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Sample records for quantum yield measurements

  1. Quantum dots fluorescence quantum yield measured by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Estupiñán-López, Carlos; Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2014-01-01

    An essential parameter to evaluate the light emission properties of fluorophores is the fluorescence quantum yield, which quantify the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons to emitted photons. We detail here an alternative nonfluorescent method to determine the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of quantum dots (QDs). The method is based in the so-called Thermal Lens Spectroscopy (TLS) technique, which consists on the evaluation of refractive index gradient thermally induced in the fluorescent material by the absorption of light. Aqueous dispersion carboxyl-coated cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs samples were used to demonstrate the Thermal Lens Spectroscopy technical procedure. PMID:25103802

  2. Self-absorption correction for solid-state photoluminescence quantum yields obtained from integrating sphere measurements.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tai-Sang; Al-Kaysi, Rabih O; Müller, Astrid M; Wentz, Katherine M; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    A new method is presented for analyzing the effects of self-absorption on photoluminescence integrating sphere quantum yield measurements. Both the observed quantum yield and luminescence spectrum are used to determine the self-absorption probability, taking into account both the initial emission and subsequent absorption and reemission processes. The analysis is experimentally validated using the model system of the laser dye perylene red dispersed in a polymer film. This approach represents an improvement over previous methods that tend to overestimate the true quantum yield, especially in cases with high sample absorbance or quantum yield values. PMID:17764365

  3. Measurement of the Fluorescence Quantum Yield Using a Spectrometer With an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    PubMed

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Wang, Lili

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the fluorescence quantum yield (QY) using a commercial spectrophotometer with a 150 mm integrating sphere (IS) detector. The IS detector is equipped with an internal cuvette holder so that absorbance measurements can be performed with the cuvette inside the IS. In addition, the spectrophotometer has a cuvette holder outside the IS for performing conventional absorbance measurements. It is shown that the fluorescence quantum yield can be obtained from a combination of absorbance measurements of the buffer and the analyte solution inside and outside the IS detector. Due to the simultaneous detection of incident and fluorescent photons, the absorbance measurements inside the IS need to be adjusted for the wavelength dependence of the photomultiplier detector and the wavelength dependence of the IS magnification factor. An estimate of the fluorescence emission spectrum is needed for proper application of the wavelength-dependent adjustments. Results are presented for fluorescein, quinine sulfate, myoglobin, rhodamine B and erythrosin B. The QY of fluorescein in 0.1 mol/L NaOH was determined as 0.90±0.02 where the uncertainty is equal to the standard deviation of three independent measurements. The method provides a convenient and rapid estimate of the fluorescence quantum yield. Refinements of the measurement model and the characteristics of the IS detector can in principle yield an accurate value of the absolute fluorescence quantum yield. PMID:27096110

  4. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced. PMID:27424895

  5. Absolute quantum yield measurements of colloidal NaYF4: Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boyer, John-Christopher; van Veggel, Frank C J M

    2010-08-01

    In this communication we describe a technique for measuring the absolute quantum yields (QYs) of upconverting nanomaterials based on the use of a commercially available fluorimeter and an integrating sphere. Using this setup, we have successfully acquired luminescence efficiency data (pump laser, absorbed pump, and visible emitted intensities) for lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles. QYs in the range of 0.005% to 0.3% were measured for several NaYF(4): 2% Er(3+), 20% Yb(3+) nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm while a QY of 3% was measured for a bulk sample. PMID:20820726

  6. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  7. Are Fluorescence Quantum Yields So Tricky to Measure? A Demonstration Using Familiar Stationery Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fery-Forgues*, Suzanne; Lavabre, Dominique

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescence quantum yields are used to quantify the efficiency of the emission process. In spite of the importance of these data, experimental directions for their acquisition are rarely given. A general procedure for determining the relative fluorescence quantum yield of solutions is described here, drawing attention to the many pitfalls that students may encounter. Starting materials are common yellow and pink highlighter pens.

  8. Absolute quantum yield measurements of colloidal NaYF4: Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, John-Christopher; van Veggel, Frank C. J. M.

    2010-08-01

    In this communication we describe a technique for measuring the absolute quantum yields (QYs) of upconverting nanomaterials based on the use of a commercially available fluorimeter and an integrating sphere. Using this setup, we have successfully acquired luminescence efficiency data (pump laser, absorbed pump, and visible emitted intensities) for lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles. QYs in the range of 0.005% to 0.3% were measured for several NaYF4: 2% Er3+, 20% Yb3+ nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm while a QY of 3% was measured for a bulk sample.In this communication we describe a technique for measuring the absolute quantum yields (QYs) of upconverting nanomaterials based on the use of a commercially available fluorimeter and an integrating sphere. Using this setup, we have successfully acquired luminescence efficiency data (pump laser, absorbed pump, and visible emitted intensities) for lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles. QYs in the range of 0.005% to 0.3% were measured for several NaYF4: 2% Er3+, 20% Yb3+ nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm while a QY of 3% was measured for a bulk sample. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, powder XRDs and TEM micrographs of the samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00253d

  9. Comparison of methods and achievable uncertainties for the relative and absolute measurement of photoluminescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Würth, Christian; Grabolle, Markus; Pauli, Jutta; Spieles, Monika; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2011-05-01

    The photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ(f)) that presents a direct measure for the efficiency of the conversion of absorbed photons into emitted photons is one of the spectroscopic key parameters of functional fluorophores. It determines the suitability of such materials for applications in, for example, (bio)analysis, biosensing, and fluorescence imaging as well as as active components in optical devices. The reborn interest in accurate Φ(f) measurements in conjunction with the controversial reliability of reported Φ(f) values of many common organic dyes encouraged us to compare two relative and one absolute fluorometric method for the determination of the fluorescence quantum yields of quinine sulfate dihydrate, coumarin 153, fluorescein, rhodamine 6G, and rhodamine 101. The relative methods include the use of a chain of Φ(f) transfer standards consisting of several "standard dye" versus "reference dye" pairs linked to a golden Φ(f) standard that covers the ultraviolet and visible spectral region, and the use of different excitation wavelengths for standard and sample, respectively. Based upon these measurements and the calibration of the instruments employed, complete uncertainty budgets for the resulting Φ(f) values are derived for each method, thereby providing evaluated standard operation procedures for Φ(f) measurements and, simultaneously, a set of assessed Φ(f) standards. PMID:21473570

  10. Quantum yield measurements of light-induced H₂ generation in a photosystem I-[FeFe]-H₂ase nanoconstruct.

    PubMed

    Applegate, Amanda M; Lubner, Carolyn E; Knörzer, Philipp; Happe, Thomas; Golbeck, John H

    2016-01-01

    The quantum yield for light-induced H2 generation was measured for a previously optimized bio-hybrid cytochrome c 6-crosslinked PSI(C13G)-1,8-octanedithiol-[FeFe]-H2ase(C97G) (PSI-H2ase) nanoconstruct. The theoretical quantum yield for the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct is 0.50 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to a requirement of two photons per H2 generated. Illumination of the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct with visible light between 400 and 700 nm resulted in an average quantum yield of 0.10-0.15 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to a requirement of 6.7-10 photons per H2 generated. A possible reason for the difference between the theoretical and experimental quantum yield is the occurrence of non-productive PSI(C13G)-1,8-octanedithiol-PSIC13G (PSI-PSI) conjugates, which would absorb light without generating H2. Assuming the thiol-Fe coupling is equally efficient at producing PSI-PSI conjugates as well as in producing PSI-H2ase nanoconstructs, the theoretical quantum yield would decrease to 0.167 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to 6 photons per H2 generated. This value is close to the range of measured values in the current study. A strategy that purifies the PSI-H2ase nanoconstructs from the unproductive PSI-PSI conjugates or that incorporates different chemistries on the PSI and [FeFe]-H2ase enzyme sites could potentially allow the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct to approach the expected theoretical quantum yield for light-induced H2 generation. PMID:25527460

  11. Measurement of quantum yield of up-conversion Luminescence in Er(3+)-doped nano-glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, V D; Tikhomirov, V K; Méndez-Ramos, J; del-Castillo, J; Görller-Walrand, C

    2009-03-01

    A measurement of quantum yield of up-conversion luminescence has been done for the Er(3+)-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics 32(SiO,)9(AlO1.5)31.5(CdF2)18.5(PbF2)5.5(ZnF2): 3.5(ErF3) mol%, where most of Er3+ dopants partition in 8 nm diameter nano-crystals Er10Pb25F65. The yield was found by newly proposed method using the pump power dependence of the resonant luminescence. The result of the measurement points out that a theoretical maximum of 50% may be reached for the up-conversion luminescence yield in this material. This high yield is shown to be due to low phonon energy and short inter-dopant distances in the nano-crystals. PMID:19435083

  12. On the use of the thermal lens effect for measuring absolute luminescence quantum yields of transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Joachim; Reinecke, Klaus; Schmidtke, Hans-Herbert

    1992-05-01

    The thermal lens effect or thermal blooming of a laser beam passing through an absorbing medium is used to determine the fraction of absorbed laser power which is converted into heat. By this photocaloric method absolute luminescence quantum yields Φ can be evaluated covering the full range of possible Φ values. A check with organic standards for which quantum yields of 1, 0.52 and 0 are reported, supplies values of 0.99, 0.52 and 0.04, respectively. The sample of compounds [Ru(bipy) 3]X 2, X  Cl, ClO 4, and bipy  bipyridine, were studied using different concentrations in water and methanol solution at room temperature. The results strongly depend on the counter ion: for the Cl -- and (ClO 4) --salts quantum yields of Φ = 0.31 and 0.79, respectively, are obtained, which may be explained by different polarization conditions. The yields are, on the other hand, independent from the solvent and from the concentration, which was considered ranging from 10 -4 to 2.5 × 10 -5 M. Thermal blooming was also observed from [Ru(bipy) 3]Cl 2 contained in KBr pellets, measuring at various temperatures.

  13. Photolysis quantum yield measurements in the near-UV; a critical analysis of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Corrie, John E T; Kaplan, Jack H; Forbush, Biff; Ogden, David C; Trentham, David R

    2016-05-11

    The photolysis quantum yield, Qp, of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl phosphate (caged Pi) measured in the near-UV (342 nm peak with 60 nm half-bandwidth) is 0.53 and is based on results reported in 1978 (Biochemistry, 17, 1929-1935). This article amplifies methodology for determining that Qp in view of different recent estimates. Some general principles together with other examples relating to measurement of Qp values are discussed together with their relevance to biological research. PMID:27050155

  14. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  15. Primary quantum yields of NO2 photodissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Edward P.; Sperry, Paul D.; Calvert, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    The quantum yields of formation of NO, O2, and NO2 loss are measured for NO2 vapor at low pressures (0.13-0.30 torr) irradiated at 334-405 nm wavelengths and temperature in the range 273-370 K in order to study the primary quantum efficiencies of NO2 photodecomposition. The temperature and wavelength dependences of the primary quantum efficiencies are examined. It is observed that the primary quantum efficiencies increase rapidly from near zero at 424 nm to near unity for excitation at wavelengths less than 394 nm. The theory of Pitts et al. (1964) that the energy deficiency for photodissociation of NO2 excited at wavelengths greater than 397.9 nm is due to the rotational and vibrational energy of the NO2 molecules is confirmed by the data. Values for the primary quantum yields of NO2 photodecomposition as a function of wavelength are presented.

  16. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition. PMID:26858287

  17. Measurement procedure for absolute broadband infrared up-conversion photoluminescent quantum yields: Correcting for absorption/re-emission

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Sean K. W.; Ivaturi, Aruna; Marques-Hueso, Jose; Richards, Bryce S.

    2014-06-15

    The internal photoluminescent quantum yield (iPLQY) – defined as the ratio of emitted photons to those absorbed – is an important parameter in the evaluation and application of luminescent materials. The iPLQY is rarely reported due to the complexities in the calibration of such a measurement. Herein, an experimental method is proposed to correct for re-emission, which leads to an underestimation of the absorption under broadband excitation. Although traditionally the iPLQY is measured using monochromatic sources for linear materials, this advancement is necessary for nonlinear materials with wavelength dependent iPLQY, such as the application of up-conversion to solar energy harvesting. The method requires an additional measurement of the emission line shape that overlaps with the excitation and absorption spectra. Through scaling of the emission spectrum, at the long wavelength edge where an overlap of excitation does not occur, it is possible to better estimate the value of iPLQY. The method has been evaluated for a range of nonlinear material concentrations and under various irradiances to analyze the necessity and boundary conditions that favor the proposed method. Use of this refined method is important for a reliable measurement of iPLQY under a broad illumination source such as the Sun.

  18. Low cost 3D-printing used in an undergraduate project: an integrating sphere for measurement of photoluminescence quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomes, John J.; Finlayson, Chris E.

    2016-09-01

    We report upon the exploitation of the latest 3D printing technologies to provide low-cost instrumentation solutions, for use in an undergraduate level final-year project. The project addresses prescient research issues in optoelectronics, which would otherwise be inaccessible to such undergraduate student projects. The experimental use of an integrating sphere in conjunction with a desktop spectrometer presents opportunities to use easily handled, low cost materials as a means to illustrate many areas of physics such as spectroscopy, lasers, optics, simple circuits, black body radiation and data gathering. Presented here is a 3rd year undergraduate physics project which developed a low cost (£25) method to manufacture an experimentally accurate integrating sphere by 3D printing. Details are given of both a homemade internal reflectance coating formulated from readily available materials, and a robust instrument calibration method using a tungsten bulb. The instrument is demonstrated to give accurate and reproducible experimental measurements of luminescence quantum yield of various semiconducting fluorophores, in excellent agreement with literature values.

  19. Measurement of Quantum Yield, Quantum Requirement, and Energetic Efficiency of the O2-Evolving System of Photosynthesis by a Simple Dye Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros Barcelò, A.; Zapata, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    Photosynthesis is the conversion of absorbed radiant energy from sunlight into various forms of chemical energy by the chloroplasts of higher green plants. The overall process of photosynthesis consists of the oxidation of water (with the release of O2 as a product) and the reduction of CO2 to form carbohydrates. In the test tube electrons produced by the photolytic cleavage of H2) may be deviated from their true acceptor by inserting a suitable dye in the electron chain; i.e.; 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) (E'o = + 0.217 V), which is blue in the oxidized quinone form and which becomes colorless when reduced to the phenolic form. This dye-electrom acceptor also has the advantage that it accepts electroms directly from the quinone (Qa) electron-acceptor of the photosystem II< the reaction center associated with the O2-evolving (or water-slplitting) system. Based in the bleaching of DCPIP by illuminated spinach leaf chloroplasts, a classroom laboratory protocol has been developed to determine the quantum yield (QY = micromol O2 s-1 / micromol photons s-1, the quantum requirement (1/QY) and the energetic efficiency (f = chemical energy stored / light energy supplied) of the O2-evolving system of photosynthesis. Although values for the quantum yield, the quantum requirement and the energetic efficiency calculated in the classroom laboratory differ widely from those expected theoretically, these calculations are useful for illustrating the transformation of light energy into chemical energy by the chloroplasts of green plants.

  20. Near-Unity Quantum Yields of Biexciton Emission from CdSe=CdS Nanocrystals Measured Using Single-Particle Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young-Shin; Malko, Anton V.; Vela, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Garcia-Santamaria, Florencio; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han

    2011-05-03

    Biexciton photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (Q2X) of individual CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots with various shell thicknesses are derived from independent PL saturation and two-photon correlation measurements. We observe a near-unity Q{sub 2X} for some nanocrystals with an ultrathick 19-monolayer shell. High Q2X’s are, however, not universal and vary widely among nominally identical nanocrystals indicating a significant dependence of Q2X upon subtle structural differences. Interestingly, our measurements indicate that high Q2X’s are not required to achieve complete suppression of PL intensity fluctuations in individual nanocrystals.

  1. Determination of the Strong Phase in D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} Using Quantum-Correlated Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.

    2008-06-06

    We exploit the quantum coherence between pair-produced D{sup 0} and D{sup 0} in {psi}(3770) decays to study charm mixing, which is characterized by the parameters x and y, and to make a first determination of the relative strong phase {delta} between D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 281 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at E{sub cm}=3.77 GeV, as well as branching fraction input and time-integrated measurements of R{sub M}{identical_to}(x{sup 2}+y{sup 2})/2 and R{sub WS}{identical_to}{gamma}(D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{gamma}(D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) from other experiments, we find cos{delta}=1.03{sub -0.17}{sup +0.31}{+-}0.06, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. By further including other mixing parameter measurements, we obtain an alternate measurement of cos{delta}=1.10{+-}0.35{+-}0.07, as well as xsin{delta}=(4.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.7}{+-}2.9)x10{sup -3} and {delta}=(22{sub -12-11}{sup +11+9}) deg.

  2. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  3. Quantum strategies of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2001-03-01

    In the classical Monty Hall problem, one player can always win with probability 2/3. We generalize the problem to the quantum domain and show that a fair two-party zero-sum game can be carried out if the other player is permitted to adopt quantum measurement strategy.

  4. Spectroscopy characterization and quantum yield determination of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ortiz, S. N.; Mejía Ospino, E.; Cabanzo, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show the characterization of two kinds of quantum dots: hydrophilic and hydrophobic, with core and core/shell respectively, using spectroscopy techniques such as UV-Vis, fluorescence and Raman. We determined the quantum yield in the quantum dots using the quinine sulphate as standard. This salt is commonly used because of its quantum yield (56%) and stability. For the CdTe excitation, we used a wavelength of 549nm and for the CdSe/ZnS excitation a wavelength of 527nm. The results show that CdSe/ZnS (49%) has better fluorescence, better quantum dots, and confirm the fluorescence result. The quantum dots have shown a good fluorescence performance, so this property will be used to replace dyes, with the advantage that quantum dots are less toxic than some dyes like the rhodamine. In addition, in this work we show different techniques to find the quantum dots emission: fluorescence spectrum, synchronous spectrum and Raman spectrum.

  5. Measuring solid-state quantum yields: The conversion of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG diode laser pointer module into a viable light source.

    PubMed

    Daglen, Bevin C; Harris, John D; Dax, Clifford D; Tyler, David R

    2007-07-01

    This article outlines the difficulties associated with measuring quantum yields for solid-state samples using a high-pressure mercury arc lamp as the irradiation source. Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive frequency-doubled neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) diode laser pointer module into a viable irradiation source. The modified Nd:YAG laser was incorporated into a computer-controlled system, which allowed for the simultaneous irradiation and spectroscopic monitoring of the sample. The data obtained with the Nd:YAG diode laser system show far less scatter than data obtained with a high-pressure Hg arc lamp, and consequently the degradation rates obtained with the laser system could be calculated with far greater accuracy. PMID:17672778

  6. Quantum Yield of Gold-Cathode Photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Charles B.

    1961-01-01

    Two gold-cathode EMI 6255G tubes have been investigated for their quantum yield between 3100 and 1900 A. The tubes had cathodes of different appearances. One of these, numbered 3012, had a slight bluish tinge and was very transparent to visible light; the other, numbered 3021, had a definite gold coloration. The relative quantum yield of each tube was determined with the aid of a Cary model 14 recording spectrophotometer used as a monochromator. The monochromator relative-energy output was determined from the current output of a sodium-salicylate-coated RCA 1P21 photomultiplier. Each gold-cathode tube was then operated at 3000 v, and the central 1.8 cm cube of the cathode was exposed to the monochromator output.

  7. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  8. Quantum Yield of Single Surface Plasmons Generated by a Quantum Dot Coupled with a Silver Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between surface plasmons (SPs) in metal nanostructures and excitons in quantum emitters (QEs) lead to many interesting phenomena and potential applications that are strongly dependent on the quantum yield of SPs. The difficulty in distinguishing all the possible exciton recombination channels hinders the experimental determination of SP quantum yield. Here, we experimentally measured for the first time the quantum yield of single SPs generated by the exciton-plasmon coupling in a system composed of a single quantum dot and a silver nanowire (NW). By utilizing the SP guiding property of the NW, the decay rates of all the exciton recombination channels, i.e., direct free space radiation channel, SP generation channel, and nonradiative damping channel, are quantitatively obtained. It is determined that the optimum emitter-NW coupling distance for the largest SP quantum yield is about 10 nm, resulting from the different distance-dependent decay rates of the three channels. These results are important for manipulating the coupling between plasmonic nanostructures and QEs and developing on-chip quantum plasmonic devices for potential nanophotonic and quantum information applications. PMID:26583200

  9. Measurement of Quantum Yield and Upconversion Brightness in Red, Blue and Green on NIR Excited M2O2S:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeks, Ivan; Kumar, Ajith G.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    A series of broadly color tunable upconversion phosphors were synthesized from M2O2S (M=Y,Gd,La) using a flux fusion method. We investigate their upconversion properties as a function of the dopant concentrations and excitation power density. The phosphor compositions were determined for their upconversion characteristics under 800, 980 and 1550 nm excitations. By measuring the quantum yield and luminous brightness, we investigate their potential applications in biomedical imaging as well as NIR display applications. Results are compared with the well-known upconversion phosphor NaYF4:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm and found that the M2O2S phosphor systems are more efficient compared to NaYF4. By adopting various synthesis protocols, we were able to examine M2O2S in the size range of 10 nm to 10 μm. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  10. Quantum yield of conversion of the dental photoinitiator camphorquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chu; Ferracane, Jack L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    2005-06-01

    The primary absorber in dental resins is the photoinitiators, which start the photo polymerization process. We studied the quantum yield of conversion of camphorquinone (CQ), a blue light photoinitiator, using 3M FreeLight LED lamp as the light curing unit. The molar extinction coefficient, ɛ469, of CQ was measured to be 46+/-2 cm-1/(mol/L) at 469 nm. The absorption coefficient change to the radiant exposure was measured at three different irradiances. The relationship between the CQ absorption coefficient and curing lamp radiant exposure was the same for different irradiances and fit an exponential function: μa469(H)= μao exp(-H/Hthreshold), where μao is 4.46+/-0.05 cm-1, and Hthreshold=43+/-4 J/cm2. Combining this exponential relationship with CQ molar extinction coefficient and the absorbed photon energy (i.e., the product of the radiant exposure with the absorption coefficient), we plotted CQ concentration [number of molecules/cm3] as a function of the accumulated absorbed photons per volume. The slope of the relationship is the quantum yield of the CQ conversion. Therefore, in our formulation (0.7 w% CQ with reducing agents 0.35 w% DMAEMA and 0.05 w% BHT) the quantum yield was solved to be 0.07+/-0.01 CQ conversion per absorbed photon.

  11. Ultraviolet photochemistry of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-dienes: Laser spectroscopic absolute hydrogen atom quantum yield and translational energy distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, A.; Volpp, H.-R.; Sharma, P.; Mittal, J. P.; Vatsa, R. K.

    2010-07-14

    Using pulsed H-atom Lyman-{alpha} laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy along with a photolytic calibration approach, absolute H-atom product quantum yields of {phi}{sub H-b13d}=(0.32{+-}0.04) and {phi}{sub H-b12d}=(0.36{+-}0.04) were measured under collision-free conditions for the 193 nm gas-phase laser flash photolysis of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene at room temperature, which demonstrate that nascent H-atom formation is of comparable importance for both parent molecules. Comparison of the available energy fraction, f{sub T-b13d}=(0.22{+-}0.03) and f{sub T-b12d}=(0.13{+-}0.01), released as H+C{sub 4}H{sub 5} product translational energy with results of impulsive and statistical energy partitioning modeling calculations indicates that for both, buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene, H-atom formation is preceded by internal conversion to the respective electronic ground state (S{sub 0}) potential energy surfaces. In addition, values of {sigma}{sub b-1,3-d-L{alpha}=}(3.5{+-}0.2)x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} and {sigma}{sub b-1,2-d-L{alpha}=}(4.4{+-}0.2)x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} for the previously unknown Lyman-{alpha} (121.6 nm) radiation photoabsorption cross sections of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene in the gas-phase were determined.

  12. Consistent quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  13. Quantum state and quantum entanglement protection using quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuchao; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiangbin; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Yu, Zongwen; Zou, Wenjie

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of some quantum states can be slowed down or even stopped under frequent measurements. This is the usual quantum Zeno effect. Here we report an operator quantum Zeno effect, in which the evolution of some physical observables is slowed down through measurements even though thequantum state changes randomly with time. Based on the operator quantum Zeno effect, we show how we can protect quantum information from decoherence with two-qubit measurements, realizable with noisy two-qubit interactions. Besides, we report the quantum entanglement protection using weak measurement and measurement reversal scheme. Exposed in the nonzero temperature environment, a quantum system can both lose and gain excitations by interacting with the environment. In this work, we show how to optimally protect quantum states and quantum entanglement in such a situation based on measurement reversal from weak measurement. In particular, we present explicit formulas of protection. We find that this scheme can circumvent the entanglement sudden death in certain conditions.

  14. Loss of quantum yield in extremely low light.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Miko U F; Ohlemacher, Christian; Küppers, Manfred

    2004-04-01

    It has generally been assumed that the photosynthetic quantum yield of all C3 plants is essentially the same for all unstressed leaves at the same temperature and CO2 and O2 concentrations. However, some recent work by H.C. Timm et al. (2002, Trees 16:47-62) has shown that quantum yield can be reduced for some time after leaves have been exposed to darkness. To investigate under what light conditions quantum yield can be reduced, we carried out a number of experiments on leaves of a partial-shade (unlit greenhouse)-grown Coleus blumei Benth. hybrid. We found that after leaves had been exposed to complete darkness, quantum yield was reduced by about 60%. Only very low light levels were needed for quantum yield to be fully restored, with 5 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) being sufficient for 85% of the quantum yield of fully induced leaves to be achieved. Leaves regained higher quantum yields upon exposure to higher light levels with an estimated time constant of 130 s. It was concluded that the loss of quantum yield would be quantitatively important only for leaves growing in very dense understoreys where maximum light levels might not exceed 5 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) even in the middle of the day. Most leaves, even in understorey conditions, do, however, experience light levels in excess of 5 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) over periods where they obtain most of their carbon so that the loss of quantum yield would affect total carbon gain of those leaves only marginally. PMID:14722771

  15. Direct measure of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-shui; Zhao, Haiqing

    2011-12-15

    The quantumness of the correlation known as quantum correlation is usually measured by quantum discord. So far various quantum discords can be roughly understood as indirect measure by some special discrepancy of two quantities. We present a direct measure of quantum correlation by revealing the difference between the structures of classically and quantum correlated states. Our measure explicitly includes the contributions of the inseparability and local nonorthogonality of the eigenvectors of a density matrix. Besides its relatively easy computability, our measure can provide a unified understanding of quantum correlation of all the present versions.

  16. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam Pati, Arun Kumar

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  17. Spatial mapping of fluorophore quantum yield in diffusive media.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Roblyer, Darren

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence quantum yield (QY) indicates the efficiency of the fluorescence process. The QY of many fluorophores is sensitive to local tissue environments, highlighting the possibility of using QY as an indicator of important parameters such as pH or temperature. QY is commonly measured by comparison to a well-known standard in nonscattering media. We propose a new imaging method, called quantum yield imaging (QYI), to spatially map the QY of a fluorophore within an optically diffusive media. QYI utilizes the wide-field diffuse optical technique spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) as well as planar fluorescence imaging. SFDI is used to measure the optical properties of the background media and the absorption contributed by the fluorophore. The unknown QY is then calculated by combining information from both modalities. A fluorescent sample with known QY is used to account for instrument response. To demonstrate QYI, rhodamine B and SNARF-5 were imaged in liquid phantoms with different background optical properties. The methanol:water ratio and pH were changed for rhodamine B and SNARF-5 solvents, respectively, altering the QY of each through a wide range. QY was determined with an agreement of 0.021 and 0.012 for rhodamine B and SNARF-5, respectively. PMID:26308165

  18. Absolute 1* quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain versus absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I* quantum yields were measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The temperature yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-versus-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 +/- 2% and it falls off to 53.4 +/- 2% and 44.0 +/- 4% at 284 and 248 respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I* quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I* yields. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I* yield results.

  19. Nondisturbing quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Wolf, Michael M.

    2010-09-15

    We consider pairs of discrete quantum observables (POVMs) and analyze the relation between the notions of nondisturbance, joint measurability, and commutativity. We specify conditions under which these properties coincide or differ - depending, for instance, on the interplay between the number of outcomes and the Hilbert space dimension or on algebraic properties of the effect operators. We also show that (non-)disturbance is, in general, not a symmetric relation and that it can be decided and quantified by means of a semidefinite program.

  20. Measurement and quantum indeterminateness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Richard

    1993-08-01

    Albert and Loewer[1] have recently clarified their earlier objection to the interactive interpretation presented in Healey[2]. They now charge that this interpretation fails to solve a problem of which the measurement problem is but a special case. The general problem is to reconcile quantum mechanics with the prima facie determinateness of such dynamical properties as the positions of macroscopic objects. In response I defend both the preeminent significance of determinate measurement outcomes and the claim that the models of Healey[3] go a long way toward securing their determinateness.

  1. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-28

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy. PMID:26731570

  2. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  3. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  4. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  5. Work Measurement as a Generalized Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncaglia, Augusto J.; Cerisola, Federico; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2014-12-01

    We present a new method to measure the work w performed on a driven quantum system and to sample its probability distribution P (w ). The method is based on a simple fact that remained unnoticed until now: Work on a quantum system can be measured by performing a generalized quantum measurement at a single time. Such measurement, which technically speaking is denoted as a positive operator valued measure reduces to an ordinary projective measurement on an enlarged system. This observation not only demystifies work measurement but also suggests a new quantum algorithm to efficiently sample the distribution P (w ). This can be used, in combination with fluctuation theorems, to estimate free energies of quantum states on a quantum computer.

  6. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Kroll, Daniel M.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from themore » fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.« less

  7. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Kroll, Daniel M.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from the fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.

  8. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor. PMID:27245962

  9. Consecutive Measurements in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jennifer R.; Adami, Christoph

    The physics of quantum measurement still continues to puzzle with no resolution in sight between competing interpretations, in particular because no interpretation has so far produced predictions that would be falsifiable via experiment. Here we present an analysis of consecutive projective measurements performed on a quantum state using quantum information theory, where the entanglement between the quantum system and a measuring device is explicitly taken into account, and where the consecutive measurements increase the joint Hilbert space while the wavefunction of the joint system never collapses. Using this relative-state formalism we rederive well-known results for the pairwise correlation between any two measurement devices, but show that considering the joint as well as conditional entropy of three devices reveals a difference between the collapse and no-collapse pictures of quantum measurement that is experimentally testable. This research was funded by a Michigan State University Enrichment Fellowship.

  10. Measurement-based quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  11. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes. PMID:25379903

  12. Yield stress measurements using novel squeezing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Daniel

    Techniques for measuring the yield stress of materials are numerous, but often plagued with difficulties and uncertainties in measurement. The primary methods include shear rheometry and, more recently, squeezing flow. Shear rheometry requires care on the part of the experimentalist to generate uniform flow fields and avoid shear banding or wall slip which may interfere with measurements. Squeezing flow tests are often performed with poorly controlled boundary conditions creating complicated flow fields. Further, the effects of the experimental modifications made to produce these boundary conditions in measurements are often not investigated and simply ignored. The main objective of this study was to develop a novel measuring technique to study the yield stress behavior of a model material, Carbopol. First attempts were made towards a novel lubricant injection squeezing (LIS) flow technique based on the continuous lubricated squeezing flow (CLSF) setup, as well as a novel lubricant film squeezing (LFS) technique which will allow measurement of the yield stress without the complicated treatment of either the sample or experimental setup required by currently favored methods. The novel techniques were developed and validated by direct comparison with shear measurements, the current gold standard for determining yield stress. Common squeezing techniques for characterizing yield stress fluids were also compared and found to be inadequate and inconsistent when compared to the shear measurements. The results from this study showed that the LIS and LFS methods are able to qualitatively determine a yield stress, but further investigation is required before they can be achieve their full potential as viable methods for determine yield stress.

  13. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  14. BOOK REVIEW Quantum Measurement and Control Quantum Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2010-12-01

    In the last two decades there has been an enormous progress in the experimental investigation of single quantum systems. This progress covers fields such as quantum optics, quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology, which are sometimes summarized as `quantum technologies'. A key issue there is entanglement, which can be considered as the characteristic feature of quantum theory. As disparate as these various fields maybe, they all have to deal with a quantum mechanical treatment of the measurement process and, in particular, the control process. Quantum control is, according to the authors, `control for which the design requires knowledge of quantum mechanics'. Quantum control situations in which measurements occur at important steps are called feedback (or feedforward) control of quantum systems and play a central role here. This book presents a comprehensive and accessible treatment of the theoretical tools that are needed to cope with these situations. It also provides the reader with the necessary background information about the experimental developments. The authors are both experts in this field to which they have made significant contributions. After an introduction to quantum measurement theory and a chapter on quantum parameter estimation, the central topic of open quantum systems is treated at some length. This chapter includes a derivation of master equations, the discussion of the Lindblad form, and decoherence - the irreversible emergence of classical properties through interaction with the environment. A separate chapter is devoted to the description of open systems by the method of quantum trajectories. Two chapters then deal with the central topic of quantum feedback control, while the last chapter gives a concise introduction to one of the central applications - quantum information. All sections contain a bunch of exercises which serve as a useful tool in learning the material. Especially helpful are also various separate

  15. Universality of sequential quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    We show that any jointly measurable pair of quantum observables can be obtained in a sequential measurement scheme, even if the second observable will be decided after the first measurement. This means that it is possible to perform a measurement of any quantum observable in a way that does not disturb the subsequent measurements more than is dictated by joint measurability. Only measurements with a specific structure have this universality feature. As a supplementing result, we provide a characterization of all possible joint measurements obtained from a sequential measurement lacking universality.

  16. A simple formulation of the CH2O photolysis quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röth, E.-P.; Ehhalt, D. H.

    2015-07-01

    New expressions for the wavelength-dependent photolysis quantum yields of CH2O, Φj, are presented. They are based on combinations of functions of the type Ai/(1+exp[-(1/λ - 1/λ0i)/bi]). The parameters Ai, bi, and λ0i which have a physical meaning, are obtained by fits to the measured Φj data available from literature. The altitude dependence of the photolysis frequencies resulting from the new quantum yield expressions are compared to those derived from the Φj recommended by JPL and IUPAC.

  17. A simple formulation of the CH2O photolysis quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röth, E.-P.; Ehhalt, D. H.

    2015-03-01

    New expressions for the various wavelength - dependent photolysis quantum yields of CH2O, Φj, are presented. They are based on combinations of functions of the type Ai/(1 + exp[-(1/λ -1/λ 0i)/bi]). The parameters Ai, bi, and λ0i which have a physical meaning are obtained by fits to the measured data of the Φji available from the literature. The altitude dependence of the photolysis frequencies resulting from the new quantum yield expressions are compared to those derived from the Φj recommended by JPL and IUPAC.

  18. The quantum measurement of time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, in non-relativistic Quantum Mechanics, time is considered to be a parameter, rather than an observable quantity like space. In relativistic Quantum Field Theory, space and time are treated equally by reducing space to also be a parameter. Herein, after a brief review of other measurements, we describe a third possibility, which is to treat time as a directly observable quantity.

  19. Quantum statistical thermodynamics of hot finite nuclear systems: Temperatures and isotopic yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Majka, Z.; Staszel, P.; Cibor, J.; Natowitz, J.B.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Wada, R.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-06-01

    We investigate the importance of the quantum statistics and deexcitation of primary fragments on the isotope yield ratio temperature determination. A phenomenological formula is presented which allows derivation of the temperature of the decaying nuclear system at the freeze-out time from the measured double yield ratios of two isotope pairs. This prescription is applied to the recent ALADIN and EOS Collaboration data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Quantum measurements, sequential and latent

    SciTech Connect

    Dicke, R.H.

    1989-04-01

    The results of a hypothetical experiment requiring a sequence of quantum measurements are obtained retrospectively, after the experiment has been completed, from a single reading of an apparatus register. The experiment is carried out reversibly and Schroedinger's equation is satisfied until the terminal reading of the register. The technique is illustrated using a feasible method of measuring photon spin as the quantum object observable and using the photon energy as the apparatus register. The technique is used to discuss the watchdog effect, the effect of repeated measurements inhibiting quantum jumps.

  1. Quantum measurements, sequential and latent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicke, Robert H.

    1989-04-01

    The results of a hypothetical experiment requiring a sequence of quantum measurements are obtained retrospectively, after the experiment has been completed, from a single reading of an “apparatus register.” The experiment is carried out reversibly and Schrödinger's equation is satisfied until the terminal reading of the register. The technique is illustrated using a feasible method of measuring photon spin as the quantum “object” observable and using the photon energy as the “apparatus register.” The technique is used to discuss the “watchdog” effect, the effect of repeated measurements inhibiting quantum jumps.

  2. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  3. Optimum doping achieves high quantum yields in GaAs photoemitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that optimum doping exists. Measured quantum yield curves indicate optimum overall response is obtained in GaAs emitters with doping in high 10 to the 18th power per cu cm range. Doping for optimum response is not necessarily in this range.

  4. Control of the external photoluminescent quantum yield of emitters coupled to nanoantenna phased arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ke; Verschuuren, Marc A.; Lozano, Gabriel

    2015-08-21

    Optical losses in metals represent the largest limitation to the external quantum yield of emitters coupled to plasmonic antennas. These losses can be at the emission wavelength, but they can be more important at shorter wavelengths, i.e., at the excitation wavelength of the emitters, where the conductivity of metals is usually lower. We present accurate measurements of the absolute external photoluminescent quantum yield of a thin layer of emitting material deposited over a periodic nanoantenna phased array. Emission and absorptance measurements of the sample are performed using a custom-made setup including an integrating sphere and variable angle excitation. The measurements reveal a strong dependence of the external quantum yield on the angle at which the optical field excites the sample. Such behavior is attributed to the coupling between far-field illumination and near-field excitation mediated by the collective resonances supported by the array. Numerical simulations confirm that the inherent losses associated with the metal can be greatly reduced by selecting an optimum angle of illumination, which boosts the light conversion efficiency in the emitting layer. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the emission from plasmonic arrays reveals the need to carefully design the illumination to achieve the maximum external quantum yield.

  5. Monitoring quantum transport: Backaction and measurement correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Robert; Gómez-García, Jorge; Kohler, Sigmund

    2014-10-01

    We investigate a tunnel contact coupled to a double quantum dot (DQD) and employed as a charge monitor for the latter. We consider both the classical limit and the quantum regime. In the classical case, we derive measurement correlations from conditional probabilities, yielding quantitative statements about the parameter regime in which the detection scheme works well. Moreover, we demonstrate that not only the DQD occupation but also the corresponding current may strongly correlate with the detector current. The quantum-mechanical solution, obtained with a Bloch-Redfield master equation, shows that the backaction of the measurement tends to localize the DQD electrons, and thus significantly reduces the DQD current. Moreover, it provides the effective parameters of the classical treatment. It turns out that already the classical description is adequate for most operating regimes.

  6. Measuring Quantum Coherence with Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Alexander; Singh, Uttam; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    Quantum coherence is an essential ingredient in quantum information processing and plays a central role in emergent fields such as nanoscale thermodynamics and quantum biology. However, our understanding and quantitative characterization of coherence as an operational resource are still very limited. Here we show that any degree of coherence with respect to some reference basis can be converted to entanglement via incoherent operations. This finding allows us to define a novel general class of measures of coherence for a quantum system of arbitrary dimension, in terms of the maximum bipartite entanglement that can be generated via incoherent operations applied to the system and an incoherent ancilla. The resulting measures are proven to be valid coherence monotones satisfying all the requirements dictated by the resource theory of quantum coherence. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by proving that the fidelity-based geometric measure of coherence is a full convex coherence monotone, and deriving a closed formula for it on arbitrary single-qubit states. Our work provides a clear quantitative and operational connection between coherence and entanglement, two landmark manifestations of quantum theory and both key enablers for quantum technologies.

  7. Investigating energy partitioning during photosynthesis using an expanded quantum yield convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Peers, Graham; Li, Zhirong; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2009-02-01

    In higher plants, regulation of excess absorbed light is essential for their survival and fitness, as it enables avoidance of a build up of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species. Regulation processes (known as non-photochemical quenching; NPQ) can be monitored by steady-state fluorescence on intact plant leaves. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence have been used for over 20 years to evaluate the amount of NPQ and photochemistry (PC). Recently, a quantum yield representation of NPQ ( ΦNPQ), which incorporates a variable fraction of open reaction centers, was proposed by Hendrickson et al. [L. Hendrickson, R.T. Furbank, W.S. Chow, Photosynth. Res. 82 (2004) 73]. In this work we extend the quantum yield approach to describe the yields of reversible energy-dependent quenching ( ΦqE), state transitions to balance PC between photosystems II and I ( ΦqT), and photoinhibition quenching associated with damaged reaction centers ( ΦqI). We showed the additivity of the various quantum yield components of NPQ through experiments on wild-type and npq1 strains of Arabidopsis thaliana. The quantum yield approach enables comparison of ΦqE with data from a variety of techniques used to investigate the mechanism of qE. We showed that ΦqE for a series of A. thaliana genotypes scales linearly with the magnitude of zeaxanthin cation formation, suggesting that charge-transfer quenching is largely responsible for qE in plants.

  8. Excitation-energy dependence of the phosphorescence quantum yields of pyridinecarboxaldehyde vapors.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takao

    2008-12-15

    Emission and excitation spectra of 3- and 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde vapors have been measured at different pressures down to 10(-2)Torr. The phosphorescence quantum yield measured at low pressure as a function of excitation energy is nearly constant in the range of excitation energy corresponding to the S1(n, pi*) state, but it decreases abruptly at the S2(pi, pi*) threshold. The onset of the abrupt decrease of the yield corresponds to the location of the S2 absorption origin of each molecule, indicating that the nonradiative pathway depends on the type of the excited singlet state to which the molecule is initially excited. The relaxation processes are discussed based on the pressure and excitation-energy dependence of the phosphorescence quantum yield. PMID:18515180

  9. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R. E.; Wine, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well-known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl2CO2). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S((sup 3)P(sub J)) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S((sup 1)D(sub 2)) + OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N2 + N2O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought.

  10. Measurement understood through the quantum potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohm, D.; Hiley, B. J.

    1984-03-01

    We review briefly the quantum potential approach to quantum theory, and show that it yields a completely consistent account of the measurement process, including especially what has been called the “collapse of the wave function.” This is done with the aid of a new concept of active information, which enables us to describe the evolution of a physical system as a unique actuality, in principle independent of any observer (so that we can, for example, provide a simple and coherent answer to the Schrödinger cat paradox). Finally, we extend this approach to relativistic quantum field theories, and show that it leads to results that are consistent with all the known experimental implications of the theory of relativity, despite the nonlocality which this approach entails.

  11. Determination of the D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} coherence factors and average strong-phase differences using quantum-correlated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.

    2009-08-01

    The first measurements of the coherence factors (R{sub K{pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} and R{sub K3{pi}}) and the average strong-phase differences ({delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}{sup {pi}{sup 0}} and {delta}{sub D}{sup K3{pi}}) for D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are presented. These parameters can be used to improve the determination of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma} in B{sup -}{yields}DK{sup -} decays, where D is a D{sup 0} or D{sup 0} meson decaying to the same final state. The measurements are made using quantum-correlated, fully reconstructed D{sup 0}D{sup 0} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {psi}(3770) resonance. The measured values are: R{sub K{pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}}=0.84{+-}0.07, {delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}{sup {pi}{sup 0}}=(227{sub -17}{sup +14}) deg., R{sub K3{pi}}=0.33{sub -0.23}{sup +0.20}, and {delta}{sub D}{sup K3{pi}}=(114{sub -23}{sup +26}) deg. These results indicate significant coherence in the decay D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, whereas lower coherence is observed in the decay D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The analysis also results in a small improvement in the knowledge of other D-meson parameters, in particular, the strong-phase difference for D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}, and the mixing parameter y.

  12. Thermoelectric Corrections to Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin; Ratner, Mark; Stafford, Charles; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    The voltage and temperature measured by a floating probe of a nonequilibrium quantum system is shown to exhibit nontrivial thermoelectric corrections at finite temperature. Using a realistic model of a scanning thermal microscope to calculate the voltage and temperature distributions, we predict quantum temperature variations along graphene nanoribbons subject to a thermal bias which are not simply related to the local density of states. Experimentally, the wavelength of the oscillations can be tuned over several orders of magnitude by gating/doping, bringing quantum temperature oscillations within reach of the spatial resolution of existing measurement techniques. We also find that the Peltier cooling/heating which causes the temperature oscillations can lead to significant errors in voltage measurements for a wide range of system.

  13. Synthesis of Luminescent Graphene Quantum Dots with High Quantum Yield and Their Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Chen, Yunping; Li, Na; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Jingli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Xu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    High fluorescence quantum yield graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have showed up as a new generation for bioimaging. In this work, luminescent GQDs were prepared by an ameliorative photo-Fenton reaction and a subsequent hydrothermal process using graphene oxide sheets as the precursor. The as-prepared GQDs were nanomaterials with size ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 nm and emitted intense green luminescence in water. The fluorescence quantum yield was as high as 24.6% (excited at 340 nm) and the fluorescence was strongest at pH 7. Moreover, the influences of low-concentration (12.5, 25 μg/mL) GQDs on the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, internal cellular reactive oxygen species level and mortality of HeLa cells were relatively weak, and the in vitro imaging demonstrated GQDs were mainly in the cytoplasm region. More strikingly, zebrafish embryos were co-cultured with GQDs for in vivo imaging, and the results of heart rate test showed the intake of small amounts of GQDs brought little harm to the cardiovascular of zebrafish. GQDs with high quantum yield and strong photoluminescence show good biocompatibility, thus they show good promising for cell imaging, biolabeling and other biomedical applications. PMID:26709828

  14. Correspondence between quantum and classical information: Generalized quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grishanin, Boris A.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2006-04-15

    The concept of generalized quantum measurement is introduced as a transformation that sets a one-to-one correspondence between the initial states of the measured object system and final states of the object-meter system with the help of a classical informational index, unambiguously linked to a classically compatible set of quantum states. It is shown that the generalized quantum measurement concept covers all key types of quantum measurement--standard projective, entangling, fuzzy, and generalized measurements with a partial or complete destruction of initial information associated with the object. A special class of soft quantum measurements as a basic model for the fuzzy measurements widespread in physics is introduced and its information properties are studied in detail. Also, a special class of partially destructive measurements mapping all states of the Hilbert space of a finite-dimensional quantum system onto the basis states of an infinite-dimensional quantum system is considered.

  15. Nonlocal Measurements via Quantum Erasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodutch, Aharon; Cohen, Eliahu

    2016-02-01

    Nonlocal observables play an important role in quantum theory, from Bell inequalities and various postselection paradoxes to quantum error correction codes. Instantaneous measurement of these observables is known to be a difficult problem, especially when the measurements are projective. The standard von Neumann Hamiltonian used to model projective measurements cannot be implemented directly in a nonlocal scenario and can, in some cases, violate causality. We present a scheme for effectively generating the von Neumann Hamiltonian for nonlocal observables without the need to communicate and adapt. The protocol can be used to perform weak and strong (projective) measurements, as well as measurements at any intermediate strength. It can also be used in practical situations beyond nonlocal measurements. We show how the protocol can be used to probe a version of Hardy's paradox with both weak and strong measurements. The outcomes of these measurements provide a nonintuitive picture of the pre- and postselected system. Our results shed new light on the interplay between quantum measurements, uncertainty, nonlocality, causality, and determinism.

  16. Nonlocal Measurements via Quantum Erasure.

    PubMed

    Brodutch, Aharon; Cohen, Eliahu

    2016-02-19

    Nonlocal observables play an important role in quantum theory, from Bell inequalities and various postselection paradoxes to quantum error correction codes. Instantaneous measurement of these observables is known to be a difficult problem, especially when the measurements are projective. The standard von Neumann Hamiltonian used to model projective measurements cannot be implemented directly in a nonlocal scenario and can, in some cases, violate causality. We present a scheme for effectively generating the von Neumann Hamiltonian for nonlocal observables without the need to communicate and adapt. The protocol can be used to perform weak and strong (projective) measurements, as well as measurements at any intermediate strength. It can also be used in practical situations beyond nonlocal measurements. We show how the protocol can be used to probe a version of Hardy's paradox with both weak and strong measurements. The outcomes of these measurements provide a nonintuitive picture of the pre- and postselected system. Our results shed new light on the interplay between quantum measurements, uncertainty, nonlocality, causality, and determinism. PMID:26943514

  17. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments. PMID:25370834

  18. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J.; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments. PMID:25370834

  19. Products and quantum yields for photolysis of chloroaromatics in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dulin, D.; Drossman, H.; Mill, T.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis of chlorobenzene, 2- and 4-chlorobiphenyl, and 2- and 4-chlorobiphenyl ethers in water with 250-300-nm light produce corresponding phenols or, in the case of 2-chlorobiphenyl ether, dibenzofuran exclusively. Quantum yields in most cases are very similar to those reported in hexane for the reduction process. 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TC-DD) photolyze much less efficiently in water than in hexane. A common pathway for photolysis of monochloroaromatics involving aryl cations accounts well for the experimental observations. C-O rather than C-Cl cleavage in TCDD may be a major pathway for its loss. Half-lives for photolysis of these chloroaromatics in sunlight in water range from 460 years to 5 days; TCDD photolyzes in water with a half-life of about 4-5 days in summer at 40/sup 0/ latitude. 40 references, 1 figure, 8 tables.

  20. Thermodynamics of projective quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Noam

    2012-11-01

    Quantum measurement of a system can change its mean energy as well as entropy. A selective measurement (classical or quantum) can be used as a ‘Maxwell's demon’ to power a single-temperature heat engine by decreasing the entropy. Quantum mechanically, so can a non-selective measurement, despite increasing the entropy of a thermal state. The maximal amount of work extractable following the measurement is given by the change in free energy: W(non-)selmax = ΔEmeas - TBathΔS(non-)selmeas. This follows from the ‘generalized 2nd law for nonequilibrium initial state’ (Hasegawa et al 2010 Phys. Lett. A 374 1001-4), an elementary reduction of which to the standard law is given here. It is shown that Wselmax - Wnon-selmax is equal to the work required for resetting the memory of the measuring device and that no such resetting is needed in the non-selective case. Consequently, a single-bath engine powered by either kind of measurement works at a net loss of TBathΔSnon-selmeas per cycle. By replacing the measurement by a reversible ‘pre-measurement’ and allowing a work source to couple to the system and memory, the cycle can be rendered completely reversible.

  1. "Evaluations" of Observables Versus Measurements in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, Giuseppe; Sestito, Angela

    2016-03-01

    In Quantum Physics there are circumstances where the direct measurement of a given observable encounters difficulties; in some of these cases, however, its value can be "evaluated", i.e. it can be inferred by measuring another observable characterized by perfect correlation with the observable of interest. Though an evaluation is often interpreted as a measurement of the evaluated observable, we prove that the two concepts cannot be identified in Quantum Physics, because the identification yields contradictions. Then, we establish the conceptual status of evaluations in Quantum Theory and how they are related to measurements.

  2. Photodissociation of quantum state-selected diatomic molecules yields new insight into ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart H.; Lee, Chih-Hsi; Apfelbeck, Florian; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    When a molecule is subjected to a sufficiently energetic photon it can break apart into fragments through a process called ``photodissociation''. For over 70 years this simple chemical reaction has served as a vital experimental tool for acquiring information about molecular structure, since the character of the photodissociative transition can be inferred by measuring the 3D photofragment angular distribution (PAD). While theoretical understanding of this process has gradually evolved from classical considerations to a fully quantum approach, experiments to date have not yet revealed the full quantum nature of this process. In my talk I will describe recent experiments involving the photodissociation of ultracold, optical lattice-trapped, and fully quantum state-resolved 88Sr2 molecules. Optical absorption images of the PADs produced in these experiments reveal features which are inherently quantum mechanical in nature, such as matter-wave interference between output channels, and are sensitive to the quantum statistics of the molecular wavefunctions. The results of these experiments cannot be predicted using quasiclassical methods. Instead, we describe our results with a fully quantum mechanical model yielding new intuition about ultracold chemistry.

  3. Evolution equation for geometric quantum correlation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2015-05-01

    A simple relation is established for the evolution equation of quantum-information-processing protocols such as quantum teleportation, remote state preparation, Bell-inequality violation, and particularly the dynamics of geometric quantum correlation measures. This relation shows that when the system traverses the local quantum channel, various figures of merit of the quantum correlations for different protocols demonstrate a factorization decay behavior for dynamics. We identified the family of quantum states for different kinds of quantum channels under the action of which the relation holds. This relation simplifies the assessment of many quantum tasks.

  4. A quantum yield determination of O/1D/ production from ozone via laser flash photolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The quantum yield of electronically excited atomic oxygen produced from ozone photolysis was measured at 298 K from wavelengths of 293.0 to 316.5 nm. The reaction of the atomic oxygen with N2O to form excited NO2 was used to monitor the O production; a frequency-doubled flashlamp-pumped dye laser which provided tunable ultraviolet in the desired spectral region with 0.1-nm linewidth served as the photolysis source. The atomic oxygen quantum yield was found to be constant below 300 nm, with a sharp decrease centered at 308 nm and a diminution to less than one tenth of the constant value by 313.5 nm.

  5. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A.; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures.In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance

  6. Effect of PMMA impregnation on the fluorescence quantum yield of sol-gel glasses doped with quinine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; Díaz-Torres, L. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; King, T. A.

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield of quinine sulfate in sol-gel and PMMA impregnated glasses is measured. The observed quantum yield improvement in the sol-gel matrix, compared to ethanol, is interpreted as a reduction of non-radiative relaxation channels by isolation of the molecules by the cage of the glass. PMMA impregnated sol-gel glasses show an extra improvement of the fluorescence yield, which is interpreted as a reduction of the free space and the rigid fixation of the molecules to the matrix.

  7. Quantum estimation via sequential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarth, Daniel; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Kato, Airi N.; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2015-11-01

    The problem of estimating a parameter of a quantum system through a series of measurements performed sequentially on a quantum probe is analyzed in the general setting where the underlying statistics is explicitly non-i.i.d. We present a generalization of the central limit theorem in the present context, which under fairly general assumptions shows that as the number N of measurement data increases the probability distribution of functionals of the data (e.g., the average of the data) through which the target parameter is estimated becomes asymptotically normal and independent of the initial state of the probe. At variance with the previous studies (Guţă M 2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 062324; van Horssen M and Guţă M 2015 J. Math. Phys. 56 022109) we take a diagrammatic approach, which allows one to compute not only the leading orders in N of the moments of the average of the data but also those of the correlations among subsequent measurement outcomes. In particular our analysis points out that the latter, which are not available in usual i.i.d. data, can be exploited in order to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation. An explicit application of our scheme is discussed by studying how the temperature of a thermal reservoir can be estimated via sequential measurements on a quantum probe in contact with the reservoir.

  8. Weak Measurements Destroy Too Much Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2016-01-01

    The quantum correlation under weak measurements is studied via skew information. For 2 × d-dimensional states, it can be given by a closed form which linearly depends on the quantum correlation [EPL. 107 (2014) 10007] determined by the strength of the weak measurement. It is found that the quantum correlation under weak measurements only captures partial quantumness of the state. In particular, the extraction of the residual quantumness by the latter measurements will inevitably destroy too much quantumness. To demonstration, the Werner state is given as an example.

  9. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures. PMID:25806486

  10. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  11. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kiriya, Daisuke; Xiao, Jun; Azcatl, Angelica; Noh, Jiyoung; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Addou, Rafik; KC, Santosh; Dubey, Madan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Xiang; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2015-11-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low. The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QY of 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Here we report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a final QY of more than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 ± 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials. PMID:26612948

  12. Non-commutativity measure of quantum discord.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Quantum discord is a manifestation of quantum correlations due to non-commutativity rather than entanglement. Two measures of quantum discord by the amount of non-commutativity via the trace norm and the Hilbert-Schmidt norm respectively are proposed in this paper. These two measures can be calculated easily for any state with arbitrary dimension. It is shown by several examples that these measures can reflect the amount of the original quantum discord. PMID:27122226

  13. Non-commutativity measure of quantum discord

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Quantum discord is a manifestation of quantum correlations due to non-commutativity rather than entanglement. Two measures of quantum discord by the amount of non-commutativity via the trace norm and the Hilbert-Schmidt norm respectively are proposed in this paper. These two measures can be calculated easily for any state with arbitrary dimension. It is shown by several examples that these measures can reflect the amount of the original quantum discord. PMID:27122226

  14. Protective Measurement and Quantum Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan

    2015-01-01

    1. Protective measurements: an introduction Shan Gao; Part I. Fundamentals and Applications: 2. Protective measurements of the wave function of a single system Lev Vaidman; 3. Protective measurement, postselection and the Heisenberg representation Yakir Aharonov and Eliahu Cohen; 4. Protective and state measurement: a review Gennaro Auletta; 5. Determination of the stationary basis from protective measurement on a single system Lajos Diósi; 6. Weak measurements, the energy-momentum tensor and the Bohm approach Robert Flack and Basil J. Hiley; Part II. Meanings and Implications: 7. Measurement and metaphysics Peter J. Lewis; 8. Protective measurements and the explanatory gambit Michael Dickson; 9. Realism and instrumentalism about the wave function: how should we choose? Mauro Dorato and Frederico Laudisa; 10. Protective measurements and the PBR theorem Guy Hetzroni and Daniel Rohrlich; 11. The roads not taken: empty waves, waveform collapse and protective measurement in quantum theory Peter Holland; 12. Implications of protective measurements on de Broglie–Bohm trajectories Aurelien Drezet; 13. Entanglement, scaling, and the meaning of the wave function in protective measurement Maximilian Schlosshauer and Tangereen V. B. Claringbold; 14. Protective measurements and the nature of the wave function within the primitive ontology approach Vincent Lam; 15. Reality and meaning of the wave function Shan Gao; Index.

  15. How much a quantum measurement is informative?

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2014-12-04

    The informational power of a quantum measurement is the maximum amount of classical information that the measurement can extract from any ensemble of quantum states. We discuss its main properties. Informational power is an additive quantity, being equivalent to the classical capacity of a quantum-classical channel. The informational power of a quantum measurement is the maximum of the accessible information of a quantum ensemble that depends on the measurement. We present some examples where the symmetry of the measurement allows to analytically derive its informational power.

  16. Quantum theory of measurements as quantum decision theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2015-03-01

    Theory of quantum measurements is often classified as decision theory. An event in decision theory corresponds to the measurement of an observable. This analogy looks clear for operationally testable simple events. However, the situation is essentially more complicated in the case of composite events. The most difficult point is the relation between decisions under uncertainty and measurements under uncertainty. We suggest a unified language for describing the processes of quantum decision making and quantum measurements. The notion of quantum measurements under uncertainty is introduced. We show that the correct mathematical foundation for the theory of measurements under uncertainty, as well as for quantum decision theory dealing with uncertain events, requires the use of positive operator-valued measure that is a generalization of projection-valued measure. The latter is appropriate for operationally testable events, while the former is necessary for characterizing operationally uncertain events. In both decision making and quantum measurements, one has to distinguish composite nonentangled events from composite entangled events. Quantum probability can be essentially different from classical probability only for entangled events. The necessary condition for the appearance of an interference term in the quantum probability is the occurrence of entangled prospects and the existence of an entangled strategic state of a decision maker or of an entangled statistical state of a measuring device.

  17. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-10-24

    We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement. To reduce these difficulties, we have developed research-based learning tools such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) and peer instruction tools. A preliminary evaluation shows that these learning tools are effective in improving students' understanding of concepts related to quantum measurement.

  18. Local Density Fluctuations Predict Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Azobenzene-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Addie; Samai, Soumyadyuti; Yan, Yunqi; Ginger, David S; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Azobenzene incorporated into DNA has a photoisomerization quantum yield that depends on the DNA sequence near the azobenzene attachment site. We use Molecular Dynamics computer simulations to elucidate which physical properties of the modified DNA determine the quantum yield. We show for a wide range of DNA sequences that the photoisomerization quantum yield is strongly correlated with the variance of the number of atoms in close proximity to the outer phenyl ring of the azobenzene group. We infer that quantum yield is controlled by the availability of fluctuations that enable the conformational change. We demonstrate that these simulations can be used as a qualitative predictive tool by calculating the quantum yield for several novel DNA sequences, and confirming these predictions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results will be useful for the development of a wide range of applications of photoresponsive DNA nanotechnology. PMID:27428569

  19. Quantum union bounds for sequential projective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jingliang

    2015-11-01

    We present two quantum union bounds for sequential projective measurements. These bounds estimate the disturbance accumulation and probability of outcomes when the measurements are performed sequentially. These results are based on a trigonometric representation of quantum states and should have wide application in quantum information theory for information-processing tasks such as communication and state discrimination, and perhaps even in the analysis of quantum algorithms.

  20. Quantum variance: A measure of quantum coherence and quantum correlations for many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frérot, Irénée; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental common trait of quantum phenomena, from the interference of matter waves to quantum degeneracy of identical particles. Despite its importance, estimating and measuring quantum coherence in generic, mixed many-body quantum states remains a formidable challenge, with fundamental implications in areas as broad as quantum condensed matter, quantum information, quantum metrology, and quantum biology. Here, we provide a quantitative definition of the variance of quantum coherent fluctuations (the quantum variance) of any observable on generic quantum states. The quantum variance generalizes the concept of thermal de Broglie wavelength (for the position of a free quantum particle) to the space of eigenvalues of any observable, quantifying the degree of coherent delocalization in that space. The quantum variance is generically measurable and computable as the difference between the static fluctuations and the static susceptibility of the observable; despite its simplicity, it is found to provide a tight lower bound to most widely accepted estimators of "quantumness" of observables (both as a feature as well as a resource), such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information and the quantum Fisher information. When considering bipartite fluctuations in an extended quantum system, the quantum variance expresses genuine quantum correlations among the two parts. In the case of many-body systems, it is found to obey an area law at finite temperature, extending therefore area laws of entanglement and quantum fluctuations of pure states to the mixed-state context. Hence the quantum variance paves the way to the measurement of macroscopic quantum coherence and quantum correlations in most complex quantum systems.

  1. Determination of photoluminescence quantum yields of scattering media with an integrating sphere: direct and indirect illumination.

    PubMed

    Würth, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing use of fluorescent nanomaterials and micrometer-sized beads in the life and material sciences requires reliable procedures for the measurement of the key performance parameter fluorescence quantum yield (Φf) of scattering particle dispersions and reference systems to evaluate the performance of such measurements. This encouraged us to systematically study, both theoretically and experimentally, the optical determination of photoluminescent quantum yield as a function of the scattering and absorption properties of the sample and the illumination geometry with an integrating sphere method. The latter included measurements with a direct and an indirect illumination. As a representative and easy-to-prepare reference system, we used ethanolic dispersions of 250 nm sized silica particles and the dye rhodamine 101 and systematically varied the concentration of the dye and particles within the typical ranges of spectroscopic and (bio)analytical applications of fluorescent nanomaterials. Based on our measurements, we recommend indirect sample illumination geometry for the accurate measurement of Φf of samples with low or unknown absorption and high scattering coefficients such as dispersions of luminescent particles or fluorescent reporters in biological matrices. This finding is of utmost relevance for all (bio)analytical applications of fluorescent nanomaterials ranging from particle labels and probes over assay platforms to safety barcodes. PMID:25955619

  2. Quantum Measurement and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2016-03-01

    Quantum measurement finds the observed system in a collapsed state, rather than in the state predicted by the Schrödinger equation. Yet there is a relatively spread opinion that the wavefunction collapse can be explained by unitary evolution (for instance in the decoherence approach, if we take into account the environment). In this article it is proven a mathematical result which severely restricts the initial conditions for which measurements have definite outcomes, if pure unitary evolution is assumed. This no-go theorem remains true even if we take the environment into account. The result does not forbid a unitary description of the measurement process, it only shows that such a description is possible only for very restricted initial conditions. The existence of such restrictions of the initial conditions can be understood in the four-dimensional block universe perspective, as a requirement of global self-consistency of the solutions of the Schrödinger equation.

  3. Quantum Measurement and the Real World

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2012-04-18

    While quantum measurement remains the central philosophical conundrum of quantum mechanics, it has recently grown into a respectable (read: experimental!) discipline as well. New perspectives on measurement have grown out of new technological possibilities, but also out of attempts to design systems for quantum information processing. I will present several examples of how our current ideas on quantum measurement go far beyond the usual textbook treatments, using examples from our entangled-photon and ultracold-atoms laboratories in Toronto. Topics will be drawn from weak measurement, 'interaction-free' measurement, Hardy's Paradox, measurement-induced quantum logic, and techniques for controlling and characterizing the coherence of quantum systems. The moral of the story will be that there are many different kinds of measurement strategies, with their own advantages and disadvantages; and that some things we have been taught not to even think about can actually be measured in a certain sense.

  4. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2016-07-01

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derive a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. A comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements. PMID:27575061

  5. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derive a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. A comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements.

  6. Aeronomical determinations of the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from dissociative recombination of O2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Abreu, Vincent J.; Colwell, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the visible-airglow experiment on the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite have been used to determine the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from the dissociative recombination of O2(+) based on a constant total recombination rate from each vibrational level. A range of values between 0.05 and 0.18 has been obtained for the quantum yield of O (1S) and shows a positive correlation with the extent of the vibrational excitation of O2(+). The quantum yield of O (1D) has been measured to be 0.9 + or - 0.2, with no apparent dependence on the vibrational distribution of O2(+).

  7. Uncertainty characteristics of generalized quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2003-02-01

    The effects of any quantum measurement can be described by a collection of measurement operators {Mm} acting on the quantum state of the measured system. However, the Hilbert space formalism tends to obscure the relationship between the measurement results and the physical properties of the measured system. In this paper, a characterization of measurement operators in terms of measurement resolution and disturbance is developed. It is then possible to formulate uncertainty relations for the measurement process that are valid for arbitrary input states. The motivation of these concepts is explained from a quantum communication viewpoint. It is shown that the intuitive interpretation of uncertainty as a relation between measurement resolution and disturbance provides a valid description of measurement back action. Possible applications to quantum cryptography, quantum cloning, and teleportation are discussed.

  8. Improved quantum state transfer via quantum partially collapsing measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Ba An, Nguyen; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we present a general scheme to improve quantum state transfer (QST) by taking advantage of quantum partially collapsing measurements. The scheme consists of a weak measurement performed at the initial time on the qubit encoding the state of concern and a subsequent quantum reversal measurement at a desired time on the destined qubit. We determine the strength q{sub r} of the post quantum reversal measurement as a function of the strength p of the prior weak measurement and the evolution time t so that near-perfect QST can be achieved by choosing p close enough to 1, with a finite success probability, regardless of the evolution time and the distance over which the QST takes place. The merit of our scheme is twofold: it not only improves QST, but also suppresses the energy dissipation, if any. - Highlights: • A scheme using weak/reversal measurements is devised to improve quantum state transfer. • It can suppress dissipation allowing optimal quantum state transfer in open system. • Explicit condition for achieving near-perfect quantum state transfer is established. • Applications to spin chain and cavity array are considered in detail.

  9. Quantum measurements and Landauer's principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.

    2015-05-01

    Information processing systems must obey laws of physics. One of particular examples of this general statement is known as Landauer's principle - irreversible operations (such as erasure) performed by any computing device at finite temperature have to dissipate some amount of heat bound from below. Together with other results of this kind, Landauer's principle represents a fundamental limit any modern or future computer must obey. We discuss interpretation of the physics behind the Landauer's principle using a model of Unruh-DeWitt detector. Of particular interest is the validity of this limit in quantum domain. We systematically study finite time effects. It is shown, in particular, that in high temperature limit finiteness of measurement time leads to renormalization of the detector's temperature.

  10. Gradient CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots with Room Temperature Biexciton Unity Quantum Yield.

    PubMed

    Nasilowski, Michel; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoît

    2015-06-10

    Auger recombination is a major limitation for the fluorescent emission of quantum dots (QDs). It is the main source of QDs fluorescence blinking at the single-particle level. At high-power excitation, when several charge carriers are formed inside a QD, Auger becomes more efficient and severely decreases the quantum yield (QY) of multiexcitons. This limits the efficiency and the use of colloidal QDs in applications where intense light output is required. Here, we present a new generation of thick-shell CdSe/CdS QDs with dimensions >40 nm and a composition gradient between the core and the shell that exhibits 100% QY for the emission of both the monoexciton and the biexciton in air and at room temperature for all the QDs we have observed. The fluorescence emission of these QDs is perfectly Poissonian at the single-particle level at different excitation levels and temperatures, from 30 to 300 K. In these QDs, the emission of high-order (>2) multiexcitons is quite efficient, and we observe white light emission at the single-QD level when high excitation power is used. These gradient thick shell QDs confirm the suppression of Auger recombination in gradient core/shell structures and help further establish the colloidal QDs with a gradient shell as a very stable source of light even under high excitation. PMID:25990468

  11. Quantum yield and lifetime data analysis for the UV curable quantum dot nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qi; Liu, Cui; Wei, Wenjun; Xu, Heng; You, Qingliang; Zou, Linling; Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Zheng, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The quantum yield (QY) and lifetime are the important parameters for the photoluminescent materials. The data here report the changes of the QY and lifetime for the quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite after the UV curing of the urethane acrylate prepolymer. The data were collected based on the water soluble CdTe QDs and urethane acrylate prepolymer. Colloidal QDs were in various concentration from 0.5×10−3 molL−1 to 10×10−3 molL−1, and 1% (wt%) 1173 was the photoinitiator. The QY before the curing was 56.3%, 57.8% and 58.6% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. The QY after the curing was changed to 8.9%, 9.6% and 13.4% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. Lifetime data showed that the lifetime was changed from 23.71 ns, 24.55 ns, 23.52 ns to 1.29 ns, 2.74 ns, 2.45 ns for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. PMID:26909375

  12. Quantum yield and lifetime data analysis for the UV curable quantum dot nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi; Liu, Cui; Wei, Wenjun; Xu, Heng; You, Qingliang; Zou, Linling; Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Zheng, Guang

    2016-03-01

    The quantum yield (QY) and lifetime are the important parameters for the photoluminescent materials. The data here report the changes of the QY and lifetime for the quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite after the UV curing of the urethane acrylate prepolymer. The data were collected based on the water soluble CdTe QDs and urethane acrylate prepolymer. Colloidal QDs were in various concentration from 0.5×10(-3) molL(-1) to 10×10(-3) molL(-1), and 1% (wt%) 1173 was the photoinitiator. The QY before the curing was 56.3%, 57.8% and 58.6% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. The QY after the curing was changed to 8.9%, 9.6% and 13.4% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. Lifetime data showed that the lifetime was changed from 23.71 ns, 24.55 ns, 23.52 ns to 1.29 ns, 2.74 ns, 2.45 ns for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. PMID:26909375

  13. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO2 nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Ailan; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO2 nanotubes (GQDs/TiO2 NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600-800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV-vis light irradiation (λ = 380-780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO2 NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO2 composite.

  14. Quantum yields for photochemical production of NO2 from organic nitrates at tropospherically relevant wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina M; Evans, Louise A; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Shallcross, Dudley E; Tew, David P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2014-04-17

    Absorption cross-sections and quantum yields for NO2 production (ΦNO2) are reported for gaseous methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, and isopropyl nitrate at 294 K. Absorption cross-sections in the wavelength range of 240-320 nm agree well with prior determinations. NO2 quantum yields at photoexcitation wavelengths of 290, 295, and 315 nm are unity within experimental uncertainties for all of the alkyl nitrates studied and are independent of bath gas (N2) pressure for total sample pressures in the range of 250-700 Torr. When averaged over all wavelengths and sample pressures, values of ΦNO2 are 1.03 ± 0.05 (methyl nitrate), 0.98 ± 0.09 (ethyl nitrate), 1.01 ± 0.04 (n-propyl nitrate), and 1.00 ± 0.05 (isopropyl nitrate), with uncertainties corresponding to 1 standard deviation. Absorption cross-sections for ethyl nitrate, isopropyl nitrate, and two unsaturated dinitrate compounds, but-3-ene-1,2-diyl dinitrate and (Z)-but-2-ene-1,4-diyl dinitrate in acetonitrile solution, are compared to gas-phase values, and over the wavelength range of 260-315 nm, the gas-phase values are well-reproduced by dividing the liquid-phase cross-sections by 2.0, 1.6, 1.7, and 2.2, respectively. Reasonable estimates of the gas-phase absorption cross-sections for low-volatility organic nitrates can therefore be obtained by halving the values for acetonitrile solutions. The quantum yield for NO2 formation from photoexcitation of but-3-ene-1,2-diyl dinitrate at 290 nm is significantly lower than those for the alkyl (mono) nitrates: a best estimate of ΦNO2 ≤ 0.25 is obtained from the experimental measurements. PMID:24684215

  15. Photophysics of protoporphyrin ions in vacuo: Triplet-state lifetimes and quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. Reyes; Andersen, Jens Ulrik; Hvelplund, Preben; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Pedersen, Ulrik V.; Rangama, Jimmy; Tomita, Shigeo; Forster, James S.

    2004-03-01

    Lifetimes of triplet-state molecules and triplet quantum yields are important parameters in photobiology as they determine the generation of singlet-oxygen upon irradiation with visible light. Here we report lifetimes of protoporphyrin IX (pp) in vacuo measured in an ion storage ring. We find that after 532 nm photon absorption, pp- (free base and negatively charged carboxylate) and pp+ (single protonation of ring nitrogen) have triplet-state lifetimes of 12 and 6 ms, respectively. After 415 or 390 nm absorption the lifetime of the anion is shorter (1.5 and 0.6 ms) as expected from the increase in temperature. Triplet quantum yields of pp- and pp+ are similar, 0.6-0.7, close to values reported for the free base and monocation in solution. The other channel, direct decay to the electronic ground state and subsequent dissociation of vibrationally excited ions, is much faster than triplet-singlet intersystem crossing. We measured lifetimes of 63 μs, 96 μs, and 0.3 ms after 390, 415, and 532 nm excitation, respectively. A fit of a statistical model to the pp- decay results in an Arrhenius activation energy of 0.5±0.2 eV for CO2 loss and a low preexponential factor (106-1010 s-1), indicative of an entropic barrier.

  16. Biological measurement beyond the quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Janousek, Jiri; Daria, Vincent; Knittel, Joachim; Hage, Boris; Bachor, Hans-A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic biological measurements require low light levels to avoid damaging the specimen. With this constraint on optical power, quantum noise fundamentally limits the measurement sensitivity. This limit can only be surpassed by extracting more information per photon by using quantum correlations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the quantum shot noise limit can be overcome for measurements of living systems. Quantum-correlated light with amplitude noise squeezed 75% below the vacuum level is used to perform microrheology experiments within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. Naturally occurring lipid granules are tracked in real time as they diffuse through the cytoplasm, and the quantum noise limit is surpassed by 42%. The laser-based microparticle tracking technique used is compatible with non-classical light and is immune to low-frequency noise, leading the way to achieving a broad range of quantum-enhanced measurements in biology.

  17. A Comprehensive Strategy to Boost the Quantum Yield of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Júnior, Severino A.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2013-08-01

    Lanthanide luminescence has many important applications in anion sensing, protein recognition, nanosized phosphorescent devices, optoelectronic devices, immunoassays, etc. Luminescent europium complexes, in particular, act as light conversion molecular devices by absorbing ultraviolet (UV) light and by emitting light in the red visible spectral region. The quantum yield of luminescence is defined as the ratio of the number of photons emitted over the number of UV photons absorbed. The higher the quantum yield of luminescence, the higher the sensitivity of the application. Here we advance a conjecture that allows the design of europium complexes with higher values of quantum yields by simply increasing the diversity of good ligands coordinated to the lanthanide ion. Indeed, for the studied cases, the percent boost obtained on the quantum yield proved to be strong: of up to 81%, accompanied by faster radiative rate constants, since the emission becomes less forbidden.

  18. A Comprehensive Strategy to Boost the Quantum Yield of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Júnior, Severino A.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide luminescence has many important applications in anion sensing, protein recognition, nanosized phosphorescent devices, optoelectronic devices, immunoassays, etc. Luminescent europium complexes, in particular, act as light conversion molecular devices by absorbing ultraviolet (UV) light and by emitting light in the red visible spectral region. The quantum yield of luminescence is defined as the ratio of the number of photons emitted over the number of UV photons absorbed. The higher the quantum yield of luminescence, the higher the sensitivity of the application. Here we advance a conjecture that allows the design of europium complexes with higher values of quantum yields by simply increasing the diversity of good ligands coordinated to the lanthanide ion. Indeed, for the studied cases, the percent boost obtained on the quantum yield proved to be strong: of up to 81%, accompanied by faster radiative rate constants, since the emission becomes less forbidden. PMID:23928866

  19. Primary quantum yields of ketyl radicals in photoreduction by amines. Abstraction of H from N

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1980-02-13

    Results of laser flash photolysis studies of the primary reaction of benzophenone triplet with aliphatic amines in benzene solution are reported. Quantum yield of formation of benzophenone ketyl radical was 0.9 - 1.0. Quantum yields for reduction of ketone also were determined for various amines, and the effects of tert-butyl alcohol on radical formation was investigated. Data indicated that H is not abstracted from -CH/sub 3/ but is abstracted efficiently from -NH/sub 2/. The very high quantum yields observed with tertiary and secondary amines were thought to imply exciplex formation, but lower quantum yields with primary amines were conditionally attributed to higher ionization potentials. (BLM)

  20. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  1. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-15

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom-the symplectic eigenvalues-which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  2. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  3. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics. PMID:26967399

  4. Fact Sheet: Accurately measuring forage yield in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have a few options for measuring pasture yield. These include pasture rulers, plate meters, and electronic gauges. Pasture rulers simply measure canopy height and assume that forage yield is directly related to height. Plate meters improve accuracy by measuring compressed height. Electronic ...

  5. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes. PMID:24333386

  6. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Measurement Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Mikio; Pasaczio, Saverio

    1996-01-01

    Critically analyzing the so-called quantum Zeno effect in the measurement problem, we show that observation of this effect does not necessarily mean experimental evidence for the naive notion of wave-function collapse by measurement (the simple projection rule). We also examine what kind of limitation the uncertainty relation and others impose on the observation of the quantum Zeno effect.

  7. Measurement of Neutron Yields from UF4

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane W; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Ohmes, Martin F; Xu, Yunlin; Downar, Thomas J; Pozzi, Sara A

    2010-01-01

    We have performed measurements of neutron production from UF{sub 4} samples using liquid scintillator as the detector material. Neutrons and gamma rays were separated by a multichannel digital pulse shape discriminator, and the neutron pulse-height spectra were unfolded using sequential least-squares optimization with an active set strategy. The unfolded spectra were compared to estimates calculated with the SOURCES 4C code.

  8. The Measurement Problem in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuzo

    2001-02-01

    Since the establishment of quantum mechanics in the 20s of this century, the controversial discussions 1 have ever continued about its basis, that is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Strangely those discussions are prevailed mainly in the circle of theoretical group, while the experimental physicists who are directly concerned with the measurement, indifferently to the discussion have performed their study works, showing firmly the validity of quantum theory. This curious affair seems to be stemmed from the situation that the discussions overlooked by basing on what quantum theoretic ground the experimental equipments are installed, its sure operations are examined and the obtained results are explained, etc. In this talk 2 we shall aim to make clear the relation between the experiment and the structure of quantum mechanics, and to present some epistemological considerations on the quantum mechanics.

  9. Quantum measurement in coherence-vector representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    We consider the quantum measurements on a finite quantum system in coherence-vector representation. In this representation, all the density operators of an N-level ( N ⩾ 2) quantum system constitute a convex set M (N) embedded in an ( N 2 - 1)-dimensional Euclidean space R^{N^2 - 1}, and we find that an orthogonal measurement is an ( N - 1)-dimensional projector operator on R^{N^2 - 1}. The states unchanged by an orthogonal measurement form an ( N - 1)-dimensional simplex, and in the case when N is prime or power of prime, the space of the density operator is a direct sum of ( N + 1) such simplices. The mathematical description of quantum measurement is plain in this representation, and this may have further applications in quantum information processing.

  10. Photoactivated biological processes as quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamoglu, A.; Whaley, K. B.

    2015-02-01

    We outline a framework for describing photoactivated biological reactions as generalized quantum measurements of external fields, for which the biological system takes on the role of a quantum meter. By using general arguments regarding the Hamiltonian that describes the measurement interaction, we identify the cases where it is essential for a complex chemical or biological system to exhibit nonequilibrium quantum coherent dynamics in order to achieve the requisite functionality. We illustrate the analysis by considering measurement of the solar radiation field in photosynthesis and measurement of the earth's magnetic field in avian magnetoreception.

  11. Calculated quantum yield of photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the Marine Light-Mixed Layers (59 deg N, 21 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Lee, Z. P.; Marra, John; Steward, R. G.; Perry, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C/mol photons) was calculated at six depths for the waters of the Marine Light-Mixed Layer (MLML) cruise of May 1991. As there were photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) but no spectral irradiance measurements for the primary production incubations, three ways are presented here for the calculation of the absorbed photons (AP) by phytoplankton for the purpose of calculating phi. The first is based on a simple, nonspectral model; the second is based on a nonlinear regression using measured PAR values with depth; and the third is derived through remote sensing measurements. We show that the results of phi calculated using the nonlinear regreesion method and those using remote sensing are in good agreement with each other, and are consistent with the reported values of other studies. In deep waters, however, the simple nonspectral model may cause quantum yield values much higher than theoretically possible.

  12. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Dada, Adetunmise C.; Andersson, Erika; Jones, Martin L.; Kendon, Vivien M.; Everitt, Mark S.

    2011-04-15

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two nonstandard quantum measurements using cavity QED. The first measurement optimally and unambiguously distinguishes between two nonorthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionization detection of atoms and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurements have been realized only on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical systems. This is for fundamental reasons but also since quantum coding gain in general increases with code word length, and a realization using atoms could be more easily scaled than existing realizations using photons.

  13. Work measurement in a quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariani, Francesco; Zhang, Keye; Dong, Ying; Meystre, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    We consider an optomechanical quantum heat engine operating on an Otto cycle for photon-phonon polaritons, the working substance of the engine. We discuss both the average value and quantum fluctuations of its work output, concentrating in particular on the effects of quantum non-adiabaticity due to the finite duration of the cycle. We also determine the quantum back-action of both absorptive and dispersive continuous measurements of the work, and quantify their impact on the Curzon-Ahlborn engine efficiency at maximum power and its fluctuations. We ackowledge financial support from National Basic Research Program of China, NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuaSAR programs

  14. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. V. Quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-01

    The FEYNMAN program has been developed during the last years to support case studies on the dynamics and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers. Apart from basic transformations and (gate) operations, it currently supports a good number of separability criteria and entanglement measures, quantum channels as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects in quantum information theory, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions. With the present update of the FEYNMAN program, we provide a simple access to (the simulation of) quantum measurements. This includes not only the widely-applied projective measurements upon the eigenspaces of some given operator but also single-qubit measurements in various pre- and user-defined bases as well as the support for two-qubit Bell measurements. In addition, we help perform generalized and POVM measurements. Knowing the importance of measurements for many quantum information protocols, e.g., one-way computing, we hope that this update makes the FEYNMAN code an attractive and versatile tool for both, research and education. New version program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v5_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 210 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 960 471 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 12 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; the program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux Classification: 4.15 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADWE_v4_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun

  15. The measurements of total electron yield from silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, A.-G.; Li, C.-Q.; Wang, L.; Pei, Y.-J.

    2009-12-01

    A device for measuring total electron yields in the energy range 4-65 keV from conductor was set up successfully, which was made up of electron gun system, vacuum system and electrical system. By the pulse electron gun method, the total electron yields in the energy range 4-65 keV from silver were measured, based on the relation between the secondary electron yield and total electron yield at high incident electron energy from metals, the secondary electron yields in the energy range 10-65 keV from silver were deduced. Total electron yields measured with the device were compared with theoretical values, and the deduced secondary electron yield were compared with several authors' values, the results were discussed and a conclusion was drawn that the deduced secondary electron yields and the total electron yields from silver measured with the device are credible. This project was supported by the Science Foundation of Nanjing University of Information and Technology (Grant No. QD65).

  16. Lectures on Dynamical Models for Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí Balian, Roger

    2015-10-01

    In textbooks, ideal quantum measurements are described in terms of the tested system only by the collapse postulate and Born's rule. This level of description offers a rather flexible position for the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Here we analyse an ideal measurement as a process of interaction between the tested system S and an apparatus A, so as to derive the properties postulated in textbooks. We thus consider within standard quantum mechanics the measurement of a quantum spin component ŝz by an apparatus A, being a magnet coupled to a bath. We first consider the evolution of the density operator of S+A describing a large set of runs of the measurement process. The approach describes the disappearance of the off-diagonal terms ("truncation") of the density matrix as a physical effect due to A, while the registration of the outcome has classical features due to the large size of the pointer variable, the magnetisation. A quantum ambiguity implies that the density matrix at the final time can be decomposed on many bases, not only the one of the measurement. This quantum oddity prevents to connect individual outcomes to measurements, a difficulty known as the "measurement problem". It is shown that it is circumvented by the apparatus as well, since the evolution in a small time interval erases all decompositions, except the one on the measurement basis. Once one can derive the outcome of individual events from quantum theory, the so-called "collapse of the wave function" or the "reduction of the state" appears as the result of a selection of runs among the original large set. Hence nothing more than standard quantum mechanics is needed to explain features of measurements. The employed statistical formulation is advocated for the teaching of quantum theory.

  17. Acausal measurement-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of by-product operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, by-product operators cannot be avoided. Here we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner, Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing restricting local operations to projective measurements. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the standard causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that if we restrict local operations to projective measurements the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing. We also show that it is possible to consider a causal game whose causal inequality is violated by acausal measurement-based quantum computing.

  18. Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Hamici-Bendimerad, Amel Hiba; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the von Neumann entropy of a quantum state does not decrease with a projective measurement. This property holds for Tsallis and Rényi entropies as well. We show that the recently introduced quantum version of the Kaniadakis entropy preserves this property.

  19. Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement.

    PubMed

    Ourabah, Kamel; Hamici-Bendimerad, Amel Hiba; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the von Neumann entropy of a quantum state does not decrease with a projective measurement. This property holds for Tsallis and Rényi entropies as well. We show that the recently introduced quantum version of the Kaniadakis entropy preserves this property. PMID:26465433

  20. Quantum nondemolition measurements. [by gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginskii, V. B.; Vorontsov, Iu. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes new electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements and the theory underlying them. Consideration is given to resonant-bar gravitational-wave antennas. Position measurements are discussed along with energy measurements and back-action-evading measurements. Thermal noise in oscillators and amplifiers is outlined. Prospects for stroboscopic measurements are emphasized.

  1. A quantum measure of the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenkin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently suggested that probabilities of different events in the multiverse are given by the frequencies at which these events are encountered along the worldline of a geodesic observer (the ``watcher''). Here I discuss an extension of this probability measure to quantum theory. The proposed extension is gauge-invariant, as is the classical version of this measure. Observations of the watcher are described by a reduced density matrix, and the frequencies of events can be found using the decoherent histories formalism of Quantum Mechanics (adapted to open systems). The quantum watcher measure makes predictions in agreement with the standard Born rule of QM.

  2. A quantum measure of the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Vilenkin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently suggested that probabilities of different events in the multiverse are given by the frequencies at which these events are encountered along the worldline of a geodesic observer (the ''watcher''). Here I discuss an extension of this probability measure to quantum theory. The proposed extension is gauge-invariant, as is the classical version of this measure. Observations of the watcher are described by a reduced density matrix, and the frequencies of events can be found using the decoherent histories formalism of Quantum Mechanics (adapted to open systems). The quantum watcher measure makes predictions in agreement with the standard Born rule of QM.

  3. Thermoelectric corrections to quantum voltage measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin P.; Stafford, Charles A.

    2014-12-01

    A generalization of Büttiker's voltage probe concept for nonzero temperatures is an open third terminal of a quantum thermoelectric circuit. An explicit analytic expression for the thermoelectric correction to an ideal quantum voltage measurement in linear response is derived and interpreted in terms of local Peltier cooling/heating within the nonequilibrium system. The thermoelectric correction is found to be large (up to ±24 % of the peak voltage) in a prototypical ballistic quantum conductor (graphene nanoribbon). The effects of measurement nonideality are also investigated. Our findings have important implications for precision local electrical measurements.

  4. Inconclusive quantum measurements and decisions under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav; Sornette, Didier

    2016-04-01

    We give a mathematical definition for the notion of inconclusive quantum measurements. In physics, such measurements occur at intermediate stages of a complex measurement procedure, with the final measurement result being operationally testable. Since the mathematical structure of Quantum Decision Theory has been developed in analogy with the theory of quantum measurements, the inconclusive quantum measurements correspond, in Quantum Decision Theory, to intermediate stages of decision making in the process of taking decisions under uncertainty. The general form of the quantum probability for a composite event is the sum of a utility factor, describing a rational evaluation of the considered prospect, and of an attraction factor, characterizing irrational, subconscious attitudes of the decision maker. Despite the involved irrationality, the probability of prospects can be evaluated. This is equivalent to the possibility of calculating quantum probabilities without specifying hidden variables. We formulate a general way of evaluation, based on the use of non-informative priors. As an example, we suggest the explanation of the decoy effect. Our quantitative predictions are in very good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Effective lactation yield: A measure to compare milk yield between cows with different dry period lengths.

    PubMed

    Kok, A; van Middelaar, C E; Engel, B; van Knegsel, A T M; Hogeveen, H; Kemp, B; de Boer, I J M

    2016-04-01

    To compare milk yields between cows or management strategies, lactations are traditionally standardized to 305-d yields. The 305-d yield, however, gives no insight into the combined effect of additional milk yield before calving, decreased milk yield after calving, and a possible shorter calving interval in the case of a shortened dry period. We aimed to develop a measure that would enable the comparison of milk yield between cows with different dry period (DP) lengths. We assessed the importance of accounting for additional milk yield before calving and for differences in calving interval. The 305-d yield was compared with a 365-d yield, which included additional milk yield in the 60 d before calving. Next, an effective lactation yield was computed, defined as the daily yield from 60d before calving to 60 d before the next calving, to account for additional milk yield before calving and for differences in calving interval. Test-day records and drying-off dates of 15 commercial farms were used to compute the 305-d, 365-d, and effective lactation yields for individual cows. We analyzed 817 second-parity lactations preceded by no DP, a short DP (20 to 40 d), or a conventional DP (49 to 90 d). Compared with cows with a conventional DP, the 305-d yield of cows with no DP was 7.0 kg of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM) per day lower, and the 305-d yield of cows with a short DP was 2.3 kg of FPCM per day lower. Including additional milk yield before calving in the 365-d yield reduced this difference to 3.4 kg of FPCM per cow per day for cows with no DP and to 0.9 kg of FPCM per cow per day for cows with a short DP. Compared with cows with a conventional DP, median days open were reduced by 25d for cows with no DP and by 18d for cows with a short DP. Accounting for these differences in calving interval in the effective lactation yield further decreased yield reductions for cows with no DP or a short DP by 0.3 kg of FPCM per cow per day. At the herd level, estimated

  6. Nanosecond flash studies of reduction of benzophenone by aliphatic amines. Quantum yields and kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1981-03-11

    Nanosecond flash photolysis, steady irradiation, and deuterium substitution studies have been carried out on solutions of benzophenone with added reductants. Quantum yields (phi/sub ketyl/) for reduction in benzene of benzophenone triplet to ketyl radical, based on phi = 2 for benzhydrol (I), were approx. 1 for cyclohexane (II), tert-butylamine (III), 2-aminobutane (IV), cyclohexylamine (V), di-n-propylamine (VI), and triethylamine (VII), approx. 0.7 for 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (VIII), and approx. 0 for tert-butyl alcohol (IX). Thus, quenching, without radical formation by H abstraction from N and/or ..cap alpha..-C, does not occur with common aliphatic amines but does with Dabco (VIII). The latter quenching is markedly increased by small additions of acetonitrile; the flash spectrum from this compound indicates formation of a triplet amine CT complex or radical ion pair. Triplet-reductant interaction rate constants, k/sur ir/, are high for the amines (approx. 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) but also show significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects: 1.9 with III-N-d/sub 2/; 1.4 with IV-N-d/sub 2/; 1.2-1.3 with IV-..cap alpha..-C-d. It is proposed that k/sub ir/ measures H atom abstraction, favored in the transition state by an initial charge-transfer interaction. Overall steady irradiation quantum yields of reduction by amines, phi/sub Red/, are much lower than phi/sub ketyl/. This is attributed to disproportionationreactions of ketyl and alkylaminyl radicals for primary and secondary amines, and, possibly, aminoalkyl radicals for tertiary amines. In the case of tert-butylamine, the rate constant for disproportionation is obtained from the decay kinetics of ketyl radical and leads to phi/sub Red/ in agreement with that directly measured.

  7. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-15

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  8. Quantum nondemolition measurements of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Caves, C. M.; Zimmermann, M.; Sandberg, V. D.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Measuring systems to determine the real component of the complex amplitude of a harmonic oscillator are described. This amplitude is constant in the absence of driving forces, and the uncertainty principle accounts for the fact that only the real component can be measured precisely and continuously ('quantum nondemolition measurement'). Application of the measuring systems to the detection of gravitational waves is considered.

  9. Who is afraid of POV measures? Unified approach to quantum phase observables

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, P. |; Grabowski, M.; Lahti, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that introducing phase observables as shift-covariant positive-operator-valued measures yields a coherent unification of various conceptually different approaches to the phase in quantum theory. {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

  10. [Fluorescence spectra and quantum yield of TiO2 nanocrystals synthesized by alcohothermal method].

    PubMed

    Song, Cui-Hong; Li, Yan-Ting; Li, Jing; Wei, Yong-Ju; Hu, Yu-Zhu; Wei, Yu

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quantum yield of TiO2 nanocrystals were studied. Using tetra n-butyl titanate as a starting material, a facile alcohothermal technique was used to synthesize TiO2 nanocrystals. As can be seen from the transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) image, TiO2 nanocrystals with a relatively uniform particle size distribution of < 10 nm are present in the transparent sol. The transparent sol presents a strong stable fluorescence emission with a maximum at 450 nm, which is greatly dependent on the size quantization effects, defect energy level and the surface state of TiO2 nanocrystals. The quantum yield (gamma) of TiO2 was determined by the relative comparison procedure, using freshly prepared analytical purity quinine sulfate in 0.05 mol x L(-1) H2SO4 as a relative quantum yield standard. The emission quantum yield of TiO2 nanocrystals prepared in alcoholic media was calculated to be about 0.20 at wavelengths ranging from 330 to 370 nm, which was much higher than the values reported in previous works. So, it is supposed that nano-TiO2 will be applied as a potential quantum dots fluorescence probe in biological analysis. PMID:18422145

  11. Photonic effects on the radiative decay rate and luminescence quantum yield of doped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Senden, Tim; Rabouw, Freddy T; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-02-24

    Nanocrystals (NCs) doped with luminescent ions form an emerging class of materials. In contrast to excitonic transitions in semiconductor NCs, the optical transitions are localized and not affected by quantum confinement. The radiative decay rates of the dopant emission in NCs are nevertheless different from their bulk analogues due to photonic effects, and also the luminescence quantum yield (QY, important for applications) is affected. In the past, different theoretical models have been proposed to describe the photonic effects for dopant emission in NCs, with little experimental validation. In this work we investigate the photonic effects on the radiative decay rate of luminescent doped NCs using 4 nm LaPO4 NCs doped with Ce(3+) or Tb(3+) ions in different refractive index solvents and bulk crystals. We demonstrate that the measured influence of the refractive index on the radiative decay rate of the Ce(3+) emission, having near unity QY, is in excellent agreement with the theoretical nanocrystal-cavity model. Furthermore, we show how the nanocrystal-cavity model can be used to quantify the nonunity QY of Tb(3+)-doped LaPO4 NCs and demonstrate that, as a general rule, the QY is higher in media with higher refractive index. PMID:25584627

  12. Do upland conservation measures reduce watershed sediment yield?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of conservation measures do not always result in an immediate and measurable sediment yield reduction at the outlet of large watersheds. In this study, instantaneous suspended sediment and discharge measurements, taken in 1943-1948 and again in 2004-2008, in the Fort Cobb Reservoir wa...

  13. ISOL Yield Predictions from Holdup-Time Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spejewski, Eugene H.; Carter, H Kennon; Mervin, Brenden T.; Prettyman, Emily S.; Kronenberg, Andreas; Stracener, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    A formalism based on a simple model is derived to predict ISOL yields for all isotopes of a given element based on a holdup-time measurement of a single isotope of that element. Model predictions, based on parameters obtained from holdup-time measurements, are compared to independently-measured experimental values.

  14. Norm-based measurement of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchun; Guo Guangcan

    2011-06-15

    In this paper we derived a necessary and sufficient condition for classical correlated states and proposed a norm-based measurement Q of quantum correlation. Using the max norm of operators, we gave the expression of the quantum correlation measurement Q and investigated the dynamics of Q in Markovian and non-Markovian cases, respectively. Q decays exponentially and vanishes only asymptotically in the Markovian case and causes periodical death and rebirth in the non-Markovian case. In the pure state, the quantum correlation Q is always larger than the entanglement, which was different from other known measurements. In addition, we showed that locally broadcastable and broadcastable are equivalent and reproved the density of quantum correlated states.

  15. Quantum state estimation with informationally overcomplete measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2014-07-01

    We study informationally overcomplete measurements for quantum state estimation so as to clarify their tomographic significance as compared with minimal informationally complete measurements. We show that informationally overcomplete measurements can improve the tomographic efficiency significantly over minimal measurements when the states of interest have high purities. Nevertheless, the efficiency is still too limited to be satisfactory with respect to figures of merit based on monotone Riemannian metrics, such as the Bures metric and quantum Chernoff metric. In this way, we also pinpoint the limitation of nonadaptive measurements and motivate the study of more sophisticated measurement schemes. In the course of our study, we introduce the best linear unbiased estimator and show that it is equally efficient as the maximum likelihood estimator in the large sample limit. This estimator may significantly outperform the canonical linear estimator for states with high purities. It is expected to play an important role in experimental designs and adaptive quantum state tomography besides its significance to the current study.

  16. On the theory of quantum measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, Hermann A.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    1994-01-01

    Many so called paradoxes of quantum mechanics are clarified when the measurement equipment is treated as a quantized system. Every measurement involves nonlinear processes. Self consistent formulations of nonlinear quantum optics are relatively simple. Hence optical measurements, such as the quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of photon number, are particularly well suited for such a treatment. It shows that the so called 'collapse of the wave function' is not needed for the interpretation of the measurement process. Coherence of the density matrix of the signal is progressively reduced with increasing accuracy of the photon number determination. If the QND measurement is incorporated into the double slit experiment, the contrast ratio of the fringes is found to decrease with increasing information on the photon number in one of the two paths.

  17. Raman microscope and quantum yield studies on the primary photochemistry of A2-visual pigments.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, B; Mathies, R A; Pardoen, J A; Lugtenburg, J

    1987-01-01

    The 77-K resonance Raman vibrational spectrum of intact goldfish rod photoreceptors containing 3,4-dehydro (A2) retinal is dominated by scattering from the 9-cis component of the steady state at all excitation wavelengths. Intact goldfish photoreceptors were regenerated with an A1-retinal chromophore to determine whether this behavior is caused by the protein or the chromophore. The resulting Raman spectrum was typical of an A1-pigment exhibiting significant scattering from all three components of the steady state: rhodopsin, bathorhodopsin, and isorhodopsin. Furthermore, regeneration of bovine opsin with A2-retinal produces a characteristic "A2-Raman spectrum" that is dominated by scattering from the 9-cis pigment. We conclude that the differences between the Raman spectra of the A1-and A2-pigments are caused by some intrinsic difference in the photochemical properties of the retinal chromophores. To quantitate these observations, the 77-K adsorption spectra and the photochemical quantum yields (phi) of the native A2-goldfish and the regenerated A2-bovine pigments were measured. In the goldfish A2-pigment, the value of phi 4 (9-cis----trans) is 0.05; phi 3 (trans----9-cis) is 0.10; and phi 2 (trans----11-cis) is 0.35. By contrast, in the bovine A1-pigment, these quantum yields are 0.10, 0.053, and 0.50, respectively. The reduced value of phi 4 and the increased value of phi 3 in the goldfish pigment confirms that the 9-cis isomer is photochemically more stable in A2-pigments. PMID:3676440

  18. Asphaltenes yield curve measurements on a microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Sieben, Vincent J; Tharanivasan, Asok Kumar; Ratulowski, John; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2015-10-21

    We describe a microfluidic apparatus and method for performing asphaltene yield measurements on crude oil samples. Optical spectroscopy measurements are combined with a microfluidic fluid handling platform to create an automated microfluidic apparatus to measure the asphaltene yield. The microfluidic measurements show good agreement with conventional wet chemistry measurements as well as available models. The initial absorbance of the oil is measured, and asphaltenes are removed from the oil by the gradual addition of n-alkane, which leads to flocculation and subsequent filtration. The absorbance of the de-asphalted oil (maltenes) is then measured and the initial asphaltene content is determined by the change in absorbance. The solubility of asphaltene is evaluated by varying the titrant-to-oil ratio (e.g., n-heptane-oil), which induces no, partial, or full precipitation of asphaltenes depending on the chosen ratio. The absorbance of the filtrate is measured and normalized to the maximum content to determine the fractional precipitation at each ratio. Traditionally, a yield curve comprised of 20 such ratios would require weeks to months to generate, while consuming over 6 L of solvent and more than 100 g of crude oil sample. Using the microfluidic approach described here, the same measurement can be performed in 1 day, with 0.5 L of solvent and 10 g of crude oil sample. The substantial reduction in time and consumables will enable more frequent asphaltene yield measurements and reduce its environmental impact significantly. PMID:26333290

  19. Uniqueness of measures in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, Maximilian

    2015-09-15

    In Ashtekar and Campiglia [Classical Quantum Gravity 29, 242001 (2012)], residual diffeomorphisms have been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We show that, in the homogeneous isotropic case, unitarity of the translations with respect to the extended ℝ-action (exponentiated reduced fluxes in the standard approach) singles out the Bohr measure on both the standard quantum configuration space ℝ{sub Bohr} as well as on the Fleischhack one (ℝ⊔ℝ{sub Bohr}). Thus, in both situations, the same condition singles out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of LQC.

  20. Preparation and measurement in quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, James L.; Band, William

    1992-05-01

    To honor Henry Margenau on the occasion of his 90th birthday, we attempt in this essay to integrate certain aspects of the physics, philosophy, and pedagogy of quantum mechanics in a manner very much inspired by Margenau's idealist scientific epistemology. Over half a century ago, Margenau was perhaps the first philosopher of science to recognize and elaborate upon the essential distinction between the preparation of a quantum state and the measurement of an observable associated with a system in that state; yet in contemporary quantum texts that distinction rarely receives adequate emphasis even though, as we demonstrate, it may be explicated through a series of simple illustrations.

  1. Measurement and Fundamental Processes in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2015-07-01

    In the standard mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics, measurement is an additional, exceptional fundamental process rather than an often complex, but ordinary process which happens also to serve a particular epistemic function: during a measurement of one of its properties which is not already determined by a preceding measurement, a measured system, even if closed, is taken to change its state discontinuously rather than continuously as is usual. Many, including Bell, have been concerned about the fundamental role thus given to measurement in the foundation of the theory. Others, including the early Bohr and Schwinger, have suggested that quantum mechanics naturally incorporates the unavoidable uncontrollable disturbance of physical state that accompanies any local measurement without the need for an exceptional fundamental process or a special measurement theory. Disturbance is unanalyzable for Bohr, but for Schwinger it is due to physical interactions' being borne by fundamental particles having discrete properties and behavior which is beyond physical control. Here, Schwinger's approach is distinguished from more well known treatments of measurement, with the conclusion that, unlike most, it does not suffer under Bell's critique of quantum measurement. Finally, Schwinger's critique of measurement theory is explicated as a call for a deeper investigation of measurement processes that requires the use of a theory of quantum fields.

  2. Search via quantum walks with intermediate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buksman, Efrain; de Oliveira, André L. Fonseca; de Lacalle, Jesús García López

    2015-06-01

    A modification of Tulsi's quantum search algorithm with intermediate measurements of the control qubit is presented. In order to analyze the effect of measurements in quantum searches, a different choice of the angular parameter is used. The study is performed for several values of time lapses between measurements, finding close relationships between probabilities and correlations (mutual information and cumulative correlation measure). The order of this modified algorithm is estimated, showing that for some time lapses the performance is improved, and becomes of order O(N) (classical brute-force search) when measurements are taken in every step. The results provide a possible way to analyze improvements to other quantum algorithms using one, or more, control qubits.

  3. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors. PMID:22540686

  4. Quantum yields and energy partitioning in the ultraviolet photodissociation of 1,2 dibromo-tetrafluoroethane (Halon-2402)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng; McGivern, W. Sean; Sorkhabi, Osman; Suits, Arthur G.; North, Simon W.

    2000-11-01

    The photodissociation of 1,2 dibromo-tetrafluoroethane (Halon-2402) has been investigated at 193 nm using photofragment translational spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet ionization and at 193, 233, and 266 nm using state-selected translational spectroscopy with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. The product branching ratios, angular distributions, and translational energy distributions were measured at these wavelengths, providing insight into the ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of CF2BrCF2Br. The total bromine atom quantum yields were found to be 1.9±0.1 at both 193 and 233 nm and 1.4±0.1 at 266 nm. The first C-Br bond dissociation energy was determined to be 69.3 kcal/mol from ab initio calculations. The second C-Br bond dissociation energy was determined to be 16±2 kcal/mol by modeling of the bromine quantum yield. In addition, variational Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory was used to calculate the secondary dissociation rates for a range of dissociation energies above threshold. These results suggest that CF2CF2Br photofragments with sufficient internal energies will undergo secondary dissociation prior to collisional stabilization under atmospheric conditions. Based on the measured translational energy distributions and product branching ratios, a model is proposed to describe the wavelength-dependent bromine quantum yield and the implications of these results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of a commercial integrating sphere setup for the determination of absolute photoluminescence quantum yields of dilute dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Würth, Christian; Lochmann, Cornelia; Spieles, Monika; Pauli, Jutta; Hoffmann, Katrin; Schüttrigkeit, Tanja; Franzl, Thomas; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2010-07-01

    The commercial availability of stand-alone setups for the determination of absolute photoluminescence quantum yields (Phi(f)) in conjunction with the increasing use of integrating sphere accessories for spectrofluorometers is expected to have a considerable influence not only on the characterization of chromophore systems for use in optical and opto-electronic devices, but also on the determination of this key parameter for (bio)analytically relevant dyes and functional luminophores. Despite the huge potential of systems measuring absolute Phi(f) values and the renewed interest in dependable data, evaluated protocols for even the most elementary case, the determination of the fluorescence quantum yield of transparent dilute solutions of small organic dyes with integrating sphere methods, are still missing. This encouraged us to evaluate the performance and sources of uncertainty of a simple commercial integrating sphere setup with dilute solutions of two of the best characterized fluorescence quantum yield standards, quinine sulfate dihydrate and rhodamine 101, strongly differing in spectral overlap between absorption and emission. Special attention is dedicated to illustrate common pitfalls of this approach, thereby deriving simple procedures to minimize measurement uncertainties and improve the comparability of data for the broad community of users of fluorescence techniques. PMID:20615286

  6. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2014-06-01

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ˜1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  7. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study. PMID:24985636

  8. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  9. First fission mass yield measurements using SPIDER at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Devlin, Matt; Bredeweg, Todd; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Shields, Dan; Blakeley, Rick; Hecht, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Robust measurements of fission product properties, including mass yields, are important for advancing our understanding of the complex fission process and as improved inputs to calculation and simulation efforts in nuclear applications. The SPIDER detector, located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), is a recently developed mass spectrometer aimed at measuring fission product mass yields with high resolution as a function of incident neutron energy and product mass, charge, and kinetic energy. The prototype SPIDER detector has been assembled, tested, installed at the Lujan Center at LANSCE, and taken initial thermal neutron induced measurements. The first results of mass yields for spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal neutron-induced fission of 235U measured with SPIDER will be presented. Ongoing upgrades and future plans for SPIDER will also be discussed. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR. LA-UR-14-24830.

  10. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  11. Operational meaning of quantum measures of recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Tom; Hirche, Christoph; Morgan, Ciara; Olson, Jonathan P.; Seshadreesan, Kaushik P.; Watrous, John; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-08-01

    Several information measures have recently been defined that capture the notion of recoverability. In particular, the fidelity of recovery quantifies how well one can recover a system A of a tripartite quantum state, defined on systems A B C , by acting on system C alone. The relative entropy of recovery is an associated measure in which the fidelity is replaced by relative entropy. In this paper we provide concrete operational interpretations of the aforementioned recovery measures in terms of a computational decision problem and a hypothesis testing scenario. Specifically, we show that the fidelity of recovery is equal to the maximum probability with which a computationally unbounded quantum prover can convince a computationally bounded quantum verifier that a given quantum state is recoverable. The quantum interactive proof system giving this operational meaning requires four messages exchanged between the prover and verifier, but by forcing the prover to perform actions in superposition, we construct a different proof system that requires only two messages. The result is that the associated decision problem is in QIP(2) and another argument establishes it as hard for QSZK (both classes contain problems believed to be difficult to solve for a quantum computer). We finally prove that the regularized relative entropy of recovery is equal to the optimal type II error exponent when trying to distinguish many copies of a tripartite state from a recovered version of this state, such that the type I error is constrained to be no larger than a constant.

  12. A new technique for measuring sputtering yields at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of thin, self-supporting carbon catcher foils allows one to measure sputtering yields in a broad range of materials with high sensitivity. Analyzing the foils with Rutherford forward scattering, sputtered Al, Si and P surface densities down to 5 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm with uncertainties of about 20 percent have been measured.

  13. Nonsymmetrized correlations in quantum noninvasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Bednorz, Adam; Bruder, Christoph; Reulet, Bertrand; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2013-06-21

    A long-standing problem in quantum mesoscopic physics is which operator order corresponds to noise expressions like , where I(ω) is the measured current at frequency ω. Symmetrized order describes a classical measurement while nonsymmetrized order corresponds to a quantum detector, e.g., one sensitive to either emission or absorption of photons. We show that both order schemes can be embedded in quantum weak-measurement theory taking into account measurements with memory, characterized by a memory function which is independent of a particular experimental detection scheme. We discuss the resulting quasiprobabilities for different detector temperatures and how their negativity can be tested on the level of second-order correlation functions already. Experimentally, this negativity can be related to the squeezing of the many-body state of the transported electrons in an ac-driven tunnel junction. PMID:23829718

  14. Separation of photoactive conformers based on hindered diarylethenes: efficient modulation in photocyclization quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlong; Jiao, Changhong; Li, Xin; Xie, Yongshu; Nakatani, Keitaro; Tian, He; Zhu, Weihong

    2014-04-25

    Endowing both solvent independency and excellent thermal bistability, the benzobis(thiadiazole)-bridged diarylethene system provides an efficient approach to realize extremely high photocyclization quantum yields (Φo-c , up to 90.6 %) by both separating completely pure anti-parallel conformer and suppressing intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). PMID:24668917

  15. Solvatochromic pyrene analogues of Prodan exhibiting extremely high fluorescence quantum yields in apolar and polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Niko, Yosuke; Kawauchi, Susumu; Konishi, Gen-ichi

    2013-07-22

    True colors: Novel pyrene analogues of Prodan exhibit outstanding photophysical properties with remarkably high fluorescence quantum yield (QY) in solvents ranging from apolar hexane to polar methanol (see figure). This is accompanied by strong solvatochromism and large Stokes shifts. These properties have not been previously achieved in enormous solvatochromic dyes, but are quite useful for emitting materials and imaging tools. PMID:23744761

  16. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel. PMID:26972678

  17. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  18. Absolute Photoluminescence Quantum Yields of IR-26 Dye, PbS, and PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, Octavi Escala; Johnson, Justin C; Luther, Joseph M; Midgett, Aaron G; Nozik, Arthur J; Beard, Matthew C

    2010-08-19

    In this study, we have directly measured the photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ{sub PL}) of IR-26 at a range of concentrations and the Φ{sub PL} of PbS and PbSe QDs for a range of sizes. We find that the Φ{sub PL} of IR-26 has a weak concentration dependence due to reabsorption, with a Φ{sub PL} of 0.048 ± 0.002% for low concentrations, lower than previous reports by a full order of magnitude. We also find that there is a dramatic size dependence for both PbS and PbSe QDs, with the smallest dots exhibiting a Φ{sub PL} in excess of 60%, while larger dots fall below 3%. A model, including nonradiative transition between electronic states and energy transfer to ligand vibrations, appears to explain this size dependence. These findings provide both a better characterization of photoluminescence for near-infrared emitters and some insight into how improved QDs can be developed.

  19. Implementing an ancilla-free 1{yields}M economical phase-covariant quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum-interference devices in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Longbao; Ye Liu; Zhang Wenhai

    2007-09-15

    We propose a simple scheme to realize 1{yields}M economical phase-covariant quantum cloning machine (EPQCM) with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits. In our scheme, multi-SQUIDs are fixed into a microwave cavity by adiabatic passage for their manipulation. Based on this model, we can realize the EPQCM with high fidelity via adiabatic quantum computation.

  20. Xenon Sputter Yield Measurements for Ion Thruster Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Gardner, Michael M.; Johnson, Mark L.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a technique that was used to measure total and differential sputter yields of materials important to high specific impulse ion thrusters. The heart of the technique is a quartz crystal monitor that is swept at constant radial distance from a small target region where a high current density xenon ion beam is aimed. Differential sputtering yields were generally measured over a full 180 deg arc in a plane that included the beam centerline and the normal vector to the target surface. Sputter yield results are presented for a xenon ion energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV and an angle of incidence range from 0 deg to 70 deg from the target surface normal direction for targets consisting of molybdenum, titanium, solid (Poco) graphite, and flexible graphite (grafoil). Total sputter yields are calculated using a simple integration procedure and comparisons are made to sputter yields obtained from the literature. In general, the agreement between the available data is good. As expected for heavy xenon ions, the differential and total sputter yields are found to be strong functions of angle of incidence. Significant under- and over-cosine behavior is observed at low- and high-ion energies, respectively. In addition, strong differences in differential yield behavior are observed between low-Z targets (C and Ti) and high-Z targets (Mo). Curve fits to the differential sputter yield data are provided. They should prove useful to analysts interested in predicting the erosion profiles of ion thruster components and determining where the erosion products re-deposit.

  1. Influence of the Inner-Shell Architecture on Quantum Yield and Blinking Dynamics in Core/Multishell Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Pooja; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Anh; Omogo, Benard; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-03-01

    Choosing the composition of a shell for QDs is not trivial, as both the band-edge energy offset and interfacial lattice mismatch influence the final optical properties. One way to balance these competing effects is by forming multishells and/or gradient-alloy shells. However, this introduces multiple interfaces, and their relative effects on quantum yield and blinking are not yet fully understood. Here, we undertake a systematic, comparative study of the addition of inner shells of a single component versus gradient-alloy shells of cadmium/zinc chalogenides onto CdSe cores, and then capping with a thin ZnS outer shell to form various core/multishell configurations. We show that architecture of the inner shell between the CdSe core and the outer ZnS shell significantly influences both the quantum yield and blinking dynamics, but that these effects are not correlated-a high ensemble quantum yield doesn't necessarily equate to reduced blinking. Two mathematical models have been proposed to describe the blinking dynamics-the more common power-law model and a more recent multiexponential model. By binning the same data with 1 and 20 ms resolution, we show that the on times can be better described by the multiexponential model, whereas the off times can be better described by the power-law model. We discuss physical mechanisms that might explain this behavior and how it can be affected by the inner-shell architecture. PMID:26693950

  2. Differential sputter yield measurements using cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Surla, Vijay; Yalin, Azer P

    2007-07-01

    The first use of cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to measure differential (angular) sputter yield profiles of sputtered particles is reported. Owing to the path-integrated nature of CRDS, inversion techniques are required. Our approach is to scan the optical axis relative to the source of sputtered particles and to measure the spatial profile of the CRDS signals. Modeling is then used to determine the differential sputter yield profile from the measured CRDS spatial profile. Demonstrative measurements are made with a Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator laser system for 750 eV argon ions normally incident on a molybdenum target. At these conditions we find an under- cosine sputtering distribution characterized by alpha = 0.22 +/- 0.07 in good agreement with past quartz crystal microbalance measurements (alpha = 0.19). PMID:17571136

  3. Quantum measurement of a mesoscopic spin ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Giedke, G.; Taylor, J. M.; Lukin, M. D.; D'Alessandro, D.; Imamoglu, A.

    2006-09-15

    We describe a method for precise estimation of the polarization of a mesoscopic spin ensemble by using its coupling to a single two-level system. Our approach requires a minimal number of measurements on the two-level system for a given measurement precision. We consider the application of this method to the case of nuclear-spin ensemble defined by a single electron-charged quantum dot: we show that decreasing the electron spin dephasing due to nuclei and increasing the fidelity of nuclear-spin-based quantum memory could be within the reach of present day experiments.

  4. Measurement-induced quantum entanglement recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoye; Xu Jinshi; Li Chuanfeng; Guo Guangcan

    2010-08-15

    By using photon pairs created in parametric down-conversion, we report on an experiment, which demonstrates that measurement can recover the quantum entanglement of a two-qubit system in a pure dephasing environment. The concurrence of the final state with and without measurement is compared and is analyzed. Furthermore, we verify that recovered states can still violate the Bell inequality, that is, to say, such recovered states exhibit nonlocality. In the context of quantum entanglement, sudden death and rebirth provide clear evidence, which verifies that entanglement dynamics of the system is sensitive not only to its environment, but also to its initial state.

  5. Laboratory Study of Nitrate Photolysis in Antarctic Snow: Quantum Yield and Isotope Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, C.; Berhanu, T. A.; Erbland, J.; Jost, R.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Savarino, J. P.; Johnson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Post-depositional processes alter the nitrate concentration and its isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at low snow accumulation sites, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. Photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack was shown to be the major nitrate loss mechanism from the snowpack. Here a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption by flushing the snow with pure N2 at 100 % humidity during irradiation with UV light from a Xenon lamp. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the 200 and 300 nm absorption bands of nitrate and to emulate actinic fluxes similar to those in Dome C. Irradiated snow was sampled in 1 cm sections and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O); the actinic flux was measured at similar sections in the snow. The quantum yield was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.05 within what corresponds to weeks of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate and one of trapped or buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may be increased significantly due to the observed quantum yield in this study influencing predicted boundary layer chemistry including ozone concentrations. An average photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = -15×1.2 ‰ was found for the experiments without a wavelength filter. These results are ascribed to excitation of the 200 nm nitrate absorption band. Blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, showed a photolytic fractionation constant of 15ɛ = -47.9 × 6.8 ‰ which lies within the fractionation determined in the field

  6. Preliminary work on the quantum defect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcherson, Lindsay; Sanders, Justin; Han, Jianing

    2016-05-01

    Van der Waals interactions are generally studied in physics, chemistry, biology, and other fields of science. In order to fine-tune van der Waals interactions, the atomic energy levels need to be known very accurately. That is, we must accurately determine the quantum defects. Quantum defects of 85Rb have been recently measured, and the quantum defects of 87Rb have also been measured for nS and nD states with the resolution of 1 MHz. this experiment will focus on the P, F, and G states, which are higher angular momentum states and more sensitive to electric fields. These states are crucial for collisions, which may lead to some of the interesting phenomena in ultracold atoms, such as ultracold plasma. In this presentation, a progress report will be given on this project. The authors would like to acknowledge the travel Grants from DDOE and the University of South Alabama.

  7. Realization of a minimal disturbance quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Sciarrino, F; Ricci, M; De Martini, F; Filip, R; Mista, L

    2006-01-20

    We report the first experimental realization of an "optimal" quantum device able to perform a minimal disturbance measurement on polarization encoded qubits saturating the theoretical boundary established between the classical knowledge acquired of any input state, i.e., a "classical guess," and the fidelity of the same state after disturbance due to measurement. The device has been physically realized by means of a linear optical qubit manipulation, postselection measurement, and a classical feed-forward process. PMID:16486551

  8. Entropic uncertainties for joint quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brougham, Thomas; Andersson, Erika; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the uncertainty associated with a joint quantum measurement of two spin components of a spin-(1/2) particle and quantify this in terms of entropy. We consider two entropic quantities, the joint entropy and the sum of the marginal entropies, and obtain lower bounds for each of these quantities. For the case of joint measurements where we measure each spin observable equally well, these lower bounds are tight.

  9. Influence of the QD luminescence quantum yield on photocurrent in QD/graphene hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Ivan A.; Gromova, Yulia A.; Zlatov, Andrei S.; Baranov, Mikhail A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced changes in luminescent and photoelectrical properties of the hybrid structure based on CdSe/ZnS QDs and multilayer graphene nanobelts were studied. It was shown that an irradiation of the structures by 365 nm mercury line in doses up to 23 J led to growth of QD luminescent quantum yield and photocurrent in the QD/graphene structures. This confirms the proximity of the rates of the QD luminescence decay and energy/charge transfer from QDs to graphene, and opens an opportunity to photoinduced control of the photoelectric response of the graphene based hybrid structures with semiconductor quantum dots.

  10. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that

  11. Direct measurement of general quantum states using strong measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Song, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The direct state measurement (DSM) based on the weak measurement has the advantage of simplicity, versatility, and directness. However, the weak measurement will introduce an unavoidable error in the reconstructed quantum state. We modify the DSM by replacing the weak coupling between the system and the pointer by a strong one, and present two procedures for measuring quantum states, one of which can give the wave function or the density matrix directly. We can also measure the Dirac distribution of a discrete system directly. Furthermore, we propose quantum circuits for realizing these procedures, and the main body of the circuits consists of Toffoli gates. By numerical simulation, we find that our scheme can eliminate the biased error effectively.

  12. Derivation of quantum probability from measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbut, Fedor

    2016-05-01

    To begin with, it is pointed out that the form of the quantum probability formula originates in the very initial state of the object system as seen when the state is expanded with the eigenprojectors of the measured observable. Making use of the probability reproducibility condition, which is a key concept in unitary measurement theory, one obtains the relevant coherent distribution of the complete-measurement results in the final unitary-measurement state in agreement with the mentioned probability formula. Treating the transition from the final unitary, or premeasurement, state, where all possible results are present, to one complete-measurement result sketchily in the usual way, the well-known probability formula is derived. In conclusion it is pointed out that the entire argument is only formal unless one makes it physical assuming that the quantum probability law is valid in the extreme case of probability-one (certain) events (projectors).

  13. Neutron Interference Experiments and Quantum Measurement Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiko, M.; Otake, Y.; Soshi, H.

    1987-03-01

    Physical and epistemological implications of recent experiments on the neutron interference are discussed from the viewpoint of the Machida-Namiki theory of measurement in quantum mechanics, without resort to discussion on the number-phase uncertainty relation. The same idea is also applied to the neutrino oscillation problem.

  14. In cellulo Evaluation of Phototransformation Quantum Yields in Fluorescent Proteins Used As Markers for Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Avilov, Sergiy; Berardozzi, Romain; Gunewardene, Mudalige S.; Adam, Virgile; Hess, Samuel T.; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy of biological samples requires a precise knowledge of the employed fluorescent labels. Photoactivation, photoblinking and photobleaching of phototransformable fluorescent proteins influence the data acquisition and data processing strategies to be used in (Fluorescence) Photoactivation Localization Microscopy ((F)-PALM), notably for reliable molecular counting. As these parameters might depend on the local environment, they should be measured in cellulo in biologically relevant experimental conditions. Here, we measured phototransformation quantum yields for Dendra2 fused to actin in fixed mammalian cells in typical (F)-PALM experiments. To this aim, we developed a data processing strategy based on the clustering optimization procedure proposed by Lee et al (PNAS 109, 17436–17441, 2012). Using simulations, we estimated the range of experimental parameters (molecular density, molecular orientation, background level, laser power, frametime) adequate for an accurate determination of the phototransformation yields. Under illumination at 561 nm in PBS buffer at pH 7.4, the photobleaching yield of Dendra2 fused to actin was measured to be (2.5±0.4)×10−5, whereas the blinking-off yield and thermally-activated blinking-on rate were measured to be (2.3±0.2)×10−5 and 11.7±0.5 s−1, respectively. These phototransformation yields differed from those measured in poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and were strongly affected by addition of the antifading agent 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). In the presence of DABCO, the photobleaching yield was reduced 2-fold, the blinking-off yield was decreased more than 3-fold, and the blinking-on rate was increased 2-fold. Therefore, DABCO largely improved Dendra2 photostability in fixed mammalian cells. These findings are consistent with redox-based bleaching and blinking mechanisms under (F)-PALM experimental conditions. Finally, the green-to-red photoconversion quantum yield of Dendra2 was

  15. Liquid Scintillator Light Yield Measurements for the SNO+ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grullon, Sean

    2013-04-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow-up to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The heavy water that was in SNO will be replaced with a liquid scintillator of linear alkylbenzene. SNO+ will have a broad physics program which will include measuring the pep and CNO solar neutrino flux, detecting geo-neutrinos, studying reactor neutrino oscillations, serving as a supernova neutrino detector, and carrying out a search for neutrinoless double beta decay by loading an isotope such as neodymium into the liquid scintillator. Since energy resolution is of profound importance for the experiment, it is extremely important to accurately measure the light yield of the liquid scintillator for different loading percentages of Neodymium. A series of measurements made comparing the relative light yields of different liquid scintillator configurations to a Cherenkov spectrum will be described.

  16. Quantum Hamiltonian identification from measurement time traces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2014-08-22

    Precise identification of parameters governing quantum processes is a critical task for quantum information and communication technologies. In this Letter, we consider a setting where system evolution is determined by a parametrized Hamiltonian, and the task is to estimate these parameters from temporal records of a restricted set of system observables (time traces). Based on the notion of system realization from linear systems theory, we develop a constructive algorithm that provides estimates of the unknown parameters directly from these time traces. We illustrate the algorithm and its robustness to measurement noise by applying it to a one-dimensional spin chain model with variable couplings. PMID:25192077

  17. Quantum nondemolition measurement of the Werner state

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui; Pei Pei; Song Heshan

    2010-10-15

    We propose a theoretical scheme of quantum nondemolition measurement of two-qubit Werner state. We discuss our scheme with the two qubits restricted in a local place and then extend the scheme to the case in which two qubits are separated. We also consider the experimental realization of our scheme based on cavity quantum electrodynamics. It is very interesting that our scheme is robust against the dissipative effects introduced by the probe process. We also give a brief interpretation of our scheme finally.

  18. Sources of Variability in the Measurement of Fungal Spore Yields

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. S.; Slade, S. J.; Nordheim, E. V.; Cascino, J. J.; Harris, R. F.; Andrews, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Variability in the production of fungal spores and in the measurement of spore yields was investigated in four species of fungi: Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Colletotrichum coccodes, Colletotrichum phomoides, and Acremonium strictum. When the fungi were grown on solid medium in microplates and spore yields were measured by counting the subsamples with a hemacytometer, the variability among hemacytometer squares was always the largest source of variation, accounting for 51 to 91% of the total variation. Variability among replicate cultures and results of repeat experiments were generally also significant. The effect of square-to-square variability on the precision of spore yield measurement was minimized by counting a moderate number (ca. 30) of squares per culture. Culture-to-culture variability limited the practical precision of spore production measurements to a 95% confidence interval of approximately the mean ± 25%. We provide guidelines for determining the number of replicate cultures required to attain this or other degrees of precision. Particle counter-derived spore counts and counts based on spore weights were much less variable than were hemacytometer counts, but they did not improve spore production estimates very much because of culture-to-culture variability. Results obtained by both of these methods differed from those obtained with a hemacytometer; particle counter measurements required a correction for spore pairs, while the relationship between spore weights and spore counts changed as the cultures aged. PMID:16347653

  19. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang; Cui, Ping

    2016-04-01

    An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  20. Incompatible measurements on quantum causal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Reitzner, Daniel; Chiribella, Giulio; Ziman, Mário

    2016-05-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements, epitomized by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, is one of the distinctive features of quantum theory. So far, quantum incompatibility has been studied for measurements that test the preparation of physical systems. Here we extend the notion to measurements that test dynamical processes, possibly consisting of multiple time steps. Such measurements are known as testers and are implemented by interacting with the tested process through a sequence of state preparations, interactions, and measurements. Our first result is a characterization of the incompatibility of quantum testers, for which we provide necessary and sufficient conditions. Then we propose a quantitative measure of incompatibility. We call this measure the robustness of incompatibility and define it as the minimum amount of noise that has to be added to a set of testers in order to make them compatible. We show that (i) the robustness is lower bounded by the distinguishability of the sequence of interactions used by the tester and (ii) maximum robustness is attained when the interactions are perfectly distinguishable. The general results are illustrated in the concrete example of binary testers probing the time evolution of a single-photon polarization.

  1. Photoluminescence and quantum yields of organic/inorganic hybrids prepared through formic acid solvolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lianshe; Sá Ferreira, R. A.; Fernandes, M.; Nunes, S. C.; de Zea Bermudez, V.; Hungerford, Graham; Rocha, J.; Carlos, L. D.

    2008-03-01

    Three undoped di-urea cross-linked poly(oxyethylene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid matrices, classed as di-ureasils, incorporating POE segments with different lengths were prepared through the carboxylic acid solvolysis sol-gel method using formic acid. The resulting hybrids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy, 29Si and cross-polarization 13C magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The hybrids' structure is essentially independent of the polymer chain length and the materials are room temperature white-light emitters with emission quantum yields of ˜10 ± 1% and lifetime average values between 2 and 4 ns. For the di-ureasil host with short polymer chains the solvolysis method favours the increase of the PL quantum yields relatively to conventional sol-gel route.

  2. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  3. Photocurrent Quantum Yield in Suspended Carbon Nanotube p-n Junctions.

    PubMed

    Aspitarte, Lee; McCulley, Daniel R; Minot, Ethan D

    2016-09-14

    We study photocurrent generation in individual suspended carbon nanotube p-n junctions using spectrally resolved scanning photocurrent microscopy. Spatial maps of the photocurrent allow us to determine the length of the p-n junction intrinsic region, as well as the role of the n-type Schottky barrier. We show that reverse-bias operation eliminates complications caused by the n-type Schottky barrier and increases the length of the intrinsic region. The absorption cross-section of the CNT is calculated using an empirically verified model, and the effect of substrate reflection is determined using FDTD simulations. We find that the room temperature photocurrent quantum yield is approximately 30% when exciting the carbon nanotube at the S44 and S55 excitonic transitions. The quantum yield value is an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. PMID:27575386

  4. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; et al

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally,more » individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  5. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O`Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-07-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E-2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E-v measurement.

  6. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O׳Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally, individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  7. Quantum Phase Space from Schwinger's Measurement Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P.; Bracken, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Schwinger's algebra of microscopic measurement, with the associated complex field of transformation functions, is shown to provide the foundation for a discrete quantum phase space of known type, equipped with a Wigner function and a star product. Discrete position and momentum variables label points in the phase space, each taking distinct values, where is any chosen prime number. Because of the direct physical interpretation of the measurement symbols, the phase space structure is thereby related to definite experimental configurations.

  8. Grounding the randomness of quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2016-05-28

    Julian Schwinger provided to physics a mathematical reconstruction of quantum mechanics on the basis of the characteristics of sequences of measurements occurring at the atomic level of physical structure. The central component of this reconstruction is an algebra of symbols corresponding to quantum measurements, conceived of as discrete processes, which serve to relate experience to theory; collections of outcomes of identically circumscribed such measurements are attributed expectation values, which constitute the predictive content of the theory. The outcomes correspond to certain phase parameters appearing in the corresponding symbols, which are complex numbers, the algebra of which he finds by a process he refers to as 'induction'. Schwinger assumed these (individually unpredictable) phase parameters to take random, uniformly distributed definite values within a natural range. I have previously suggested that the 'principle of plenitude' may serve as a basis in principle for the occurrence of the definite measured values that are those members of the collections of measurement outcomes from which the corresponding observed statistics derive (Jaeger 2015Found. Phys.45, 806-819. (doi:10.1007/s10701-015-9893-6)). Here, I evaluate Schwinger's assumption in the context of recent critiques of the notion of randomness and explicitly relate the randomness of these phases with the principle of plenitude and, in this way, provide a fundamental grounding for the objective, physically irreducible probabilities, conceived of as graded possibilities, that are attributed to measurement outcomes by quantum mechanics. PMID:27091162

  9. Photochemistry of matrix-isolated and thin film acid chlorides: Quantum yields and product structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, B.; Hess, W.P.; Winter, P.R.; Ellison, G.B.; Radziszewski, J.G.

    1999-02-18

    Ultraviolet photoexcitation of matrix-isolated CH{sub 3}COCl, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}COCl, and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COCl produces HCl{center_dot}CH{sub 2}{double_bond}C{double_bond}O, HCl{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CHC{double_bond}C{double_bond}O, and HCl{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CHC{double_bond}C{double_bond}O complexes. The authors report precursor and matrix dependent reaction quantum yields. Quantum yield values decrease with increasing alkyl chain length due to a reduced number of {alpha} H-atoms available for the elimination reaction and steric considerations. The authors found quantum yields in neat matrixes to be roughly half that in argon or xenon matrixes and assign structures for HCL and ketene complexes in argon and xenon matrixes by comparing IR spectra ab initio electronic structure calculations. In argon matrixes, the product complex HCl frequently is strongly shifted whereas the ketene remains unshifted with respect to matrix-isolated ketene. In xenon matrixes, HCl{center_dot}ketene complexes display absorption bands indicative of two distinct structures. Differences between HCl{center_dot}ketene structures in argon and xenon matrixes are attributed to size differences of the matrix lattice.

  10. High Photoluminescence Quantum Yield in Band Gap Tunable Bromide Containing Mixed Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Li, Yanbo; Amani, Matin; Ager, Joel W; Toma, Francesca M; Yablonovitch, Eli; Sharp, Ian D; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-13

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite based semiconductor materials are attractive for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices because they combine the advantages of suitable optoelectronic attributes and simultaneously low-cost solution processability. Here, we present a two-step low-pressure vapor-assisted solution process to grow high quality homogeneous CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx perovskite films over the full band gap range of 1.6-2.3 eV. Photoluminescence light-in versus light-out characterization techniques are used to provide new insights into the optoelectronic properties of Br-containing hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites as a function of optical carrier injection by employing pump-powers over a 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range. The internal luminescence quantum yield of wide band gap perovskites reaches impressive values up to 30%. This high quantum yield translates into substantial quasi-Fermi level splitting and high "luminescence or optically implied" open-circuit voltage. Most importantly, both attributes, high internal quantum yield and high optically implied open-circuit voltage, are demonstrated over the entire band gap range (1.6 eV ≤ Eg ≤ 2.3 eV). These results establish the versatility of Br-containing perovskite semiconductors for a variety of applications and especially for the use as high-quality top cell in tandem photovoltaic devices in combination with industry dominant Si bottom cells. PMID:26691065

  11. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z.

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  12. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, Y. Z.; Liu, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  13. Coarsening Measurement References and the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Lim, Youngrong; Kim, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of inefficiency in quantum measurements in the quantum-to-classical transition, and consistently observe the quantum-to-classical transition by coarsening the references of the measurements (e.g., when and where to measure). Our result suggests that the definition of measurement precision in quantum theory should include the degree of the observer's ability to precisely control the measurement references.

  14. Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam; Mishra, Utkarsh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar

    2014-11-15

    Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources. - Highlights: • Extension of weak measurement reversal scheme to protect multiparty quantum correlations. • Protection of multiparty quantum correlation under local amplitude damping noise. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum teleportation in one sender and many receivers setting. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum information splitting protocol.

  15. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  16. Cu(2+) inhibits photosystem II activities but enhances photosystem I quantum yield of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-08-01

    Responses of photosystem I and II activities of Microcystis aeruginosa to various concentrations of Cu(2+) were simultaneously examined using a Dual-PAM-100 fluorometer. Cell growth and contents of chlorophyll a were significantly inhibited by Cu(2+). Photosystem II activity [Y(II)] and electron transport [rETRmax(II)] were significantly altered by Cu(2+). The quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)] decreased by 29 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. On the contrary, photosystem I was stable under Cu(2+) stress and showed an obvious increase of quantum yield [Y(I)] and electron transport [rETRmax(I)] due to activation of cyclic electron flow (CEF). Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was enhanced by 17 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. The contribution of linear electron flow to photosystem I [Y(II)/Y(I)] decreased with increasing Cu(2+) concentration. Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was negatively correlated with the maximal photosystem II photochemical efficiency (F v/F m). In summary, photosystem II was the major target sites of toxicity of Cu(2+), while photosystem I activity was enhanced under Cu(2+) stress. PMID:24920130

  17. Dynamics of incompatibility of quantum measurements in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addis, Carole; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The nonclassical nature of quantum states, often illustrated using entanglement measures or quantum discord, constitutes a resource for quantum information protocols. However, the nonclassicality of a quantum system cannot be seen as a property of the state alone, as the set of available measurements used to extract information on the system is typically restricted. In this work we study how the nonclassicality of quantum measurements, quantified via their incompatibility, is influenced by quantum noise and how a non-Markovian environment can be useful for maintaining the measurement resources.

  18. Energy distribution and quantum yield for photoemission from air-contaminated gold surfaces under ultraviolet illumination close to the threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald; Ziegler, Tobias; Biswas, Indro; Seibel, Christoph; Schulze, Mathias; Brandt, Nico; Schöll, Achim; Bergner, Patrick; Reinert, Friedrich T.

    2012-06-01

    The kinetic energy distributions of photo-electrons emitted from gold surfaces under illumination by UV-light close to the threshold (photon energy in the order of the material work function) are measured and analyzed. Samples are prepared as chemically clean through Ar-ion sputtering and then exposed to atmosphere for variable durations before quantum yield measurements are performed after evacuation. During measurements, the bias voltage applied to the sample is varied and the resulting emission current measured. Taking the derivative of the current-voltage curve yields the energy distribution which is found to closely resemble the distribution of total energies derived by DuBridge for emission from a free electron gas. We investigate the dependence of distribution shape and width on electrode geometry and contaminant substances adsorbed from the atmosphere, in particular, to water and hydro-carbons. Emission efficiency increases initially during air exposure before diminishing to zero on a timescale of several hours, whilst subsequent annealing of the sample restores emissivity. A model fit function, in good quantitative agreement with the measured data, is introduced which accounts for the experiment-specific electrode geometry and an energy dependent transmission coefficient. The impact of large patch potential fields from contact potential drops between sample and sample holder is investigated. The total quantum yield is split into bulk and surface contributions which are tested for their sensitivity to light incidence angle and polarization. Our results are directly applicable to model parameters for the contact-free discharge system onboard the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder spacecraft.

  19. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  20. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  1. Relativistic quantum metrology: exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects. PMID:24851858

  2. Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects. PMID:24851858

  3. Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-05-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.

  4. Cosmological inflation and the quantum measurement problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Peter, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    According to cosmological inflation, the inhomogeneities in our Universe are of quantum-mechanical origin. This scenario is phenomenologically very appealing as it solves the puzzles of the standard hot big bang model and naturally explains why the spectrum of cosmological perturbations is almost scale invariant. It is also an ideal playground to discuss deep questions among which is the quantum measurement problem in a cosmological context. Although the large squeezing of the quantum state of the perturbations and the phenomenon of decoherence explain many aspects of the quantum-to-classical transition, it remains to understand how a specific outcome can be produced in the early Universe, in the absence of any observer. The continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) approach to quantum mechanics attempts to solve the quantum measurement question in a general context. In this framework, the wave function collapse is caused by adding new nonlinear and stochastic terms to the Schrödinger equation. In this paper, we apply this theory to inflation, which amounts to solving the CSL parametric oscillator case. We choose the wave function collapse to occur on an eigenstate of the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable and discuss the corresponding modified Schrödinger equation. Then, we compute the power spectrum of the perturbations and show that it acquires a universal shape with two branches, one which remains scale invariant and one with nS=4, a spectral index in obvious contradiction with the cosmic microwave background anisotropy observations. The requirement that the non-scale-invariant part be outside the observational window puts stringent constraints on the parameter controlling the deviations from ordinary quantum mechanics. Due to the absence of a CSL amplification mechanism in field theory, this also has the consequence that the collapse mechanism of the inflationary fluctuations is not efficient. Then, we determine the collapse time. On small scales the collapse is

  5. Quantum nondemolition measurement by pulsed oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Kai-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Paramagnetic Faraday rotation is a quantum nondemolition measurement method that can generate spin squeezing and improve the measurement precision of a collective spin component beyond the standard quantum limit. In practice, a constant bias magnetic field is used to drive the spin precessing at sufficiently high frequency in order to lift the signal out of low-frequency technical noises. However, continuous measurement of precessing spins introduces back-action noise (BAN) due to the light-shift effect. Two types of back-action-evading (BAE) measurement of collective spin components have been demonstrated recently: continuous measurement of a two-ensemble system and stroboscopic measurement of a single ensemble. Here we propose another single ensemble BAE measurement by periodically modulating the bias field with π pulses. Our theoretical calculation shows that under experimental settings where pulse-field modulation does not introduce significant decoherences, the proposed method can suppress the BAN and generate spin squeezing faster than the stroboscopic one at the same probe light power. Moreover, if it is combined with synchronous stroboscopic probing, light-shift BAN can be completely eliminated.

  6. Spectroscopy of colloidal semiconductor core/shell nanoplatelets with high quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Tessier, M D; Mahler, B; Nadal, B; Heuclin, H; Pedetti, S; Dubertret, B

    2013-07-10

    Free standing two-dimensional materials appear as a novel class of structures. Recently, the first colloidal two-dimensional heterostructures have been synthesized. These core/shell nanoplatelets are the first step toward colloidal quantum wells. Here, we study in detail the spectroscopic properties of this novel generation of colloidal nanoparticles. We show that core/shell CdSe/CdZnS nanoplatelets with 80% quantum yield can be obtained. The emission time trace of single core/shell nanoplatelets exhibits reduced blinking compared to core nanoplatelets with a two level emission time trace. At cryogenic temperatures, these nanoplatelets have a quantum yield close to 100% and a stable emission time trace. A solution of core/shell nanoplatelets has emission spectra with a full width half-maximum close to 20 nm, a value much lower than corresponding spherical or rod-shaped heterostructures. Using single particle spectroscopy, we show that the broadening of the emission spectra upon the shell deposition is not due to dispersity between particles but is related to an intrinsic increased exciton-phonon coupling in the shell. We also demonstrate that optical spectroscopy is a relevant tool to investigate the presence of traps induced by shell deposition. The spectroscopic properties of the core/shell nanoplatelets presented here strongly suggest that this new generation of objects will be an interesting alternative to spherical or rod-shaped nanocrystals. PMID:23731211

  7. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, Matthew; Preiss, Philipp; Tai, Eric; Lukin, Alex; Schittko, Robert; Kaufman, Adam; Ma, Ruichao; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The presence of large-scale entanglement is a defining characteristic of exotic quantum phases of matter. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially true in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. We demonstrate a novel approach to the measurement of entanglement entropy of any bosonic system, using a quantum gas microscope with tailored potential landscapes. This protocol enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. In general, these experiments exemplify a method enabling the measurement and characterization of quantum phase transitions and in particular would be apt for studying systems such as magnetic ordering within the quantum Ising model.

  8. Photosensitized electron transfer processes in SiO/sub 2/ colloids and sodium lauryl sulfate micellar sytems: correlation of quantum yields with interfacial surface potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Laane, C.; Willner, I.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1981-10-01

    The effectiveness of negatively charged colloidal SiO/sub 2/ particles in controlling photosensitized electron transfer reactions has been studied and compared with that of the negatively charged sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLauSO/sub 4/) micellar system. In particular, the photosensitized reduction of the zwitterionic electron acceptor propylviologen sulfonate (PVS/sup 0/) with tris(2,2'-bi-pyridinium)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bipy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/) as the sensitizer and triethanolamine as the electron donor is found to have a quantum yield of 0.033 for formation of the radical anion (PVS) in the SiO/sub 2/ colloid compared with 0.005 in the homogeneous system and 0.0086 in a NaLauSO/sub 4/ micellar solution. The higher quantum yields obtained with the SiO/sub 2/ colloidal system are attributed to substantial stabilization against back reaction of the intermediate photoproducts - i.e., Ru(bipy)/sub 3//sup 3 +/ and PVS/sup -/ - by electrostatic repulsion of the reduced electron acceptor from the negatively charged particle surface. The binding properties of the SiO/sub 2/ particles and NaLauSO/sub 4/ micelles were investigated by flow dialysis. The results show that the sensitizer binds to both interfaces and that the SiO/sub 2/ interface is characterized by much higher surface potential than the micellar interface. The effect of ionic strength on the surface potential was estimated from the Gouy-Chapman theory, and the measured quantum yields of photosensitized electron transfer were correlated shows that the quantum yield is not affected by surface potentials smaller than approx. = -40 mV. At larger potentials, the quantum yield increases rapidly. These results indicate that the surface potential is the dominant factor in the quantum yield improvement for PVS/sup 0/ reduction.

  9. Channel capacities versus entanglement measures in multiparty quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2010-01-15

    For quantum states of two subsystems, highly entangled states have a higher capacity of transmitting classical as well as quantum information, and vice versa. We show that this is no more the case in general: Quantum capacities of multiaccess channels, motivated by communication in quantum networks, do not have any relation with genuine multiparty entanglement measures. Importantly, the statement is demonstrated for arbitrary multipartite entanglement measures. Along with revealing the structural richness of multiaccess channels, this gives us a tool to classify multiparty quantum states from the perspective of its usefulness in quantum networks, which cannot be visualized by any genuine multiparty entanglement measure.

  10. Study of concentration-dependent quantum yield of Rhodamine 6G by gold nanoparticles using thermal-lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2014-06-01

    Tailoring optical properties of the dye molecules using metal nanoparticles is a burgeoning area of research. In this work, we report our results on the studies of how the absorption and emission behavior of Rhodamine 6G dye is tailored using gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, the influence of dye concentration on these properties for a given concentration of nanoparticles in the dye-nanoparticle mixture is investigated. In addition, the difference between the concentration-dependent fluorescence quantum yield of the dye molecules is measured in the absence and presence of nanoparticles using the dual-beam thermal-lens technique. Our absorption spectral studies show additional spectral features due to nanoparticle aggregation on interaction with cationic Rhodamine 6G dye. Dye concentration-dependent steady-state fluorescence studies in the presence of nanoparticles indicate a blue shift in peak fluorescence emission wavelength. The quantum yield value measured using thermal-lens technique exhibit a non-monotonic behavior with dye concentration with substantial quenching for lower dye concentrations. The results are interpreted in terms of dye-nanoparticle interaction and the formation of dye shell around the nanoparticle.

  11. Fluorescence quantum yields of a series of red and near-infrared dyes emitting at 600-1000 nm.

    PubMed

    Rurack, Knut; Spieles, Monika

    2011-02-15

    The determination of the fluorescence quantum yields (QY, Φ(f)) of a series of fluorescent dyes that span the absorption/excitation and emission ranges of 520-900 and 600-1000 nm is reported. The dyes encompass commercially available rhodamine 101 (Rh-101, Φ(f) = 0.913), cresyl violet (0.578), oxazine 170 (0.579), oxazine 1 (0.141), cryptocyanine (0.012), HITCI (0.283), IR-125 (0.132), IR-140 (0.167), and four noncommercial cyanine dyes with specific spectroscopic features, all of them in dilute ethanol solution. The QYs have been measured relative to the National Institute of Standards and Technology's standard reference material (SRM) 936a (quinine sulfate, QS) on a traceably characterized fluorometer, employing a chain of transfer standard dyes that include coumarin 102 (Φ(f) = 0.764), coumarin 153 (0.544), and DCM (0.435) as links between QS and Rh-101. The QY of Rh-101 has also been verified in direct measurements against QS using two approaches that rely only on instrument correction. In addition, the effects of temperature and the presence of oxygen on the fluorescence quantum yield of Rh-101 have been assessed. PMID:21250654

  12. Enhancing entanglement trapping by weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying-Jie; Han, Wei; Fan, Heng; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to enhance trapping of entanglement of two qubits in the environment of a photonic band gap material. Our entanglement trapping promotion scheme makes use of combined weak measurements and quantum measurement reversals. The optimal promotion of entanglement trapping can be acquired with a reasonable finite success probability by adjusting measurement strengths. - Highlights: • Propose a scheme to enhance entanglement trapping in photonic band gap material. • Weak measurement and its reversal are performed locally on individual qubits. • Obtain an optimal condition for maximizing the concurrence of entanglement trapping. • Entanglement sudden death can be prevented by weak measurement in photonic band gap.

  13. Information Divergence and Distance Measures for Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Zhaozhi

    2015-02-01

    Both information divergence and distance are measures of closeness of two quantum states which are widely used in the theory of information processing and quantum cryptography. For example, the quantum relative entropy and trace distance are well known. Here we introduce a number of new quantum information divergence and distance measures into the literature and discuss their relations and properties. We also propose a method to analyze the properties and relations of various distance and pseudo-distance measures.

  14. Information gain and information leak in quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the relationships among various quantities of information during the process of an efficient quantum measurement, e.g., information gain, quantum loss, Holevo information, and coherent information. In particular, we give an uncertaintylike relation between information gain and coherent information. We also investigate the information gain by local measurements and quantum correlations in bipartite quantum systems. Moreover, we discuss two cases of information leak according to whether the observer of the environment possesses extra information about the measured system.

  15. Continuous quantum measurement in spin environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong; Wang, An Min

    2015-08-01

    We derive a stochastic master equation (SME) which describes the decoherence dynamics of a system in spin environments conditioned on the measurement record. Markovian and non-Markovian nature of environment can be revealed by a spectroscopy method based on weak continuous quantum measurement. On account of that correlated environments can lead to a non-local open system which exhibits strong non-Markovian effects although the local dynamics are Markovian, the spectroscopy method can be used to demonstrate that there is correlation between two environments.

  16. Photoluminescence quantum yield of PbS nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Greben, M.; Fucikova, A.; Valenta, J.

    2015-04-14

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of oleic acid-capped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) in toluene is thoroughly investigated as function of QD size, concentration, excitation photon energy, and conditions of storage. We observed anomalous decrease of QY with decreasing concentration for highly diluted suspensions. The ligand desorption and QD-oxidation are demonstrated to be responsible for this phenomenon. Excess of oleic acid in suspensions makes the QY values concentration-independent over the entire reabsorption-free range. The PL emission is shown to be dominated by surface-related recombinations with some contribution from QD-core transitions. We demonstrate that QD colloidal suspension stability improves with increasing the concentration and size of PbS QDs.

  17. Investigating photoluminescence quantum yield of silicon nanocrystals formed in SiOx with different initial Si excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Nguyen Xuan; Limpens, Rens; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Optical properties of silicon nanocrystals dispersed in SiO2 matrix were investigated in terms of photoluminescence quantum yield at room temperature. Two multilayer samples, prepared from substoichiometric silicon oxide layers by annealing at 1150°C were used to investigate the influence of Si concentration. Significant reduction of photoluminescence quantum yield and a very specific change of its excitation energy dependence upon variation of silicon excess are concluded from the experimental data. Possible mechanisms leading to these changes are discussed.

  18. Quantum yield of photosensitized singlet oxygen (a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]) production in solid polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Martire, D.O.; Ogilby, P.R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Taylor, V.L.; Clough, R.L. )

    1994-08-15

    The quantum yield of singlet oxygen (a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]), produced by energy transfer from the photosensitizer acridine, has been determined by two independent spectroscopic methods in solid polystyrene. Upon 355-nm pulsed-laser irradiation of acridine at 1.3 mJ/pulse, the O[sub 2](a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]) quantum yield in polystyrene [[phi][sub [Delta

  19. Coherent versus incoherent sequential quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2011-03-15

    We compare a trade-off between knowledge and decoherence for the incoherent and coherent partial sequential compatible measurements on single-qubit systems. The individual partial measurement nondestructively monitors basis states of the system by single-qubit meter. For the same decoherence caused by this unbiased measurement, the individual coherent measurement gives more knowledge than the incoherent one. For identical sequential coherent measurements, knowledge accumulated not additively increases more slowly than for the incoherent measurements. The overall knowledge can be accumulated using an adaptive measurement strategy on the meters if the single-qubit coherence of meters is kept. On the other hand, preservation of the mutual qubit coherence between the meters necessary for the collective measurement strategy is not required. A loss of single-qubit coherence degrades the coherent measurements back to the incoherent ones. Since the decoherence caused by the measurement process is a quadratic function of knowledge extracted by the individual measurement, Zeno-like behavior can be observed for repetitive weak compatible measurements. This unconditional universal effect does not depend on any dynamics of the qubit and it is a direct consequence of optimally controlled sequential evolution of quantum information.

  20. A general quantitative pH sensor developed with dicyandiamide N-doped high quantum yield graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhu Lian; Gao, Ming Xuan; Wang, Ting Ting; Wan, Xiao Yan; Zheng, Lin Ling; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-03-01

    A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water to intracellular contents.A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water

  1. Measurement-device-independent quantum coin tossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liangyuan; Yin, Zhenqiang; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Chen, Hua; Guo, Guangcan; Han, Zhengfu

    2015-12-01

    Quantum coin tossing (QCT) is an important primitive of quantum cryptography and has received continuous interest. However, in practical QCT, Bob's detectors can be subjected to detector-side channel attacks launched by dishonest Alice, which will possibly make the protocol completely insecure. Here, we report a simple strategy of a detector-blinding attack based on a recent experiment. To remove all the detector side channels, we present a solution of measurement-device-independent QCT (MDI-QCT). This method is similar to the idea of MDI quantum key distribution (QKD). MDI-QCT is loss tolerant with single-photon sources and has the same bias as the original loss-tolerant QCT under a coherent attack. Moreover, it provides the potential advantage of doubling the secure distance for some special cases. Finally, MDI-QCT can also be modified to fit the weak coherent-state sources. Thus, based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our proposal can be implemented easily.

  2. Robust state transfer in the quantum spin channel via weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chunmei; Zou, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using the weak measurement (WM) and quantum measurement reversal (QMR) approach, robust state transfer and entanglement distribution can be realized in the spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain. We find that the ultrahigh fidelity and long distance of quantum state transfer with certain success probability can be obtained using proper WM and QMR, i.e., the average fidelity of a general pure state from 80% to almost 100%, which is almost size independent. We also find that the distance and quality of entanglement distribution for the Bell state and the general Werner mixed state can be obviously improved by the WM and QMR approach.

  3. Connection between measurement disturbance relation and multipartite quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Li; Du, Kun; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    It is found that the measurement disturbance relation (MDR) determines the strength of quantum correlation and hence is one of the essential facets of the nature of quantum nonlocality. In reverse, the exact form of MDR may be ascertained through measuring the correlation function. To this aim, an optical experimental scheme is proposed. Moreover, by virtue of the correlation function, we find that the quantum entanglement, the quantum nonlocality, and the uncertainty principle can be explicitly correlated.

  4. Fundamental Bounds in Measurements for Estimating Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Ra, Young-Sik; Hong, Kang-Hee; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2014-07-01

    Quantum measurement unavoidably disturbs the state of a quantum system if any information about the system is extracted. Recently, the concept of reversing quantum measurement has been introduced and has attracted much attention. Numerous efforts have thus been devoted to understanding the fundamental relation of the amount of information obtained by measurement to either state disturbance or reversibility. Here, we experimentally prove the trade-off relations in quantum measurement with respect to both state disturbance and reversibility. By demonstrating the quantitative bound of the trade-off relations, we realize an optimal measurement for estimating quantum systems with minimum disturbance and maximum reversibility. Our results offer fundamental insights on quantum measurement and practical guidelines for implementing various quantum information protocols.

  5. A Measurement of the Scintillation Light Yield in CD4 Using a Photosensitive GEM Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Azmoun, B.; Azmoun, B.; Caccavano, A.; Rumore, M.; Sinsheimer, J.; Smirnov, N.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2010-08-01

    The absolute photon yield of scintillation light produced by highly ionizing particles in pure CF{sub 4} has been measured using a photosensitive Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. The detector consists of two standard GEMs and a CsI coated GEM which acts as a photocathode that is sensitive to the 160 nm scintillation light produced in CF{sub 4}. The light yield was determined in terms of the number of scintillation photons emitted into a 4{pi} solid angle produced per MeV of energy deposited in the gas by a 5.5 MeV alpha particle and found to be 314 {+-} 15 photons per MeV. The quantum yield was determined using a fitting method to determine the number of photoelectrons from the measured pulse height distribution, and by an independent method using the measured gain of the GEM detector. The effect of scintillation light in CF{sub 4} on the performance of Cherenkov detectors, such as the PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector (HBD) at RHIC, is also discussed.

  6. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-01

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam. PMID:11328133

  7. Inflation and the quantum measurement problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Magueijo, João

    2016-08-01

    We propose a solution to the quantum measurement problem in inflation. Our model treats Fourier modes of cosmological perturbations as analogous to particles in a weakly interacting Bose gas. We generalize the idea of a macroscopic wave function to cosmological fields, and construct a self-interaction Hamiltonian that focuses that wave function. By appropriately setting the coupling between modes, we obtain the standard adiabatic, scale-invariant power spectrum. Because of central limit theorem, we recover a Gaussian random field, consistent with observations.

  8. A Gaussian measure of quantum phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the width of the semiclassical phase distribution of a quantum state in its dependence on the average number of photons (m) in this state. As a measure of phase noise, we choose the width, delta phi, of the best Gaussian approximation to the dominant peak of this probability curve. For a coherent state, this width decreases with the square root of (m), whereas for a truncated phase state it decreases linearly with increasing (m). For an optimal phase state, delta phi decreases exponentially but so does the area caught underneath the peak: all the probability is stored in the broad wings of the distribution.

  9. Wavelength and temperature-dependent apparent quantum yields for photochemical formation of hydrogen peroxide in seawater.

    PubMed

    Kieber, David J; Miller, Gary W; Neale, Patrick J; Mopper, Kenneth

    2014-04-01

    Wavelength and temperature-dependent apparent quantum yields (AQYs) were determined for the photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide using seawater obtained from coastal and oligotrophic stations in Antarctica, the Pacific Ocean at Station ALOHA, the Gulf of Mexico, and at several sites along the East Coast of the United States. For all samples, AQYs decreased exponentially with increasing wavelength at 25 °C, ranging from 4.6 × 10(-4) to 10.4 × 10(-4) at 290 nm to 0.17 × 10(-4) to 0.97 × 10(-4) at 400 nm. AQYs for different seawater samples were remarkably similar irrespective of expected differences in the composition and concentrations of metals and dissolved organic matter (DOM) and in prior light exposure histories; wavelength-dependent AQYs for individual seawater samples differed by less than a factor of two relative to respective mean AQYs. Temperature-dependent AQYs increased between 0 and 35 °C on average by a factor of 1.8 per 10 °C, consistent with a thermal reaction (e.g., superoxide dismutation) controlling H2O2 photochemical production rates in seawater. Taken together, these results suggest that the observed poleward decrease in H₂O₂ photochemical production rates is mainly due to corresponding poleward decreases in irradiance and temperature and not spatial variations in the composition and concentrations of DOM or metals. Hydrogen peroxide photoproduction AQYs and production rates were not constant and not independent of the photon exposure as has been implicitly assumed in many published studies. Therefore, care should be taken when comparing and interpreting published H₂O₂ AQY or photochemical production rate results. Modeled depth-integrated H₂O₂ photochemical production rates were in excellent agreement with measured rates obtained from in situ free-floating drifter experiments conducted during a Gulf of Maine cruise, with differences (ca. 10%) well within measurement and modeling uncertainties. Results from this study

  10. Devising local protocols for multipartite quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a method of designing protocols for implementing multipartite quantum measurements when the parties are restricted to local operations and classical communication (LOCC). For each finite integer number of rounds r , the method succeeds in every case for which an r -round protocol exists for the measurement under consideration, and failure of the method has the immediate implication that the measurement under consideration cannot be implemented by LOCC no matter how many rounds of communication are allowed, including when the number of rounds is allowed to be infinite. It turns out that this method shows—often with relative ease—the impossibility by LOCC for a number of examples, including cases where this was not previously known, as well as the example that demonstrated what has famously become known as nonlocality without entanglement.

  11. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  12. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E.

    2015-02-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C=C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Perhaps remarkably, but apparently because of electrostatic repulsion, the direction of rotation is the same for both reactions.

  13. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of 2DAM.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, D; Melavanki, R M; Patil, N R; Kusanur, R A

    2014-09-15

    The relative quantum yield of diethyl 2-acetamido-2-((3-oxo-3H-benzo[f]chromen-1-yl)methyl)malonate [2DAM] is estimated using single point method with quinine sulfate as standard reference. The quantum yield varies between 0.1161 and 0.3181 depending on the nature of the solvent. The rates of radiative and non radiative decay constants are also calculated. The fluorescence quenching of [2DAM] by aniline is studied at room temperature, by steady state, in five different solvents namely acetonitrile (AN), 1,4 dioxane (DX), 1,2 dichloroethane (DCE), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL), in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern Volmer plots for all solvents. Various parameters for the quenching process are determined by ground state complex, sphere of action static quenching model and finite sink approximation model. The magnitudes of these rate parameters indicate that positive deviation in the Stern Volmer (SV) plot is due to both static and dynamic processes. Further, finite sink approximation model is used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of distance parameter R' and diffusion co efficient D are determined and then compared with the values of encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using Stokes-Einstein equation. PMID:24769383

  14. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications.In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00451b

  15. Montelukast photodegradation: elucidation of Ф-order kinetics, determination of quantum yields and application to actinometry.

    PubMed

    Maafi, Mounir; Maafi, Wassila

    2014-08-25

    A recently developed Ф-order semi-emperical integrated rate-law for photoreversible AB(2Ф) reactions has been successfully applied to investigate Montelukast sodium (Monte) photodegradation kinetics in ethanol. The model equations also served to propose a new stepwise kinetic elucidation method valid for any AB(2Ф) system and its application to the determination of Monte's forward (Ф(λ(irr))(A-->B)) and reverse (Ф(λ(irr))(B-->A)) quantum yields at various irradiation wavelengths. It has been found that Ф(λ(irr))(A-->B) undergoes a 15-fold increase with wavelength between 220 and 360 nm, with the spectral section 250-360 nm representing Monte effective photodegradation causative range. The reverse quantum yield values were generally between 12 and 54% lower than those recorded for Ф(λ(irr))(A-->B), with the trans-isomer (Monte) converting almost completely to its cis-counterpart at high irradiation wavelengths. Furthermore, the potential use of Monte as an actinometer has been investigated, and an actinometric method was proposed. This study demonstrated the usefulness of Monte for monochromatic light actinometry for the dynamic range 258-380 nm. PMID:24835854

  16. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of a newly synthesized coumarin derivative.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, D; Melavanki, R M; Patil, N R; Geethanjali, H S; Kusanur, R A

    2015-08-01

    We estimated the relative florescence quantum yield (Φ) of 8-methoxy-3-[1-(4,5-dicarbomethoxy-1,2,3-triazoloacetyl)]coumarin [8MDTC] using a single-point method with quinine sulfate in 0.1 M of sulfuric acid used as a standard reference. The fluorescence lifetimes, radiative and non-radiative decay rate constants are calculated. Relative quantum yields were found to be less in the non-polar solvents, indicating that the solute exhibits less fluorescence in a non-polar environment. The fluorescence quenching of [8MDTC] by aniline was studied at room temperature by examining the steady state in five different solvents in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern-Volmer plots in all solvents. Ground state complex and sphere of action static quenching models were used to interpret the results. Many quenching rate parameters were calculated using these models. The values of these parameters suggest that the sphere of action static quenching model agrees well with the experimental results. Further, a finite sink approximation model was used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of the distance parameter R' and the diffusion coefficient D were determined and are compared with the values of the encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using the Stokes-Einstein equation. PMID:25214175

  17. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of 2DAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, D.; Melavanki, R. M.; Patil, N. R.; Kusanur, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    The relative quantum yield of diethyl 2-acetamido-2-((3-oxo-3H-benzo[f]chromen-1-yl)methyl) malonate [2DAM] is estimated using single point method with quinine sulfate as standard reference. The quantum yield varies between 0.1161 and 0.3181 depending on the nature of the solvent. The rates of radiative and non radiative decay constants are also calculated. The fluorescence quenching of [2DAM] by aniline is studied at room temperature, by steady state, in five different solvents namely acetonitrile (AN), 1,4 dioxane (DX), 1,2 dichloroethane (DCE), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL), in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern Volmer plots for all solvents. Various parameters for the quenching process are determined by ground state complex, sphere of action static quenching model and finite sink approximation model. The magnitudes of these rate parameters indicate that positive deviation in the Stern Volmer (SV) plot is due to both static and dynamic processes. Further, finite sink approximation model is used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of distance parameter R‧ and diffusion co efficient D are determined and then compared with the values of encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using Stokes-Einstein equation.

  18. Preparation and photophysical studies of [Ln(hfac)3DPEPO], Ln = Eu, Tb, Yb, Nd, Gd; interpretation of total photoluminescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Martina; Alamiry, Mohamed; Moudam, Omar; Ciorba, Serena; Richardson, Patricia R; Maron, Laurent; Jones, Anita C; Richards, Bryce S; Robertson, Neil

    2013-10-01

    Synthesis and photophysical characterisation of [Ln(hfac)3DPEPO] complexes (with Ln = Eu, Tb, Yb, Nd, Gd) has been carried out to investigate the factors responsible for the variation in total photoluminescence quantum yield within this family of emissive lanthanide complexes. Electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy, in conjunction with DFT calculations of the excited state of the Eu complex, elucidate the role of each ligand in the sensitisation of the lanthanide through the antenna effect. The X-ray crystal structure of [Gd(hfac)3DPEPO] has been determined and shows an 8-coordinate environment around the Gd and a ten-membered chelate ring involving the DPEPO ligand. Total photoluminescence quantum yields were measured to be 6%, 1% and 2% for Ln = Tb, Nd and Yb, respectively, in comparison with around 80% for Ln = Eu. The lower quantum yield for Nd and Yb, compared with Eu, can be attributed to more efficient quenching of the excited Ln state by high-energy oscillations within the ligands, whereas the lower quantum yield for Tb is assigned to a combination of poor energy transfer from the ligand excited state to the Tb and longer radiative lifetime. PMID:23900430

  19. Measurement-only topological quantum computation via anyonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa Freedman, Michael Nayak, Chetan

    2009-04-15

    We describe measurement-only topological quantum computation using both projective and interferometrical measurement of topological charge. We demonstrate how anyonic teleportation can be achieved using 'forced measurement' protocols for both types of measurement. Using this, it is shown how topological charge measurements can be used to generate the braiding transformations used in topological quantum computation, and hence that the physical transportation of computational anyons is unnecessary. We give a detailed discussion of the anyonics for implementation of topological quantum computation (particularly, using the measurement-only approach) in fractional quantum Hall systems.

  20. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  1. Entanglement Measure and Quantum Violation of Bell-Type Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; He, Ying-Qiu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-05-01

    By calculating entanglement measures and quantum violation of Bell-type inequality, we reveal the relationship between entanglement measure and the amount of quantum violation for a family of four-qubit entangled states. It has been demonstrated that the Bell-type inequality is completely violated by these four-qubit entangled states. The plot of entanglement measure as a function of the expectation value of Bell operator shows that entanglement measure first decreases and then increases smoothly with increasing quantum violation.

  2. Quantum Zeno effect in the strong measurement regime of circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slichter, D. H.; Müller, C.; Vijay, R.; Weber, S. J.; Blais, A.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-05-01

    We observe the quantum Zeno effect—where the act of measurement slows the rate of quantum state transitions—in a superconducting qubit using linear circuit quantum electrodynamics readout and a near-quantum-limited following amplifier. Under simultaneous strong measurement and qubit drive, the qubit undergoes a series of quantum jumps between states. These jumps are visible in the experimental measurement record and are analyzed using maximum likelihood estimation to determine qubit transition rates. The observed rates agree with both analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The analysis methods are suitable for processing general noisy random telegraph signals.

  3. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  4. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  5. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M.; Eric Tai, M.; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems.

  6. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems. PMID:26632587

  7. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the

  8. Generalized energy measurements and modified transient quantum fluctuation theorems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Gentaro; Venkatesh, B Prasanna; Talkner, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Determining the work which is supplied to a system by an external agent provides a crucial step in any experimental realization of transient fluctuation relations. This, however, poses a problem for quantum systems, where the standard procedure requires the projective measurement of energy at the beginning and the end of the protocol. Unfortunately, projective measurements, which are preferable from the point of view of theory, seem to be difficult to implement experimentally. We demonstrate that, when using a particular type of generalized energy measurements, the resulting work statistics is simply related to that of projective measurements. This relation between the two work statistics entails the existence of modified transient fluctuation relations. The modifications are exclusively determined by the errors incurred in the generalized energy measurements. They are universal in the sense that they do not depend on the force protocol. Particularly simple expressions for the modified Crooks relation and Jarzynski equality are found for Gaussian energy measurements. These can be obtained by a sequence of sufficiently many generalized measurements which need not be Gaussian. In accordance with the central limit theorem, this leads to an effective error reduction in the individual measurements and even yields a projective measurement in the limit of infinite repetitions. PMID:25353748

  9. Intrinsic randomness as a measure of quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhou, Hongyi; Cao, Zhu; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2015-08-01

    Based on the theory of quantum mechanics, intrinsic randomness in measurement distinguishes quantum effects from classical ones. From the perspective of states, this quantum feature can be summarized as coherence or superposition in a specific (classical) computational basis. Recently, by regarding coherence as a physical resource, Baumgratz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401] presented a comprehensive framework for coherence measures. Here, we propose a quantum coherence measure essentially using the intrinsic randomness of measurement. The proposed coherence measure provides an answer to the open question in completing the resource theory of coherence. Meanwhile, we show that the coherence distillation process can be treated as quantum extraction, which can be regarded as an equivalent process of classical random number extraction. From this viewpoint, the proposed coherence measure also clarifies the operational aspect of quantum coherence. Finally, our results indicate a strong similarity between two types of quantumness—coherence and entanglement.

  10. Silver nanoparticle size-dependent measurement of quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kumar, B. Rajesh; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2013-12-01

    The plasmonic absorption band of silver nanoparticles in the visible range of electromagnetic spectrum has been successfully exploited to alter the emission characteristics of the Rhodamine 6G dye molecule. The influence of the nanoparticle size on the fluorescence quantum yield of Rhodamine 6G is interrogated via steady state fluorescence as well as dual beam thermal lens technique. The potential of the thermal lens technique that probe nonradiative path in contrast to radiative path exhibited in the fluorescence spectra as a complementary method to measure the quantum yield of a dye molecule is exploited. Analysis of the results clearly indicates that the particle size and the spectral overlap between the emission spectra of Rhodamine 6G, and absorption spectra of the silver nanoparticles determine the quantum yield value of dye-nanoparticle mixture.

  11. Efficient Measurement of Multiparticle Entanglement with Embedding Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Dian; Su, Zu-En; Cai, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xi-Lin; Yang, Tao; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-02-19

    The quantum measurement of entanglement is a demanding task in the field of quantum information. Here, we report the direct and scalable measurement of multiparticle entanglement with embedding photonic quantum simulators. In this embedding framework [R. Di Candia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240502 (2013)], the N-qubit entanglement, which does not associate with a physical observable directly, can be efficiently measured with only two (for even N) and six (for odd N) local measurement settings. Our experiment uses multiphoton quantum simulators to mimic dynamical concurrence and three-tangle entangled systems and to track their entanglement evolutions. PMID:26943520

  12. Sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum measure algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Zafiris, Elias

    2006-09-15

    We construct a sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum probabilistic structures, in terms of covering systems of Boolean measure algebras. These systems coordinatize quantum states by means of Boolean coefficients, interpreted as Boolean localization measures. The representation is based on the existence of a pair of adjoint functors between the category of presheaves of Boolean measure algebras and the category of quantum measure algebras. The sheaf-theoretic semantic transition of quantum structures shifts their physical significance from the orthoposet axiomatization at the level of events, to the sheaf-theoretic gluing conditions at the level of Boolean localization systems.

  13. Computable measure of total quantum correlations of multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behdani, Javad; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Quantum discord as a measure of the quantum correlations cannot be easily computed for most of density operators. In this paper, we present a measure of the total quantum correlations that is operationally simple and can be computed effectively for an arbitrary mixed state of a multipartite system. The measure is based on the coherence vector of the party whose quantumness is investigated as well as the correlation matrix of this part with the remainder of the system. Being able to detect the quantumness of multipartite systems, such as detecting the quantum critical points in spin chains, alongside with the computability characteristic of the measure, makes it a useful indicator to be exploited in the cases which are out of the scope of the other known measures.

  14. Enhanced fluorescence yields through cavity quantum-electrodynamic effects in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield per molecule of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in 4--16-[mu]m-diameter levitated microdroplets show a size dependence that is attributed to a net increase in the fluorescence decay rate for the smaller (4--5-[mu]m) droplets. The average fluorescence yield in 4-[mu]m droplets (for which we have previously observed emission-rate enhancement) is approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets for which emission-rate enhancement does not occur. These results suggest that there is little emission-rate inhibition in this system, even though the fluorescence emission spectrum overlaps several cavity resonances. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent line-shape functions.

  15. Gold Doping of Silver Nanoclusters: A 26-Fold Enhancement in the Luminescence Quantum Yield.

    PubMed

    Soldan, Giada; Aljuhani, Maha A; Bootharaju, Megalamane S; AbdulHalim, Lina G; Parida, Manas R; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Mohammed, Omar F; Bakr, Osman M

    2016-05-01

    A high quantum yield (QY) of photoluminescence (PL) in nanomaterials is necessary for a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, the weak PL and moderate stability of atomically precise silver nanoclusters (NCs) suppress their utility. Herein, we accomplished a ≥26-fold PL QY enhancement of the Ag29 (BDT)12 (TPP)4 cluster (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiol; TPP: triphenylphosphine) by doping with a discrete number of Au atoms, producing Ag29-x Aux (BDT)12 (TPP)4 , x=1-5. The Au-doped clusters exhibit an enhanced stability and an intense red emission around 660 nm. Single-crystal XRD, mass spectrometry, optical, and NMR spectroscopy shed light on the PL enhancement mechanism and the probable locations of the Au dopants within the cluster. PMID:27060602

  16. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  17. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  18. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  19. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  20. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-09-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3×10-3, which is comparable to that (7.5×10-3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10-3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  1. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  2. Measures of Quantum Synchronization in Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, A.; Farace, A.; Didier, N.; Giovannetti, V.; Fazio, R.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce and characterize two different measures which quantify the level of synchronization of coupled continuous variable quantum systems. The two measures allow us to extend to the quantum domain the notions of complete and phase synchronization. The Heisenberg principle sets a universal bound to complete synchronization. The measure of phase synchronization is, in principle, unbounded; however, in the absence of quantum resources (e.g., squeezing) the synchronization level is bounded below a certain threshold. We elucidate some interesting connections between entanglement and synchronization and, finally, discuss an application based on quantum optomechanical systems.

  3. Measures of quantum synchronization in continuous variable systems.

    PubMed

    Mari, A; Farace, A; Didier, N; Giovannetti, V; Fazio, R

    2013-09-01

    We introduce and characterize two different measures which quantify the level of synchronization of coupled continuous variable quantum systems. The two measures allow us to extend to the quantum domain the notions of complete and phase synchronization. The Heisenberg principle sets a universal bound to complete synchronization. The measure of phase synchronization is, in principle, unbounded; however, in the absence of quantum resources (e.g., squeezing) the synchronization level is bounded below a certain threshold. We elucidate some interesting connections between entanglement and synchronization and, finally, discuss an application based on quantum optomechanical systems. PMID:25166668

  4. Solution-based synthesis of high yield CZTS (Cu2ZnSnS4) spherical quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, G.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Subramanian, E. P.; Venkatraman, M. R.; Agilan, S.; Ragavendran, V.; Thambidurai, M.; Velumani, S.; Yi, Junsin; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2015-01-01

    High yield CZTS quantum dots have been synthesized using simple precursors by chemical precipitation technique. Formation mechanism of CZTS spherical quantum dots also has been investigated. According to the mechanism, copper sulfide nuclei firstly forms, and serves as the starting point for the nucleation and growth of CZTS. X-ray diffraction pattern, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and Raman spectra reveals the formation of pure kesterite structure Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticles. HRTEM analysis reveals the formation of CZTS quantum dots with an average particle size of ∼8.3 nm. The elemental distribution of CZTS quantum dots studied using STEM elemental mapping reveals that Cu, Zn, Sn and S are present in the sample. The photoluminescence spectra of CZTS exhibit a broad red emission band at 657 nm. The optical band gap is shifted to the higher energy side and it shows the presence of quantum confinement effect.

  5. Measurement of quantum fluctuations in geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2008-05-01

    A particular form for the quantum indeterminacy of relative spacetime position of events is derived from the context of a holographic geometry with a minimum length at the Planck scale. The indeterminacy predicts fluctuations from a classically defined geometry in the form of “holographic noise” whose spatial character, absolute normalization, and spectrum are predicted with no parameters. The noise has a distinctive transverse spatial shear signature and a flat power spectral density given by the Planck time. An interferometer signal displays noise due to the uncertainty of relative positions of reflection events. The noise corresponds to an accumulation of phase offset with time that mimics a random walk of those optical elements that change the orientation of a wavefront. It only appears in measurements that compare transverse positions and does not appear at all in purely radial position measurements. A lower bound on holographic noise follows from a covariant upper bound on gravitational entropy. The predicted holographic noise spectrum is estimated to be comparable to measured noise in the currently operating interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO600. Because of its transverse character, holographic noise is reduced relative to gravitational wave effects in other interferometer designs, such as the LIGO observatories, where beam power is much less in the beam splitter than in the arms.

  6. Quantum yields and reaction times of photochromic diarylethenes: nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics for normal- and inverse-type.

    PubMed

    Wiebeler, Christian; Schumacher, Stefan

    2014-09-11

    Photochromism is a light-induced molecular process that is likely to find its way into future optoelectronic devices. In further optimization of photochromic materials, light-induced conversion efficiencies as well as reaction times can usually only be determined once a new molecule was synthesized. Here we use nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics to study the electrocyclic reaction of diarylethenes, comparing normal- and inverse-type systems. Our study highlights that reaction quantum yields can be successfully predicted in accord with experimental findings. In particular, we find that inverse-type diarylethenes show a significantly higher reaction quantum yield and cycloreversion on times typically as short as 100 fs. PMID:25140609

  7. Debugging quantum processes using monitoring measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangjia; Ying, Mingsheng

    2014-04-01

    Since observation on a quantum system may cause the system state collapse, it is usually hard to find a way to monitor a quantum process, which is a quantum system that continuously evolves. We propose a protocol that can debug a quantum process by monitoring, but not disturb the evolution of the system. This protocol consists of an error detector and a debugging strategy. The detector is a projection operator that is orthogonal to the anticipated system state at a sequence of time points, and the strategy is used to specify these time points. As an example, we show how to debug the computational process of quantum search using this protocol. By applying the Skolem-Mahler-Lech theorem in algebraic number theory, we find an algorithm to construct all of the debugging protocols for quantum processes of time-independent Hamiltonians.

  8. Incompatible quantum measurements admitting a local-hidden-variable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino, Marco Túlio; Bowles, Joseph; Hirsch, Flavien; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The observation of quantum nonlocality, i.e., quantum correlations violating a Bell inequality, implies the use of incompatible local quantum measurements. Here we consider the converse question. That is, can any set of incompatible measurements be used in order to demonstrate Bell inequality violation? Our main result is to construct a local hidden variable model for an incompatible set of qubit measurements. Specifically, we show that if Alice uses this set of measurements, then for any possible shared entangled state and any possible dichotomic measurements performed by Bob, the resulting statistics are local. This represents significant progress towards proving that measurement incompatibility does not imply Bell nonlocality in general.

  9. Developing a diagnostic model for estimating terrestrial vegetation gross primary productivity using the photosynthetic quantum yield and Earth Observation data.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, Booker O; Dash, Jadunandan; Dawson, Terence P

    2013-09-01

    This article develops a new carbon exchange diagnostic model [i.e. Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model] for estimating daily gross primary productivity (GPP). The model exploits the maximum quantum yields of two key photosynthetic pathways (i.e. C3 and C4 ) to estimate the conversion of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation into GPP. Furthermore, this is the first model to use only the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (i.e. FAPARps ) rather than total canopy, to predict GPP. The GPP predicted by the SCARF model was comparable to in situ GPP measurements (R(2)  > 0.7) in most of the evaluated biomes. Overall, the SCARF model predicted high GPP in regions dominated by forests and croplands, and low GPP in shrublands and dry-grasslands across USA and Europe. The spatial distribution of GPP from the SCARF model over Europe and conterminous USA was comparable to those from the MOD17 GPP product except in regions dominated by croplands. The SCARF model GPP predictions were positively correlated (R(2)  > 0.5) to climatic and biophysical input variables indicating its sensitivity to factors controlling vegetation productivity. The new model has three advantages, first, it prescribes only two quantum yield terms rather than species specific light use efficiency terms; second, it uses only the fraction of PAR absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (FAPARps ) hence capturing the actual PAR used in photosynthesis; and third, it does not need a detailed land cover map that is a major source of uncertainty in most remote sensing based GPP models. The Sentinel satellites planned for launch in 2014 by the European Space Agency have adequate spectral channels to derive FAPARps at relatively high spatial resolution (20 m). This provides a unique opportunity to produce global GPP operationally using the Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model at high spatial resolution. PMID:23687009

  10. Measuring the yield stress in magnetorheological fluids using ultrasounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Jaime; Elvira, Luis; Montero de Espinosa Freijo, Francisco; Bossis, Georges; de Vicente, Juan

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we propose a method to accurately determine the yield stress in magnetorheological (MR) fluids using ultrasounds. The setup is constructed, and experimental data are obtained on a model conventional MR fluid under steady shear stress ramp-up tests. By using video-microscopy, ultrasonic techniques, and rheometry simultaneously, it is possible to precisely determine the yield stress at experimentally accessible times.

  11. Determination of Phosphorescence Quantum Yield of Singlet Oxygen O 2( 1Δ g) Photosensitized by Phenalenone in Air-Saturated Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Okiyasu; Watanabe, Jun; Imakubo, Keiichi; Naito, Shizuo

    1998-11-01

    The phosphorescence quantum yield Φ P (=einsteins emitted/einsteins absorbed by sensitizer) of singlet oxygen (1O2) was measured for an air-saturated CCl4 solution of phenalenone (PH) used as a photosensitizer, by means of a photon-counting technique based on the use of a near-IR-sensitive photomultiplier. Employment of steady-state excitation allowed for the determination of the absolute quantum yield of Φ P=(1.38±0.05)×10-3 in CCl4. The result was obtained by direct comparison of the areas under the corrected emission spectra of 1O2 and of quinine bisulfate (QBS) in 1N H2SO4 as a luminescence standard.

  12. Accurate quantum yields by laser gain vs absorption spectroscopy - Investigation of Br/Br(asterisk) channels in photofragmentation of Br2 and IBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugen, H. K.; Weitz, E.; Leone, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Various techniques have been used to study photodissociation dynamics of the halogens and interhalogens. The quantum yields obtained by these techniques differ widely. The present investigation is concerned with a qualitatively new approach for obtaining highly accurate quantum yields for electronically excited states. This approach makes it possible to obtain an accuracy of 1 percent to 3 percent. It is shown that measurement of the initial transient gain/absorption vs the final absorption in a single time-resolved signal is a very accurate technique in the study of absolute branching fractions in photodissociation. The new technique is found to be insensitive to pulse and probe laser characteristics, molecular absorption cross sections, and absolute precursor density.

  13. Towards quantum-enhanced precision measurements: Promise and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Jian; Xiao, Min

    2013-11-01

    Quantum metrology holds the promise of improving the measurement precision beyond the limit of classical approaches. To achieve such enhancement in performance requires the development of quantum estimation theories as well as novel experimental techniques. In this article, we provide a brief review of some recent results in the field of quantum metrology. We emphasize that the unambiguous demonstration of the quantum-enhanced precision needs a careful analysis of the resources involved. In particular, the implementation of quantum metrology in practice requires us to take into account the experimental imperfections included, for example, particle loss and dephasing noise. For a detailed introduction to the experimental demonstrations of quantum metrology, we refer the reader to another article ‘Quantum metrology’ in the same issue.

  14. Enhancing teleportation of quantum Fisher information by partial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Wo-Jun; Li, Yan-Ling; Xie, Ying-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The purport of quantum teleportation is to completely transfer information from one party to another distant partner. However, from the perspective of parameter estimation, it is the information carried by a particular parameter, not the information of total quantum state that needs to be teleported. Due to the inevitable noise in environments, we propose two schemes to enhance quantum Fisher information (QFI) teleportation under amplitude damping noise with the technique of partial measurements. We find that post-partial measurement can greatly enhance the teleported QFI, while the combination of prior partial measurement and post-partial measurement reversal could completely eliminate the effect of decoherence. We show that, somewhat consequentially, enhancing QFI teleportation is more economic than that of improving fidelity teleportation. Our work extends the ability of partial measurements as a quantum technique to battle decoherence in quantum information processing.

  15. Quantum probabilities of composite events in quantum measurements with multimode states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2013-10-01

    The problem of defining quantum probabilities of composite events is considered. This problem is of great importance for the theory of quantum measurements and for quantum decision theory, which is a part of measurement theory. We show that the Lüders probability of consecutive measurements is a transition probability between two quantum states and that this probability cannot be treated as a quantum extension of the classical conditional probability. The Wigner distribution is shown to be a weighted transition probability that cannot be accepted as a quantum extension of the classical joint probability. We suggest the definition of quantum joint probabilities by introducing composite events in multichannel measurements. The notion of measurements under uncertainty is defined. We demonstrate that the necessary condition for mode interference is the entanglement of the composite prospect together with the entanglement of the composite statistical state. As an illustration, we consider an example of a quantum game. Special attention is paid to the application of the approach to systems with multimode states, such as atoms, molecules, quantum dots, or trapped Bose-condensed atoms with several coherent modes.

  16. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  17. Aerogels from CdSe/CdS Nanorods with Ultra-long Exciton Lifetimes and High Fluorescence Quantum Yields.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Paradinas, Sara; Dorfs, Dirk; Friebe, Sebastian; Freytag, Axel; Wolf, Andreas; Bigall, Nadja C

    2015-10-28

    Hydrogels are fabricated from CdSe/CdS seeded nanorod building blocks by the addition of hydrogen peroxide and converted to aerogels by supercritical drying. The aerogels show higher photoluminescence quantum yields and longer lifetimes than the hydrogels and the nanoparticle solutions. A model for this observation is derived. PMID:26332446

  18. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE EASTERN EQUATORIAL PACIFIC DETERMINED FROM VARIABILITY IN THE QUANTUM YIELD OF FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a transect study in the eastern equatorial Pacific, from the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll tropical waters to the oligotrophic subtropical waters, we determined the variability in the maximum change in the quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence by means of a fast repetitio...

  20. MnBr₂/18-crown-6 coordination complexes showing high room temperature luminescence and quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, David; Kuzmanoski, Ana; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-04-21

    The reaction of manganese(ii) bromide and the crown ether 18-crown-6 in the ionic liquid [(n-Bu)3MeN][N(Tf)2] under mild conditions (80-130 °C) resulted in the formation of three different coordination compounds: MnBr2(18-crown-6) (), Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 () and Mn3Br6(18-crown-6) (). In general, the local coordination and the crystal structure of all compounds are driven by the mismatch between the small radius of the Mn(2+) cation (83 pm) and the ring opening of 18-crown-6 as a chelating ligand (about 300 pm). This improper situation leads to different types of coordination and bonding. MnBr2(18-crown-6) represents a molecular compound with Mn(2+) coordinated by two bromine atoms and only five oxygen atoms of 18-crown-6. Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 falls into a [MnBr(18-crown-6)](+) cation - with Mn(2+) coordinated by six oxygen atoms and Br - and a [MnBr(18-crown-6)MnBr4](-) anion. In this anion, Mn(2+) is coordinated by five oxygen atoms of the crown ether as well as by two bromine atoms, one of them bridging to an isolated (MnBr4) tetrahedron. Mn3Br6(18-crown-6), finally, forms an infinite, non-charged [Mn2(18-crown-6)(MnBr6)] chain. Herein, 18-crown-6 is exocyclically coordinated by two Mn(2+) cations. All compounds show intense luminescence in the yellow to red spectral range and exhibit remarkable quantum yields of 70% (Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)) and 98% (Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2). The excellent quantum yield of Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 and its differentiation from MnBr2(18-crown-6) and Mn3Br6(18-crown-6) can be directly correlated to the local coordination. PMID:26956783

  1. Measured quantum probability distribution functions for Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, G. W.; O'Connell, R. F.

    2007-10-15

    The quantum analog of the joint probability distributions describing a classical stochastic process is introduced. A prescription is given for constructing the quantum distribution associated with a sequence of measurements. For the case of quantum Brownian motion this prescription is illustrated with a number of explicit examples. In particular, it is shown how the prescription can be extended in the form of a general formula for the Wigner function of a Brownian particle entangled with a heat bath.

  2. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases. PMID:26841968

  3. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases. PMID:26841968

  4. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-02-01

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases.

  5. Lithium: Measurement of Young's Modulus and Yield Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P Schultz

    2002-11-07

    The Lithium Collection Lens is used for anti-proton collection. In analyzing the structural behavior during operation, various material properties of lithium are often needed. properties such as density, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressability, etc.; are well known. However, to the authors knowledge there is only one published source for Young's Modulus. This paper reviews the results from the testing of Young's Modulus and the yield strength of lithium at room temperature.

  6. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis.

    PubMed

    Meiling, Till T; Cywiński, Piotr J; Bald, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst. PMID:27334409

  7. Enhanced quantum yield of photoluminescent porous silicon prepared by supercritical drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Defforge, Thomas; Loni, Armando; Kim, Dokyoung; Li, Z. Y.; Sailor, Michael J.; Gautier, Gael; Canham, Leigh T.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of supercritical drying (SCD) on the preparation of porous silicon (pSi) powders has been investigated in terms of photoluminescence (PL) efficiency. Since the pSi contains closely spaced and possibly interconnected Si nanocrystals (<5 nm), pore collapse and morphological changes within the nanocrystalline structure after common drying processes can affect PL efficiency. We report the highly beneficial effects of using SCD for preparation of photoluminescent pSi powders. Significantly higher surface areas and pore volumes have been realized by utilizing SCD (with CO2 solvent) instead of air-drying. Correspondingly, the pSi powders better retain the porous structure and the nano-sized silicon grains, thus minimizing the formation of non-radiative defects during liquid evaporation (air drying). The SCD process also minimizes capillary-stress induced contact of neighboring nanocrystals, resulting in lower exciton migration levels within the network. A significant enhancement of the PL quantum yield (>32% at room temperature) has been achieved, prompting the need for further detailed studies to establish the dominant causes of such an improvement.

  8. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.

  9. Effects of inter-nanocrystal distance on luminescence quantum yield in ensembles of Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2014-12-15

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of multilayers of Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) separated by SiO{sub 2} barriers were thoroughly studied as function of the barrier thickness, excitation wavelength, and temperature. By mastering the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth, we produce a series of samples with the same size-distribution of SiNCs but variable interlayer barrier distance. These samples enable us to clearly demonstrate that the increase of barrier thickness from ∼1 to larger than 2 nm induces doubling of the PL QY value, which corresponds to the change of number of close neighbors in the hcp structure. The temperature dependence of PL QY suggests that the PL QY changes are due to a thermally activated transport of excitation into non-radiative centers in dark NCs or in the matrix. We estimate that dark NCs represent about 68% of the ensemble of NCs. The PL QY excitation spectra show no significant changes upon changing the barrier thickness and no clear carrier multiplication effects. The dominant effect is the gradual decrease of the PL QY with increasing excitation photon energy.

  10. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst. PMID:27334409

  11. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  12. Ultrasmall Organic Nanoparticles with Aggregation-Induced Emission and Enhanced Quantum Yield for Fluorescence Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suying; Bai, Xilin; Ma, Jingwen; Xu, Minmin; Hu, Gaofei; James, Tony D; Wang, Leyu

    2016-08-01

    The use of fluorescence probes for biomedical imaging has attracted significant attention over recent years owing to their high resolution at cellular level. The probes are available in many formats including small particle size based imaging agents which are considered to be promising candidates, due to their excellent stabilities. Yet, concerns over the potential cytotoxicity effects of inorganic luminescent particles have led to questions about their suitability for imaging applications. Exploration of alternatives inspired us to use organic fluorophores with aggregation-induced emission (AIE), prepared by functionalizing the amine group on tetraphenylethene with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl isocyanate. The as-synthesized novel AIE fluorophore (TPE-F) display enhanced quantum yield and longer lifetime as compared with its counterparts (4,4',4″,4‴-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetraaniline, TPE-AM). Furthermore, the TPE-F was encapsulated into small-size organic nanoparticles (NPs; dynamic light scattering size, ∼10 nm) with polysuccinimide (PSI). The biocompatibility, excellent stability, bright fluorescence, and selective cell targeting of these NPs enable the as-prepared TPE-F NPs to be suitable for specific fluorescence cell imaging. PMID:27349933

  13. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  14. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  15. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states.

  16. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement. I. Investigation of Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-01-01

    We describe the difficulties that advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement within the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. We explore the possible origins of these difficulties by analyzing student responses to questions from both surveys and interviews. Results from this research are applied to develop…

  17. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G H; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C P

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  18. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  19. Accounting for the decrease of photosystem photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance to estimate quantum yield of leaf photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; Belay, Daniel W; van der Putten, Peter E L; Struik, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    Maximum quantum yield for leaf CO2 assimilation under limiting light conditions (Φ CO2LL) is commonly estimated as the slope of the linear regression of net photosynthetic rate against absorbed irradiance over a range of low-irradiance conditions. Methodological errors associated with this estimation have often been attributed either to light absorptance by non-photosynthetic pigments or to some data points being beyond the linear range of the irradiance response, both causing an underestimation of Φ CO2LL. We demonstrate here that a decrease in photosystem (PS) photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance, even at very low levels, is another source of error that causes a systematic underestimation of Φ CO2LL. A model method accounting for this error was developed, and was used to estimate Φ CO2LL from simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence on leaves using various combinations of species, CO2, O2, or leaf temperature levels. The conventional linear regression method under-estimated Φ CO2LL by ca. 10-15%. Differences in the estimated Φ CO2LL among measurement conditions were generally accounted for by different levels of photorespiration as described by the Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry model. However, our data revealed that the temperature dependence of PSII photochemical efficiency under low light was an additional factor that should be accounted for in the model. PMID:25149653

  20. High-efficiency tomographic reconstruction of quantum states by quantum nondemolition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. S.; Wei, L. F.; Oh, C. H.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a high-efficiency scheme to tomographically reconstruct an unknown quantum state by using a series of quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements. The proposed QND measurements of the qubits are implemented by probing the stationary transmissions through a driven dispersively coupled resonator. It is shown that only one kind of QND measurement is sufficient to determine all the diagonal elements of the density matrix of the detected quantum state. The remaining nondiagonal elements can be similarly determined by transferring them to the diagonal locations after a series of unitary operations. Compared with the tomographic reconstructions based on the usual destructive projective measurements (wherein one such measurement can determine only one diagonal element of the density matrix), the present reconstructive approach exhibits significantly high efficiency. Specifically, our generic proposal is demonstrated by the experimental circuit quantum electrodynamics systems with a few Josephson charge qubits.

  1. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    PubMed

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  2. Process tomography via sequential measurements on a single quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, Humairah; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Choudhary, Sujit K.; Uys, Hermann; Diósi, Lajos; Konrad, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We utilize a discrete (sequential) measurement protocol to investigate quantum process tomography of a single two-level quantum system, with an unknown initial state, undergoing Rabi oscillations. The ignorance of the dynamical parameters is encoded into a continuous-variable classical system which is coupled to the two-level quantum system via a generalized Hamiltonian. This combined estimate of the quantum state and dynamical parameters is updated by using the information obtained from sequential measurements on the quantum system and, after a sufficient waiting period, faithful state monitoring and parameter determination is obtained. Numerical evidence is used to demonstrate the convergence of the state estimate to the true state of the hybrid system.

  3. Low-Pressure Photolysis of 2,3-Pentanedione in Air: Quantum Yields and Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hichem; Djehiche, Mokhtar; Gierczak, Tomasz; Morajkar, Pranay; Fittschen, Christa; Coddeville, Patrice; Tomas, Alexandre

    2015-12-24

    Dicarbonyls in the atmosphere mainly arise from secondary sources as reaction products in the degradation of a large number of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Because of their sensitivity to solar radiation, photodissociation of dicarbonyls can dominate the fate of these VOC and impact the atmospheric radical budget. The photolysis of 2,3-pentanedione (PTD) has been investigated for the first time as a function of pressure in a static reactor equipped with continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy to measure the HO2 radical photostationary concentrations along with stable species. We showed that (i) Stern-Volmer plots are consistent with low OH-radical formation yields in RCO + O2 reactions, (ii) the decrease of the photodissociation rate due to pressure increase from 26 to 1000 mbar is of about 30%, (iii) similarly to other dicarbonyls, the Stern-Volmer analysis shows a curvature at the lower pressure investigated, which may be assigned to the existence of excited singlet and triplet PTD states, (iv) PTD photolysis at 66 mbar leads to CO2, CH2O and CO with yields of (1.16 ± 0.04), (0.33 ± 0.02) and (0.070 ± 0.005), respectively, with CH2O yield independent of pressure up to 132 mbar and CO yield in agreement with that obtained at atmospheric pressure by Bouzidi et al. (2014), and (v) the PTD photolysis mechanism remains unchanged between atmospheric pressure and 66 mbar. As a part of this work, the O2 broadening coefficient for the absorption line of HO2 radicals at 6638.21 cm(-1) has been determined (γO2 = 0.0289 cm(-1) atm(-1)). PMID:26608471

  4. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  5. Nonequilibrium work and entropy production by quantum projective measurements.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2013-09-01

    We study the thermodynamic notion of quantum projective measurements, using a framework for the fluctuation theorem of nonequilibrium work. The energy change induced by measurements satisfies the Jarzynski equality, leading us to the interpretation that the quantum projective measurements perform nonequilibrium work on the measured system. The work average exhibits intriguing limiting behaviors due to the heat-up effect caused by repeated measurements and the quantum Zeno effect caused by measurements of an infinite frequency. If the measured system relaxes back to its initial equilibrium state, the work is completely dissipated in the form of heat into a reservoir. The corresponding entropy increase in the reservoir is shown to be not less than the von Neumann entropy change generated during the course of the measurements, proving Landauer's principle. PMID:24125212

  6. Demonstration of Quantum Nonlocality in the Presence of Measurement Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, Djeylan; Tanzilli, Sébastien; Martin, Anthony; Pütz, Gilles; Thew, Rob; Gisin, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Quantum nonlocality stands as a resource for device independent quantum information processing (DIQIP), such as, for instance, device independent quantum key distribution. We investigate, experimentally, the assumption of limited measurement dependence, i.e., that the measurement settings used in Bell inequality tests or DIQIP are partially influenced by the source of entangled particle and/or by an adversary. Using a recently derived Bell-like inequality [G. Pütz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 190402 (2014)] and a 99% fidelity source of partially entangled polarization photonic qubits, we obtain a clear violation of the inequality, excluding a much larger range of measurement dependent local models than would be possible with an adapted Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality. It is therefore shown that the measurement independence assumption can be widely relaxed while still demonstrating quantum nonlocality.

  7. Demonstration of Quantum Nonlocality in the Presence of Measurement Dependence.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Djeylan; Tanzilli, Sébastien; Martin, Anthony; Pütz, Gilles; Thew, Rob; Gisin, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Quantum nonlocality stands as a resource for device independent quantum information processing (DIQIP), such as, for instance, device independent quantum key distribution. We investigate, experimentally, the assumption of limited measurement dependence, i.e., that the measurement settings used in Bell inequality tests or DIQIP are partially influenced by the source of entangled particle and/or by an adversary. Using a recently derived Bell-like inequality [G. Pütz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 190402 (2014)] and a 99% fidelity source of partially entangled polarization photonic qubits, we obtain a clear violation of the inequality, excluding a much larger range of measurement dependent local models than would be possible with an adapted Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality. It is therefore shown that the measurement independence assumption can be widely relaxed while still demonstrating quantum nonlocality. PMID:26196606

  8. Red Drop in the Quantum Yield of Fluorescence of Sonicated Algae

    PubMed Central

    Das, M.; Rabinowitch, E.; Szalay, L.

    1968-01-01

    The change of the quantum yield of fluorescence, Φ, with the frequency of exciting light, was investigated in Chlorella, Anacystis, and Porphyridium suspensions, and in sonicates from these cells prepared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In case of Chlorella, sonicates were made in acid and in alkaline media (pH 4.65 and 7.80). In the alkaline medium, a drop of Φ towards the longer waves was found to begin at 1.466 × 104 cm-1 (682 nm) in sonicates, and in suspension. In the acid medium, the drop began at 1.471 × 104 cm-1 (680 nm), 1.418 × 104 cm-1 (705 nm), and 1.389 × 104 cm-1 (720 nm) in suspension, anaerobic sonicate, and aerobic sonicate, respectively. The results indicate that the cause of the change in the red drop is preferential destruction of a long-wave component of chlorophyll a (such as Chl a 693). The amount of this component remaining after sonication is larger in alkaline than in acid sonicates. With Anacystis and Porphyridium, only alkaline suspensions (pH 7.80) could be used for sonication, because in acid medium, the phycobilin-chlorophyll complex is rapidly broken and phycobilin extracted from the cell. In Anacystis, the red drop begins at 1.562 × 104 cm-1 (640 nm) and 1.538 × 104 cm-1 (650 nm) in suspension and sonicate, respectively; in Porphyridium, it starts at 1.550 × 104 cm-1 (645 nm) in both cases. These results suggest that sonication in alkaline medium (pH 7.80) destroys some Chl a 693 in Anacystis, but not in Porphyridium. PMID:5679392

  9. On the measurement of time for the quantum harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1992-01-01

    A generalization of previous treatments of quantum phase is presented. Restrictions on the class of realizable phase statistics are thereby removed; thus, permitting 'phase wavefunction collapse' (and other advantages). This is accomplished by exciting the auxiliary mode of the measurement apparatus in a time-reversed fashion. The mathematical properties of this auxiliary mode are studied in the hope that they will lead to an identification of a physical apparatus which can realize the quantum phase measurement.

  10. Quantum state tomography with noninstantaneous measurements, imperfections, and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, P.; Campagne-Ibarcq, Ph.; Dotsenko, I.; Sarlette, A.; Huard, B.; Rouchon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tomography of a quantum state is usually based on a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) and on their experimental statistics. Among the available reconstructions, the maximum-likelihood (MaxLike) technique is an efficient one. We propose an extension of this technique when the measurement process cannot be simply described by an instantaneous POVM. Instead, the tomography relies on a set of quantum trajectories and their measurement records. This model includes the fact that, in practice, each measurement could be corrupted by imperfections and decoherence, and could also be associated with the record of continuous-time signals over a finite amount of time. The goal is then to retrieve the quantum state that was present at the start of this measurement process. The proposed extension relies on an explicit expression of the likelihood function via the effective matrices appearing in quantum smoothing and solutions of the adjoint quantum filter. It allows us to retrieve the initial quantum state as in standard MaxLike tomography, but where the traditional POVM operators are replaced by more general ones that depend on the measurement record of each trajectory. It also provides, aside from the MaxLike estimate of the quantum state, confidence intervals for any observable. Such confidence intervals are derived, as the MaxLike estimate, from an asymptotic expansion of multidimensional Laplace integrals appearing in Bayesian mean estimation. A validation is performed on two sets of experimental data: photon(s) trapped in a microwave cavity subject to quantum nondemolition measurements relying on Rydberg atoms, and heterodyne fluorescence measurements of a superconducting qubit.

  11. Model-independent Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC using the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Heather E.; Salvail, Jeff Z.

    2011-10-01

    We show that combining a direct measurement of the Higgs total width from the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape with Higgs signal rate measurements allows Higgs couplings to be extracted in a model-independent way from CERN LHC data. Using existing experimental studies with 30 fb{sup -1} at one detector of the 14 TeV LHC, we show that the couplings squared of a 190 GeV Higgs to WW, ZZ, and gg can be extracted with statistical precisions of about 10%, and a 95% confidence level upper limit on an unobserved component of the Higgs decay width of about 22% of the standard model Higgs width can be set. The method can also be applied for heavier Higgs masses.

  12. Simplified method measures changes in tensile yield strength using least number of specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Simplified method determines yield strength due to heat treat, irradiation or mechanical treatment. Each specimen in a group of specimens is tested for yield stress point, subjected to heat treat or irradiation, and retested for new yield stress point which is a measure of change in material.

  13. A model of the measurement process in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diel, H. H.

    2015-07-01

    The so-called measurement problem of quantum theory (QT) is still lacking a satisfactory, or at least widely agreed upon, solution. A number of theories, known as interpretations of quantum theory, have been proposed and found differing acceptance among physicists. Most of the proposed theories try to explain what happens during a QT measurement using a modification of the declarative equations that define the possible results of a measurement of QT observables or by making assumptions outside the scope of falsifiable physics. This paper proposes a solution to the QT measurement problem in terms of a model of the process for the evolution of two QT systems that interact in a way that represents a measurement. The model assumes that the interactions between the measured QT object and the measurement apparatus are ’’normal” interactions which adhere to the laws of quantum field theory.

  14. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, Stefan L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.

    2012-04-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  15. Measuring bipartite quantum correlations of an unknown state.

    PubMed

    Silva, I A; Girolami, D; Auccaise, R; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Bonagamba, T J; deAzevedo, E R; Soares-Pinto, D O; Adesso, G

    2013-04-01

    We report the experimental measurement of bipartite quantum correlations of an unknown two-qubit state. Using a liquid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance setup and employing geometric discord, we evaluate the quantum correlations of a state without resorting to prior knowledge of its density matrix. The method is applicable to any 2 ⊗ d system and provides, in terms of number of measurements required, an advantage over full state tomography scaling with the dimension d of the unmeasured subsystem. The negativity of quantumness is measured as well for reference. We also observe the phenomenon of sudden transition of quantum correlations when local phase and amplitude damping channels are applied to the state. PMID:25166969

  16. Optimizing quantum correlation dynamics by weak measurement in dissipative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie; Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the protection of quantum correlations of two qubits in independent vacuum reservoirs by means of weak measurements. It is found that the weak measurement can reduce the amount of quantum correlation for one type of initial state at the beginning in a non-Markovian environment and meanwhile it can reduce the occurrence time of entanglement sudden death (ESD) in the process of time evolution. In a Markovian environment, the quantum entanglements of the two kinds of initial states decay rapidly and the weak measurement can further weaken the quantum entanglement, therefore in this case the entanglement cannot be optimized in the evolution process. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012 and No.11147019).

  17. Structure-Triggered High Quantum Yield Luminescence and Switchable Dielectric Properties in Manganese(II) Based Hybrid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xia; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Tang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Heng-Yun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Two new manganese(II) based organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, C11 H21 Cl3 MnN2 (1) and C11 H22 Cl4 MnN2 (2), with prominent photoluminescence and dielectric properties were synthesized by solvent modulation. Compound 1 with novel trigonal bipyramidal geometry exhibits bright red luminescence with a lifetime of 2.47 ms and high quantum yield of 35.8 %. Compound 2 with tetrahedral geometry displays intense long-lived (1.54 ms) green light emission with higher quantum yield of 92.3 %, accompanied by reversible solid-state phase transition at 170 K and a distinct switchable dielectric property. The better performance of 2 results from the structure, including a discrete organic cation moiety and inorganic metal anion framework, which gives the cations large freedom of motion. PMID:26864910

  18. Laser flash photolysis of ozone - O/1D/ quantum yields in the fall-off region 297-325 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, J. C.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for O(1D) production from ozone photolysis has been determined between 297.5 nm and 325 nm in order to resolve serious discrepancies among previous studies. The results of this investigation are compared to earlier work by calculating atmospheric production rate constants for O(1D). It is found that for the purpose of calculating this rate constant, there is now good agreement among three studies at 298 K. Furthermore, it appears that previous data on the temperature dependence of the O(1D) quantum yield fall-off is adequate for determining the vertical profile of the O(1D) production rate constant. Several experimental difficulties associated with using NO2(asterisk) chemiluminescence to monitor O(1D) have been identified.

  19. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  20. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal–Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 ± 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm⁻¹ blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  1. Short-Term Flooding Effects on Gas Exchange and Quantum Yield of Rabbiteye Blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) 1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Frederick S.; Flore, James A.

    1986-01-01

    Roots of 1.5-year-old `Woodard' rabbiteye blueberry plants (Vaccinium ashei Reade) were flooded in containers or maintained at container capacity over a 5-day period. Carbon assimilation, and stomatal and residual conductances were monitored on one fully expanded shoot/plant using an open flow gas analysis system. Quantum yield was calculated from light response curves. Carbon assimilation and quantum yield of flooded plants decreased to 64 and 41% of control values, respectively, after 1 day of flooding and continued decreasing to 38 and 27% after 4 days. Stomatal and residual conductances to CO2 also decreased after 1 day of flooding compared with those of unflooded plants with residual conductance severely limiting carbon assimilation after 4 days of flooding. Stomatal opening occurred in 75 to 90 minutes and rate of opening was unaffected by flooding. PMID:16664791

  2. Measurement-induced control with a nondestructive quantum gas microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Minwoo; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Rabinowitz, Jacob; Wellner, Zoe; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The physics of ultracold lattice gases has expanded from understanding Hubbard models to a much broader set of questions of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics, quantum thermodynamics, manybody entanglement, etc. These studies are increasingly being enabled by the advent of quantum gas microscopy, i.e. acquiring in-situ real space information, that is gaining prominence as a very powerful technique to study lattice gases. Nonetheless, the realization of fascinating correlated manybody states requires prohibitively low temperatures and entropies, far below what can be accessed through conventional evaporative cooling. The combination of quantum gas microscopy and measurement based quantum control offers an alternate route to state preparation of lattice gases in regimes of strong correlations. In this poster, we present our ongoing work on using site resolved imaging for the preparation of correlated manybody phases. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  3. Proton-transfer and hydrogen-bond interactions determine fluorescence quantum yield and photochemical efficiency of bacteriophytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Toh, K. C.; Stojković, Emina A.; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T. M.

    2010-01-01

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptor proteins that regulate a variety of responses and cellular processes in plants, bacteria, and fungi. The phytochrome light activation mechanism involves isomerization around the C15═C16 double bond of an open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophore, resulting in a flip of its D-ring. In an important new development, bacteriophytochrome (Bph) has been engineered for use as a fluorescent marker in mammalian tissues. Here we report that an unusual Bph, RpBphP3 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, denoted P3, is fluorescent. This Bph modulates synthesis of light-harvesting complex in combination with a second Bph exhibiting classical photochemistry, RpBphP2, denoted P2. We identify the factors that determine the fluorescence and isomerization quantum yields through the application of ultrafast spectroscopy to wild-type and mutants of P2 and P3. The excited-state lifetime of the biliverdin chromophore in P3 was significantly longer at 330–500 ps than in P2 and other classical phytochromes and accompanied by a significantly reduced isomerization quantum yield. H/D exchange reduces the rate of decay from the excited state of biliverdin by a factor of 1.4 and increases the isomerization quantum yield. Comparison of the properties of the P2 and P3 variants shows that the quantum yields of fluorescence and isomerization are determined by excited-state deprotonation of biliverdin at the pyrrole rings, in competition with hydrogen-bond rupture between the D-ring and the apoprotein. This work provides a basis for structure-based conversion of Bph into an efficient near-IR fluorescent marker. PMID:20435909

  4. Quantum Measurement of Spin Correlations in a Symmetric Many-Body State ∖ f 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaee, Ezad; Kalev, Amir; Deutsch, Ivan; Cquic Team

    2016-05-01

    Continuous (nonprojective) measurement on a quantum system has been employed previously for fast, robust, and high-fidelity quantum state tomography (QST) on qudits. We expand this protocol to many-body systems in order to perform QST on the reduced one-body and two-body density matrices of a symmetric many-body state of multiple qubits. Such QST will characterize the spin correlations in the system. In this protocol, a continuous measurement is done collectively on many copies of the reduced state at the same time, and therefore, while it is weakly perturbative on each copy, yields high signal-to-noise. Simultaneously, we subject the system to an external collective control in order to generate an informationally complete measurement record. We characterize the information-gain measurement disturbance tradeoff in terms of parameters in the problem (number of qubits, control parameters, shot-noise bandwidth, and the measurement strength). Support from NSF is acknowledged.

  5. Cl{sub 2}O photochemistry: Ultraviolet/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and O({sup 3}P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Feierabend, Karl J.; Burkholder, James B.

    2011-05-28

    The photochemistry of Cl{sub 2}O (dichlorine monoxide) was studied using measurements of its UV/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the O({sup 3}P) atom quantum yield, {Phi}{sub Cl{sub 2}O}{sup O}({lambda}), in its photolysis at 193 and 248 nm. The Cl{sub 2}O UV/vis absorption spectrum was measured over the temperature range 201-296 K between 200 and 500 nm using diode array spectroscopy. Cl{sub 2}O absorption cross sections, {sigma}{sub Cl{sub 2}O}({lambda},T), at temperatures <296 K were determined relative to its well established room temperature values. A wavelength and temperature dependent parameterization of the Cl{sub 2}O spectrum using the sum of six Gaussian functions, which empirically represent transitions from the ground {sup 1}A{sub 1} electronic state to excited states, is presented. The Gaussian functions are found to correlate well with published theoretically calculated vertical excitation energies. O({sup 3}P) quantum yields in the photolysis of Cl{sub 2}O at 193 and 248 nm were measured using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O({sup 3}P) atoms. O({sup 3}P) quantum yields were measured to be 0.85 {+-} 0.15 for 193 nm photolysis at 296 K and 0.20 {+-} 0.03 at 248 nm, which was also found to be independent of temperature (220-352 K) and pressure (17 and 28 Torr, N{sub 2}). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2{sigma} (95% confidence) level and include estimated systematic errors. ClO radical temporal profiles obtained following the photolysis of Cl{sub 2}O at 248 nm, as reported previously in Feierabend et al.[J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12052, (2010)], were interpreted to establish a <5% upper-limit for the O + Cl{sub 2} photodissociation channel, which indicates that O({sup 3}P) is primarily formed in the three-body, O + 2Cl, photodissociation channel at 248 nm. The analysis also indirectly provided a Cl atom quantum yield of 1.2 {+-} 0.1 at 248 nm. The results from this work are compared

  6. Application of secondary neutral mass spectrometry in low-energy sputtering yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhang, J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ray, P. K.; Shivaparan, N. R.; Smith, R. J.

    1997-06-01

    An experimental study was initiated to measure low-energy (150 to 600 eV) sputtering yields of molybdenum with xenon ions using a Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometer (SNMS). An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 μA/cm 2. The SNMS spectra obtained at 50° incident angle were converted to sputtering yields for perpendicular incidence by normalizing SNMS spectral data at 500 eV with the yield measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Sputtering yields as well as the shape of the yield-energy curve obtained in this manner are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. Sputtering yields calculated by using two semi-empirical formulations agree reasonably well with the measured data.

  7. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  8. Exploring Quantum Dynamics of Continuous Measurement with a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadbabaie, Arian; Forouzani, Neda; Tan, Dian; Murch, Kater

    Weak measurements obtain partial information about a quantum state with minimal backaction. This enables state tracking without immediate collapse to eigenstates, of interest to both experimental and theoretical physics. State tomography and continuous weak measurements may be used to reconstruct the evolution of a single system, known as a quantum trajectory. We examine experimental trajectories of a two-level system at varied measurement strengths with constant unitary drive. Our analysis is applied to a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to a 3D microwave cavity in the circuit QED architecture. The weakly coupled cavity acts as pointer system for QND measurements in the qubit's energy basis. Our results indicate a marked difference in state purity between two approaches for trajectory reconstruction: the Bayesian and Stochastic Master Equation (SME) formalisms. Further, we observe the transition from diffusive to jump-like trajectories, state purity evolution, and a novel, tilted form of the Quantum Zeno effect. This work provides new insight into quantum behavior and prompts further comparison of SME and Bayesian formalisms to understand the nature of quantum systems. Our results are applicable to a variety of fields, from stochastic thermodynamics to quantum control.

  9. Energy yield determination of concentrator solar cells using laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisz, John F.; García, Iván; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  10. Continuous-variable measurement-device-independent multipartite quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yadong; Zhou, Jian; Gong, Xinbao; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; He, Guangqiang

    2016-02-01

    A continuous-variable measurement-device-independent multiparty quantum communication protocol is investigated in this paper. Utilizing the distributed continuous-variable Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, this protocol can implement both quantum cryptographic conference and quantum secret sharing. We analyze the security of the protocol against both the entangling cloner attack and the coherent attack. The entangling cloner attack is a practical individual attack, and the coherent attack is the optimal attack Eve can implement. Simulation results show that the coherent attack can greatly reduce the secret key rate. Different kinds of entangled attacks are compared and we finally discuss the optimal coherent attacks.

  11. Quantum and concept combination, entangled measurements, and prototype theory.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the meaning of the violation of the marginal probability law for situations of correlation measurements where entanglement is identified. We show that for quantum theory applied to the cognitive realm such a violation does not lead to the type of problems commonly believed to occur in situations of quantum theory applied to the physical realm. We briefly situate our quantum approach for modeling concepts and their combinations with respect to the notions of "extension" and "intension" in theories of meaning, and in existing concept theories. PMID:24482332

  12. The optimization of measurement device independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Hai-Qiang; Jiao, Rong-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Measurement device independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is a promising method for realistic quantum communication which could remove all the side-channel attacks from the imperfections of the devices. Here in this study, we theoretically analyzed the performance of the MDI-QKD system. The asymptotic case rate with the increment of the transmission distance at different polarization misalignment, background count rate and intensity is calculated respectively. The result may provide important parameters for practical application of quantum communications.

  13. Josephson directional amplifier for quantum measurement of superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Baleegh; Sliwa, Katrina; Shankar, S; Hatridge, Michael; Frunzio, Luigi; Schoelkopf, Robert; Devoret, Michel

    2014-04-25

    We realize a microwave quantum-limited amplifier that is directional and can therefore function without the front circulator needed in many quantum measurements. The amplification takes place in only one direction between the input and output ports. Directionality is achieved by multipump parametric amplification combined with wave interference. We have verified the device noise performances by using it to read out a superconducting qubit and observed quantum jumps. With an improved version of this device, the qubit and preamplifer could be integrated on the same chip. PMID:24815669

  14. Smearing of Observables and Spectral Measures on Quantum Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    2013-02-01

    An observable on a quantum structure is any σ-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel σ-algebra of the real line into the quantum structure which is in our case a monotone σ-complete effect algebra with the Riesz Decomposition Property. We show that every observable is a smearing of a sharp observable which takes values from a Boolean σ-subalgebra of the effect algebra, and we prove that for every element of the effect algebra there corresponds a spectral measure.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet photoresists: Film quantum yields and LER of thin film resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Craig

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) is the leading candidate for a commercially viable solution for next generation lithography. The development of EUV chemically amplified photoresists and processes are critical to the future lithographic requirements of the microelectronics industry. To meet the necessary requirements for both integrated circuit (IC) specifications and cost, the resolution, line-edge roughness (LER) and sensitivity all need to be reduced. Unfortunately, a fundamental trade-off has been observed between these three crucial elements. We have predicted that the best way to obtain the required resolution, line-edge roughness and sensitivity (RLS) is to create more acid molecules per photon absorbed. This quantity is referred to as the film quantum yield (FQY). Utilizing increased photoacid generator (PAG) concentrations, the impact of FQY on the overall resist lithographic performance is characterized. However, despite significant improvements in RLS performance, LER continues to fall significantly short of industry requirements. Lithographic exposures have shown that LER increases significantly as film thickness decreases (< 50 nm) for 193 nm and EUV wavelengths. LER degradation is a significant problem for future technology nodes where film thicknesses of 50 nm or less will be necessary to help mitigate pattern collapse. Understanding the mechanistic cause of the thickness dependent LER degradation is therefore very critical for future needs of the lithographic community. Investigations highlight key concerns related to the image degradation of ultra-thin film photoresists (< 50 nm) with the aim of better understanding the correlation between resist LER, acid diffusion and glass transition temperature. Meeting the required LER will become increasingly difficult for future technology nodes due to thin film effects. Therefore, alternative processes and LER mitigation techniques are likely required for the implementation of EUV. Studies have demonstrated that

  16. Enhanced upconversion quantum yield near spherical gold nanoparticles - a comprehensive simulation based analysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan; Kumar, Deepu; Hallermann, Florian; von Plessen, Gero; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-03-21

    Photon upconversion is promising for many applications. However, the potential of lanthanide doped upconverter materials is typically limited by low absorption coefficients and low upconversion quantum yields (UCQY) under practical irradiance of the excitation. Modifying the photonic environment can strongly enhance the spontaneous emission and therefore also the upconversion luminescence. Additionally, the non-linear nature of the upconversion processes can be exploited by an increased local optical field introduced by photonic or plasmonic structures. In combination, both processes may lead to a strong enhancement of the UCQY at simultaneously lower incident irradiances. Here, we use a comprehensive 3D computation-based approach to investigate how absorption, upconversion luminescence, and UCQY of an upconverter are altered in the vicinity of spherical gold nanoparticles (GNPs). We use Mie theory and electrodynamic theory to compute the properties of GNPs. The parameters obtained in these calculations were used as input parameters in a rate equation model of the upconverter β-NaYF4: 20% Er3+. We consider different diameters of the GNP and determine the behavior of the system as a function of the incident irradiance. Whether the UCQY is increased or actually decreased depends heavily on the position of the upconverter in respect to the GNP. Whereas the upconversion luminescence enhancement reaches a maximum around a distance of 35 nm to the surface of the GNP, we observe strong quenching of the UCQY for distances <40 nm and a UCQY maximum around 125 to 150 nm, in the case of a 300 nm diameter GNP. Hence, the upconverter material needs to be placed at different positions, depending on whether absorption, upconversion luminescence, or UCQY should be maximized. At the optimum position, we determine a maximum UCQY enhancement of 117% for a 300 nm diameter GNP at a low incident irradiance of 0.01 W/cm2. As the irradiance increases, the

  17. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield

    PubMed Central

    Purchase, R. L.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m−2 d−1 for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum–classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics

  18. Information conservation and entropy change in quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Shunlong

    2010-11-15

    The information transfer in the system-apparatus-environment trio is of fundamental importance for both the theory and practice of quantum information. Based on a canonical joint purification which encodes the system, apparatus, and environment as well as their interplay, we establish several basic relations involving various entropies arising from the most general quantum measurements. Some celebrated results concerning entropy change and information-disturbance tradeoff are recaptured as particular cases in a unified framework of information conservation.

  19. Characterization of measurements in quantum communication. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, V. W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A characterization of quantum measurements by operator valued measures is presented. The generalized measurements include simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables. This characterization is suitable for solving problems in quantum communication. Two realizations of such measurements are discussed. The first is by adjoining an apparatus to the system under observation and performing a measurement corresponding to a self-adjoint operator in the tensor-product Hilbert space of the system and apparatus spaces. The second realization is by performing, on the system alone, sequential measurements that correspond to self-adjoint operators, basing the choice of each measurement on the outcomes of previous measurements. Simultaneous generalized measurements are found to be equivalent to a single finer grain generalized measurement, and hence it is sufficient to consider the set of single measurements. An alternative characterization of generalized measurement is proposed. It is shown to be equivalent to the characterization by operator-values measures, but it is potentially more suitable for the treatment of estimation problems. Finally, a study of the interaction between the information-carrying system and a measurement apparatus provides clues for the physical realizations of abstractly characterized quantum measurements.

  20. Energy-Time Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Quantum measurement is a physical process. A system and an apparatus interact for a certain time period (measurement time), and during this interaction, information about an observable is transferred from the system to the apparatus. In this study, we quantify the energy fluctuation of the quantum apparatus required for this physical process to occur autonomously. We first examine the so-called standard model of measurement, which is free from any non-trivial energy-time uncertainty relation, to find that it needs an external system that switches on the interaction between the system and the apparatus. In such a sense this model is not closed. Therefore to treat a measurement process in a fully quantum manner we need to consider a "larger" quantum apparatus which works also as a timing device switching on the interaction. In this setting we prove that a trade-off relation (energy-time uncertainty relation), τ \\cdot Δ H_A ≥ π hbar /4 , holds between the energy fluctuation Δ H_A of the quantum apparatus and the measurement time τ . We use this trade-off relation to discuss the spacetime uncertainty relation concerning the operational meaning of the microscopic structure of spacetime. In addition, we derive another trade-off inequality between the measurement time and the strength of interaction between the system and the apparatus.

  1. Fast universal performance certification of measurement schemes for quantum tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutný, Dominik; Teo, Yong Siah; Hradil, Zdeněk; Řeháček, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    Prior to a measurement in a quantum-state tomography experiment, it is important to evaluate the performance of this measurement with respect to the average accuracy in state estimation. We propose a fast and reliable numerical certification of measurement performance that is applicable to any known quantum measurement. This numerical method is based on the statistical theory of unbiased estimation that is valid for any physically accessible quantum state that is necessarily full rank in the limit of a large number of measurement copies, and the Hoeffding inequality that applies to bounded statistical quantities in the quantum state space. We present the use of this straightforward certification procedure by illustrating the convergence to optimal pure-state tomography with an increasing number of overcomplete measurement outcomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the performances of symmetric informationally complete measurements and mutually unbiased bases, which are commonly regarded as optimal measurements, can be easily beaten in tomographic performance with randomly generated measurements that are only slightly more informationally overcomplete. Two important classes of random measurements are also discussed with the help of our numerical machinery.

  2. Continuous quantum measurement of a light-matter system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, R.; Jenkins, S. D.; Campbell, C. J.; Kennedy, T. A. B.; Kuzmich, A.; Matsukevich, D. N.; Chaneliere, T.

    2010-03-15

    Continuous measurements on correlated quantum systems, in addition to providing information on the state vector of the system in question, induce evolution in the unmeasured degrees of freedom conditioned on the measurement outcome. However, experimentally accessing these nontrivial regimes requires high-efficiency measurements over time scales much longer than the temporal resolution of the measurement apparatus. We report the observation of such a continuous conditioned evolution in the state of a light-collective atomic excitation system undergoing photoelectric measurement.

  3. Measuring polynomial invariants of multiparty quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, M.S.; Linden, N.; Winter, A.

    2004-05-01

    We present networks for directly estimating the polynomial invariants of multiparty quantum states under local transformations. The structure of these networks is closely related to the structure of the invariants themselves and this lends a physical interpretation to these otherwise abstract mathematical quantities. Specifically, our networks estimate the invariants under local unitary (LU) transformations and under stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). Our networks can estimate the LU invariants for multiparty states, where each party can have a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension and the SLOCC invariants for multiqubit states. We analyze the statistical efficiency of our networks compared to methods based on estimating the state coefficients and calculating the invariants.

  4. Upconverting core-shell nanocrystals with high quantum yield under low irradiance: On the role of isotropic and thick shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Stefan; Johnson, Noah J. J.; Pichaandi, Jothirmayanantham; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; van Veggel, Frank C. J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal upconverter nanocrystals (UCNCs) that convert near-infrared photons to higher energies are promising for applications ranging from life sciences to solar energy harvesting. However, practical applications of UCNCs are hindered by their low upconversion quantum yield (UCQY) and the high irradiances necessary to produce relevant upconversion luminescence. Achieving high UCQY under practically relevant irradiance remains a major challenge. The UCQY is severely limited due to non-radiative surface quenching processes. We present a rate equation model for migration of the excitation energy to show that surface quenching does not only affect the lanthanide ions directly at the surface but also many other lanthanide ions quite far away from the surface. The average migration path length is on the order of several nanometers and depends on the doping as well as the irradiance of the excitation. Using Er3+-doped β-NaYF4 UCNCs, we show that very isotropic and thick (˜10 nm) β-NaLuF4 inert shells dramatically reduce the surface-related quenching processes, resulting in much brighter upconversion luminescence at simultaneously considerably lower irradiances. For these UCNCs embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate), we determined an internal UCQY of 2.0% ± 0.2% using an irradiance of only 0.43 ± 0.03 W/cm2 at 1523 nm. Normalized to the irradiance, this UCQY is 120× higher than the highest values of comparable nanomaterials in the literature. Our findings demonstrate the important role of isotropic and thick shells in achieving high UCQY at low irradiances from UCNCs. Additionally, we measured the additional short-circuit current due to upconversion in silicon solar cell devices as a proof of concept and to support our findings determined using optical measurements.

  5. Upconverting core-shell nanocrystals with high quantum yield under low irradiance: On the role of isotropic and thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Johnson, Noah J. J.; Pichaandi, Jothirmayanantham; Veggel, Frank C. J. M. van

    2015-11-21

    Colloidal upconverter nanocrystals (UCNCs) that convert near-infrared photons to higher energies are promising for applications ranging from life sciences to solar energy harvesting. However, practical applications of UCNCs are hindered by their low upconversion quantum yield (UCQY) and the high irradiances necessary to produce relevant upconversion luminescence. Achieving high UCQY under practically relevant irradiance remains a major challenge. The UCQY is severely limited due to non-radiative surface quenching processes. We present a rate equation model for migration of the excitation energy to show that surface quenching does not only affect the lanthanide ions directly at the surface but also many other lanthanide ions quite far away from the surface. The average migration path length is on the order of several nanometers and depends on the doping as well as the irradiance of the excitation. Using Er{sup 3+}-doped β-NaYF{sub 4} UCNCs, we show that very isotropic and thick (∼10 nm) β-NaLuF{sub 4} inert shells dramatically reduce the surface-related quenching processes, resulting in much brighter upconversion luminescence at simultaneously considerably lower irradiances. For these UCNCs embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate), we determined an internal UCQY of 2.0% ± 0.2% using an irradiance of only 0.43 ± 0.03 W/cm{sup 2} at 1523 nm. Normalized to the irradiance, this UCQY is 120× higher than the highest values of comparable nanomaterials in the literature. Our findings demonstrate the important role of isotropic and thick shells in achieving high UCQY at low irradiances from UCNCs. Additionally, we measured the additional short-circuit current due to upconversion in silicon solar cell devices as a proof of concept and to support our findings determined using optical measurements.

  6. Measurement of the asymmetry parameter for the decay {Lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a sample of 58x10{sup 6}J/{psi} decays collected with the BESII detector at the BEPC, the {Lambda} decay parameter {alpha}{sub {Lambda}}for {Lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup +} is measured using about 9000 J/{psi}{yields}{Lambda}{Lambda}{yields}pp{pi}{sup +{pi}-} decays. A fit to the joint angular distributions yields {alpha}{sub {Lambda}({Lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup +})}=-0.755{+-}0.083{+-}0.063, where the first error is statistical, and the second systematic.

  7. Long-distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with coherent-state superpositions.

    PubMed

    Yin, H-L; Cao, W-F; Fu, Y; Tang, Y-L; Liu, Y; Chen, T-Y; Chen, Z-B

    2014-09-15

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with decoy-state method is believed to be securely applied to defeat various hacking attacks in practical quantum key distribution systems. Recently, the coherent-state superpositions (CSS) have emerged as an alternative to single-photon qubits for quantum information processing and metrology. Here, in this Letter, CSS are exploited as the source in MDI-QKD. We present an analytical method that gives two tight formulas to estimate the lower bound of yield and the upper bound of bit error rate. We exploit the standard statistical analysis and Chernoff bound to perform the parameter estimation. Chernoff bound can provide good bounds in the long-distance MDI-QKD. Our results show that with CSS, both the security transmission distance and secure key rate are significantly improved compared with those of the weak coherent states in the finite-data case. PMID:26466295

  8. Stabilization and feedback control of weak measurement monitored quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Du Toit, Pieter; Burd, Shaun; Konrad, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study feedback control of quantum oscillators, monitored through periodic weak measurement. By implementing reversals of measurement perturbations based on a Bayesian estimate of the state dynamics, we demonstrate suppressed measurement noise leading to greater oscillator stability and improved quantum feedback control. The work in this paper was supported in part by the National Research Foundation of South Africa through Grant No. 93602 as well as an award by the United States Airforce Office of Scientific Research, Award No. FA9550-14-1-0151.

  9. Measuring Entanglement in a Photonic Embedding Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Loredo, J C; Almeida, M P; Di Candia, R; Pedernales, J S; Casanova, J; Solano, E; White, A G

    2016-02-19

    Measuring entanglement is a demanding task that usually requires full tomography of a quantum system, involving a number of observables that grows exponentially with the number of parties. Recently, it was suggested that adding a single ancillary qubit would allow for the efficient measurement of concurrence, and indeed any entanglement monotone associated with antilinear operations. Here, we report on the experimental implementation of such a device-an embedding quantum simulator-in photonics, encoding the entangling dynamics of a bipartite system into a tripartite one. We show that bipartite concurrence can be efficiently extracted from the measurement of merely two observables, instead of 15, without full tomographic information. PMID:26943521

  10. Information, fidelity, and reversibility in general quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    We present the amount of information, fidelity, and reversibility obtained by arbitrary quantum measurements on completely unknown states. These quantities are expressed as functions of the singular values of a measurement operator corresponding to the obtained outcome. As an example, we consider a class of quantum measurements with highly degenerate singular values to discuss trade-offs among information, fidelity, and reversibility. The trade-offs are at the level of a single outcome, in the sense that the quantities pertain to each single outcome rather than the average over all possible outcomes.

  11. Coherent versus Measurement Feedback: Linear Systems Theory for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing a control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal; hence, their comparison in several situations is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals: backaction evasion, generation of a quantum nondemolished variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem, all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand, it is shown that, for each control goal there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of the above three notions in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  12. Measuring the fourth-generation b{yields}s quadrangle at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Wei-Shu; Kohda, Masaya; Xu Fanrong

    2011-11-01

    We show that simultaneous precision measurements of the CP-violating phase in time-dependent B{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} study and the B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rate, together with measuring m{sub t'} by direct search at the LHC, would determine V{sub t's}*V{sub t'b} and therefore the b{yields}s quadrangle in the four-generation standard model. The forward-backward asymmetry in B{yields}K*l{sup +}l{sup -} provides further discrimination.

  13. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J; Chandler, G A; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M; McWatters, B R; Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Knittel, K M; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Styron, J D

    2012-10-01

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β(+)) and (65)Cu(n,2n)( 64) Cu(β(+)), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI γ-γ coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel ρR to uncertainties as low as 5%. PMID:23126920

  14. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Burkholder, James B.

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO){sub 2}, has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO){sub 2} and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV/vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, {Phi}({lambda}), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl){sub 2}+ hv{yields} ClCO*+ Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO*{yields} Cl + CO (3a), {yields} ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M {yields} Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2}. {Phi}(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 {+-} 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N{sub 2}), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 {+-} 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 {+-} 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N{sub 2}). {Phi}(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N{sub 2}). The low

  15. Repeatable measurements in quantum theory: Their role and feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, P.; Grabowski, M.; Lahti, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    Recent advantages in experimental quantum physics call for a careful reconsideration of the measurements process in quantum mechanics. In this paper we describe the structure of the ideal measurements and their status among the repeatable measurements. Then we provide an exhaustive account of the interrelations between repeatability and the apparently weaker notions of value reproducible or first-kind measurements. We demonstrate the close link between repeatable measurements and discrete observables and show how the ensuing measurement limitations for continuous observables can be lifted in a way that is in full accordance with actual experimental practice. We present examples of almost repeatable measurements of continuous observables and some realistic models of weakly disturbing measurements.

  16. The theory research of multi-user quantum access network with Measurement Device Independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yi-Ming; Li, Yun-Xia; Shi, Lei; Meng, Wen; Cui, Shu-Min; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Quantum access network can't guarantee the absolute security of multi-user detector and eavesdropper can get access to key information through time-shift attack and other ways. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is immune from all the detection attacks, and accomplishes the safe sharing of quantum key. In this paper, that Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is used in the application of multi-user quantum access to the network is on the research. By adopting time-division multiplexing technology to achieve the sharing of multiuser detector, the system structure is simplified and the security of quantum key sharing is acquired.

  17. Measures of correlations in infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    Several important measures of correlations of the state of a finite-dimensional composite quantum system are defined as linear combinations of marginal entropies of this state. This paper is devoted to infinite-dimensional generalizations of such quantities and to an analysis of their properties. We introduce the notion of faithful extension of a linear combination of marginal entropies and consider several concrete examples, the simplest of which are quantum mutual information and quantum conditional entropy. Then we show that quantum conditional mutual information can be defined uniquely as a lower semicontinuous function on the set of all states of a tripartite infinite-dimensional system possessing all the basic properties valid in finite dimensions. Infinite-dimensional generalizations of some other measures of correlations in multipartite quantum systems are also considered. Applications of the results to the theory of infinite-dimensional quantum channels and their capacities are considered. The existence of a Fawzi-Renner recovery channel reproducing marginal states for all tripartite states (including states with infinite marginal entropies) is shown. Bibliography: 47 titles.

  18. Long-distance measurement-device-independent multiparty quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2015-03-01

    The Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement, originally introduced to uncover the extreme violation of local realism against quantum mechanics, is an important resource for multiparty quantum communication tasks. But the low intensity and fragility of the GHZ entanglement source in current conditions have made the practical applications of these multiparty tasks an experimental challenge. Here we propose a feasible scheme for practically distributing the postselected GHZ entanglement over a distance of more than 100 km for experimentally accessible parameter regimes. Combining the decoy-state and measurement-device-independent protocols for quantum key distribution, we anticipate that our proposal suggests an important avenue for practical multiparty quantum communication. PMID:25793788

  19. Quantum measurement and uncertainty relations in photon polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies have given raise to new aspects in quantum measurements and error-disturbance uncertainty relations. After a brief review of these issues, we present an experimental test of the error-disturbance uncertainty relations in photon polarization measurements. Using a generalized, strength-variable measurement of a single photon polarization state, we experimentally evaluate the error and disturbance in the measurement process and demonstrate the validity of recently proposed uncertainty relations.

  20. Algebras of Measurements: The Logical Structure of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Daniel; Engesser, Kurt; Gabbay, Dov M.

    2006-04-01

    In quantum physics, a measurement is represented by a projection on some closed subspace of a Hilbert space. We study algebras of operators that abstract from the algebra of projections on closed subspaces of a Hilbert space. The properties of such operators are justified on epistemological grounds. Commutation of measurements is a central topic of interest. Classical logical systems may be viewed as measurement algebras in which all measurements commute.

  1. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  2. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Walk, Nathan; Assad, Syed M.; Janousek, Jiri; Hosseini, Sara; Ralph, Timothy C.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-04-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require advanced experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. Recently, it was shown that the benefits of noiseless amplification could be extracted by performing a post-selective filtering of the measurement record to improve the performance of quantum key distribution. We apply this protocol to entanglement degraded by transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100 km of optical fibre. We measure an effective entangled resource stronger than that achievable by even a maximally entangled resource passively transmitted through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime. The measurement-based noiseless linear amplifier offers two advantages over its physical counterpart: ease of implementation and near-optimal probability of success. It should provide an effective and versatile tool for a broad class of entanglement-based quantum communication protocols.

  3. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  4. Symbolic dynamics of successive quantum-mechanical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian; Graudenz, Dirk

    1992-11-01

    We consider successive measurements on quantum-mechnical systems and investigate the way in which sequences of measurements produce information. The eigenvalues of suitable projection operators form symbolic sequences that characterize the quantum system under consideration. For several model systems with finite-dimensional state space, we explicitly calculate the probabilities to observe certain symbol sequences and determine the corresponding Rényi entropies K(β) with the help of the transfer-matrix method. A nontrivial dependence on β is observed. We show that the Rényi entropies as well as the symbol-sequence probabilities of the quantum-mechanical measurement process coincide with those of appropriate classes of one-dimensional chaotic maps.

  5. Probing 2D black phosphorus by quantum capacitance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuiri, Manabendra; Kumar, Chandan; Chakraborty, Biswanath; Gupta, Satyendra N; Naik, Mit H; Jain, Manish; Sood, A K; Das, Anindya

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures have emerged as a new class of materials, not only for fundamental physics but also for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Black phosphorus (BP) is a relatively new addition to this class of materials. Its strong in-plane anisotropy makes BP a unique material for making conceptually new types of electronic devices. However, the global density of states (DOS) of BP in device geometry has not been measured experimentally. Here, we report the quantum capacitance measurements together with the conductance measurements on an hBN-protected few-layer BP (∼six layers) in a dual-gated field effect transistor (FET) geometry. The measured DOS from our quantum capacitance is compared with density functional theory (DFT). Our results reveal that the transport gap for quantum capacitance is smaller than that in conductance measurements due to the presence of localized states near the band edge. The presence of localized states is confirmed by the variable range hopping seen in our temperature dependence conductivity. A large asymmetry is observed between the electron and hole side. This asymmetric nature is attributed to the anisotropic band dispersion of BP. Our measurements establish the uniqueness of quantum capacitance in probing the localized states near the band edge, hitherto not seen in conductance measurements. PMID:26559656

  6. The enhancement of fluorescence quantum yields of anilino naphthalene sulfonic acids by inclusion of various cyclodextrins and cucurbit[7]uril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Fujita, Tomonori; Nakatani, Shinichiro; Inazumi, Naoya; Osawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-01

    The association constants (K) for the inclusion complexation of four kinds of cyclodextrins (CDs (β- and γ-), 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD, and 2,3,6-tri-O-methylated β-CD) and cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) with 1,8- and 2,6-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acids (ANSs) were determined from fluorescence spectra enhanced by inclusion. Various CDs and CB[7] form stable 1:1 inclusion complexes with 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs: K = 80-11 700 M-1 for 2,6-ANS and 50-195 M-1 for 1,8-ANS. The high stability of the inclusion complexes of 2,6-ANS with CB[7] and 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD is shown. Further, we determined the fluorescence quantum yields (Φ values) for the inclusion complexes of ANSs by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with a half-moon unit. The Φ values of 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs were largely enhanced by the inclusion of methylated β-CDs and did not correlate with the degree of stability (K) of the inclusion complexes. We characterized the structures of the inclusion complexes by 2D ROESY-NMR measurements. In addition, the microenvironmental polarity inside the hydrophobic CD and CB[7] cavities was evaluated using the fluorescence probe 2,6-ANS. Based on the emission mechanism and the aspect of inclusion in a hydrophobic cavity, we have suggested that the microenvironmental polarity and viscosity for the excited state of ANS plays an important role for the Φ values of inclusion complexes.

  7. Experimental realization of generalized qubit measurements based on quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan-yuan; Yu, Neng-kun; Kurzyński, Paweł; Xiang, Guo-yong; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-04-01

    We report an experimental implementation of a single-qubit generalized measurement scenario, the positive-operator valued measure (POVM), based on a quantum walk model. The qubit is encoded in a single-photon polarization. The photon performs a quantum walk on an array of optical elements, where the polarization-dependent translation is performed via birefringent beam displacers and a change of the polarization is implemented with the help of wave plates. We implement: (i) trine POVM, i.e., the POVM elements uniformly distributed on an equatorial plane of the Bloch sphere; (ii) symmetric-informationally-complete (SIC) POVM; and (iii) unambiguous discrimination of two nonorthogonal qubit states.

  8. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Romero, G.; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Retamal, J. C.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-06-15

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  9. Quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high-sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, B.; Topper, J. L.; Farnell, C. C.; Yalin, A. P.

    2009-10-15

    We present a quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements of different target materials due to ion bombardment. The differential sputter yields can be integrated to find total yields. Possible ion beam conditions include ion energies in the range of 30-350 eV and incidence angles of 0 deg. - 70 deg. from normal. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy (<100 eV) and a two-grid ion optics is used for higher energies (up to 750 eV). A complementary weight loss approach is also used to measure total sputter yields. Validation experiments are presented that confirm high sensitivity and accuracy of sputter yield measurements.

  10. Quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high-sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements.

    PubMed

    Rubin, B; Topper, J L; Farnell, C C; Yalin, A P

    2009-10-01

    We present a quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements of different target materials due to ion bombardment. The differential sputter yields can be integrated to find total yields. Possible ion beam conditions include ion energies in the range of 30-350 eV and incidence angles of 0 degrees-70 degrees from normal. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy (<100 eV) and a two-grid ion optics is used for higher energies (up to 750 eV). A complementary weight loss approach is also used to measure total sputter yields. Validation experiments are presented that confirm high sensitivity and accuracy of sputter yield measurements. PMID:19895063

  11. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  12. Measuring the heat exchange of a quantum process.

    PubMed

    Goold, John; Poschinger, Ulrich; Modi, Kavan

    2014-08-01

    Very recently, interferometric methods have been proposed to measure the full statistics of work performed on a driven quantum system [Dorner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230601 (2013) and Mazzola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230602 (2013)]. The advantage of such schemes is that they replace the necessity to make projective measurements by performing phase estimation on an appropriately coupled ancilla qubit. These proposals are one possible route to the tangible experimental exploration of quantum thermodynamics, a subject which is the center of much current attention due to the current control of mesoscopic quantum systems. In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate that a modification of the phase estimation protocols can be used in order to measure the heat distribution of a quantum process. In addition, we demonstrate how our scheme maybe implemented using ion trap technology. Our scheme should pave the way for experimental explorations of the Landauer principle and hence the intricate energy to information conversion in mesoscopic quantum systems. PMID:25215667

  13. Quantum-confined Stark effect measurements in Ge/SiGe quantum-well structures.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Papichaya; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Isella, Giovanni; Chrastina, Daniel; Le Roux, Xavier; Gatti, Eleonora; Edmond, Samson; Osmond, Johann; Cassan, Eric; Vivien, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the room-temperature quantum-confined Stark effect in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown by low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The active region is embedded in a p-i-n diode, and absorption spectra at different reverse bias voltages are obtained from optical transmission, photocurrent, and differential transmission measurements. The measurements provide accurate values of the fraction of light absorbed per well of the Ge/SiGe MQWs. Both Stark shift and reduction of exciton absorption peak are observed. Differential transmission indicates that there is no thermal contribution to these effects. PMID:20808367

  14. Disclosing hidden information in the quantum Zeno effect: Pulsed measurement of the quantum time of arrival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echanobe, J.; Del Campo, A.; Muga, J. G.

    2008-03-01

    Repeated measurements of a quantum particle to check its presence in a region of space was proposed long ago [G. R. Allcock, Ann. Phys. 53, 286 (1969)] as a natural way to determine the distribution of times of arrival at the orthogonal subspace, but the method was discarded because of the quantum Zeno effect: in the limit of very frequent measurements the wave function is reflected and remains in the original subspace. We show that by normalizing the small bits of arriving (removed) norm, an ideal time distribution emerges in correspondence with a classical local-kinetic-energy distribution.

  15. Applications of fidelity measures to complex quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-06-13

    We revisit fidelity as a measure for the stability and the complexity of the quantum motion of single-and many-body systems. Within the context of cold atoms, we present an overview of applications of two fidelities, which we call static and dynamical fidelity, respectively. The static fidelity applies to quantum problems which can be diagonalized since it is defined via the eigenfunctions. In particular, we show that the static fidelity is a highly effective practical detector of avoided crossings characterizing the complexity of the systems and their evolutions. The dynamical fidelity is defined via the time-dependent wave functions. Focusing on the quantum kicked rotor system, we highlight a few practical applications of fidelity measurements in order to better understand the large variety of dynamical regimes of this paradigm of a low-dimensional system with mixed regular-chaotic phase space. PMID:27140967

  16. Spin transport measurements in gallium arsenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folk, Joshua Alexander

    This thesis presents a series of measurements investigating the spin physics of lateral quantum dots, defined electrostatically in the 2-D electron gas at the interface of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The experiments span a range from open dots, where the leads of the dot carry at least one fully transmitting mode, to closed dots, where the leads are set to be tunnel barriers. For open dots, spin physics is inferred from measurements of conductance fluctuations; the effects of spin degeneracy in the orbital levels as well as a spin-orbit interaction are observed. In the closed dot measurements, ground state spin transitions as electrons are added to the dot may be determined from the motion of Coulomb blockade peaks in an in-plane magnetic field. In addition, this thesis demonstrates for the first time a direct measurement of the spin polarization of current emitted from a quantum dot, or a quantum point contact, during transport. These experiments make use of a spin-sensitive focusing geometry in which a quantum point contact serves as a spin analyzer for the mesoscopic device under test. Measurements are presented both in the open dot regime, where good agreement with theory is found, as well as the closed dot regime, where the data defies a simple theoretical explanation.

  17. Measurements of 1/f noise in Josephson junctions at zero voltage: Implications for decoherence in superconducting quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; Korn, Matthias; Mugford, C. G. A.; Kycia, J. B.; Clarke, John

    2005-01-01

    Critical current fluctuations with a 1/f spectral density (f is frequency) are potentially a limiting source of intrinsic decoherence in superconducting quantum bits (qubits) based on Josephson tunnel junctions. Prior measurements of this noise were made at nonzero voltages whereas qubits are operated in the zero voltage state. We report measurements of 1/f noise in a dc superconducting quantum interference device first, coupled to a resonant tank circuit and operated in a dispersive mode at zero voltage, and, second, operated conventionally with a current bias in the voltage regime. Both measurements yield essentially the same magnitude of critical current 1/f noise.

  18. [Optimal measure for cultivation of Artemisia annua with high seeds yield].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yekuan; Li, Longyun; Hu, Yingi

    2009-09-01

    The relationship of Artemisia annua seed yield with density, N, P and K fertilizer applied amount was studied, and a mathematical model involving the 4 factors affecting seed yield was established using the orthogonal rotation design of quadratic regression. The seed yield function model was established according to parameters through field tests and data treated by computer techniques. The best agronomic measures complex project was selected and developed by computer imitation. The effects on seed yield of A. annua are density > N > P > K in turn. To obtain the highest yield density should be 13 000-15 000 plants x hm(-2), Ureal 186-242 kg x hm(-2), calcium superphosphate 874-1 023 kg x hm(-2), potassium chloride 135-165 kg x hm(-2) in the experiment. Reasonable planting density and fertilizer application could improve the seed yield of A. annua. PMID:19943472

  19. Information capacities of quantum measurement channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    We study the relation between the unassisted and entanglement-assisted classical capacities C and Cea of entanglement-breaking channels. We argue that the gain of entanglement assistance Cea/C > 1 generically for measurement channels with unsharp observables; in particular for the measurements with pure posterior states the information loss in the entanglement-assisted protocol is zero, resulting in an arbitrarily large gain for very noisy or weak signal channels. This is illustrated by examples of continuous observables corresponding to state tomography in finite dimensions and heterodyne measurement. In contrast, state preparations are characterized by the property of having no gain of entanglement assistance, Cea/C = 1.

  20. Timing in quantum measurements of position and momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Busshardt, Michael; Freyberger, Matthias

    2010-10-15

    The prototype for a simultaneous measurement of two conjugate variables was originally introduced by Arthurs and Kelly in 1965. It relies on coupling the quantum particle to be probed to two additional systems, which serve as measurement pointers. In this contribution we investigate an extended scheme to measure position and momentum of a massive particle. By considering an explictly time-dependent coupling we can quantify the timing of the measurement. We investigate how the noise resulting from such a measurement process depends on the interaction strength and the size of the pointers. In particular, we focus on the question of which measurement timing minimizes the corresponding uncertainty product.

  1. On the Interpretation of Measurement Within the Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Leon N.; Van Vechten, Deborah

    1969-01-01

    In interpretation of the process of measurement is proposed which can be placed wholly within the quantum theory. The entire system including the apparatus and even the mind of the observer can be considered to develop according to the Schrodinger equation. (RR)

  2. Quantum Circuits for Measuring Levin-Wen Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesteel, Nick; Divincenzo, David

    2012-02-01

    We give explicit quantum circuits (expressed in terms of Toffoli gates, CNOTs and single qubit rotations) which can be used to perform quantum non-demolition measurements of the commuting set of vertex and plaquette operators that appear in the Levin-Wen model [1] for the case of doubled Fibonacci anyons. Such measurements can be viewed as syndrome measurements for the quantum error correcting code defined by the ground states of the Levin-Wen model --- a scenario envisioned in [2]. A key component in our construction is a quantum circuit F that acts on 5 qubits at a time and carries out a so-called F-move, a unitary operation whose form is essentially fixed by a self-consistency condition known as the pentagon equation. In addition to our measurement circuits we also give an explicit 7 qubit circuit which can be used to verify that F satisfies the full pentagon equation as well as a simpler 2 qubit circuit which verifies the essential nontrivial content of this equation. [1] M.A. Levin and X.-G. Wen, Phys. Rev. B 71 045110 (2005). [2] R. Koenig, G. Kuperberg, and B.W. Reichardt, Ann. Phys 325, 2707 (2010).

  3. Enhancing quantum Fisher information by utilizing uncollapsing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Ding, Zhi-Yong; Ye, Liu

    2016-09-01

    As an indicator of estimation precision, quantum Fisher information (QFI) lies at the heart of quantum metrology theory. In this work, an effective scheme for enhancing QFI is proposed by utilizing quantum uncollapsing measurements. Two kinds of strategies for the arbitrary two-qubit pure state with weight parameter and phase parameter are implemented under different situations, respectively. We derive the explicit conditions for the optimal measurement strengths, and verify that the QFI can be improved quite well. Meanwhile, due to the relation of quantum correlation and QFI, the maximal value of QFI associated with phase parameter for pure state is always equal to 1. It is worth noting that the optimal measurement strength is only related to the weight parameter, as uncollapsing measurements operation does not induce any disturbance on the value of phase parameter. The scheme also can be extended to improve the parameter estimation precision for an N-qubit pure state. In addition, as an example, the situation of an arbitrary single-qubit state under amplitude damping channel is investigated. It is shown that our scheme also works well for enhancing QFI under decoherence.

  4. Experimental measurement-device-independent verification of quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, Sacha; Hall, Michael J. W.; Bennet, Adam J.; Saunders, Dylan J.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2015-01-01

    Bell non-locality between distant quantum systems—that is, joint correlations which violate a Bell inequality—can be verified without trusting the measurement devices used, nor those performing the measurements. This leads to unconditionally secure protocols for quantum information tasks such as cryptographic key distribution. However, complete verification of Bell non-locality requires high detection efficiencies, and is not robust to typical transmission losses over long distances. In contrast, quantum or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering, a weaker form of quantum correlation, can be verified for arbitrarily low detection efficiencies and high losses. The cost is that current steering-verification protocols require complete trust in one of the measurement devices and its operator, allowing only one-sided secure key distribution. Here we present measurement-device-independent steering protocols that remove this need for trust, even when Bell non-locality is not present. We experimentally demonstrate this principle for singlet states and states that do not violate a Bell inequality.

  5. Quantum CPF gates between rare earth ions through measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun-Feng; Han, Zheng-Fu; Yang, Yong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) through interaction between a single-photon pulse and two microsphere cavities with a single three-level ion respectively and final photonic measurement. Our CPF gates are scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate, and are more applicable based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology.

  6. Simulation of Quantum-Mechanical Measurements with Programmable Pocket Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a method for the illustration of the statistical nature of measurements in quantum physics by means of simulation with pocket calculators. The application to examples like the double-slit experiment, Mott scattering, and the demonstration of the uncertainty relation is discussed. (Author/HM)

  7. Closed timelike curves in measurement-based quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Raphael; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2011-01-15

    Many results have been recently obtained regarding the power of hypothetical closed timelike curves (CTCs) in quantum computation. Here we show that the one-way model of measurement-based quantum computation encompasses in a natural way the CTC model proposed by Bennett, Schumacher, and Svetlichny. We identify a class of CTCs in this model that can be simulated deterministically and point to a fundamental limitation of Deutsch's CTC model which leads to predictions conflicting with those of the one-way model.

  8. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  9. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  10. Measurements-based Moving Target Detection in Quantum Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Khan, Asif R.; Yang, Huamin

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect a moving target in multi-channel quantum video is proposed based on multiple measurements on the video strip. The proposed method is capable of detecting the location of the moving target in each frame of the quantum video thereby ensuring that the motion trail of the object is easily and efficiently retrieved. Three experiments, i.e. moving target detection (MTD) of a pixel, MTD of an object in complex shape, and MTD of a pixel whose color is conterminous with that of its background, are implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal. This study presents a modest attempt to focus on the moving target detection and its applications in quantum video.

  11. Measure problem in slow roll inflation and loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Karami, Asieh

    2011-05-15

    We consider the measure problem in standard slow-roll inflationary models from the perspective of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). Following recent results by Ashtekar and Sloan, we study the probability of having enough e-foldings and focus on its dependence on the quantum gravity scale, including the transition of the theory to the limit where general relativity (GR) is recovered. Contrary to the standard expectation, the probability of having enough inflation, that is close to 1 in LQC, grows and tends to 1 as one approaches the GR limit. We study the origin of the tension between these results with those by Gibbons and Turok, and offer an explanation that brings these apparent contradictory results into a coherent picture. As we show, the conflicting results stem from different choices of initial conditions for the computation of probability. The singularity-free scenario of loop quantum cosmology offers a natural choice of initial conditions, and suggests that enough inflation is generic.

  12. Decoherence in generalized measurement and the quantum Zeno paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Gerhard; Wallentowitz, Sascha; Toschek, Peter E.

    2014-07-01

    In the development of quantum mechanics, the evolution of a quantum system was a controversial item. The duality of unitary evolution and state reduction as proposed by John von Neumann was widely felt unsatisfactory. Among the various attempts to reconcile the two incompatible modes of dynamics, the model of decoherence has turned out rather convincing. While the debate has been going on mainly by reasoning the consequences of gedanken experiments, the technical progress has made available techniques of addressing real experiments, even on an individual quantum object. In particular, the impeded evolution of an atom under continuous or reiterated measurement, predicted long ago, has been proven. The procedure of such an experiment-as with many a more conventional one-includes sequences of alternating time intervals of preparation and detection, known as “pump-probe”, or “drive-probe” measurements. We discuss this procedure in the context of the decoherence model. The emergence of pointer states of the meter is outlined. We show compatibility of this approach with photon counting, and emphasize the importance of information transfer in the course of measurement. Qualitative conditions having been considered so far necessary and sufficient criteria for meeting the “quantum Zeno paradox” are being quantified.

  13. Continuous Measurement Quantum State Tomography of Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio Almeida, Carlos A.

    Quantum state tomography is a fundamental tool in quantum information processing tasks. It allows us to estimate the state of a quantum system by measuring different observables on many identically prepared copies of the system. Usually, one makes projective measurements of an "informationally complete" set of observables and repeats them enough times so that good estimates of their expectation values are obtained. This is, in general, a very time-consuming task that requires a large number of measurements. There are, however, systems in which the data acquisition can be done more efficiently. In fact, an ensemble of quantum systems can be prepared and manipulated by external fields while being continuously probed collectively, producing enough information to estimate its state. This provides a basis for continuous measurement quantum tomography, and is the main topic of this dissertation. This method, based on weak continuous measurement, has the advantage of being fast, accurate, and almost nonperturbative. In this work, we present a extensive discussion and a generalization of the protocol proposed in [1], which was experimentally achieved in [2] using cold cesium atoms. In this protocol, an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner so as to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time. To achieve this, we use two different estimation methods: the widely used maximum likelihood and the novel compressed sensing algorithms. The general formalism is applied to the case of reconstruction of the quantum state encoded in the magnetic sub-levels of a large-spin alkali atom, 133Cs. We extend the applicability of the protocol in [1] to the more ambitious case of reconstruction of states in the full 16-dimensional electronic-ground subspace ( F = 3, F = 4), controlled by microwaves and radio

  14. Quantum Markov chains, sufficiency of quantum channels, and Rényi information measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-12-01

    A short quantum Markov chain is a tripartite state {ρ }{ABC} such that system A can be recovered perfectly by acting on system C of the reduced state {ρ }{BC}. Such states have conditional mutual information I(A;B| C) equal to zero and are the only states with this property. A quantum channel {N} is sufficient for two states ρ and σ if there exists a recovery channel using which one can perfectly recover ρ from {N}(ρ ) and σ from {N}(σ ). The relative entropy difference D(ρ \\parallel σ )-D({N}(ρ )\\parallel {N}(σ )) is equal to zero if and only if {N} is sufficient for ρ and σ. In this paper, we show that these properties extend to Rényi generalizations of these information measures which were proposed in (Berta et al 2015 J. Math. Phys. 56 022205; Seshadreesan et al 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 395303), thus providing an alternate characterization of short quantum Markov chains and sufficient quantum channels. These results give further support to these quantities as being legitimate Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information and the relative entropy difference. Along the way, we solve some open questions of Ruskai and Zhang, regarding the trace of particular matrices that arise in the study of monotonicity of relative entropy under quantum operations and strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy.

  15. Analyzing the Gaussian character of the spectral quantum state of light via quantum noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, A. S.; Barbosa, F. A. S.; Cassemiro, K. N.; Martinelli, M.; Villar, A. S.; Nussenzveig, P.

    2015-07-01

    Gaussian quantum states hold special importance in the continuous variable regime. In quantum information science, the understanding and characterization of central resources such as entanglement may strongly rely on the knowledge of the Gaussian or non-Gaussian character of the quantum state. However, the quantum measurement associated with the spectral photocurrent of light modes consists of a mixture of quadrature observables. Within the framework of two recent papers [Phys. Rev. A 88, 052113 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.052113 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 200402 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.200402], we address here how the statistics of the spectral photocurrent relates to the character of the Wigner function describing those modes. We show that a Gaussian state can be misidentified as non-Gaussian and vice versa, a conclusion that forces the adoption of tacit a priori assumptions to perform quantum state reconstruction. We experimentally analyze the light beams generated by the optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold to show that the data strongly supports the generation of Gaussian states of the field, validating the use of necessary and sufficient criteria to characterize entanglement in this system.

  16. Algebraic and algorithmic frameworks for optimized quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghaout, Amine; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-10-01

    von Neumann projections are the main operations by which information can be extracted from the quantum to the classical realm. They are, however, static processes that do not adapt to the states they measure. Advances in the field of adaptive measurement have shown that this limitation can be overcome by "wrapping" the von Neumann projectors in a higher-dimensional circuit which exploits the interplay between measurement outcomes and measurement settings. Unfortunately, the design of adaptive measurement has often been ad hoc and setup specific. We shall here develop a unified framework for designing optimized measurements. Our approach is twofold: The first is algebraic and formulates the problem of measurement as a simple matrix diagonalization problem. The second is algorithmic and models the optimal interaction between measurement outcomes and measurement settings as a cascaded network of conditional probabilities. Finally, we demonstrate that several figures of merit, such as Bell factors, can be improved by optimized measurements. This leads us to the promising observation that measurement detectors which—taken individually—have a low quantum efficiency can be arranged into circuits where, collectively, the limitations of inefficiency are compensated for.

  17. Generalized Galilean transformations and the measurement problem in the entropic dynamics approach to quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David T.

    Quantum mechanics is an extremely successful and accurate physical theory, yet since its inception, it has been afflicted with numerous conceptual difficulties. The primary subject of this thesis is the theory of entropic quantum dynamics (EQD), which seeks to avoid these conceptual problems by interpreting quantum theory from an informational perspective. We begin by reviewing Cox's work in describing probability theory as a means of rationally and consistently quantifying uncertainties. We then discuss how probabilities can be updated according to either Bayes' theorem or the extended method of maximum entropy (ME). After that discussion, we review the work of Caticha and Giffin that shows that Bayes' theorem is a special case of ME. This important result demonstrates that the ME method is the general method for updating probabilities. We then review some motivating difficulties in quantum mechanics before discussing Caticha's work in deriving quantum theory from the approach of entropic dynamics, which concludes our review. After entropic dynamics is introduced, we develop the concepts of symmetries and transformations from an informational perspective. The primary result is the formulation of a symmetry condition that any transformation must satisfy in order to qualify as a symmetry in EQD. We then proceed to apply this condition to the extended Galilean transformation. This transformation is of interest as it exhibits features of both special and general relativity. The transformation yields a gravitational potential that arises from an equivalence of information. We conclude the thesis with a discussion of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. We discuss the difficulties that arise in the standard quantum mechanical approach to measurement before developing our theory of entropic measurement. In entropic dynamics, position is the only observable. We show how a theory built on this one observable can account for the multitude of measurements present in

  18. Groverian entanglement measure of pure quantum states with arbitrary partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoni, Yishai; Biham, Ofer

    2007-02-15

    The Groverian entanglement measure of pure quantum states of n qubits is generalized to the case in which the qubits are divided into any p{<=}n parties. The entanglement between these parties is evaluated numerically using an efficient parametrization. To demonstrate this measure we apply it to symmetric states such as the Greenberg-Horne-Zeiliner state and the W state. Interestingly, this measure is equivalent to an entanglement measure introduced earlier [H. Barnum and N. Linden, J. Phys. A 34, 6787 (2001)], using different considerations.

  19. Optimal two-copy discrimination of quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Micuda, Michal

    2009-10-15

    We investigate optimal discrimination between two projective quantum measurements on a single qubit. We consider a scenario where the measurement that should be identified can be performed twice and we show that adaptive discrimination strategy, entangled probe states, and feed forward all help to increase the probability of correct identification of the measurement. We also experimentally demonstrate the studied discrimination strategies and test their performance. The employed experimental setup involves projective measurements on polarization states of single photons and preparation of required probe two-photon polarization states by the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion and passive linear optics.

  20. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, L F; Schreppler, S; Kohler, J; Spethmann, N; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2016-07-15

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation. PMID:27472106

  1. Detecting Large Quantum Fisher Information with Finite Measurement Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröwis, Florian; Sekatski, Pavel; Dür, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We propose an experimentally accessible scheme to determine the lower bounds on the quantum Fisher information (QFI), which ascertains multipartite entanglement or usefulness for quantum metrology. The scheme is based on comparing the measurement statistics of a state before and after a small unitary rotation. We argue that, in general, the limited resolution of collective observables prevents the detection of large QFI. This can be overcome by performing an additional operation prior to the measurement. We illustrate the power of this protocol for present-day spin-squeezing experiments, where the same operation used for the preparation of the initial spin-squeezed state improves also the measurement precision and hence the lower bound on the QFI by 2 orders of magnitude. We also establish a connection to the Leggett-Garg inequalities. We show how to simulate a variant of the inequalities with our protocol and demonstrate that large QFI is necessary for their violation with coarse-grained detectors.

  2. Gauges and functional measures in quantum gravity I: Einstein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, N.; Percacci, R.; Pereira, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a general computation of the off-shell one-loop divergences in Einstein gravity, in a two-parameter family of path integral measures, corresponding to different ways of parametrizing the graviton field, and a two-parameter family of gauges. Trying to reduce the gauge- and measure-dependence selects certain classes of measures and gauges respectively. There is a choice of two parameters (corresponding to the exponential parametrization and the partial gauge condition that the quantum field be traceless) that automatically eliminates the dependence on the remaining two parameters and on the cosmological constant. We observe that the divergences are invariant under a Z 2 "duality" transformation that (in a particularly important special case) involves the replacement of the densitized metric by a densitized inverse metric as the fundamental quantum variable. This singles out a formulation of unimodular gravity as the unique "self-dual" theory in this class.

  3. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  4. Quantum steering of Gaussian states via non-Gaussian measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Se-Wan; Lee, Jaehak; Park, Jiyong; Nha, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Quantum steering—a strong correlation to be verified even when one party or its measuring device is fully untrusted—not only provides a profound insight into quantum physics but also offers a crucial basis for practical applications. For continuous-variable (CV) systems, Gaussian states among others have been extensively studied, however, mostly confined to Gaussian measurements. While the fulfilment of Gaussian criterion is sufficient to detect CV steering, whether it is also necessary for Gaussian states is a question of fundamental importance in many contexts. This critically questions the validity of characterizations established only under Gaussian measurements like the quantification of steering and the monogamy relations. Here, we introduce a formalism based on local uncertainty relations of non-Gaussian measurements, which is shown to manifest quantum steering of some Gaussian states that Gaussian criterion fails to detect. To this aim, we look into Gaussian states of practical relevance, i.e. two-mode squeezed states under a lossy and an amplifying Gaussian channel. Our finding significantly modifies the characteristics of Gaussian-state steering so far established such as monogamy relations and one-way steering under Gaussian measurements, thus opening a new direction for critical studies beyond Gaussian regime. PMID:27411853

  5. Quantum steering of Gaussian states via non-Gaussian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Se-Wan; Lee, Jaehak; Park, Jiyong; Nha, Hyunchul

    2016-07-01

    Quantum steering—a strong correlation to be verified even when one party or its measuring device is fully untrusted—not only provides a profound insight into quantum physics but also offers a crucial basis for practical applications. For continuous-variable (CV) systems, Gaussian states among others have been extensively studied, however, mostly confined to Gaussian measurements. While the fulfilment of Gaussian criterion is sufficient to detect CV steering, whether it is also necessary for Gaussian states is a question of fundamental importance in many contexts. This critically questions the validity of characterizations established only under Gaussian measurements like the quantification of steering and the monogamy relations. Here, we introduce a formalism based on local uncertainty relations of non-Gaussian measurements, which is shown to manifest quantum steering of some Gaussian states that Gaussian criterion fails to detect. To this aim, we look into Gaussian states of practical relevance, i.e. two-mode squeezed states under a lossy and an amplifying Gaussian channel. Our finding significantly modifies the characteristics of Gaussian-state steering so far established such as monogamy relations and one-way steering under Gaussian measurements, thus opening a new direction for critical studies beyond Gaussian regime.

  6. Measurement-induced phase transition in a quantum spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Shrabanti; Dasgupta, Subinay

    2016-05-01

    Suppose a quantum system starts to evolve under a Hamiltonian from some initial state. When, for the first time, will an observable attain a preassigned value? To answer this question, one method often adopted is to make instantaneous measurements periodically and note down the serial number for which the desired result is obtained for the first time. We apply this protocol to an interacting spin system at zero temperature and show analytically that the response of this system shows a nonanalyticity as a function of the parameter of the Hamiltonian and the time interval of measurement. In contrast to quantum phase transitions, this type of phase transition is not a property of the ground state and arises from the Hamiltonian dynamics and quantum-mechanical nature of the measurement. The specific system studied is the transverse Ising chain, and the measurement performed is whether the total transverse magnetic moment (per site) is not equal to 1. The results for some other types of measurement are also discussed.

  7. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  8. The quantum yield of CO2 fixation is reduced for several minutes after prior exposure to darkness. Exploration of the underlying causes.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, M U F; Oja, V; Laisk, A

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the apparent quantum yield of CO2 fixation can be reduced for up to several minutes after prior exposure to darkness. In the work reported here, we investigated this phenomenon more fully and have deduced information about the underlying processes. This was done mainly by concurrent measurements of O2 and CO2 exchange in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Measurements of O2 evolution indicated that photochemical efficiency was not lost through dark adaptation, and that O2 evolution could proceed immediately at high rates provided that there were reducible pools of photosynthetic intermediates. Part of the delay in reaching the full quantum yield of CO2 fixation could be attributed to the need to build up pools of photosynthetic intermediates to high enough levels to support steady rates of CO2 fixation. There was no evidence that Rubisco inactivation contributed towards delayed CO2 uptake (under measurement conditions of low light). However, we obtained evidence that an enzyme in the reaction path between triose phosphates and RuBP must become completely inactivated in the dark. As a consequence, in dark-adapted leaves, a large amount of triose phosphates were exported from the chloroplast over the first minute of light rather than being converted to RuBP for CO2 fixation. That pattern was not observed if the pre-incubation light level was increased to just 3-5 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1). The findings from this work underscore that there are fundamental differences in enzyme activation between complete darkness and even a very low light level of only 3-5 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1) which predispose leaves to different gas exchange patterns once leaves are transferred to higher light levels. PMID:15666215

  9. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.; Smelser, R. M.; McWatters, B. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Yeamans, C. B.; Knittel, K. M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-10-15

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, {sup 63}Cu(n,2n){sup 62}Cu({beta}{sup +}) and {sup 65}Cu(n,2n) {sup 64} Cu({beta}{sup +}), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel {rho}R to uncertainties as low as 5%.

  10. Note: A simple charge neutralization method for measuring the secondary electron yield of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Ming Cao, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2014-03-15

    We report on a simple and effective charge neutralization method for measuring the total electron-induced secondary electron yield of insulators in a measurement system with a single pulsed electron gun. In this method, the secondary electron collector is negatively biased with respect to the sample to force some emitted secondary electrons to return to the sample surface and therefore to neutralize positive charges accumulated in the sample during the previous measurement. The adequate negative bias is determined and the equilibrium state of negative charging is discussed. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the measured electron yields in the cases with and without charge neutralization and by comparison with existing electron yield data of polyimide.

  11. All-optical measurement-based quantum-information processing in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Avinash; Lovett, Brendon W; Benjamin, Simon C; Stace, Thomas M

    2006-12-22

    Parity measurements on qubits can generate the entanglement resource necessary for scalable quantum computation. Here we describe a method for fast optical parity measurements on electron spin qubits within coupled quantum dots. The measurement scheme, which can be realized with existing technology, consists of the optical excitation of excitonic states followed by monitored relaxation. Conditional on the observation of a photon, the system is projected into the odd/even-parity subspaces. Our model incorporates all the primary sources of error, including detector inefficiency, effects of spatial separation and nonresonance of the dots, and also unwanted excitations. Through an analytical treatment we establish that the scheme is robust to such effects. Two applications are presented: a realization of a controlled-NOT gate, and a technique for growing large scale graph states. PMID:17280337

  12. Measurement of the B{sup +}{yields}{omega}l{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +}{yields}{eta}l{sup +}{nu} branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.

    2009-03-01

    We present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +}{yields}{omega}l{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +}{yields}{eta}l{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 3.83x10{sup 8} BB pairs recorded at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}. We measure the branching fractions B(B{sup +}{yields}{omega}l{sup +}{nu})=(1.14{+-}0.16{sub stat}{+-}0.08{sub syst})x10{sup -4} and B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}l{sup +}{nu})=(0.31{+-}0.06{sub stat}{+-}0.08{sub syst})x10{sup -4}.

  13. Comment on 'Quantum measurement and decoherence'

    SciTech Connect

    Gobert, Dominique; Delft, Jan von; Ambegaokar, Vinay

    2004-08-01

    Ford, Lewis, and O'Connell [Phys. Rev. A 64, 032101 (2001)] have recently discussed a thought experiment in which a Brownian particle is subjected to a double-slit measurement . Analyzing the decay of the emerging interference pattern, they derive a decoherence rate that is much faster than previous results and even persists in the limit of vanishing dissipation. This result is based on the definition of a certain attenuation factor, which they analyze for short times. In this note, we point out that this attenuation factor captures the physics of decoherence only for times larger than a certain time t{sub mix}, which is the time it takes until the two emerging wave packets begin to overlap. Therefore, the strategy of Ford et al. of extracting the decoherence time from the regime tt{sub mix}, one recovers familiar behavior for the decoherence time; in particular, no decoherence is seen in the absence of dissipation. We confirm the latter conclusion by calculating the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix.

  14. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Burkholder, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO)2, has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO)2 and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV/vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001), 10.1021/jp0019456], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, Φ(λ), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO)2 has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl)2 + hv → ClCO* + Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO* → Cl + CO (3a), → ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M → Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO)2. Φ(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 ± 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N2), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO)2 is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 ± 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N2). Φ(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N2). The low-pressure limit of the total Cl atom quantum yield, Φ0(351 nm), was 2.05

  15. Radical quantum yields from formaldehyde photolysis in the 30,400-32,890 cm(-1) (304-329 nm) spectral region: detection of radical photoproducts using pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tatum Ernest, Cheryl; Bauer, Dieter; Hynes, Anthony J

    2012-07-01

    The relative quantum yield for the production of radical products, H + HCO, from the UV photolysis of formaldehyde (HCHO) has been measured using a pulsed laser photolysis–pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLP–PLIF) technique across the 30,400–32,890 cm(–1) (304–329 nm) spectral region of the Ã(1)A2–X̃(1)A1 electronic transition. The photolysis laser had a bandwidth of 0.09 cm(–1), which is slightly broader than the Doppler width of a rotational line of formaldehyde at 300 K (0.07 cm(–1)), and the yield spectrum shows detailed rotational structure. The H and HCO photofragments were monitored using LIF of the OH radical as a spectroscopic marker. The OH radicals were produced by rapid reaction of the H and HCO photofragments with NO2. This technique produced an “action” spectrum that at any photolysis wavelength is the product of the H + HCO radical quantum yield and HCHO absorption cross section at the photolysis wavelength and is a relative measurement. Using the HCHO absorption cross section previously obtained in this laboratory, the relative quantum yield was determined two different ways. One produced band specific yields, and the other produced yields averaged over each 100 cm(–1). Yields were normalized to a value of 0.69 at 31,750 cm(–1) based on the current recommendation of Sander et al. (Sander, S. P.; Abbatt, J.; Barker, J. R.; Burkholder, J. B.; Friedl, R. R.; Golden, D. M.; Huie, R. E.; Kolb, C. E.; Kurylo, M. J.; Moortgat, G. K.; et al. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies, Evaluation No. 17; Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Pasadena, CA, USA, 2011). The resulting radical quantum yields agree well with previous experimental studies and the current JPL recommendation but show greater wavelength dependent structure. A significant decrease in the quantum yield was observed for the 5(0)(1) + 1(0)(1)4(0)(1) combination band centered at 31,125 cm(–1). This band has a low absorption cross section and

  16. Noise robustness of the incompatibility of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Reitzner, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements is a fundamental phenomenon having no explanation in classical physics. Intuitively, one considers given measurements to be incompatible within a framework of a physical theory, if their simultaneous implementation on a single physical device is prohibited by the theory itself. In the mathematical language of quantum theory, measurements are described by POVMs (positive operator valued measures), and given POVMs are by definition incompatible if they cannot be obtained via coarse-graining from a single common POVM; this notion generalizes noncommutativity of projective measurements. In quantum theory, incompatibility can be regarded as a resource necessary for manifesting phenomena such as Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality violations or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering which do not have classical explanation. We define operational ways of quantifying this resource via the amount of added classical noise needed to render the measurements compatible, i.e., useless as a resource. In analogy to entanglement measures, we generalize this idea by introducing the concept of incompatibility measure, which is monotone in local operations. In this paper, we restrict our consideration to binary measurements, which are already sufficient to explicitly demonstrate nontrivial features of the theory. In particular, we construct a family of incompatibility monotones operationally quantifying violations of certain scaled versions of the CHSH Bell inequality, prove that they can be computed via a semidefinite program, and show how the noise-based quantities arise as special cases. We also determine maximal violations of the new inequalities, demonstrating how Tsirelson's bound appears as a special case. The resource aspect is further motivated by simple quantum protocols where our incompatibility monotones appear as relevant figures of merit.

  17. Super quantum measures on effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yongjian Ren, Fang; Yang, Aili

    2015-10-15

    We give one basis of the space of super quantum measures on finite effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties (RDP for short). Then we prove that the super quantum measures and quantum interference functions on finite effect algebras with the RDP are determined each other. At last, we investigate the relationships between the super quantum measures and the diagonally positive signed measures on finite effect algebras with the RDP in detail.

  18. Quantum state tomography with fully symmetric measurements and product measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Huangjun; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2011-08-15

    We introduce random-matrix theory to study the tomographic efficiency of a wide class of measurements constructed out of weighted 2-designs, including symmetric informationally complete (SIC) probability operator measurements (POMs). In particular, we derive analytic formulas for the mean Hilbert-Schmidt distance and the mean trace distance between the estimator and the true state, which clearly show the difference between the scaling behaviors of the two error measures with the dimension of the Hilbert space. We then prove that the product SIC POMs, the multipartite analog of the SIC POMs, are optimal among all product measurements in the same sense as the SIC POMs are optimal among all joint measurements. We further show that, for bipartite systems, there is only a marginal efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs over the product SIC POMs. In marked contrast, for multipartite systems, the efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs increases exponentially with the number of parties.

  19. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  20. Quantitative relations between measurement incompatibility, quantum steering, and nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Skrzypczyk, P.

    2016-05-01

    The certification of Bell nonlocality or quantum steering implies the use of incompatible measurements. Here we make this connection quantitative. We show how to strengthen robustness-based steering and nonlocality quantifiers in order that they give strong lower bounds to previously proposed incompatibility quantifiers. Our results can be seen from two perspectives. On the one hand, they can be used to estimate how much steering or nonlocality can be demonstrated with a given set of measurements. On the other hand, they give one-sided device-independent and device-independent ways of estimating measurement incompatibility.

  1. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2013-04-01

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum-classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie-Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix Dˆ(t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin-pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state Dˆ(t) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although Dˆ(t) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of runs. Individual runs are approached by analyzing

  2. Reply to "Comment on `Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-08-01

    We rely on our proof of the nondecreasing character of quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], and we put it into perspective with the results of Bosyk et al. [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016), 10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our method, adopted for the proof that Kaniadakis entropy does not decrease under a projective measurement, is based on Jensen's inequalities, while the method proposed by the authors of the Comment represents another alternative and clearly correct method to prove the same thing. Furthermore, we clarify that our interest in Kaniadakis entropy is due to the fact that this entropy has a transparent physical significance, emerging within the special relativity.

  3. Reply to "Comment on 'Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement' ".

    PubMed

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-08-01

    We rely on our proof of the nondecreasing character of quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], and we put it into perspective with the results of Bosyk et al. [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016)10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our method, adopted for the proof that Kaniadakis entropy does not decrease under a projective measurement, is based on Jensen's inequalities, while the method proposed by the authors of the Comment represents another alternative and clearly correct method to prove the same thing. Furthermore, we clarify that our interest in Kaniadakis entropy is due to the fact that this entropy has a transparent physical significance, emerging within the special relativity. PMID:27627426

  4. Role of Weak Measurements on States Ordering and Monogamy of Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng; Tian, Dong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The information-theoretic definition of quantum correlation, e.g., quantum discord, is measurement dependent. By considering the more general quantum measurements, weak measurements, which include the projective measurement as a limiting case, we show that while weak measurements can enable one to capture more quantumness of correlation in a state, it can also induce other counterintuitive quantum effects. Specifically, we show that the general measurements with different strengths can impose different orderings for quantum correlations of some states. It can also modify the monogamous character for certain classes of states as well which may diminish the usefulness of quantum correlation as a resource in some protocols. In this sense, we say that the weak measurements play a dual role in defining quantum correlation.

  5. The Retrocausal Nature of Quantum Measurement Revealed by Partial and Weak Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2011-11-29

    Quantum measurement is sometimes more effective when its result is not definite. Partial measurement turns the initial superposition not into a certain state but to a greater probability for it, enabling probing the quantum state in cases where complete measurement makes the noncommuting variables inaccessible. It also enables full quantum erasure that, unlike prevailing method, can be carried out even on recorded results. Aharonov's weak measurement is another method of imprecisely measuring quantum variables, outsmarting the uncertainty principle in even subtler ways. Happily, the two methods complement and corroborate one another in several interesting ways. We gedankenly apply these measurements to the EPR case. A pair of entangled particles undergoes more than one pair of partial and weak measurements, which, unlike complete measurements, leave them partially correlated. Their erasure is then shown to be as nonlocal as measurement itself. Surprisingly, the temporal relations between such measurements in the EPR setting do not follow the temporal sequence perceived by an external observer. For each particle, the measurements performed on the other operate as if they occurred (with signs reversed) in its own past, and in reversed order. This fully accords with Cramer's transactional interpretation and Aharonov's two state-vector formalism.

  6. Nonparametric estimation of quantum states, processes and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougovski, Pavel; Bennink, Ryan

    Quantum state, process, and measurement estimation methods traditionally use parametric models, in which the number and role of relevant parameters is assumed to be known. When such an assumption cannot be justified, a common approach in many disciplines is to fit the experimental data to multiple models with different sets of parameters and utilize an information criterion to select the best fitting model. However, it is not always possible to assume a model with a finite (countable) number of parameters. This typically happens when there are unobserved variables that stem from hidden correlations that can only be unveiled after collecting experimental data. How does one perform quantum characterization in this situation? We present a novel nonparametric method of experimental quantum system characterization based on the Dirichlet Process (DP) that addresses this problem. Using DP as a prior in conjunction with Bayesian estimation methods allows us to increase model complexity (number of parameters) adaptively as the number of experimental observations grows. We illustrate our approach for the one-qubit case and show how a probability density function for an unknown quantum process can be estimated.

  7. The measurement problem in quantum mechanics: A phenomenological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Joel Brooks

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation is a phenomenological investigation of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. The primary subject matter for description and analysis is scientific instruments and their use in experiments which elicit the measurement problem. A methodological critique is mounted against the ontological commitments taken for granted in the canonical interpretations of quantum theory and the scientific activity of measurement as the necessary interface between theoretical interest and perceptual results. I argue that an aesthetic dimension of reality functions as aproto-scientific establishment of sense-making that constantly operates to set integratively all other cognitively neat determinations, including scientifically rendered objects that are intrinsically non-visualizable. The way in which data "key in" to the original and originative register of the sensible in observation is clarified by examining prostheses, measuring apparatuses and instruments that are sense-conveying and -integrative with the human sensorium. Experiments, technology and instrumentation are examined in order to understand how knowing and that which is known is bonded by praxis-aisthesis. Quantum measurement is a praxic-dynamie activity and homologically structured and structur ing functional engagement in terms of instantiation, quantifiability, and spatiotemporal differentiation. The distinctions between a beauty-aesthetic and praxis-aisthesis are delineated. It is argued that a beauty-aesthetic is a construal of the economic dimension of scientific objects and work, and is not the primary manner in which the aesthetic dimension is disclosed. The economic dimension of abstractions reduces to an austere aesthetic of calculative economy. Nature itself, however, is not stingy; it is intrinsically capacious, extravagant, full of surprise, nuance, ambiguity and allusiveness. The capaciousness of Nature and the way in which we are integratively set within Nature in a materiality

  8. Iridium Cyclometalated Complexes in Host-Guest Chemistry: A Strategy for Maximizing Quantum Yield in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Alrawashdeh, Lubna R; Cronin, Michael P; Woodward, Clifford E; Day, Anthony I; Wallace, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    The weaker emission typically seen for iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes in aqueous medium can be reversed via encapsulation in cucurbit[10]uril (Q[10]). The Q[10] cavity is shown to effectively maximize quantum yields for the complexes, compared to any other medium. This may provide significant advantages for a number of sensor applications. NMR studies show that the complexes are accommodated similarly within the host molecule, even with cationic substituents attached to the ppy ligands, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the dominant driving force for binding. Cavity-encapsulated 1:1 host-guest species dominate the emission, but 1:2 species are also indicated, which also give some enhancement of intensity. Results demonstrate that the enhancement is due primarily to much lower rates of nonradiative decay but also suggest that the encapsulation can cause a change in character of the emitting state. PMID:27315543

  9. Diurnal changes of photosynthetic quantum yield in the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii under simulated tidal emersion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong Qiang; Zhang, Quan Sheng; Tang, Yong Zheng; Li, Xue Meng; Liu, Hong Liang; Li, Li Xia

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a three-way factorial experimental design was used to investigate the diurnal changes of photosynthetic activity of the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii in response to temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation during a simulated diurnal light cycle. The maximum (Fv/Fm) and effective (ΦPSII) quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) were estimated by chlorophyll fluorescence using a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Results showed that this species exhibited sun-adapted characteristics, as evidenced by the daily variation of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII. Both yield values decreased with increasing irradiance towards noon and recovered rapidly in the afternoon suggesting a dynamic photoinhibition. The photosynthetic quantum yield of S. thunbergii thalli varied significantly with temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation. Thalli were more susceptible to light-induced damage at high temperature of 25 °C and showed complete recovery of photosynthetic activity only when exposed to 8 °C. In contrast with the mid-morning low tide period, although there was an initial increase in photosynthetic yield during emersion, thalli showed a greater degree of decline at the end of emersion and remained less able to recover when low tide occurred at mid-afternoon. Short-term air exposure of 2 h did not significantly influence the photosynthesis. However, when exposed to moderate conditions (4 h desiccation at 15 °C or 6 h desiccation at 8 °C), a significant inhibition of photosynthesis was followed by partial or complete recovery upon re-immersion in late afternoon. Only extreme conditions (4 h desiccation at 25 °C or 6 h desiccation at 15 °C or 25 °C) resulted in the complete inhibition, with little indication of recovery until the following morning, implying the occurrence of chronic PSII damage. Based on the magnitude of effect, desiccation was the predominant negative factor affecting the photosynthesis under the simulated daytime irradiance period. These

  10. A Generalized Geometric Measurement of Quantum Discord: Exact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hai-Tao; Tian, Jun-Long; Yang, Gui

    2016-02-01

    A generalization of the geometric measure of quantum discord is introduced in this article, based on Hellinger distance. Our definition has virtues of computability and independence of local measurement. In addition it also does not suffer from the recently raised critiques about quantum discord. The exact result can be obtained for bipartite pure states with arbitrary levels, which is completely determined by the Schmidt decomposition. For bipartite mixed states the exact result can also be found for a special case. Furthermore the generalization into multipartite case is direct. It is shown that it can be evaluated exactly when the measured state is invariant under permutation or translation. In addition the detection of quantum phase transition is also discussed for Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick and Dicke model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11005002 and 11475004, New Century Excellent Talent of M.O.E (NCET-11-0937), and Sponsoring Program of Excellent Younger Teachers in universities in Henan Province under Grant No. 2010GGJS-181

  11. A Generalized Geometric Measurement of Quantum Discord: Exact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hai-Tao; Tian, Jun-Long; Yang, Gui

    2016-02-01

    A generalization of the geometric measure of quantum discord is introduced in this article, based on Hellinger distance. Our definition has virtues of computability and independence of local measurement. In addition it also does not suffer from the recently raised critiques about quantum discord. The exact result can be obtained for bipartite pure states with arbitrary levels, which is completely determined by the Schmidt decomposition. For bipartite mixed states the exact result can also be found for a special case. Furthermore the generalization into multipartite case is direct. It is shown that it can be evaluated exactly when the measured state is invariant under permutation or translation. In addition the detection of quantum phase transition is also discussed for Lipkin–Meshkov–Glick and Dicke model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11005002 and 11475004, New Century Excellent Talent of M.O.E (NCET-11-0937), and Sponsoring Program of Excellent Younger Teachers in universities in Henan Province under Grant No. 2010GGJS-181

  12. Computing the rates of measurement-induced quantum jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Tilloy, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Small quantum systems can now be continuously monitored experimentally which allows for the reconstruction of quantum trajectories. A peculiar feature of these trajectories is the emergence of jumps between the eigenstates of the observable which is measured. Using the stochastic master equation (SME) formalism for continuous quantum measurements, we show that the density matrix of a system indeed shows a jumpy behaviour when it is subjected to a tight measurement (even if the noise in the SME is Gaussian). We are able to compute the jump rates analytically for any system evolution, i.e. any Lindbladian, and we illustrate how our general recipe can be applied to two simple examples. We then discuss the mathematical, foundational and practical applications of our results. The analysis we present is based on a study of the strong noise limit of a class of stochastic differential equations (the SME) and as such the method may be applicable to other physical situations in which a strong noise limit plays a role.

  13. A new method for measuring the yield stress in thin layers of sedimenting blood.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C L; Smith, C M; Blackshear, P L

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented to describe the low shear rate behavior of blood. We observed the response of a thin layer of sedimenting blood to a graded shear stress in a wedge-shaped chamber. The method allows quantitation of the degree of phase separation between red cells and plasma, and extracts the yield stress of the cell phase as a function of hematocrit. Our studies showed that the behavior of normal human blood underwent a transition from a solid-like gel to a Casson fluid. This transition began at the Casson predicted yield stress. The viscoelastic properties of blood were examined at shear stresses below the yield stress. The measured Young's elastic moduli were in good agreement with published data. The yield stress of blood showed a linear dependence on hematocrit up to 60%, and increased more rapidly at higher hematocrit. PMID:3663830

  14. Modeling the quantum yields of herbicide 2,4-D decay in UV/H2O2 process.

    PubMed

    Chu, W

    2001-08-01

    The photodecay of herbicide 2,4-D in a hydrogen peroxide-aided photolysis process was studied and modeled. The decay rate of 2,4-D was known to be low in the natural environment, but rate improvement was achieved in an H2O2/UV system. The 2,4-D decay quantum yields under ultraviolet (UV) light at 253.7 nm increased from 4.86 x 10(-6) to 1.30 x 10(-4) as the ratio of [H2O2]/[2,4-D] increased from 0.05 to 12.5. Apparently, in the presence of UV light, the decay rate of 2,4-D could be greatly improved as the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased. However, the efficiency of 2,4-D photodecay was retarded if the concentration of H2O2 was overdosed, because the excess hydrogen peroxide consumes the hydroxyl radicals (HO*) in the solution, resulting in a much weaker oxidant HO2*. The decay of 2,4-D was also pH dependent. A ranking of acid (highest), base (middle) and neutral (lowest) was observed owing to the property change of reactants and the shifting of dominant mechanisms among photolysis, photohydrolysis and chemical oxidation. Two mathematical models were proposed to predict the quantum yield for various [H2O2]/[2,4-D] ratios and initial pH levels, in which very good correlation was found for the ranges of regular application. PMID:11513426

  15. Relationship between neutron yield rate of tokamak plasmas and spectrometer measured flux for different sight lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gorini, G.; Kaellne, J.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2011-03-15

    A parametric relationship between total neutron yield rate and collimated fluxes related to the brightness (B) of plasma chords ({lambda}) is developed for different emissivity distributions of tokamak plasmas. Specifically, the brightness was expressed as a function of chord coordinates of radial position using a simple model for the emissivity profiles of width parameter w. The functional brightness dependence B({lambda},w) was calculated to examine the relationship between measured flux and deduced yield rate, and its plasma profile dependence. The results were used to determine the chord range of minimum profile sensitivity in order to identify the preferred collimator sight for the determination of yield rate from neutron emission spectroscopy (YNES) measurements. The YNES method is discussed in comparison to conventional methods to determine the total neutron yield rates and related plasma fusion power relying on uncollimated flux measurements and a different calibration base for the flux-yield relationship. The results have a special bearing for tokamaks operating with both deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas and future high power machines such as for ITER, DEMO, and IGNITOR.

  16. Disturbance trade-off principle for quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandayam, Prabha; Srinivas, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a fundamental principle of disturbance tradeoff for quantum measurements, along the lines of the celebrated uncertainty principle: The disturbances associated with measurements performed on distinct yet identically prepared ensembles of systems in a pure state cannot all be made arbitrarily small. Indeed, we show that the average of the disturbances associated with a set of projective measurements is strictly greater than zero whenever the associated observables do not have a common eigenvector. For such measurements, we show an equivalence between disturbance tradeoff measured in terms of fidelity and the entropic uncertainty tradeoff formulated in terms of the Tsallis entropy (T2). We also investigate the disturbances associated with the class of nonprojective measurements, where the difference between the disturbance tradeoff and the uncertainty tradeoff manifests quite clearly.

  17. Measurements of {sigma}(e+e- {yields} hadrons) and B({psi}(3770) {yields} DD-bar, non-DD-bar)

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Gang

    2006-02-11

    We report measurements of the cross sections for inclusive hadronic event production in e+e- annihilation at the energies of 3.650, 3.6648, and 3.773 GeV and measurements of the branching fractions for {psi}(3770) {yields} D0D-bar0, D+D-, DD-bar, and for {psi}(3770) {yields} non-DD-bar.

  18. Measurement-based quantum phase estimation algorithm for finding eigenvalues of non-unitary matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hefeng; Nori, Franco; Wu Lianao; Liu Yuxi

    2010-12-15

    We propose a quantum algorithm for finding eigenvalues of non-unitary matrices. We show how to construct, through interactions in a quantum system and projective measurements, a non-Hermitian or non-unitary matrix and obtain its eigenvalues and eigenvectors. This proposal combines ideas of frequent measurement, measured quantum Fourier transform, and quantum state tomography. It provides a generalization of the conventional phase estimation algorithm, which is limited to Hermitian or unitary matrices.

  19. Study of a monogamous entanglement measure for three-qubit quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiting; Cui, Jianlian; Wang, Shuhao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-06-01

    The entanglement quantification and classification of multipartite quantum states is an important research area in quantum information. In this paper, in terms of the reduced density matrices corresponding to all possible partitions of the entire system, a bounded entanglement measure is constructed for arbitrary-dimensional multipartite quantum states. In particular, for three-qubit quantum systems, we prove that our entanglement measure satisfies the relation of monogamy. Furthermore, we present a necessary condition for characterizing maximally entangled states using our entanglement measure.

  20. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Sage, C.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Litaize, O.; Mutti, P.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  1. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-02-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be Y337=5.61±0.06stat±0.22syst photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  2. Measurement of the charged multiplicity of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} events

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.

    1994-08-01

    Using an impact parameter tag to select an enriched sample of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} events, the authors have measured the difference between the average charged multiplicity of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} and Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons to be {bar n}{sub b} - {bar n}{sub had} = 2.24 {+-} 0.30(stat.) {+-} 0.33(syst.) tracks per event. From this, they have derived {bar n}{sub b} - {bar n}{sub uds} = 3.31 {+-} 0.41 {+-} 0.79. Comparing this measurement with those at lower center-of-mass energies, the authors find no evidence that {bar n}{sub b} - {bar n}{sub uds} depends on energy, in agreement with a precise prediction of perturbative QCD.

  3. Breaking Quantum and Thermal Limits on Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    I will give an overview of our efforts to use correlations and entanglement between many atoms to overcome quantum and thermal limits on precision measurements. In the first portion of my talk, I will present a path toward a 10000 times reduced sensitivity to the thermal mirror motion that limits the linewidth of today's best lasers. By utilizing narrow atomic transitions, the laser's phase information is primarily stored in the atomic gain medium rather than in the vibration-sensitive cavity field. To this end, I will present the first observation of lasing based on the mHz linewidth optical-clock transition in a laser-cooled ensemble of strontium atoms. In the second portion of my talk, I will describe how we use collective measurements to surpass the standard quantum limit on phase estimation 1 /√{ N} for N unentangled atoms. We achieve a directly observed reduction in phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit of as much as 17.7(6) dB. Supported by DARPA QuASAR, NIST, ARO, and NSF PFC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844 Physics Frontier Center.

  4. Delayed choice experiments, the arrow of time, and quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, L. S.

    2011-11-29

    By a radical modification of statistical mechanics the measurement process of quantum mechanics can be described in terms of pure, unitary time evolution, with no wave function collapse or many-world ideas. The key notion is 'special states', rare microscopic states of a complex system. Recovering the standard probabilities requires of this theory the appearance of Cauchy-distributed noise in some measurement processes. This article treats experimental situations where such noise might be detected and correlated with the need or absence of need for special states. Included in this possibility are 'delayed choice' experiments, in which the correlation contravenes conventional ideas on causality. Background material on all topics is provided.

  5. The ultimate quantum limits on the accuracy of measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1992-01-01

    A quantum generalization of rate-distortion theory from standard communication and information theory is developed for application to determining the ultimate performance limit of measurement systems in physics. For the estimation of a real or a phase parameter, it is shown that the root-mean-square error obtained in a measurement with a single-mode photon level N cannot do better than approximately N exp -1, while approximately exp(-N) may be obtained for multi-mode fields with the same photon level N. Possible ways to achieve the remarkable exponential performance are indicated.

  6. [Contrast of Z-Pinch X-Ray Yield Measure Technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Wang, Liang-ping; Sheng, Liang; Lu, Yi

    2015-03-01

    Resistive bolometer and scintillant detection system are two mainly Z-pinch X-ray yield measure techniques which are based on different diagnostic principles. Contrasting the results from two methods can help with increasing precision of X-ray yield measurement. Experiments with different load material and shape were carried out on the "QiangGuang-I" facility. For Al wire arrays, X-ray yields measured by the two techniques were largely consistent. However, for insulating coating W wire arrays, X-ray yields taken from bolometer changed with load parameters while data from scintillant detection system hardly changed. Simulation and analysis draw conclusions as follows: (1) Scintillant detection system is much more sensitive to X-ray photons with low energy and its spectral response is wider than the resistive bolometer. Thus, results from the former method are always larger than the latter. (2) The responses of the two systems are both flat to Al plasma radiation. Thus, their results are consistent for Al wire array loads. (3) Radiation form planar W wire arrays is mainly composed of sub-keV soft X-ray. X-ray yields measured by the bolometer is supposed to be accurate because of the nickel foil can absorb almost all the soft X-ray. (4) By contrast, using planar W wire arrays, data from scintillant detection system hardly change with load parameters. A possible explanation is that while the distance between wires increases, plasma temperature at stagnation reduces and spectra moves toward the soft X-ray region. Scintillator is much more sensitive to the soft X-ray below 200 eV. Thus, although the total X-ray yield reduces with large diameter load, signal from the scintillant detection system is almost the same. (5) Both Techniques affected by electron beams produced by the loads. PMID:26117906

  7. Experimental Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices.

  8. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S; Fejer, M M; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-27

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices. PMID:24116758

  9. Secure quantum weak oblivious transfer against individual measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2015-06-01

    In quantum weak oblivious transfer, Alice sends Bob two bits and Bob can learn one of the bits at his choice. It was found that the security of such a protocol is bounded by , where is the probability with which Alice can guess Bob's choice, and is the probability with which Bob can guess both of Alice's bits given that he learns one of the bits with certainty. Here we propose a protocol and show that as long as Alice is restricted to individual measurements, then both and can be made arbitrarily close to , so that maximal violation of the security bound can be reached. Even with some limited collective attacks, the security bound can still be violated. Therefore, although our protocol still cannot break the bound in principle when Alice has unlimited cheating power, it is sufficient for achieving secure quantum weak oblivious transfer in practice.

  10. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  11. PREDICTING RICE YIELD RESPONSE TO MIDSEASON NITROGEN WITH PLANT AREA MEASURMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method is needed to aid farmers with midseason N decisions in dry-seeded, delayed flood rice (Oryza sativa L.). This study was conducted to develop thresholds using visual and digital image measurements for predicting rice yield response to N topdressing. 'Francis' and 'Cheniere' (cv) ric...

  12. Experimental evaluation of nonclassical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and the unknown target observable. In the present paper, we investigate this relation by performing a sequence of two measurements on the polarization of a photon, so that the first measurement commutes with the target observable and the second measurement is sensitive to a complementary observable. While the initial measurement can be evaluated using classical statistics, the second measurement introduces the effects of quantum correlations between the noncommuting physical properties. By varying the resolution of the initial measurement, we can change the relative contribution of the nonclassical correlations and identify their role in the evaluation of the quantum measurement. It is shown that the most striking deviation from classical expectations is obtained at the transition between weak and strong measurements, where the competition between different statistical effects results in measurement values well outside the range of possible eigenvalues.

  13. A new resonant based measurement method for squeeze mode yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-10-01

    A new approach to measure the field-dependent yield stress of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in squeeze mode using the resonance concept is proposed. The measurement system is designed using the piezolaminated cantilever beam coupled with an electromagnetic coil based MR fluid squeezing setup. The cantilever beam is maintained at resonance using simple closed-loop electronics. The magnetic field produced by the coil changes the viscosity of MR fluids and produces an additional stiffness to the resonating cantilever beam. The shift in resonant frequency due to the change in viscosity of the MR fluid is measured, and the shift in frequency is analytically related to the yield stress. Two types of MR fluids based on sphere and plate iron particles are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed measurement system.

  14. Measuring {alpha} in B(t){yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, M.; Zupan, J.

    2004-10-01

    Defining a most economical parametrization of time-dependent B{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} decays, including a measurable phase {alpha}{sub eff} which equals the weak phase {alpha} in the limit of vanishing penguin amplitudes, we propose two ways for determining {alpha} in this processes. We explain the limitation of one method, assuming only that two relevant tree amplitudes factorize and that their relative strong phase {delta}{sub t} is negligible. The other method, based on broken flavor SU(3), permits a determination of {alpha} in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} in an over constrained system using also rate measurements of B{sup 0,+}{yields}K*{pi} and B{sup 0,+}{yields}{rho}K. Current data are shown to restrict two ratios of penguin and tree amplitudes r{sub {+-}} to a narrow range around 0.2 and to imply an upper bound |{alpha}{sub eff}-{alpha}|<15 deg. . Assuming that {delta}{sub t} is much smaller than 90 deg. , we find {alpha}=(93{+-}16) deg. and (102{+-}20) deg. using BABAR and BELLE results for B(t){yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}. Avoiding this assumption for completeness, we demonstrate the reduction of discrete ambiguities in {alpha} with increased statistics and show that SU(3) breaking effects are effectively second order in r{sub {+-}}.

  15. Direct measurement of the yield stress of filamentous fermentation broths with the rotating vane technique.

    PubMed

    Leong-Poi, L; Allen, D G

    1992-07-01

    The existence of a yield stress in filamentous fermentation broths has important transport phenomena implications in the design and operation of bioreactors. In this study, the constant shear rate vane method was assessed for directly measuring the yield stress of filamentous Aspergillus niger fermentation broths, as well as model fluids (ketchup, yogurt, and pulp suspensions). The method involved rotating 4-, 6-, and 8-bladed vanes (7.2 cm < or = height < or = 15 cm; 4.0 cm < or = dia. < or= 6 cm) at speeds of 0.01 to 0.64 rpm in the fluid and plotting the torque as a function of time. Based on visual observations, the consistency of the results with vane type and speed and comparison with previous work on nonbiological samples, it was concluded that the method is an effective and consistent technique for yield stress measurements on filamentous fermentation broths. Based on comparisons with concentric cylinder viscometer results, it was also concluded that the value determined via the vane method was a "static" yield stress (values of up to 28 Pa) which was much greater than the extrapolated (or "dynamic") yield stress determined via the concentric cylinder viscometer. PMID:18601131

  16. Measurements of fission yields in the heavy region at the recoil ass spectrometer lohengrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Dupont, E.; Michel-Sendis, F.

    2009-10-01

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields in the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. It has been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 241Pu(nth,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239Pu(nth,f) to determine the isotopic yields by γ spectrometry. The results are presented in this paper.

  17. Geometric measure of quantum correlation: The influence of the asymmetry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qinsheng; Ding, Changchun; Wu, Shaoyi; Lai, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The quantum correlation in open quantum systems is of fundamental and practical importance for quantum information processing and controllable nanometer devices. And the properties of quantum correlation can be influenced by the information flow between systems and environments. In this study, we investigated the geometric measure discord of quantum correlation of a two qubits system, interacting with two independent and intrinsic interacting spin-environments, respectively. Based on the asymmetry environments with comparable parameters, the different properties of the geometric measure of entanglement and quantum discord are displayed and discussed for initial Bell states.

  18. Jensen-Shannon divergence as a measure of distinguishability between mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Majtey, A. P.; Lamberti, P. W.; Prato, D. P.

    2005-11-15

    We discuss an alternative to relative entropy as a measure of distance between mixed quantum states. The proposed quantity is an extension to the realm of quantum theory of the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD) between probability distributions. The JSD has several interesting properties. It arises in information theory and, unlike the Kullback-Leibler divergence, it is symmetric, always well-defined, and bounded. We show that the quantum JSD shares with the relative entropy most of the physically relevant properties, in particular those required for a 'good' quantum distinguishability measure. We relate it to other known quantum distances and we suggest possible applications in the field of the quantum information theory.

  19. Linearity of Quantum Probability Measure and Hardy's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Oh, C. H.; Zhang, Chengjie

    2014-01-01

    We re-examine d = 4 hidden-variables model for a system of two spin-1/2 particles in view of the concrete model of Hardy, who analyzed the criterion of entanglement without referring to inequality. The basis of our analysis is the linearity of the probability measure related to the Born probability interpretation, which excludes noncontextual hidden-variables model in d≥3. To be specific, we note the inconsistency of the noncontextual hidden-variables model in d = 4 with the linearity of the quantum mechanical probability measure in the sense <ψ|aṡσ ⊗b ṡσ|ψ>+ <ψ|a ṡσ ⊗b‧ ṡσ|ψ> = <ψ|aṡσ⊗(b + b‧)ṡσ|ψ> for noncollinear b and b‧. It is then shown that Hardy's model in d = 4 does not lead to a unique mathematical expression in the demonstration of the discrepancy of local realism (hidden-variables model) with entanglement and thus his proof is incomplete. We identify the origin of this nonuniqueness with the nonuniqueness of translating quantum mechanical expressions into expressions in hidden-variables model, which results from the failure of the above linearity of the probability measure. In contrast, if the linearity of the probability measure is strictly imposed, which tantamounts to asking that the noncontextual hidden-variables model in d = 4 gives the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality ||≤2 uniquely, it is shown that the hidden-variables model can describe only separable quantum mechanical states; this conclusion is in perfect agreement with the so-called Gisin's theorem which states that ||≤2 implies separable states.

  20. Cooperative effects for measurement: Raman superradiance imaging and quantum states for Heisenberg limited interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann

    Cooperative effects in many-particle systems can be exploited to achieve measurement outcomes not possible with independent probe particles. We explore two measurement applications based on the cooperative phenomenon of superradiance or on correlated quantum states closely related to superradiance. In the first application we study the off-resonant superradiant Raman scattering of light from an ultracold Bose atomic vapor. We investigate the temperature dependence of superradiance for a trapped vapor and show that in the regime where superradiance occurs on a timescale comparable to a trap frequency, scattering takes place preferentially from atoms in the lowest trap levels due to Doppler dephasing. As a consequence, below the critical temperature for Bose condensation, absorption images of transmitted light serve as a direct probe of the condensed state. Subsequently, we consider a pure condensate and study the time-dependent spatial features of transmitted light, obtaining good qualitative agreement with recent imaging experiments. Inclusion of quantum fluctuations in the initial stages of the superradiant emission accounts well for shot-to-shot fluctuations. Secondly, we have used simulated annealing, a global optimization strategy, to systematically search for correlated quantum interferometer input states that approach the Heisenberg limited uncertainty in estimates of the interferometer phase shift. That limit improves over the standard quantum limit to the phase sensitivity of interferometric measurements by a factor of 1/ N , where N is the number of interfering particles. We compare the performance of these states to that of other non-classical states already known to yield Heisenberg limited uncertainty.

  1. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  2. Quantum measurement and the mind-brain connection

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1990-10-17

    It is argued that quantum measurements do pose a problem, within the context created by the fundamental aim of science, which is identified as the construction of a cohesive, comprehensive, and rationally coherent idea of the nature of the world in which we live. Models of nature are divided into two classes: (1), those in which there is a selection process that, for any possible measurement, would, if that measurement were to be performed, pick out one single outcome, and, (2), all others. It is proved that any model of class that reproduces the predictions of quantum theory must violate the condition that there be no faster-than-light influences of any kind. This result is used to motivate the study of models in which unitary evolution is maintained and there is no selection of unique outcomes. A consideration of ontic probabilities, historical records, and the form of the mind-brain connection leads to an elaboration of the Everett many-worlds interpretation that appears to provide the basis of satisfactory solution of the measurement problem. 18 refs.

  3. Bi-photon spectral correlation measurements from a silicon nanowire in the quantum and classical regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jizan, Iman; Helt, L. G.; Xiong, Chunle; Collins, Matthew J.; Choi, Duk-Yong; Joon Chae, Chang; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Clark, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    The growing requirement for photon pairs with specific spectral correlations in quantum optics experiments has created a demand for fast, high resolution and accurate source characterisation. A promising tool for such characterisation uses classical stimulated processes, in which an additional seed laser stimulates photon generation yielding much higher count rates, as recently demonstrated for a χ(2) integrated source in A. Eckstein et al. Laser Photon. Rev. 8, L76 (2014). In this work we extend these results to χ(3) integrated sources, directly measuring for the first time the relation between spectral correlation measurements via stimulated and spontaneous four wave mixing in an integrated optical waveguide, a silicon nanowire. We directly confirm the speed-up due to higher count rates and demonstrate that this allows additional resolution to be gained when compared to traditional coincidence measurements without any increase in measurement time. As the pump pulse duration can influence the degree of spectral correlation, all of our measurements are taken for two different pump pulse widths. This allows us to confirm that the classical stimulated process correctly captures the degree of spectral correlation regardless of pump pulse duration, and cements its place as an essential characterisation method for the development of future quantum integrated devices. PMID:26218609

  4. Ion traps, quantum computing, and the measurement problem^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a useful information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high- fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. NIST and other groups are addressing this scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly- parallel processing. As the number of qubits increases, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics becomes more glaring; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on this fundamental issue. Recent NIST work in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, J. Chiaverini, R. E. Drullinger, R. Epstein, D. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, J. Koelemeij, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, R. Reichle, T. Rosenband, P. O. Schmidt, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. Wesenberg, and supported by DTO, ONR, and NIST.

  5. Measurement of the Helicity Difference in {gamma}{sup {yields}p{yields}{yields}p{pi}+{pi}-} with the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungkyun

    2010-08-05

    The study of the properties of baryon resonances can provide us with hints to help us understand the structure of non-perturbative QCD and the effect of a particular resonance on polarization observables. The investigation of double-pion photoproduction data is needed to discover higher-lying states and their properties at and above W {approx_equal} 1.8 GeV. Therefore, the analysis of the helicity difference in gp {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will help us in our understanding of QCD.The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory, has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly and circularly polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. The FROST experiment provides an important step toward a ''complete'' experiment for the reaction {gamma}N{yields}KY.In this contribution, the method to calculate the helicity difference for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will be described and preliminary results will be discussed.

  6. Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst

    SciTech Connect

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel E-mail: atarisal@gmail.com; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Mayer, Roberto E.

    2014-01-15

    This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

  7. Implementation of generalized quantum measurements for unambiguous discrimination of multiple non-orthogonal coherent states.

    PubMed

    Becerra, F E; Fan, J; Migdall, A

    2013-01-01

    Generalized quantum measurements implemented to allow for measurement outcomes termed inconclusive can perform perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states, a task which is impossible using only measurements with definitive outcomes. Here we demonstrate such generalized quantum measurements for unambiguous discrimination of four non-orthogonal coherent states and obtain their quantum mechanical description, the positive-operator valued measure. For practical realizations of this positive-operator valued measure, where noise and realistic imperfections prevent perfect unambiguous discrimination, we show that our experimental implementation outperforms any ideal standard-quantum-limited measurement performing the same non-ideal unambiguous state discrimination task for coherent states with low mean photon numbers. PMID:23774177

  8. A Novel Method For Predicting Carbon Monoxide Apparent Quantum Yield Spectra in Coastal Water Using Remote Sensing Reflectance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, H. E.; Miller, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Photochemical oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the major source of carbon monoxide to the surface ocean. Bacterial consumption and air-sea exchange comprise the two known sinks for CO in marine systems. Though the two loss terms are relatively efficient, CO remains supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in the surface ocean. Global oceanic estimates of CO photoproduction range from 30-84Tg CO/year (Zafiriou 2003, Fichot and Miller 2010). The variation in estimates is largely due to the difficulty in predicting the efficiency of photoproduction (i.e. Apparent Quantum Yield; AQY). Though the AQY for CO photoproduction appears to be relatively constant, there is indication that terrestrially derived sources, such as those found in estuarine environments, produce CO more efficiently than marine derived sources (Ziolkowski 2000). Since variation among sources is likely in the global ocean, accurate assignment of AQY to variable water types is required to accurately predict CO photoproduction. Deriving the correct apparent quantum yield from remotely sensed data would lead to better predictions of large scale CO photoproduction from optical data. Thirty-eight (38) AQY spectra for CO photoproduction were determined by monthly sampling during spring tides in three dark water locations on the coast of Georgia, USA, from November 2008 to September 2009. Sapelo Sound, a marine dominated system, receives little to no freshwater input over the year, while Altamaha Sound drains the largest watershed in the state of Georgia, and has largely variably freshwater input. Doboy Sound, situated between Sapelo Sound and Altamaha Sound, is largely marine dominated, though in periods of high flow on the Altamaha River, receives some fresh water overflow. The coast of Georgia is dominated by Spartina alterniflora salt marshes, and thus also has a strong non-point source of terrestrially derived carbon. CO apparent quantum yields were determined by

  9. Upper bounds on quantum uncertainty products and complexity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Ángel; Sánchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesús S.

    2011-10-01

    The position-momentum Shannon and Rényi uncertainty products of general quantum systems are shown to be bounded not only from below (through the known uncertainty relations), but also from above in terms of the Heisenberg-Kennard product . Moreover, the Cramér-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and López-Ruiz, Mancini, and Calbet shape measures of complexity (whose lower bounds have been recently found) are also bounded from above. The improvement of these bounds for systems subject to spherically symmetric potentials is also explicitly given. Finally, applications to hydrogenic and oscillator-like systems are done.

  10. Upper bounds on quantum uncertainty products and complexity measures

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Angel; Sanchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesus S.

    2011-10-15

    The position-momentum Shannon and Renyi uncertainty products of general quantum systems are shown to be bounded not only from below (through the known uncertainty relations), but also from above in terms of the Heisenberg-Kennard product . Moreover, the Cramer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and Lopez-Ruiz, Mancini, and Calbet shape measures of complexity (whose lower bounds have been recently found) are also bounded from above. The improvement of these bounds for systems subject to spherically symmetric potentials is also explicitly given. Finally, applications to hydrogenic and oscillator-like systems are done.

  11. Minimal length in quantum gravity and gravitational measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag Ali, Ahmed; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-10-01

    The existence of a minimal length is a common prediction of various theories of quantum gravity. This minimal length leads to a modification of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle to a Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP). Various studies showed that a GUP modifies the Hawking radiation of black holes. In this paper, we propose a modification of the Schwarzschild metric based on the modified Hawking temperature derived from the GUP. Based on this modified metric, we calculate corrections to the deflection of light, time delay of light, perihelion precession, and gravitational redshift. We compare our results with gravitational measurements to set an upper bound on the GUP parameter.

  12. Optimal Control of Quantum Measurement for Superconducting Phase Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank; Egger, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution towards a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of non-controllable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the GRAPE algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a non-unitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to large measurement contrast close to 99%. We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 ns pulses with 98.2% contrast. Work posted at arXiv:1408.6086, in press at Physical Review A Supported by the EU through SCALEQIT.

  13. Detecting Large Quantum Fisher Information with Finite Measurement Precision.

    PubMed

    Fröwis, Florian; Sekatski, Pavel; Dür, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We propose an experimentally accessible scheme to determine the lower bounds on the quantum Fisher information (QFI), which ascertains multipartite entanglement or usefulness for quantum metrology. The scheme is based on comparing the measurement statistics of a state before and after a small unitary rotation. We argue that, in general, the limited resolution of collective observables prevents the detection of large QFI. This can be overcome by performing an additional operation prior to the measurement. We illustrate the power of this protocol for present-day spin-squeezing experiments, where the same operation used for the preparation of the initial spin-squeezed state improves also the measurement precision and hence the lower bound on the QFI by 2 orders of magnitude. We also establish a connection to the Leggett-Garg inequalities. We show how to simulate a variant of the inequalities with our protocol and demonstrate that large QFI is necessary for their violation with coarse-grained detectors. PMID:26991166

  14. Quantum wave packet study of nonadiabatic effects in O({sup 1}D) + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.; Petrongolo, C.; Drukker, K.; Schatz, G.C.

    1999-11-25

    The authors develop a wave packet approach to treating the electronically nonadiabatic reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H, allowing for the 1{sup 1}A{prime} and 2{sup 1}A{prime} potential energy surfaces and couplings, as well as the three internal nuclear coordinates. Two different systems of coupled potential energy surfaces are considered, a semiempirical diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) system due to Kuntz, Niefer, and Sloan, and a recently developed ab initio system due to Dobbyn and Knowles (DK). Nonadiabatic quantum results, with total angular momentum J = 0, are obtained and discussed. Several single surface calculations are carried out for comparison with the nonadiabatic results. Comparisons with trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations, and with approximate quantum calculations, are also included. The electrostatic coupling produces strong interactions between the 1{sup 1}A{prime} and 2{sup 1}A{prime} states at short range (where these states have a conical intersection) and weak but, interestingly, nonnegligible interactions between these states at longer range. The wave packet results show that if the initial state is chosen to be effectively the 1A{prime} state (for which insertion to form products occurs on the adiabatic surface), then there is very little difference between the adiabatic and coupled surface results. In either case the reaction probability is a relatively flat function of energy, except for resonant oscillations. However, the 2A{prime} reaction, dynamics (which involves a collinear transition state) is strongly perturbed by nonadiabatic effects in two distinct ways. At energies above the transition state barrier, the diabatic limit is dominant, and the 2A{prime} reaction probability is similar to that for 1A{double{underscore}prime}, which has no coupling with the other surfaces. At energies below the barrier, the authors find a significant component of the reaction probability from long range electronic

  15. Synthesis and formation mechanistic investigation of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with high quantum yields and yellowish-green fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Juan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Tianyu; Wang, Bo; Li, Huiyu; Ding, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A possible formation mechanism has thus been proposed including dehydration, polymerization and carbonization. Furthermore, the N-CDs could serve as a facile and label-free probe for the detection of iron and fluorine ions with detection limits of 50 nmol L-1 and 75 nmol L-1, respectively.Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A

  16. Quantum Computation and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2010-12-01

    Part I. Fundamental Concepts: 1. Introduction and overview; 2. Introduction to quantum mechanics; 3. Introduction to computer science; Part II. Quantum Computation: 4. Quantum circuits; 5. The quantum Fourier transform and its application; 6. Quantum search algorithms; 7. Quantum computers: physical realization; Part III. Quantum Information: 8. Quantum noise and quantum operations; 9. Distance measures for quantum information; 10. Quantum error-correction; 11. Entropy and information; 12. Quantum information theory; Appendices; References; Index.

  17. Quantum Algorithm for Universal Implementation of the Projective Measurement of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Shojun; Soeda, Akihito; Murao, Mio

    2015-05-01

    A projective measurement of energy (PME) on a quantum system is a quantum measurement determined by the Hamiltonian of the system. PME protocols exist when the Hamiltonian is given in advance. Unknown Hamiltonians can be identified by quantum tomography, but the time cost to achieve a given accuracy increases exponentially with the size of the quantum system. In this Letter, we improve the time cost by adapting quantum phase estimation, an algorithm designed for computational problems, to measurements on physical systems. We present a PME protocol without quantum tomography for Hamiltonians whose dimension and energy scale are given but which are otherwise unknown. Our protocol implements a PME to arbitrary accuracy without any dimension dependence on its time cost. We also show that another computational quantum algorithm may be used for efficient estimation of the energy scale. These algorithms show that computational quantum algorithms, with suitable modifications, have applications beyond their original context.

  18. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Cooper, G. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Knittel, K. M.; Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ˜20-200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM), 25-50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n') reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n) reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  19. Measurement and Information Extraction in Complex Dynamics Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Montangero, Simone

    Quantum Information processing has several di.erent applications: some of them can be performed controlling only few qubits simultaneously (e.g. quantum teleportation or quantum cryptography) [1]. Usually, the transmission of large amount of information is performed repeating several times the scheme implemented for few qubits. However, to exploit the advantages of quantum computation, the simultaneous control of many qubits is unavoidable [2]. This situation increases the experimental di.culties of quantum computing: maintaining quantum coherence in a large quantum system is a di.cult task. Indeed a quantum computer is a many-body complex system and decoherence, due to the interaction with the external world, will eventually corrupt any quantum computation. Moreover, internal static imperfections can lead to quantum chaos in the quantum register thus destroying computer operability [3]. Indeed, as it has been shown in [4], a critical imperfection strength exists above which the quantum register thermalizes and quantum computation becomes impossible. We showed such e.ects on a quantum computer performing an e.cient algorithm to simulate complex quantum dynamics [5,6].

  20. Experimental Concept for a Precision Measurement of Nuclear Recoil Ionization Yields for Low Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the response of dark matter detectors at the lowest recoil energies is important for correctly interpreting data from current experiments or predicting the sensitivity of future experiments to low mass weakly interacting massive particles. In particular, the ionization yield is essential for determining the correct recoil energy of candidate nuclear recoil events; however, few measurements in cryogenic crystals exist below 1 keV. Using the voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection technique with a mono-energetic neutron source, we show that it is possible to determine the ionization yield in cryogenic crystals down to an energy to 100 eV. This measurement will also determine the statistics of ionization production at these low energies.