electronic properties, such as electronic transitions by UV-Visible analysis, HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and various global reactivity and selectivity descriptors (chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity index). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Atomic charges obtained by Mulliken population analysis and NBO analysis are compared. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures are also calculated.

  12. Molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and thermal properties of 4-vinylcyclohexene by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Periandy, S; Karabacak, Mehmet; Govindarajan, M

    2015-06-15

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-vinylcyclohexene (abbreviated as 4-VCH) have been recorded in the region 4000-100cm(-1). The optimized molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 4-VCH have been precisely assigned and analyzed with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method at 6-311++G(d,p) level basis set. The theoretical frequencies were properly scaled and compared with experimentally obtained FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. Also, the effect due the substitution of vinyl group on the ring vibrational frequencies was analyzed and a detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated total energy distribution (TED). The time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method was employed to predict its electronic properties, such as electronic transitions by UV-Visible analysis, HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and various global reactivity and selectivity descriptors (chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity index). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Atomic charges obtained by Mulliken population analysis and NBO analysis are compared. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures are also calculated. PMID:25795608

  13. A comparison between theoretical and experimental state-to-state charge transfer cross sections for H(+) + H2 at 20 eV: Evidence for quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Michael; Niedner, Gereon; Toennies, J. Peter

    1988-06-01

    A 3-D quantum mechanical close coupling study for the system H(+) +H2 is communicated. The quantum calculations, caried out in the finite order swiden approximation, show a better fit to previous experiments than the classical trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations, and provide direct evidence for the usefulness of a quantum treatment in predicting charge transfer (CT) processes. The total differential cross sections (summed over all final vibrational states) for the CT processes were calculated, in good agreement with experimental results. It is shown that a quantum mechanical treatment of both the inelastic and the charge transfer nonadiabatic processes is feasible and provides a superior description of the experiments compared to the TSH treatment. This demonstrates the importance of quantum effects in ion-molecule charge transfer.

  14. Using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations to model fluorescence observables

    PubMed Central

    Speelman, Amy L.; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Hinkle, Katie L.; VanBeek, Darren B.; Mennucci, Benedetta; Krueger, Brent P.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a critical examination of two different methods for generating a donor-acceptor electronic coupling trajectory from a molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and three methods for sampling that coupling trajectory, allowing the modeling of experimental observables directly from the MD simulation. In the first coupling method we perform a single quantum-mechanical (QM) calculation to characterize the excited state behavior, specifically the transition dipole moment, of the fluorescent probe, which is then mapped onto the configuration space sampled by MD. We then utilize these transition dipoles within the ideal dipole approximation (IDA) to determine the electronic coupling between the probes that mediates the transfer of energy. In the second method we perform a QM calculation on each snapshot and use the complete transition densities to calculate the electronic coupling without need for the IDA. The resulting coupling trajectories are then sampled using three methods ranging from an independent sampling of each trajectory point (the Independent Snapshot Method) to a Markov chain treatment that accounts for the dynamics of the coupling in determining effective rates. The results show that the IDA significantly overestimates the energy transfer rate (by a factor of 2.6) during the portions of the trajectory in which the probes are close to each other. Comparison of the sampling methods shows that the Markov chain approach yields more realistic observables at both high and low FRET efficiencies. Differences between the three sampling methods are discussed in terms of the different mechanisms for averaging over structural dynamics in the system. Convergence of the Markov chain method is carefully examined. Together, the methods for estimating coupling and for sampling the coupling provide a mechanism for directly connecting the structural dynamics modeled by MD with fluorescence observables determined through FRET experiments. PMID:21417498

  15. Ligand field density functional theory calculation of the 4f2→ 4f15d1 transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Herein we present a Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LFDFT) based methodology for the analysis of the 4f(n)→ 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in rare earth compounds and apply it for the characterization of the 4f(2)→ 4f(1)5d(1) transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr(3+) with the elpasolite structure type. The methodological advances are relevant for the analysis and prospection of materials acting as phosphors in light-emitting diodes. The positions of the zero-phonon energy corresponding to the states of the electron configurations 4f(2) and 4f(1)5d(1) are calculated, where the praseodymium ion may occupy either the Cs(+)-, K(+)- or the Y(3+)-site, and are compared with available experimental data. The theoretical results show that the occupation of the three undistorted sites allows a quantum-cutting process. However size effects due to the difference between the ionic radii of Pr(3+) and K(+) as well as Cs(+) lead to the distortion of the K(+)- and the Cs(+)-site, which finally exclude these sites for quantum-cutting. A detailed discussion about the origin of this distortion is also described. PMID:23846586

  16. Theoretical ROVibrational Energies (TROVE): A robust numerical approach to the calculation of rovibrational energies for polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Thiel, Walter; Jensen, Per

    2007-10-01

    We present a new computational method with associated computer program TROVE (Theoretical ROVibrational Energies) to perform variational calculations of rovibrational energies for general polyatomic molecules of arbitrary structure in isolated electronic states. The (approximate) nuclear kinetic energy operator is represented as an expansion in terms of internal coordinates. The main feature of the computational scheme is a numerical construction of the kinetic energy operator, which is an integral part of the computation process. Thus the scheme is self-contained, i.e., it requires no analytical pre-derivation of the kinetic energy operator. It is also general, since it can be used in connection with any internal coordinates. The method represents an extension of our model for pyramidal XY 3 molecules reported previously [S.N. Yurchenko, M. Carvajal, P. Jensen, H. Lin, J.J. Zheng, W. Thiel, Mol. Phys. 103 (2005) 359]. Non-rigid molecules are treated in the Hougen-Bunker-Johns approach [J.T. Hougen, P.R. Bunker, J.W.C. Johns, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 34 (1970) 136]. In this case, the variational calculations employ a numerical finite basis representation for the large-amplitude motion using basis functions that are generated by Numerov-Cooley integration of the appropriate one-dimensional Schrödinger equation.

  17. Quantum mechanics calculation of catalytic properties of a copper sensor for prediction of flow characteristics in plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, V. L.; Kroupnov, A. A.; Vetchinkin, А. S.

    2015-12-01

    Basing on quantum-mechanical calculations within cluster models, rate coefficients of elementary steps of the complete system of heterogeneous catalytic recombination of dissociated oxygen on the copper oxide surface were determined. They were used for calculation of dependence of the effective coefficient of oxygen atom heterogeneous catalytic recombination on the temperature and partial pressure in a wide range of conditions at the surface. It has been established that its value substantially varies depending on the conditions at the surface.

  18. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  19. Theoretical study on electromagnetically induced transparency in molecular aggregate models using quantum Liouville equation method

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Takuya; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which is known as an efficient control method of optical absorption property, is investigated using the polarizability spectra and population dynamics obtained by solving the quantum Liouville equation. In order to clarify the intermolecular interaction effect on EIT, we examine several molecular aggregate models composed of three-state monomers with the dipole-dipole coupling. On the basis of the present results, we discuss the applicability of EIT in molecular aggregate systems to a new type of optical switch.

  20. From C60 to Infinity: Large-Scale Quantum Chemistry Calculations of the Heats of Formation of Higher Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bun; Kawashima, Yukio; Katouda, Michio; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2016-02-01

    We have carried out large-scale computational quantum chemistry calculations on the K computer to obtain heats of formation for C60 and some higher fullerenes with the DSD-PBE-PBE/cc-pVQZ double-hybrid density functional theory method. Our best estimated values are 2520.0 ± 20.7 (C60), 2683.4 ± 17.7 (C70), 2862.0 ± 18.5 (C76), 2878.8 ± 13.3 (C78), 2946.4 ± 14.5 (C84), 3067.3 ± 15.4 (C90), 3156.6 ± 16.2 (C96), 3967.7 ± 33.4 (C180), 4364 (C240) and 5415 (C320) kJ mol(-1). In our assessment, we also find that the B3-PW91-D3BJ and BMK-D3(BJ) functionals perform reasonably well. Using the convergence behavior for the calculated per-atom heats of formation, we obtained the formula ΔfH per carbon = 722n(-0.72) + 5.2 kJ mol(-1) (n = the number of carbon atoms), which enables an estimation of ΔfH for higher fullerenes more generally. A slow convergence to the graphene limit is observed, which we attribute to the relatively small proportion of fullerene carbons that are in "low-strain" regions. We further propose that it would take tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of carbons for a fullerene to roughly approach the limit. Such a distinction may be a contributing factor to the discrete properties between the two types of nanomaterials. During the course of our study, we also observe a fairly reliable means for the theoretical calculation of heats of formation for medium-sized fullerenes. This involves the use of isodesmic-type reactions with fullerenes of similar sizes to provide a good balance of the chemistry and to minimize the use of accompanying species. PMID:26799740

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamical trends of passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Ravi

    In recent years, passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers have shown great promise as compact, efficient and reliable pulsed sources of light for a range of precision and high performance applications, such as high bit-rate optical communications, diverse waveform generation, metrology, and clock distribution in high-performance computing (HPC) processors. For such applications, stable optical pulses with short picosecond pulse durations and multi-gigahertz repetition rates are required. In addition, a low pulse-to-pulse timing jitter is also necessary to prevent errors arising from the ambiguity between neighboring pulses. In order to optimize pulse quality in terms of optical characteristics such as pulse shape and pulse train behavior, as well as RF characteristics such as phase noise and timing jitter, understanding the nonlinear output dynamics of such devices is of critical importance, not only to get a sense of the regimes of operation where device output might be stable or unstable, but also to gain insight into the parameters that influence the output characteristics the most, and how they can be accessed and exploited to optimize design and performance for next generation applications. In this dissertation, theoretical and experimental studies have been combined to investigate the dynamical trends of two-section passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers. On the theoretical side, a novel numerical modeling scheme is presented as a powerful and versatile framework to study the nonlinear dynamics specific to a device, with device-specific parameters extracted over a range of operating conditions. The practical utility of this scheme is then demonstrated, first, in an analytical capability to interpret and explain dynamical trends observed in experiment, and subsequently, as a predictive tool to guide experiment to operate in a desired dynamical regime. Modeling results are compared to experimental findings where possible. Finally, optical feedback from an

  2. Perspectives and Current the Development of Non-Born-Oppenheimer Atomic and Molecular Quantum Mechanical Variational Calculations using Explicitly Correlated Gaussian Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz Team

    2014-03-01

    The development of highly accurate theoretical quantum mechanics models for atomic and molecular calculations is crucial for the verification of the results of high-resolution experimental spectroscopy. High accuracy in the calculations can be achieved by not assuming the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (non-BO) and by using the variational principle. The non-relativistic Hamiltonian describing the internal state of the considered system used in the approach is obtained by separating out the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory frame Hamiltonian. The wave functions used in the calculations are expanded in terms of explicitly correlated Gaussian (ECG) functions. The optimization of the Gaussian non-linear parameters is aided by the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. Examples of some very accurate calculations of small atoms and diatomic molecules will be presented. The presentation will also include a discussion of the extension of the approach to perform non-BO calculations of bound states of small triatomic molecules (e.g. H 3 +). Acknowledgements go to Ludwik Adamowicz for guidance and NSF for funding (DGE1-1143953).

  3. Interfacial Atmospheric Chemistry: Quantum Chemical Calculations on the Mechanism of Protonation and Oligomerization of Isoprene on Aqueous Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, H.; Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Nielsen, R. J.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Goddard, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that atmospheric chemistry involves more than gas-phase reactions. Key processes, such as the decay of NO2 in urban plumes and the associated daytime formation of HONO, and the rapid chemistries observed in and over forest canopies at nighttime defy explanation by conventional atmospheric chemistry mechanisms. We have recently reported experimental results on several gas-liquid reactions of atmospheric interest, such as the facile protonation of gaseous isoprene on mildly acidic (pH < 4) water. Although interfacial proton transfers, such as the one involved in the protonation of gaseous isoprene, also participate in cloud and ocean acidification, bioenergetics coupling, 'on-water' catalysis, self-assembly and molecular recognition, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of such reactions. Herein we apply quantum mechanics to investigate how biogenic or anthropogenic olefins may get protonated and undergo oligomerization at the air-water interface by performing model calculations on small water clusters carrying an excess proton as surrogates for the surface of mildly acidic water as sensed by gaseous isoprene (ISO). We find that ISO binds weakly to the surface of water and accepts a proton from H+(H2O)3, leading to ISOH+ via a proton transfer hindered by a ΔG1‡ = 5.6 kcal mol-1 kinetic barrier. Subsequently, another ISO attaches loosely to this ensemble, before being attacked by the ISOH+. This process, which represents the first step of the cationic polymerization of ISO, is hindered by a similar ΔG2‡ = 5.7 kcal mol-1 barrier. Our theoretical results are consistent with experimental (~ 10-4) uptake coefficients for ISO measured on acidic water.

  4. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  5. Electronic structure of silicon nitride according to ab initio quantum-chemical calculations and experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrashevich, S. S. Gritsenko, V. A.; Klauser, R.; Gwo, S.

    2010-10-15

    Charge transfer {Delta}Q = 0.35e at the Si-N bond in silicon nitride is determined experimentally using photoelectron spectroscopy, and the ionic formula of silicon nitride Si{sub 3}{sup +1.4}N{sub 4}{sup -1.05} is derived. The electronic structure of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is studied ab initio using the density functional method. The results of calculations (partial density of states) are compared with experimental data on X-ray emission spectroscopy of amorphous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The electronic structure of the valence band of amorphous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is studied using synchrotron radiation at different excitation energies. The electron and hole effective masses m{sub e}{sup *} {approx} m{sub h}{sup *} {approx} 0.5m{sub e} are estimated theoretically. The calculated values correspond to experimental results on injection of electrons and holes into silicon nitride.

  6. Molecular structure, spectroscopic assignments and other quantum chemical calculations of anticancer drugs - A review.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A S; Deilam, M; Sharifi-Rad, J; Ashrafi, F; Hoseini-Alfatemi, S M

    2015-01-01

    In many texts, both theoretical and experimental studies on molecular structure and spectroscopic assignments of anticancer medicines have been reported. Molecular geometry parameters have been experimentally obtained by x-ray structure determination method and optimized using computational chemistry method like density functional theory. In this review, we consider calculations based on density function theory at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) levels of theory. Based on optimized geometric parameters of the molecules, molecular structures (length of bonds, bond angles and torsion angles) and vibrational assignments have been obtained. Molecular stability and bond strength have been investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Other molecular properties such as mulliken population analysis, thermodynamic properties and polarizabitities of these drugs have been reported. Calculated energies of HOMO and LUMO show that charge transfer occurs in the molecular. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of molecular chemical reactivity has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface of electrostatic and compared with experiment data. PMID:26638891

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of structural and electronic properties in the correlated oxide NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    Transition metal oxides pose difficulties for condensed matter theories due to the presence of strong electronic correlations. The complex interplay among correlation and exchange in d subshells, crystal field effects, p-d hybridization and charge transfer gives rise to a rich variety of structural and electronic phases. NiO is one such challenging d system, where conventional band theory fails. Compared to the experimental value, the cohesive energy of bulk NiO computed within DFT-LDA differs by almost a factor of 18 %. Band gap computed within standard local or semi-local functionals are off by a factor of 80 %. A quasi-particle correction like the G0W0 approach cannot correct the band gap and is still by far too low. In this work we adopt the Diffusion Quantum Monte (DMC) approach to study the structural and electronic properties of NiO. Trial wave-functions were self consistently generated in a Slater-Jastrow form. To test pseudopotentials used, DMC calculations were done on atomic Ni and O and their computed ionization potentials showed excellent agreement with experiments (within 0.04%). The equilibrium bond length and binding energy of the NiO dimer were also computed that were 0.001% and 0.03%, respectively, from experimental values. DMC calculations of equation of state and band gap of bulk NiO will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge support from U.S Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  8. Thermal Decomposition of NCN: Shock-Tube Study, Quantum Chemical Calculations, and Master-Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anna; González-García, Núria; Lendvay, György; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of cyanonitrene, NCN, was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1790-2960 K at pressures near 1 and 4 bar. Highly diluted mixtures of NCN3 in argon were shock-heated to produce NCN, and concentration-time profiles of C atoms as reaction product were monitored with atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at 156.1 nm. Calibration was performed with methane pyrolysis experiments. Rate coefficients for the reaction (3)NCN + M → (3)C + N2 + M (R1) were determined from the initial slopes of the C atom concentration-time profiles. Reaction R1 was found to be in the low-pressure regime at the conditions of the experiments. The temperature dependence of the bimolecular rate coefficient can be expressed with the following Arrhenius equation: k1(bim) = (4.2 ± 2.1) × 10(14) exp[-242.3 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficients were analyzed by using a master equation with specific rate coefficients from RRKM theory. The necessary molecular data and energies were calculated with quantum chemical methods up to the CCSD(T)/CBS//CCSD/cc-pVTZ level of theory. From the topography of the potential energy surface, it follows that reaction R1 proceeds via isomerization of NCN to CNN and subsequent C-N bond fission along a collinear reaction coordinate without a tight transition state. The calculations reproduce the magnitude and temperature dependence of the rate coefficient and confirm that reaction R1 is in the low-pressure regime under our experimental conditions. PMID:25853321

  9. First-Principles calculation of surface stress evolution of Ge quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guang-Hong; Cuma, Martin; Liu, Feng

    2004-03-01

    Ge quantum dots (huts) form on Si(001) surface after growth of a wetting layer of 3-4 monolayers, having a highly ordered structure bounded by (105) facets. Surface stress/strain plays an important role in their stabilization. Recent experiments [1,2] of Ge growth on Si(105) surface have suggested a continuous evolution toward compression with increasing Ge coverage to stabilize Ge/Si(105) facets. However, quantitative information of surface stress of Ge/Si(105) facet, and hence the surface stress on Ge dots is still lacking, which causes a big gap in our understanding. Therefore, we have performed large-scale first-principles calculations to evaluate evolution of surface energy and surface stress in the Ge-covered Si (105) surface, as a function of Ge coverage. We show a very large tensile surface stress present in clean Si(105) surface induced by surface reconstruction, which continuously evolve toward compression with increasing Ge coverage, confirming the qualitative suggestion by experiments. Quantitatively, only moderate reduction of tensile surface stress occurs for the first two layers of Ge deposition, and the surface stress actually remains to be tensile until 5-layer of Ge coverage. This work is supported by DOE. [1] Y. Fujikawa, K. Akiyama, T. Nagao, T. Sakurai, M.G. Lagally, T. Hashimoto, Y. Morikawa, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002) [2] P. Raiteri,D.B. Migas, L. Miglio, A. Rastelli, and H. von Kanel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 256103 (2002)

  10. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  11. Full dimension Rb2He ground triplet potential energy surface and quantum scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Grégoire; Viel, Alexandra; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the lowest triplet state of the Rb(2)He complex. A global analytic fit is provided as in the supplementary material [see supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4709433 for the corresponding Fortran code]. This surface is used to perform quantum scattering calculations of (4)He and (3)He colliding with (87)Rb(2) in the partial wave J = 0 at low and ultralow energies. For the heavier helium isotope, the computed vibrational relaxation probabilities show a broad and strong shape resonance for a collisional energy of 0.15 K and a narrow Feshbach resonance at about 17 K for all initial Rb(2) vibrational states studied. The broad resonance corresponds to an efficient relaxation mechanism that does not occur when (3)He is the colliding partner. The Feshbach resonance observed at higher collisional energy is robust with respect to the isotopic substitution. However, its effect on the vibrational relaxation mechanism is faint for both isotopes. PMID:22583230

  12. Full dimension Rb2He ground triplet potential energy surface and quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, Grégoire; Viel, Alexandra; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the lowest triplet state of the Rb2He complex. A global analytic fit is provided as in the supplementary material [see supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4709433E-JCPSA6-136-034218 for the corresponding Fortran code]. This surface is used to perform quantum scattering calculations of 4He and 3He colliding with 87Rb2 in the partial wave J = 0 at low and ultralow energies. For the heavier helium isotope, the computed vibrational relaxation probabilities show a broad and strong shape resonance for a collisional energy of 0.15 K and a narrow Feshbach resonance at about 17 K for all initial Rb2 vibrational states studied. The broad resonance corresponds to an efficient relaxation mechanism that does not occur when 3He is the colliding partner. The Feshbach resonance observed at higher collisional energy is robust with respect to the isotopic substitution. However, its effect on the vibrational relaxation mechanism is faint for both isotopes.

  13. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues. PMID:27171734

  14. Properties of Solar Thermal Fuels by Accurate Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Kayahan; Ataca, Can; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-03-01

    Efficient utilization of the sun as a renewable and clean energy source is one of the major goals of this century due to increasing energy demand and environmental impact. Solar thermal fuels are materials that capture and store the sun's energy in the form of chemical bonds, which can then be released as heat on demand and charged again. Previous work on solar thermal fuels faced challenges related to the cyclability of the fuel over time, as well as the need for higher energy densities. Recently, it was shown that by templating photoswitches onto carbon nanostructures, both high energy density as well as high stability can be achieved. In this work, we explore alternative molecules to azobenzene in such a nano-templated system. We employ the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method to predict the energy storage potential for each molecule. Our calculations show that in many cases the level of accuracy provided by density functional theory (DFT) is sufficient. However, in some cases, such as dihydroazulene, the drastic change in conjugation upon light absorption causes the DFT predictions to be inconsistent and incorrect. For this case, we compare our QMC results for the geometric structure, band gap and reaction enthalpy with different DFT functionals.

  15. Humic Acid Metal Cation Interaction Studied by Spectromicroscopy Techniques in Combination with Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M; Denecke, M; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-01-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the {sup 5}D{sub 0} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 1,2} fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a 'pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  16. GPU Linear Algebra Libraries and GPGPU Programming for Accelerating MOPAC Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    PubMed

    Maia, Julio Daniel Carvalho; Urquiza Carvalho, Gabriel Aires; Mangueira, Carlos Peixoto; Santana, Sidney Ramos; Cabral, Lucidio Anjos Formiga; Rocha, Gerd B

    2012-09-11

    In this study, we present some modifications in the semiempirical quantum chemistry MOPAC2009 code that accelerate single-point energy calculations (1SCF) of medium-size (up to 2500 atoms) molecular systems using GPU coprocessors and multithreaded shared-memory CPUs. Our modifications consisted of using a combination of highly optimized linear algebra libraries for both CPU (LAPACK and BLAS from Intel MKL) and GPU (MAGMA and CUBLAS) to hasten time-consuming parts of MOPAC such as the pseudodiagonalization, full diagonalization, and density matrix assembling. We have shown that it is possible to obtain large speedups just by using CPU serial linear algebra libraries in the MOPAC code. As a special case, we show a speedup of up to 14 times for a methanol simulation box containing 2400 atoms and 4800 basis functions, with even greater gains in performance when using multithreaded CPUs (2.1 times in relation to the single-threaded CPU code using linear algebra libraries) and GPUs (3.8 times). This degree of acceleration opens new perspectives for modeling larger structures which appear in inorganic chemistry (such as zeolites and MOFs), biochemistry (such as polysaccharides, small proteins, and DNA fragments), and materials science (such as nanotubes and fullerenes). In addition, we believe that this parallel (GPU-GPU) MOPAC code will make it feasible to use semiempirical methods in lengthy molecular simulations using both hybrid QM/MM and QM/QM potentials. PMID:26605718

  17. On the Systematic Error in the Quantum Mechanical Calculations to the Periodic Table of Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazan, Albert

    2011-05-01

    The scientists working on the problems of the Periodic Table of Elements regularly attempt to create models of the elements on the basis of the laws of Quantum Mechanics. One even attempted to use the calculation of the dependency ``atomic mass - element's number'' on this basis, in order to extend the Table by introducing two new Periods containing 50 elements each. The hyperbolic law we have found in the Periodic Table allows to find, first, the atomic mass of the last (heaviest stable) element (411.66), then - the number of the protons in it (155). Two functions were compared: the IUPAC 2007 function (elements 80-118) and another one created according the other data (elements 80-224). Both functions have a large deviation of data in No.104-118. Commencing in Period 8, there are three ``shifts'' of atomic mass for 17, 20, and 25 AMU. Also, our analysis manifests that there in all the aforementioned data is a single point with atomic mass 412 and number 155, where the parameters meet each other. This fact verifies our theory (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010).

  18. Schwarzschild Radius from Monte Carlo Calculation of the Wilson Loop in Supersymmetric Matrix Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, Masanori; Miwa, Akitsugu; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2009-05-08

    In the string-gauge duality it is important to understand how the space-time geometry is encoded in gauge theory observables. We address this issue in the case of the D0-brane system at finite temperature T. Based on the duality, the temporal Wilson loop W in gauge theory is expected to contain the information of the Schwarzschild radius R{sub Sch} of the dual black hole geometry as log=R{sub Sch}/(2{pi}{alpha}{sup '}T). This translates to the power-law behavior log=1.89(T/{lambda}{sup 1/3}){sup -3/5}, where {lambda} is the 't Hooft coupling constant. We calculate the Wilson loop on the gauge theory side in the strongly coupled regime by performing Monte Carlo simulations of supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with 16 supercharges. The results reproduce the expected power-law behavior up to a constant shift, which is explainable as {alpha}{sup '} corrections on the gravity side. Our conclusion also demonstrates manifestly the fuzzball picture of black holes.

  19. Molcas 8: New capabilities for multiconfigurational quantum chemical calculations across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Aquilante, Francesco; Autschbach, Jochen; Carlson, Rebecca K; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Delcey, Mickaël G; De Vico, Luca; Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Ferré, Nicolas; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Gagliardi, Laura; Garavelli, Marco; Giussani, Angelo; Hoyer, Chad E; Li Manni, Giovanni; Lischka, Hans; Ma, Dongxia; Malmqvist, Per Åke; Müller, Thomas; Nenov, Artur; Olivucci, Massimo; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Peng, Daoling; Plasser, Felix; Pritchard, Ben; Reiher, Markus; Rivalta, Ivan; Schapiro, Igor; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Stenrup, Michael; Truhlar, Donald G; Ungur, Liviu; Valentini, Alessio; Vancoillie, Steven; Veryazov, Valera; Vysotskiy, Victor P; Weingart, Oliver; Zapata, Felipe; Lindh, Roland

    2016-02-15

    In this report, we summarize and describe the recent unique updates and additions to the Molcas quantum chemistry program suite as contained in release version 8. These updates include natural and spin orbitals for studies of magnetic properties, local and linear scaling methods for the Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation, the generalized active space concept in MCSCF methods, a combination of multiconfigurational wave functions with density functional theory in the MC-PDFT method, additional methods for computation of magnetic properties, methods for diabatization, analytical gradients of state average complete active space SCF in association with density fitting, methods for constrained fragment optimization, large-scale parallel multireference configuration interaction including analytic gradients via the interface to the Columbus package, and approximations of the CASPT2 method to be used for computations of large systems. In addition, the report includes the description of a computational machinery for nonlinear optical spectroscopy through an interface to the QM/MM package Cobramm. Further, a module to run molecular dynamics simulations is added, two surface hopping algorithms are included to enable nonadiabatic calculations, and the DQ method for diabatization is added. Finally, we report on the subject of improvements with respects to alternative file options and parallelization. PMID:26561362

  20. Schwarzschild radius from Monte Carlo calculation of the Wilson loop in supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masanori; Miwa, Akitsugu; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2009-05-01

    In the string-gauge duality it is important to understand how the space-time geometry is encoded in gauge theory observables. We address this issue in the case of the D0-brane system at finite temperature T. Based on the duality, the temporal Wilson loop W in gauge theory is expected to contain the information of the Schwarzschild radius RSch of the dual black hole geometry as log(W)=RSch/(2pialpha'T). This translates to the power-law behavior log(W)=1.89(T/lambda 1/3)-3/5, where lambda is the 't Hooft coupling constant. We calculate the Wilson loop on the gauge theory side in the strongly coupled regime by performing Monte Carlo simulations of supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with 16 supercharges. The results reproduce the expected power-law behavior up to a constant shift, which is explainable as alpha' corrections on the gravity side. Our conclusion also demonstrates manifestly the fuzzball picture of black holes. PMID:19518857

  1. THE IONIC PATHWAYS OF LITHIUM CHEMISTRY IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: QUANTUM CALCULATIONS FOR LiH{sup +} REACTING WITH H

    SciTech Connect

    Bovino, S.; Gianturco, F. A.; Stoecklin, T.

    2010-01-10

    To better understand the overall role of lithium chemistry in the early universe, reactive quantum calculations involving LiH{sup +} have been carried out and rate coefficients have been obtained. The reactive quantum calculations have been performed using a negative imaginary potential method. Infinite-order sudden approximation and the coupled state approximation have been used to simplify the angular coupling dynamics. Rate coefficients are obtained from the reactive cross sections by further integration over Boltzmann distribution of velocities. The results from the present calculations suggest that, at low redshifts (z), LiH{sup +} should be amenable to observation as imprinted on the cosmic background radiation, in contrast with its neutral counterpart. At higher z, the ionic species may disappear through both depletion reaction and three-body break-up processes.

  2. Line Coupling Effects in the Isotropic Raman Spectra of N2: A Quantum Calculation at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, Franck; Boulet, Christian; Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    We present quantum calculations of the relaxation matrix for the Q branch of N2 at room temperature using a recently proposed N2-N2 rigid rotor potential. Close coupling calculations were complemented by coupled states studies at high energies and provide about 10200 two-body state-to state cross sections from which the needed one-body cross-sections may be obtained. For such temperatures, convergence has to be thoroughly analyzed since such conditions are close to the limit of current computational feasibility. This has been done using complementary calculations based on the energy corrected sudden formalism. Agreement of these quantum predictions with experimental data is good, but the main goal of this work is to provide a benchmark relaxation matrix for testing more approximate methods which remain of a great utility for complex molecular systems at room (and higher) temperatures.

  3. Measurements and Theoretical Calculations of N2-broadening and N2-shift Coefficients in the v2 band of CH3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Hambrook, Kyle; Brawley-Tremblay, Marco; Bouanich, J. P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report measured Lorentz N2-broadening and N2-induced pressure-shift coefficients of CH3D in the v2 fundamental band using a multispectrum fitting technique. These measurements were made by analyzing 11 laboratory absorption spectra recorded at 0.0056 cm(exp -1) resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona. The spectra were obtained using two absorption cells with path lengths of 10.2 and 25 cm. The total sample pressures ranged from 0.98 to 402.25 Torr with CH3D volume mixing ratios of 0.01 in nitrogen. We have been able to determine the N2 pressure- broadening coefficients of 368 v2 transitions with quantum numbers as high as J"= 20 and K = 16, where K" = K' equivalent to K (for a parallel band). The measured N2-broadening coefficients range from 0.0248 to 0.0742 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) at 296 K. All the measured pressure-shifts are negative. The reported N2-induced pressure-shift coefficients vary from about 0.0003 to 0.0094 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1). We have examined the dependence of the measured broadening and shift parameters on the J", and K quantum numbers and also developed empirical expressions to describe the broadening coefficients in terms of m (m = -J", J", and J" + 1 in the (sup Q)P-, (sup Q)Q-, and (sup Q)R-branch, respectively) and K. On average, the empirical expressions reproduce the measured broadening coefficients to within 4.7%. The N2-broadening and pressureshift coefficients were calculated on the basis of a semiclassical model of interacting linear molecules performed by considering in addition to the electrostatic contributions the atom atom Lennard-Jones potential. The theoretical results of the broadening coefficients are in good overall agreement with the experimental data (8.7%). The N2-pressure shifts whose vibrational contribution is derived from parameters fitted in the (sup Q)Q-branch of self-induced shifts of CH3D, are also in

  4. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  5. Direct calculation of the reactive transition matrix by L-squared quantum mechanical variational methods with complex boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yan; Yu, Chin-Hui; Kouri, Donald J.; Schwenke, David W.; Halvick, Philippe

    1989-01-01

    A new formalism of the generalized Newton variational principle for the calculation of quantum mechanical state-to-state reaction probabilities is presented. The reformulation involves solving directly for the transition matrix rather than the reactance mtrix so that calculations may be carried out for individual columns of the transition matrix without obtaining solutions for all possible initial channels. The convergence of calculations with real and complex boundary conditions are compared for H + H2 - H2 + H, O + H2 - OH + H, and O + HD - OH + D and OD + H.

  6. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl+CH3 in the range from T=202-298 K.

    PubMed

    Parker, James K; Payne, Walter A; Cody, Regina J; Nesbitt, Fred L; Stief, Louis J; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B

    2007-02-15

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl+CH3 association reaction at T=202, 250, and 298 K and P=0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH3 were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH4, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F2 in He. The decay of CH3 was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH3 concentration ([Cl]0/[CH3]0=9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T=202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4x10(-12) at P=0.30 Torr He to 1.8x10(-11) at P=2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k2=6.0x10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K. PMID:17253663

  7. Theoretical Calculations for Magnetic Property of FeRh Inter-Metallic Compound with Site-Exchange Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Yasunori; Ishino, Shiori; Chen, Ying; Iwata, Shuichi; Iwase, Akihiro

    2011-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between a magnetic property and a defect structure in FeRh inter-metallic compound theoretically, energy band calculations are performed based on the density functional theory. Under the assumption that the majority of defect structure is a type of site-exchanged one between Fe and Rh atoms, total energy for various magnetic structures is evaluated within a super-cell of 2×2×2 cubic cells. Due to the site-exchange defect pair of nearest neighbor Fe and Rh atoms in 12.5%/f.u. (f.u.: formula unit) density, the total energy increases by 1.91 eV/pair in the anti-ferromagnetic structure and 0.88 eV/pair in the ferromagnetic structure. Although the anti-ferromagnetic structure is the stable state at low temperatures in defect-free FeRh, it becomes unstable with an amount of the site-exchange defect density. Threshold defect density to stabilize ferromagnetic state is estimated to be 0.8%/f.u. This phenomenon is expected in ion irradiated FeRh.

  8. Theoretical polarization-dependent X-ray spectra of Be-like Fe calculated for different electron beam densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyaptseva, Alla; Mancini, Roberto

    1998-05-01

    We study theoretically the polarization properties of X-ray spectra of Be-like Fe ions excited through resonant capture by an electron beam with different electron densities. Our previous work in this area was related to the study of polarization of dielectronic satellite lines of Fe ions excited by a low-density electron beam. (A.S. Shlyaptseva, R.C. Mancini, P. Neill, P. Beiersdorfer, J.R. Crespo López-Urrutia, and K. Widmann, Phys. Rev. A, 57), 888 (1998) Here we extend our work to the case of higher-density electron beams. As the density of the electron beam increases, new channels of electron capture appear. Thus the atomic and polarization characteristics of the satellite lines change. Moreover, additional X-ray satellite lines will appear. Using the density matrix formalism, we calculate the polarization characteristics and polarization-dependent spectra of dielectronic satellite lines of Be-like Fe produced at different energies and densities of the electron beam. We compare the results of the present work with our previous ones for low-density electron beams. These results are relevant to the identification of X-ray polarization-dependent spectral features and for X-ray line polarization spectroscopy.

  9. Studies on the s-cis-trans isomerism for some furan derivatives through IR and NMR spectroscopies and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, Roberto; Ducati, Lucas C.; Tormena, Cláudio F.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.; Braga, Carolyne B.; Abraham, Raymond J.

    2013-02-01

    The s-cis-trans isomerism of two furan derivatives [2-acetyl- (AF) and 2-acetyl-5-methylfuran, (AMF)] was analyzed, using data from the deconvolution of their carbonyl absorption band in two solvents (CH2Cl2 and CH3CN). These infrared data showed that the O,O-trans conformers predominate in the less polar solvent (CH2Cl2), but these equilibria change in a more polar solvent (CH3CN) leading to a slight predominance of the O,O-cis conformers, in agreement with the theoretical calculations. The later results were obtained using B3LYP-IEFPCM/6-31++g(3df,3p) level of theory, which taking into account the solvent effects at IEFPCM (Integral Equation Formalism Polarizable Continuum Model). Low temperature 13C NMR spectra in CD2Cl2 (ca. -75 °C) showed pairs of signals for each carbon, due to the known high energy barrier for the cis-trans interconversion leading to a large predominance of the trans isomers, which decreases in acetone-d6. This was confirmed by their 1H NMR spectra at the same temperatures. Moreover, despite the larger hyperconjugative interactions for the O,O-cis isomers, obtained from NBO data, these isomers are destabilized by the their Lewis energy.

  10. Coagulation Behavior of Graphene Oxide on Nanocrystallined Mg/Al Layered Double Hydroxides: Batch Experimental and Theoretical Calculation Study.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yidong; Wang, Xiangxue; Ai, Yuejie; Liu, Yunhai; Li, Jiaxing; Ji, Yongfei; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has attracted considerable attention because of its remarkable enhanced adsorption and multifunctional properties. However, the toxic properties of GO nanosheets released into the environment could lead to the instability of biological system. In aqueous phase, GO may interact with fine mineral particles, such as chloridion intercalated nanocrystallined Mg/Al layered double hydroxides (LDH-Cl) and nanocrystallined Mg/Al LDHs (LDH-CO3), which are considered as coagulant molecules for the coagulation and removal of GO from aqueous solutions. Herein the coagulation of GO on LDHs were studied as a function of solution pH, ionic strength, contact time, temperature and coagulant concentration. The presence of LDH-Cl and LDH-CO3 improved the coagulation of GO in solution efficiently, which was mainly attributed to the surface oxygen-containing functional groups of LDH-Cl and LDH-CO3 occupying the binding sites of GO. The coagulation of GO by LDH-Cl and LDH-CO3 was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. Results of theoretical DFT calculations indicated that the coagulation of GO on LDHs was energetically favored by electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds, which was further evidenced by FTIR and XPS analysis. By integrating the experimental results, it was clear that LDH-Cl could be potentially used as a cost-effective coagulant for the elimination of GO from aqueous solutions, which could efficiently decrease the potential toxicity of GO in the natural environment. PMID:26978487

  11. Theoretical Investigation of Calculating Temperatures in the Combining Zone of Cu/Fe Composite Plate Jointed by Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Y. D.; Zhang, W. J.; Kong, X. Q.; Zhao, X.

    2016-03-01

    The heat-transfer behavior of the interface of Flyer plate (or Base Plate) has great influence on the microcosmic structures, stress distributions, and interface distortion of the welded interface of composite plates by explosive welding. In this paper, the temperature distributions in the combing zone are studied for the case of Cu/Fe composite plate jointed by explosive welding near the lower limit of explosive welding. The results show that Flyer plate (Cu plate) and Base Plate (Fe plate) firstly almost have the same melting rate in the explosive welding process. Then, the melting rate of Cu plate becomes higher than that of Fe plate. Finally, the melt thicknesses of Cu plate and Fe plate trend to be different constants, respectively. Meanwhile, the melting layer of Cu plate is thicker than that of Fe plate. The research could supply some theoretical foundations for calculating the temperature distribution and optimizing the explosive welding parameters of Cu/Fe composite plate to some extent.

  12. Effect of terrestrial radiation on brightness temperature at lunar nearside: Based on theoretical calculation and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guangfei; Li, Xiongyao; Wang, Shijie

    2015-02-01

    Terrestrial radiation is another possible source of heat in lunar thermal environment at its nearside besides the solar illumination. On the basis of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data products, the effect of terrestrial radiation on the brightness temperature (TBe) of the lunar nearside has been theoretically calculated. It shows that the mafic lunar mare with high TBe is more sensitive to terrestrial radiation than the feldspathic highland with low TBe value. According to the synchronous rotation of the Moon, we extract TBe on lunar nearside using the microwave radiometer data from the first Chinese lunar probe Chang'E-1 (CE-1). Consistently, the average TBe at Mare Serenitatis is about 1.2 K while the highland around the Geber crater (19.4°S, 13.9°E) is relatively small at ∼0.4 K. Our results indicate that there is no significant effect of terrestrial radiation on TBe at the lunar nearside. However, to extract TBe accurately, effects of heat flow, rock abundance and subsurface rock fragments which are more significant should be considered in the future work.

  13. Molecular structure, polarizability, hyperpolarizability analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 1-(chloromethyl)-2-methylnaphthalene with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabalasubramanian, P. B.; Karabacak, M.; Periandy, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum of 1-(chloromethyl)-2-methyl naphthalene (abbreviated as 1-ClM-2MN, C 12H 11Cl) have been recorded in the region 3600-10 cm -1. The optimum molecular geometry, normal mode wavenumbers, infrared and Raman intensities, Raman scattering activities, corresponding vibrational assignments, Mullikan atomic charges and thermo-dynamical parameters were investigated with the help of HF and B3LYP (DFT) method using 6-311G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Also, the dipole moment, linear polarizabilities, anisotropy, first and second hyperpolarizabilities values were also computed using the same basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments were made on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The correlation equations between heat capacities, entropies, enthalpy changes and temperatures were fitted by quadratic formulas. Lower value in the HOMO and LUMO energy gap explains the eventual charge transfer interactions taking place within the molecule. UV-vis spectral analysis of 1-ClM-2MN has been researched by theoretical calculations. In order to understand the electronic transitions of the compound, TD-DFT calculations on electronic absorption spectra in gas phase and solvent (DMSO and chloroform) were performed. The calculated frontier orbital energies, absorption wavelengths ( λ), oscillator strengths ( f) and excitation energies ( E) for gas phase and solvent are also illustrated.

  14. Molecular structure, polarizability, hyperpolarizability analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 1-(chloromethyl)-2-methylnaphthalene with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Karabacak, M; Periandy, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum of 1-(chloromethyl)-2-methyl naphthalene (abbreviated as 1-ClM-2MN, C(12)H(11)Cl) have been recorded in the region 3600-10cm(-1). The optimum molecular geometry, normal mode wavenumbers, infrared and Raman intensities, Raman scattering activities, corresponding vibrational assignments, Mullikan atomic charges and thermo-dynamical parameters were investigated with the help of HF and B3LYP (DFT) method using 6-311G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Also, the dipole moment, linear polarizabilities, anisotropy, first and second hyperpolarizabilities values were also computed using the same basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments were made on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The correlation equations between heat capacities, entropies, enthalpy changes and temperatures were fitted by quadratic formulas. Lower value in the HOMO and LUMO energy gap explains the eventual charge transfer interactions taking place within the molecule. UV-vis spectral analysis of 1-ClM-2MN has been researched by theoretical calculations. In order to understand the electronic transitions of the compound, TD-DFT calculations on electronic absorption spectra in gas phase and solvent (DMSO and chloroform) were performed. The calculated frontier orbital energies, absorption wavelengths (λ), oscillator strengths (f) and excitation energies (E) for gas phase and solvent are also illustrated. PMID:22024457

  15. Calculation of wave-functions with frozen orbitals in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. Part I. Application of the Huzinaga equation.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, György G

    2013-04-01

    Mixed quantum mechanics/quantum mechanics (QM/QM) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods make computations feasible for extended chemical systems by separating them into subsystems that are treated at different level of sophistication. In many applications, the subsystems are covalently bound and the use of frozen localized orbitals at the boundary is a possible way to separate the subsystems and to ensure a sensible description of the electronic structure near to the boundary. A complication in these methods is that orthogonality between optimized and frozen orbitals has to be warranted and this is usually achieved by an explicit orthogonalization of the basis set to the frozen orbitals. An alternative to this approach is proposed by calculating the wave-function from the Huzinaga equation that guaranties orthogonality to the frozen orbitals without basis set orthogonalization. The theoretical background and the practical aspects of the application of the Huzinaga equation in mixed methods are discussed. Forces have been derived to perform geometry optimization with wave-functions from the Huzinaga equation. Various properties have been calculated by applying the Huzinaga equation for the central QM subsystem, representing the environment by point charges and using frozen strictly localized orbitals to connect the subsystems. It is shown that a two to three bond separation of the chemical or physical event from the frozen bonds allows a very good reproduction (typically around 1 kcal/mol) of standard Hartree-Fock-Roothaan results. The proposed scheme provides an appropriate framework for mixed QM/QM and QM/MM methods. PMID:23281055

  16. FeynDyn: A MATLAB program for fast numerical Feynman integral calculations for open quantum system dynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2013-12-01

    This MATLAB program calculates the dynamics of the reduced density matrix of an open quantum system modeled either by the Feynman-Vernon model or the Caldeira-Leggett model. The user gives the program a Hamiltonian matrix that describes the open quantum system as if it were in isolation, a matrix of the same size that describes how that system couples to its environment, and a spectral distribution function and temperature describing the environment’s influence on it, in addition to the open quantum system’s initial density matrix and a grid of times. With this, the program returns the reduced density matrix of the open quantum system at all moments specified by that grid of times (or just the last moment specified by the grid of times if the user makes this choice). This overall calculation can be divided into two stages: the setup of the Feynman integral, and the actual calculation of the Feynman integral for time propagation of the density matrix. When this program calculates this propagation on a multi-core CPU, it is this propagation that is usually the rate-limiting step of the calculation, but when it is calculated on a GPU, the propagation is calculated so quickly that the setup of the Feynman integral can actually become the rate-limiting step. The overhead of transferring information from the CPU to the GPU and back seems to have a negligible effect on the overall runtime of the program. When the required information cannot fit on the GPU, the user can choose to run the entire program on a CPU. Catalogue identifier: AEPX_v1_0. Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPX_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 703. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11026. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming

  17. Segmented crystalline scintillators: empirical and theoretical investigation of a high quantum efficiency EPID based on an initial engineering prototype CsI(TI) detector.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Wang, Yi; Li, Yixin; Du, Hong; Perna, Louis

    2006-04-01

    Modern-day radiotherapy relies on highly sophisticated forms of image guidance in order to implement increasingly conformal treatment plans and achieve precise dose delivery. One of the most important goals of such image guidance is to delineate the clinical target volume from surrounding normal tissue during patient setup and dose delivery, thereby avoiding dependence on surrogates such as bony landmarks. In order to achieve this goal, it is necessary to integrate highly efficient imaging technology, capable of resolving soft-tissue contrast at very low doses, within the treatment setup. In this paper we report on the development of one such modality, which comprises a nonoptimized, prototype electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on a 40 mm thick, segmented crystalline CsI(Tl) detector incorporated into an indirect-detection active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI). The segmented detector consists of a matrix of 160 x 160 optically isolated, crystalline CsI(Tl) elements spaced at 1016 microm pitch. The detector was coupled to an indirect detection-based active matrix array having a pixel pitch of 508 microm, with each detector element registered to 2 x 2 array pixels. The performance of the prototype imager was evaluated under very low-dose radiotherapy conditions and compared to that of a conventional megavoltage AMFPI based on a Lanex Fast-B phosphor screen. Detailed quantitative measurements were performed in order to determine the x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). In addition, images of a contrast-detail phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were also acquired. The prototype imager exhibited approximately 22 times higher zero-frequency DQE (approximately 22%) compared to that of the conventional AMFPI (approximately 1%). The measured zero-frequency DQE was found to be lower than theoretical upper limits (approximately 27%) calculated from Monte Carlo simulations, which

  18. Segmented crystalline scintillators: Empirical and theoretical investigation of a high quantum efficiency EPID based on an initial engineering prototype CsI(Tl) detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao Qihua; Wang Yi; Li Yixin; Du Hong; Perna, Louis

    2006-04-15

    Modern-day radiotherapy relies on highly sophisticated forms of image guidance in order to implement increasingly conformal treatment plans and achieve precise dose delivery. One of the most important goals of such image guidance is to delineate the clinical target volume from surrounding normal tissue during patient setup and dose delivery, thereby avoiding dependence on surrogates such as bony landmarks. In order to achieve this goal, it is necessary to integrate highly efficient imaging technology, capable of resolving soft-tissue contrast at very low doses, within the treatment setup. In this paper we report on the development of one such modality, which comprises a nonoptimized, prototype electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on a 40 mm thick, segmented crystalline CsI(Tl) detector incorporated into an indirect-detection active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI). The segmented detector consists of a matrix of 160x160 optically isolated, crystalline CsI(Tl) elements spaced at 1016 {mu}m pitch. The detector was coupled to an indirect detection-based active matrix array having a pixel pitch of 508 {mu}m, with each detector element registered to 2x2 array pixels. The performance of the prototype imager was evaluated under very low-dose radiotherapy conditions and compared to that of a conventional megavoltage AMFPI based on a Lanex Fast-B phosphor screen. Detailed quantitative measurements were performed in order to determine the x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). In addition, images of a contrast-detail phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were also acquired. The prototype imager exhibited approximately 22 times higher zero-frequency DQE ({approx}22%) compared to that of the conventional AMFPI ({approx}1%). The measured zero-frequency DQE was found to be lower than theoretical upper limits ({approx}27%) calculated from Monte Carlo simulations, which were based solely on the x

  19. Acceleration of Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Calculations by Extended Lagrangian Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangho

    2013-08-13

    The implementation and performance of the atom-centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) [J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114, 9758] and the curvy-steps (CURV) methods [J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 1152] are described. These methods solve the electronic Schrödinger equation approximately by propagating the electronic degrees of freedom using the extended Lagrangian molecular dynamics (ELMD) simulation approach. The ADMP and CURV methods are implemented and parallelized to accelerate semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) methods (such as the MNDO, AM1, PM3, MNDO/d, and AM1/d methods). Test calculations show that both the ADMP and the CURV methods are 2∼4 times faster than the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) method and conserve the total energy well. The accuracy of the ADMP and CURV simulations is comparable to the BOMD simulations. The parallel implementation accelerates the MD simulation by up to 28 fold for the ADMP method and 25 fold for the CURV method, respectively, relative to the speed of the single core BOMD. In addition, a multiple time scale (MTS) approach is introduced to further speed up the semiempirical QM and QM/MM ELMD simulations. Since a larger integration time step is used for the propagation of the nuclear coordinates than that for the electronic degrees of freedom, the MTS approach allows the ELMD simulation to be carried out with a time step that is larger than the time step accessible by the original ADMP and CURV methods. It renders MD simulation to be carried out about 20 times faster than the BOMD simulation, and yields results that are comparable to the single time scale simulation results. The use of the methods introduced in the present work provides an efficient way to extend the length of the QM and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations beyond the length accessible by BOMD simulation. PMID:26584095

  20. Multi-Jastrow trial wavefunctions for electronic structure calculations with quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Bouabça, Thomas; Braïda, Benoît; Caffarel, Michel

    2010-07-28

    A new type of electronic trial wavefunction suitable for quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems is presented. In contrast with the standard Jastrow-Slater form built with a unique global Jastrow term, it is proposed to introduce individual Jastrow factors attached to molecular orbitals. Such a form is expected to be more physical since it allows to describe differently the local electronic correlations associated with various molecular environments (1s-core orbitals, 3d-magnetic orbitals, localized two-center sigma-orbitals, delocalized pi-orbitals, atomic lone pairs, etc.). In contrast with the standard form, introducing different Jastrow terms allows us to change the nodal structure of the wavefunction, a point which is important in the context of building better nodes for more accurate fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) calculations. Another important aspect resulting from the use of local Jastrow terms is the possibility of defining and preoptimizing local and transferable correlated units for building complex trial wavefunctions from simple parts. The practical aspects associated with the computation of the intricate derivatives of the multi-Jastrow trial function are presented in detail. Some first illustrative applications for atoms of increasing size (O, S, and Cu) and for the potential energy curve and spectroscopic constants of the FH molecule are presented. In the case of the copper atom, the use of the multi-Jastrow form at the variational Monte Carlo level has allowed us to improve significantly the value of the total ground-state energy (about 75% of the correlation energy with only one determinant and three atomic orbital Jastrow factors). In the case of the FH molecule (fluorine hydride), it has been found that the multi-Jastrow nodes lead to an almost exact FN-DMC value of the dissociation energy [D(0)=-140.7(4) kcal/mol instead of the estimated nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer exact value of -141.1], which is not the case

  1. Rotational and vibrational spectra of ethynol from quantum-mechanical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that ethynol (HCCOH), despite the theoretical prediction of its stability to tautomerization to ketene, has thus far not been observed. It is shown here that the identification of this unknown molecule, both in space and in the laboratory, can be aided by an ab initio calculation of spectroscopic parameters. At the HF/3-21G level, harmonic vibrational frequencies are computed by way of analytic second differentiation of the Hartee-Fock (HF) energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates. After applying an empirical scale factor, the resultant frequencies are (per cm) 473, 517, 773, 841, 1003, 1217, 2206, 3285, and 3418. The computed dipole moment at the CISD/DZ+P level is 1.79 D. At the CISD+Q/DZ+P level, the molecule's rotational constants are determined. After scaling by empirical correction factors, they are used in deriving the 4(04) - 3(03) frequency of 76.81 + or - 0.3 GHz with a triplet splitting of 0.30 + or - 0.01 GHz. The triplet splitting involves 4(14) - 3(13) and 4(13) - 3(12) relative to the 4(04) - 3(03) transition as the central line.

  2. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen-bond basicity pKBHX using quantum chemical topology descriptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Anthony J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-24

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2=0.96), methanol (r2=0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2=0.91), serine (r2=0.93), and methylamine (r2=0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2=0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2=0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values. PMID:24460383

  3. GaAs quantum structures: comparison between direct pseudopotential and single-band truncated-crystal calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    1996-03-01

    We compare the results of a single-band truncated-crystal (SBTC) approximation with direct pseudopotential calculations for free-standing, hydrogen-passivated GaAs quantum films, wires and dots. While the non parabolicity of the bulk energy bands is taken into account by the SBTC approximation, the interband coupling introduced by the lack of translational invariance is ignored. We find that (i) the confinement energy of the valence-band maximum is overestimated by the SBTC method, because the ``zero-confinement'' character of this state is neglected; (ii) the confinement energy of the Γ-derived conduction-band minimum (direct gap) is slightly overestimated by the SBTC approximation, mainly because of the assumption of infinite potential barriers at the boundaries; (iii) the confinement energy of the X-derived conduction-band minimum (indirect gap) is severely underestimated by the SBTC method in quantum wires and dots; (iv) while the SBTC approximation predicts ``quantum deconfinement'' (i.e. reduction of gap as size is reduced) for the direct gap of quantum wires, such effect is not present in the direct pseudopotential calculation.

  4. Communication: Quantum six-dimensional calculations of the coupled translation-rotation eigenstates of H2O@C60.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter M; Bačić, Zlatko

    2016-05-28

    We report rigorous quantum calculations of the translation-rotation (TR) eigenstates of para- and ortho-H2O@C60. They provide a comprehensive description of the dynamical behavior of H2O inside the fullerene having icosahedral (Ih) symmetry. The TR eigenstates are assigned in terms of the irreducible representations of the proper symmetry group of H2O@C60, as well as the appropriate translational and rotational quantum numbers. The coupling between the orbital and the rotational angular momenta of the caged H2O gives rise to the total angular momentum λ, which additionally labels each TR level. The calculated TR levels allow tentative assignments of a number of transitions in the recent experimental INS spectra of H2O@C60 that have not been assigned previously. PMID:27250272

  5. Communication: Quantum six-dimensional calculations of the coupled translation-rotation eigenstates of H2O@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, Peter M.; Bačić, Zlatko

    2016-05-01

    We report rigorous quantum calculations of the translation-rotation (TR) eigenstates of para- and ortho-H2O@C60. They provide a comprehensive description of the dynamical behavior of H2O inside the fullerene having icosahedral (Ih) symmetry. The TR eigenstates are assigned in terms of the irreducible representations of the proper symmetry group of H2O@C60, as well as the appropriate translational and rotational quantum numbers. The coupling between the orbital and the rotational angular momenta of the caged H2O gives rise to the total angular momentum λ, which additionally labels each TR level. The calculated TR levels allow tentative assignments of a number of transitions in the recent experimental INS spectra of H2O@C60 that have not been assigned previously.

  6. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

  7. Interaction of O2 with CH4, CF4, and CCl4 by Molecular Beam Scattering Experiments and Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Bartocci, Alessio; Nunzi, Francesca; Tarantelli, Francesco; Belpassi, Leonardo; Pirani, Fernando

    2016-07-14

    Gas phase collisions of O2 by CH4, CF4, and CCl4 have been investigated with the molecular beam technique by measuring both the integral cross section value, Q, and its dependence on the collision velocity, v. The adopted experimental conditions have been appropriate to resolve the oscillating "glory" pattern, a quantum interference effect controlled by the features of the intermolecular interaction, for all the three case studies. The analysis of the Q(v) data, performed by adopting a suitable representation of the intermolecular potential function, provided the basic features of the anisotropic potential energy surfaces at intermediate and large separation distances and information on the relative role of the physically relevant types of contributions to the global interaction. The present work demonstrates that while O2-CH4 and O2-CF4 are basically bound through the balance between size (Pauli) repulsion and dispersion attraction, an appreaciable intermolecular bond stabilization by charge transfer is operative in O2-CCl4. Ab initio calculations of the strength of the interaction, coupled with detailed analysis of electronic charge displacement promoted by the formation of the dimer, fully rationalizes the experimental findings. This investigation indicates that the interactions of O2, when averaged over its relative orientations, are similar to that of a noble gas (Ng), specifically Ar. We also show that the binding energy in the basic configurations of the prototypical Ng-CF4,CCl4 systems [ Cappelletti , D. ; Chem. Eur. J. 2015 , 21 , 6234 - 6240 ] can be reconstructed by using the interactions in Ng-F and Ng-Cl systems, previously characterized by molecular beam scattering experiments of state-selected halogen atom beams. This information is fundamental to approach the modeling of the weak intermolecular halogen bond. On the basis of the electronic polarizability, this also confirms [ Aquilanti , V. ; Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2005 , 44 , 2356 - 2360 ] that O2

  8. GaAs quantum structures: Comparison between direct pseudopotential and single-band truncated-crystal calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    1996-04-01

    A single-band approach for semiconductor clusters which accounts for the nonparabolicity of the energy bands was recently used by Rama Krishna and Friesner [M.V. Rama Krishna and R.A. Friesner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 629 (1991)]. We compare the results of this method (denoted here as single-band truncated-crystal, or SBTC, approximation) with a direct pseudopotential band-structure calculation for free-standing hydrogen-passivated GaAs quantum films, wires, and dots. The direct pseudopotential calculation, which includes coupling between all bands, shows that isolated GaAs quantum films, wires, and dots have an indirect band gap for thicknesses below 16, 28, and at least 30 Å (8, 14, and at least 15 ML), respectively; beyond these critical dimensions the transition becomes direct. A comparison of the SBTC approximation with the direct pseudopotential calculation shows that (i) the confinement energy of the valence-band maximum is overestimated by the SBTC method, because the zero-confinement character of this state is neglected; (ii) the confinement energy of the Γ-derived conduction state (direct band gap) is slightly overestimated by the SBTC approximation, mainly because of the assumption of infinite potential barriers at the boundaries; (iii) the confinement energy of the X-derived conduction state (indirect band gap) is severely underestimated by the SBTC method; (iv) while the SBTC approximation predicts ``quantum deconfinement'' (i.e., reduction of gap as size is reduced) for the direct gap of thin GaAs quantum wires, such effect is not present in the direct pseudopotential calculation.

  9. GaAs quantum structures: Comparison between direct pseudopotential and single-band truncated-crystal calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    1996-04-01

    A single-band approach for semiconductor clusters which accounts for the nonparabolicity of the energy bands was recently used by Rama Krishna and Friesner [M.V. Rama Krishna and R.A. Friesner, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 67}, 629 (1991)]. We compare the results of this method (denoted here as single-band truncated-crystal, or SBTC, approximation) with a direct pseudopotential band-structure calculation for free-standing hydrogen-passivated GaAs quantum films, wires, and dots. The direct pseudopotential calculation, which includes coupling between all bands, shows that isolated GaAs quantum films, wires, and dots have an indirect band gap for thicknesses below 16, 28, and at least 30 A (8, 14, and at least 15 ML), respectively; beyond these critical dimensions the transition becomes direct. A comparison of the SBTC approximation with the direct pseudopotential calculation shows that (i) the confinement energy of the valence-band maximum is overestimated by the SBTC method, because the zero-confinement character of this state is neglected; (ii) the confinement energy of the {Gamma}-derived conduction state (direct band gap) is slightly overestimated by the SBTC approximation, mainly because of the assumption of infinite potential barriers at the boundaries; (iii) the confinement energy of the {ital X}-derived conduction state (indirect band gap) is severely underestimated by the SBTC method; (iv) while the SBTC approximation predicts {open_quote}{open_quote}quantum deconfinement{close_quote}{close_quote} (i.e., {ital reduction} of gap as size is reduced) for the direct gap of thin GaAs quantum wires, such effect is not present in the direct pseudopotential calculation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Predicted phototoxicities of carbon nano-material by quantum mechanical calculations.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basis of this research is obtaining the best quantum mechanical structure of carbon nanomaterials and is fundamental in determining their other properties. Therefore, their predictive phototoxicity is directly related to the materials’ structure. The results of this project w...

  11. Comparison of Oxygen Gauche Effects in Poly(Oxyethylene) and Poly(ethylene terephtylene) Based on Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The so-called oxygen gauche effect in poly(oxyethylene) (POE) and its model molecules such as 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) and diglyme (CH3OC2H4OC2H4OCH3) is manifested in the preference for gauche C-C bond conformations over trans. This has also been observed for poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Our previous quantum chemistry calculations demonstrated that the large C-C gauche population in DME is due, in part, to a low-lying tg +/- g+ conformer that exhibits a substantial 1,5 CH ... O attraction. New calculations will be described that demonstrate the accuracy of the original quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, an extension of this work to model molecules for PET will be presented. It is seen that the C-C gauche preference is much stronger in 1,2 diacetoxyethane than in DME. In addition, there exist low-lying tg +/- g+/- and g+/-g+/-g+/- conformers that exhibit 1,5 CH ... O attractions involving the carbonyl oxygens. It is expected that the -O-C-C-O- torsional properties will be quite different in these two polymers. The quantum chemistry results are used to parameterize rotational isomeric states models (RIS) and force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of these polymers.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculation for the Equation of State of MgSiO3 perovskite at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Cohen, R. E.; Driver, Kevin P.; Militzer, Burkhard; Shulenburger, Luke; Kim, Jeongnim

    2014-03-01

    Magnesium silicate (MgSiO3) is among the most abundant minerals in the Earth's mantle. Its phase behavior under high pressure has important implications for the physical properties of deep Earth and the core-mantle boundary. A number of experiments and density functional theory calculations have studied perovskite and its transition to the post-perovskite phase. Here, we present our initial work on the equation of state of perovskite at pressures up to 200 GPa using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), a benchmark ab initio method. Our QMC calculations optimize electron correlation by using a Slater-Jastrow type wave function with a single determinant comprised of single-particle orbitals extracted from fully converged DFT calculations. The equation of state obtained from QMC calculations agrees with experimental data. E-mail: rcohen@carnegiescience.edu; This work is supported by NSF.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Calculations of Charge Effects on gating the KcsA channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kariev, Alisher M.; Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S.; Green, Michael E.

    2007-02-06

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A series of ab initio (density functional) calculations were carried out on side chains of a set of amino acids, plus water, from the (intracellular) gating region of the KcsA K+ channel. Their atomic coordinates, except hydrogen, are known from X-ray structures [D.A. Doyle, J.M. Cabral, R.A. Pfuetzner, A. Kuo, J.M. Gulbis, S.L. Cohen, B.T. Chait, R. MacKinnon, The structure of the potassium channel: molecular basis of K+ conduction and selectivity, Science 280 (1998) 69–77; R. MacKinnon, S.L. Cohen, A. Kuo, A. Lee, B.T. Chait, Structural conservation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic potassium channels, Science 280 (1998) 106–109; Y. Jiang, A. Lee, J. Chen, M. Cadene, B.T. Chait, R. MacKinnon, The open pore conformation of potassium channels. Nature 417 (2001) 523–526], as are the coordinates of some water oxygen atoms. The 1k4c structure is used for the starting coordinates. Quantum mechanical optimization, in spite of the starting configuration, places the atoms in positions much closer to the 1j95, more tightly closed, configuration. This state shows four water molecules forming a “basket” under the Q119 side chains, blocking the channel. When a hydrated K+ approaches this “basket”, the optimized system shows a strong set of hydrogen bonds with the K+ at defined positions, preventing further approach of the K+ to the basket. This optimized structure with hydrated K+ added shows an ice-like 12 molecule nanocrystal of water. If the water molecules exchange, unless they do it as a group, the channel will remain blocked. The “basket” itself appears to be very stable, although it is possible that the K+ with its hydrating water molecules may be more mobile, capable

  14. The influence of interfaces and intra-band transitions on the band gap of CdS/HgS and GaN/X (X=InN, In0.33Ga0.67N) core/shell/shell quantum dot quantum well - A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, P.; Senthilkumar, L.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical model is presented to calculate the 1s-1s transition energy of an exciton in spherically layered semiconductor quantum-dot quantum-well (QDQW), based on the LCAO variational method using effective mass approximation. The confinement energies of electron and hole and the Coulombic interaction energy between them are calculated for CdS/HgS/CdS, GaN/X/GaN (X=InN, In0.33Ga0.67N) (QDQW) with core/shell/shell structures. The results of the proposed model effectively accommodates the polarization effects at the interfaces of different semiconductor materials in a core/shell/shell structure and elucidates the significant influence of interfaces on the band gap with consistency among previous theoretical and experimental results. The wave function of exciton studied shows significant differences with other theory. The change in the band gap of QDQW is attributed to the exciton excitations by thermal occupation of the lowest dark exciton states at different temperatures. In addition, based on Quantum Confined Stark Effect (QCSE) the effect of high electric field on the charge carriers and the corresponding changes in the band gap has been investigated. The applied electric field provides strong overlap between the electron and hole wave functions as well as increases the binding energy of the exciton, which eventually decreases the band gap.

  15. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  16. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: from deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula. PMID:24811623

  17. Assessment of theoretical procedures for calculating barrier heights for a diverse set of water-catalyzed proton-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Karton, Amir; O'Reilly, Robert J; Radom, Leo

    2012-04-26

    Accurate electronic barrier heights are obtained for a set of nine proton-transfer tautomerization reactions, which are either (i) uncatalyzed, (ii) catalyzed by one water molecule, or (iii) catalyzed by two water molecules. The barrier heights for reactions (i) and (ii) are obtained by means of the high-level ab initio W2.2 thermochemical protocol, while those for reaction (iii) are obtained using the W1 protocol. These three sets of benchmark barrier heights allow an assessment of the performance of more approximate theoretical procedures for the calculation of barrier heights of uncatalyzed and water-catalyzed reactions. We evaluate initially the performance of the composite G4 procedure and variants thereof (e.g., G4(MP2) and G4(MP2)-6X), as well as that of standard ab initio procedures (e.g., MP2, SCS-MP2, and MP4). We find that the performance of the G4(MP2)-type thermochemical procedures deteriorates with the number of water molecules involved in the catalysis. This behavior is linked to deficiencies in the MP2-based basis-set-correction term in the G4(MP2)-type procedures. This is remedied in the MP4-based G4 procedure, which shows good performance for both the uncatalyzed and the water-catalyzed reactions, with mean absolute deviations (MADs) from the benchmark values lying below the threshold of "chemical accuracy" (arbitrarily defined as 1 kcal mol(-1) ≈ 4.2 kJ mol(-1)). We also examine the performance of a large number of density functional theory (DFT) and double-hybrid DFT (DHDFT) procedures. We find that, with few exceptions (most notably PW6-B95 and B97-2), the performance of the DFT procedures that give good results for the uncatalyzed reactions deteriorates with the number of water molecules involved in the catalysis. The DHDFT procedures, on the other hand, show excellent performance for both the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions. Specifically, almost all of them afford MADs below the "chemical accuracy" threshold, with ROB2-PLYP and B2K

  18. Localization of firearm projectiles in the human body using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Barbosa, C.

    2004-06-01

    A technique had been previously developed, based on magnetic field measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device sensor, to localize in three dimensions steel needles lost in the human body. In all six cases that were treated until now, the technique allowed easy surgical localization of the needles with high accuracy. The technique decreases, by a large factor, the surgery time for foreign body extraction, and also reduces the generally high odds of failure. The method is accurate, noninvasive, and innocuous, and with clear clinical importance. Despite the importance of needle localization, the most prevalent foreign body in the modern society is the firearm projectile (bullet), generally composed of lead, a paramagnetic material, thus not presenting a remanent magnetic field as steel needles do. On the other hand, since lead is a good conductor, eddy current detection techniques can be employed, by applying an alternating magnetic field with the aid of excitation coils. The primary field induces eddy currents on the lead, which in turn generate a secondary magnetic field that can be detected by a magnetometer, and give information about position and volume of the conducting foreign body. In this article we present a theoretical study for the development of a localization technique for lead bullets inside the human body. Initially, we present a model for the secondary magnetic field generated by the bullet, given a known applied field. After that, we study possible excitation systems, and propose a localization algorithm based on the detected magnetic field.

  19. On the inclusion of prime factors to calculate the theoretical lower bounds in multiplierless single constant multiplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso Romero, David E.; Meyer-Baese, Uwe; Dolecek, Gordana Jovanovic

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an extension to the theoretical lower bounds for the number of adders and for the adder depth in multiplierless single constant multiplications (SCM). It is shown that the number of prime factors of the constants is key information to extend the current lower bounds in certain cases that have not yet been exposed. Additionally, the hidden theoretical lower bound for the number of adders required to preserve the minimum adder depth is revealed.

  20. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties. PMID:26567650

  1. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  2. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  3. How Iron-Containing Proteins Control Dioxygen Chemistry: A Detailed Atomic Level Description Via Accurate Quantum Chemical and Mixed Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Friesner, Richard A.; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Guallar, Victor; Wirstam, Maria E.; Murphy, Robert B.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2003-03-01

    Over the past several years, rapid advances in computational hardware, quantum chemical methods, and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques have made it possible to model accurately the interaction of ligands with metal-containing proteins at an atomic level of detail. In this paper, we describe the application of our computational methodology, based on density functional (DFT) quantum chemical methods, to two diiron-containing proteins that interact with dioxygen: methane monooxygenase (MMO) and hemerythrin (Hr). Although the active sites are structurally related, the biological function differs substantially. MMO is an enzyme found in methanotrophic bacteria and hydroxylates aliphatic C-H bonds, whereas Hr is a carrier protein for dioxygen used by a number of marine invertebrates. Quantitative descriptions of the structures and energetics of key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction with dioxygen are provided, allowing their mechanisms to be compared and contrasted in detail. An in-depth understanding of how the chemical identity of the first ligand coordination shell, structural features, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions of more distant shells control ligand binding and reactive chemistry is provided, affording a systematic analysis of how iron-containing proteins process dioxygen. Extensive contact with experiment is made in both systems, and a remarkable degree of accuracy and robustness of the calculations is obtained from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

  4. Comprehensive comparison and experimental validation of band-structure calculation methods in III-V semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerveas, George; Caruso, Enrico; Baccarani, Giorgio; Czornomaz, Lukas; Daix, Nicolas; Esseni, David; Gnani, Elena; Gnudi, Antonio; Grassi, Roberto; Luisier, Mathieu; Markussen, Troels; Osgnach, Patrik; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Schenk, Andreas; Selmi, Luca; Sousa, Marilyne; Stokbro, Kurt; Visciarelli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present and thoroughly compare band-structures computed with density functional theory, tight-binding, k · p and non-parabolic effective mass models. Parameter sets for the non-parabolic Γ, the L and X valleys and intervalley bandgaps are extracted for bulk InAs, GaAs and InGaAs. We then consider quantum-wells with thickness ranging from 3 nm to 10 nm and the bandgap dependence on film thickness is compared with experiments for In0.53Ga0.47 As quantum-wells. The impact of the band-structure on the drain current of nanoscale MOSFETs is simulated with ballistic transport models, the results provide a rigorous assessment of III-V semiconductor band structure calculation methods and calibrated band parameters for device simulations.

  5. Quantum chemical calculations predict biological function: the case of T cell receptor interaction with a peptide/MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Germenis, Anastasios E.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of atomic correlation statistics and quantum chemical calculations are shown to predict biological function. In the present study, various antigenic peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands with near-identical stereochemistries, in complexation with the same T cell receptor (TCR), were found to consistently induce distinctly different quantum chemical behavior, directly dependent on the peptide's electron spin density and intrinsically expressed by the protonation state of the peptide's N-terminus. Furthermore, the cumulative coordination difference of any variant in respect to the native peptide was found to accurately reflect peptide biological function and immerges as the physical observable which is directly related to the immunological end-effect of pMHC-TCR interaction. PMID:25713797

  6. Some geometric properties of quantum phases and calculation of phase formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    An introduction to several geometrical ideas which are of use to quantum mechanics is presented. The Aharonov-Anandan phase is introduced and without reference to any dynamical equation, this phase is formulated by defining an appropriate connection on a specific fiber bundle. The holonomy element gives the phase. By introducing another connection, the Pancharatnam phase formula is derived following a different procedure.

  7. Calculation of Electronic Structure of a Spherical Quantum Dot Using a Combination of Quantum Genetic Algorithm and Hartree-Fock Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakir, Bekir; Özmen, Ayhan; Atav, Ülfet; Yüksel, Hüseyin; Yakar, Yusuf

    The electronic structure of Quantum Dot (QD), GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs, has been investigated by using a combination of Quantum Genetic Algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) method. One-electron system with an on-center impurity is considered by assuming a spherically symmetric confining potential of finite depth. The ground and excited state energies of one-electron QD were calculated depending on the dot radius and stoichiometric ratio. Expectation values of energy were determined by using the HFR method along with Slater-Type Orbitals (STOs) and QGA was used for the wavefunctions optimization. In addition, the effect of the size of the basis set on the energy of QD was investigated. We also calculated the binding energy for a dot with finite confining potential. We found that the impurity binding energy increases for the finite potential well when the dot radius decreases. For the finite potential well, the binding energy reaches a peak value and then diminishes to a limiting value corresponding to the radius for which there are no bound states in the well. Whereas in previous study, in Ref. 40, for the infinite potential well, we found that the impurity binding energy increases as the dot radius decreases.

  8. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  9. On the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 pyrochlore solid solution: Quantum ab initio and classic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mora, Pablo; Cosio-Castañeda, Carlos; Martinez-Anaya, Oliver; Morales, Francisco; Tavizon, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a theoretical study of the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 (Bi2-ySryIr2O16O2) α-pyrochlore-type solid solution is presented. Quantum ab initio DFT(WIEN2k) calculations were performed in order to understand the electrical resistivity changes associated to the Bi substitution by Sr in this system. The main crystallographic modification associated to this substitution is the x position of the 48f oxygen (x, 1/8, 1/8) (O1); this substitution substantially modifies the Bi/Sr-O1 and Ir-O1 atomic distances, increasing the former and diminishing the latter. Experimentally, the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 samples are metallic and the electrical resistivity increases with the Sr content. Electronic structure calculations for Bi2Ir2O7 and BiSrIr2O7 show that, regardless of structural changes, there is only a small change of electrical conductivity with the Sr substitution, and the experimentally observed increase of the resistivity can be explained in terms of a larger impact on the electronic structure of both; the Sr 'impurities' as well as of the thermal Sr oscillations.

  10. On the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 pyrochlore solid solution: Quantum ab initio and classic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mora, Pablo; Cosio-Castañeda, Carlos; Martinez-Anaya, Oliver; Morales, Francisco; Tavizon, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a theoretical study of the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 (Bi2-ySryIr2O16O2) α-pyrochlore-type solid solution is presented. Quantum ab initio DFT(WIEN2k) calculations were performed in order to understand the electrical resistivity changes associated to the Bi substitution by Sr in this system. The main crystallographic modification associated to this substitution is the x position of the 48f oxygen (x, 1/8 , 1/8 ) (O1); this substitution substantially modifies the Bi/Sr-O1 and Ir-O1 atomic distances, increasing the former and diminishing the latter. Experimentally, the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 samples are metallic and the electrical resistivity increases with the Sr content. Electronic structure calculations for Bi2Ir2O7 and BiSrIr2O7 show that, regardless of structural changes, there is only a small change of electrical conductivity with the Sr substitution, and the experimentally observed increase of the resistivity can be explained in terms of a larger impact on the electronic structure of both; the Sr 'impurities' as well as of the thermal Sr oscillations.

  11. Studies on the Conformational Landscape of Tert-Butyl Acetate Using Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, YueYue; Mouhib, Halima; Li, Guohua; Stahl, Wolfgang; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2014-06-01

    The tert-Butyl acetate molecule was studied using a combination of quantum chemical calculations and molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in the 9 to 14 GHz range. Due to its rather rigid frame, the molecule possesses only two different conformers: one of Cs and one of C1 symmetry. According to ab initio calculations, the Cs conformer is 46 kJ/mol lower in energy and is the one observed in the supersonic jet. We report on the structure and dynamics of the most abundant conformer of tert-butyl acetate, with accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Additionally, the barrier to internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group was determined. Splittings due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of up to 1.3 GHz were observed in the spectrum. Using the programs XIAM and BELGI-Cs, we determine the barrier height to be about 113 cm-1 and compare the molecular parameters obtained from these two codes. Additionally, the experimental rotational constants were used to validate numerous quantum chemical calculations. This study is part of a larger project which aims at determining the lowest energy conformers of organic esters and ketones which are of interest for flavor or perfume synthetic applications Project partly supported by the PHC PROCOPE 25059YB.

  12. Quantum mechanical calculation of the collision-induced absorption spectra of N2-N2 with anisotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Karman, Tijs; Miliordos, Evangelos; Hunt, Katharine L C; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; van der Avoird, Ad

    2015-02-28

    We present quantum mechanical calculations of the collision-induced absorption spectra of nitrogen molecules, using ab initio dipole moment and potential energy surfaces. Collision-induced spectra are first calculated using the isotropic interaction approximation. Then, we improve upon these results by considering the full anisotropic interaction potential. We also develop the computationally less expensive coupled-states approximation for calculating collision-induced spectra and validate this approximation by comparing the results to numerically exact close-coupling calculations for low energies. Angular localization of the scattering wave functions due to anisotropic interactions affects the line strength at low energies by two orders of magnitude. The effect of anisotropy decreases at higher energy, which validates the isotropic interaction approximation as a high-temperature approximation for calculating collision-induced spectra. Agreement with experimental data is reasonable in the isotropic interaction approximation, and improves when the full anisotropic potential is considered. Calculated absorption coefficients are tabulated for application in atmospheric modeling. PMID:25725730

  13. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide and ab initio, DFT based quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, T.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical spectra of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide (S2OPB) were studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of S2OPB in the solid phase were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-450 and 5000-50 cm-1 respectively. The structural and spectroscopic analyses of S2OPB were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory calculations (B3PW91, B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational interpretation has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED). The HF, B3LYP and B3PW91 methods based NMR calculation has been used to assign the 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shift of S2OPB. Comparative study on UV-Vis spectral analysis between the experimental and theoretical (B3PW91, B3LYP) methods and the global chemical parameters and local descriptor of reactivity through the Fukui function were performed. Finally the thermodynamic properties of S2OPB were calculated at different temperatures and the corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied.

  14. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide and ab initio, DFT based quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramya, T; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical spectra of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide (S2OPB) were studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of S2OPB in the solid phase were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-450 and 5000-50 cm(-1) respectively. The structural and spectroscopic analyses of S2OPB were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory calculations (B3PW91, B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational interpretation has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED). The HF, B3LYP and B3PW91 methods based NMR calculation has been used to assign the (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shift of S2OPB. Comparative study on UV-Vis spectral analysis between the experimental and theoretical (B3PW91, B3LYP) methods and the global chemical parameters and local descriptor of reactivity through the Fukui function were performed. Finally the thermodynamic properties of S2OPB were calculated at different temperatures and the corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied. PMID:25956325

  15. Development of a True Transition State Force Field from Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Madarász, Ádám; Berta, Dénes; Paton, Robert S

    2016-04-12

    Transition state force fields (TSFF) treated the TS structure as an artificial minimum on the potential energy surface in the past decades. The necessary parameters were developed either manually or by the Quantum-to-molecular mechanics method (Q2MM). In contrast with these approaches, here we propose to model the TS structures as genuine saddle points at the molecular mechanics level. Different methods were tested on small model systems of general chemical reactions such as protonation, nucleophilic attack, and substitution, and the new procedure led to more accurate models than the Q2MM-type parametrization. To demonstrate the practicality of our approach, transferrable parameters have been developed for Mo-catalyzed olefin metathesis using quantum mechanical properties as reference data. Based on the proposed strategy, any force field can be extended with true transition state force field (TTSFF) parameters, and they can be readily applied in several molecular mechanics programs as well. PMID:26925858

  16. Spectroscopic [FT-IR and FT-Raman] and molecular modeling (MM) study of benzene sulfonamide molecule using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2016-07-01

    The spectroscopic and molecular modeling (MM) study includes, FT-IR, FT-Raman and 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra of the Benzene sulfonamide were recorded for the analysis. The observed experimental and theoretical frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctive region. The present study of this title molecule have been carried out by hybrid computational calculations of HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods with 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results are tabulated. The structural modifications of the compound due to the substitutions of NH2 and SO2 were investigated. The minimum energy conformers of the compound were studied using conformational analysis. The alternations of the vibrational pattern of the base structure related to the substitutions were analyzed. The thermodynamic parameters (such as zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment) of Benzene sulfonamide have been calculated. The donor acceptor interactions of the compound and the corresponding UV transitions are found out using NBO analysis. The NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP methods and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts related to TMS were compared. A quantum computational study on the electronic and optical properties absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The energy gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand group. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase and

  17. Mechanism for quantum speedup in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bin; Yang, W. L.; An, Jun-Hong; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The quantum speed limit (QSL) time for open system characterizes the most efficient response of the system to the environmental influences. Previous results showed that the non-Markovianity governs the quantum speedup. Via studying the dynamics of a dissipative two-level system, we reveal that the non-Markovian effect is only the dynamical way of the quantum speedup, while the formation of the system-environment bound states is the essential reason for the quantum speedup. Our attribution of the quantum speedup to the energy-spectrum character can supply another vital path for experiments when the quantum speedup shows up without any dynamical calculations. The potential experimental observation of our quantum speedup mechanism in the circuit QED system is discussed. Our results may be of both theoretical and experimental interest in exploring the ultimate QSL in realistic environments, and may open new perspectives for devising active quantum speedup devices.

  18. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given.

  19. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  20. Terpenes in the gas phase: The structural conformation of S-(-)-perillaldehyde investigated by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés Moreno, Juan Ramón; Partal Ureña, Francisco; López González, Juan Jesús; Huet, Thérèse R.

    2009-04-01

    S-(-)-perillaldehyde (C 10H 14O) has been characterized in the gas phase using a Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy experiment in a supersonic molecular beam. Two conformers - with the isopropenyl group in the equatorial position - have been detected and described by a set of molecular parameters including the principal rotational constants and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameters. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that a third conformer might not be observed due to relaxation processes in the jet. The gas phase results are compared with the liquid phase IR-Raman-VCD spectra. Our study shows that gas phase spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing monoterpenes.