Science.gov

Sample records for quark delocalization colour

  1. Quantifying solvated electrons' delocalization.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2015-07-28

    Delocalized, solvated electrons are a topic of much recent interest. We apply the electron delocalization range EDR(r;u) (J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 144104) to quantify the extent to which a solvated electron at point r in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance u. Calculations on electrons in one-dimensional model cavities illustrate fundamental properties of the EDR. Mean-field calculations on hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-) show that the density-matrix-based EDR reproduces existing molecular-orbital-based measures of delocalization. Correlated calculations on hydrated electrons and electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters illustrates how electron correlation tends to move surface- and cavity-bound electrons onto the cluster or cavity surface. Applications to multiple solvated electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters provide a novel perspective on the interplay of delocalization and strong correlation central to lithium-ammonia solutions' concentration-dependent insulator-to-metal transition. The results motivate continued application of the EDR to simulations of delocalized electrons. PMID:25994586

  2. How far do electrons delocalize?

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2014-10-14

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function EDR (r⃗;u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point r⃗ in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, EDR (r⃗;u=0.25 bohr ) is close to one at points r⃗ in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ~0.25 bohr. EDR (r⃗;u=1 bohr ) is close to one at points r⃗ in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation. PMID:25318712

  3. How far do electrons delocalize?

    SciTech Connect

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-10-14

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function EDR(r{sup -vector};u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point r{sup -vector} in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, EDR(r{sup -vector};u=0.25 bohr) is close to one at points r{sup -vector} in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ∼0.25 bohr. EDR(r{sup -vector};u=1 bohr) is close to one at points r{sup -vector} in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation.

  4. How far do electrons delocalize?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Electron delocalization is central to chemical bonding, but it is also a fundamentally nonclassical and nonintuitive quantum mechanical phenomenon. Tools to quantify and visualize electron delocalization help to understand, teach, and predict chemical reactivity. We develop a new approach to quantify and visualize electron delocalization in real space. Our electron delocalization range function {EDR}({r};u) quantifies the degree to which electrons at point {r} in a calculated wavefunction delocalize over length scale u. Its predictions are physically reasonable. For example, {EDR}({r};u=0.25 {bohr}) is close to one at points {r} in the cores of first-row atoms, consistent with the localization of core electrons to ˜0.25 bohr. {EDR}({r};u=1 {bohr}) is close to one at points {r} in typical covalent bonds, consistent with electrons delocalizing over the length of the bond. Our approach provides a rich representation of atomic shell structure; covalent and ionic bonding; the delocalization of excited states, defects, and solvated electrons; metallic and insulating systems; and bond stretching and strong correlation.

  5. Quantifying Electron Delocalization in Electrides.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2016-01-12

    Electrides are ionic solids whose anions are electrons confined to crystal voids. We show that our electron delocalization range function EDR(r;d), which quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r in a calculated wave function delocalizes over distance d, provides useful insights into electrides. The EDR quantifies the characteristic delocalization length of electride electrons and provides a chemically intuitive real-space picture of the electrons' distribution. It also gives a potential diagnostic for whether a given formula unit will form a solid electride at ambient pressure, quantifies the effects of electron-electron correlation on confined electrons' interactions, and highlights analogies between covalent bonding and the interaction of interstitial quasi-atoms in high-pressure electrides. These results motivate adding the EDR to the toolbox of theoretical methods applied to electrides. PMID:26652208

  6. Coloured plastinates.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2006-03-01

    To obtain coloured plastinates by colouring anatomical structures in e.g. red, blue and yellow we used different types of chemical reagents. The colours remained stable during dehydration, degreasing and impregnation of specimen with silicone resin. The colours, which penetrated into the specimen, appeared to be included in the plastination process. To prove their stability, the coloured plastinates were exposed to light and heat for more than 5 years. A permanent colouration remained. The coloured plastinates are dry and flexible, odourless and robust. They are instructive and can be used in tutorials, examinations and seminars. PMID:16551016

  7. Applying colour science in colour design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming Ronnier

    2006-06-01

    Although colour science has been widely used in a variety of industries over the years, it has not been fully explored in the field of product design. This paper will initially introduce the three main application fields of colour science: colour specification, colour-difference evaluation and colour appearance modelling. By integrating these advanced colour technologies together with modern colour imaging devices such as display, camera, scanner and printer, some computer systems have been recently developed to assist designers for designing colour palettes through colour selection by means of a number of widely used colour order systems, for creating harmonised colour schemes via a categorical colour system, for generating emotion colours using various colour emotional scales and for facilitating colour naming via a colour-name library. All systems are also capable of providing accurate colour representation on displays and output to different imaging devices such as printers.

  8. Topological analysis of the electron delocalization range.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G

    2016-08-01

    The electron delocalization range function EDR( r→;d) (Janesko et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 144104) quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r→ in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance d. This work shows how topological analysis distills chemically useful information out of the EDR. Local maxima (attractors) in the EDR occur in regions such as atomic cores, covalent bonds, and lone pairs where the wavefunction is dominated by a single orbital lobe. The EDR characterizes each attractor in terms of a delocalization length D and a normalization N≤1, which are qualitatively consistent with the size of the orbital lobe and the number of lobes in the orbital. Attractors identify the progressively more delocalized atomic shells in heavy atoms, the interplay of delocalization and strong (nondynamical) correlation in stretched and dissociating covalent bonds, the locations of valence and weakly bound electrons in anionic water clusters, and the chemistry of different reactive sites on metal clusters. Application to ammonia dissociation over silicon illustrates how this density-matrix-based analysis can give insight into realistic systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296767

  9. Ideal fermion delocalization in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-07-01

    In this note we examine the properties of deconstructed Higgsless models for the case of a fermion whose SU(2) properties arise from delocalization over many sites of the deconstructed lattice. We derive expressions for the correlation functions and use these to establish a generalized consistency relation among correlation functions. We discuss the form of the W boson wavefunction and show that if the probability distribution of the delocalized fermions is appropriately related to the W wavefunction, then deviations in precision electroweak parameters are minimized. In particular, we show that this ''ideal fermion delocalization'' results in the vanishing of three of the four leading zero-momentum electroweak parameters defined by Barbieri et al. We then discuss ideal fermion delocalization in the context of two continuum Higgsless models, one in Anti-deSitter space and one in flat space. Our results may be applied to any Higgsless linear moose model with multiple SU(2) groups, including those with only a few extra vector bosons.

  10. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  11. Ideal fermion delocalization in Higgsless models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-07-01

    In this note we examine the properties of deconstructed Higgsless models for the case of a fermion whose SU(2) properties arise from delocalization over many sites of the deconstructed lattice. We derive expressions for the correlation functions and use these to establish a generalized consistency relation among correlation functions. We discuss the form of the W boson wavefunction and show that if the probability distribution of the delocalized fermions is appropriately related to the W wavefunction, then deviations in precision electroweak parameters are minimized. In particular, we show that this “ideal fermion delocalization” results in the vanishing of three of the four leading zero-momentum electroweak parameters defined by Barbieri et al. We then discuss ideal fermion delocalization in the context of two continuum Higgsless models, one in Anti-deSitter space and one in flat space. Our results may be applied to any Higgsless linear moose model with multiple SU(2) groups, including those with only a few extra vector bosons.

  12. Modelling memory colour region for preference colour reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huanzhao; Luo, Ronnier

    2010-01-01

    Colour preference adjustment is an essential step for colour image enhancement and perceptual gamut mapping. In colour reproduction for pictorial images, properly shifting colours away from their colorimetric originals may produce more preferred colour reproduction result. Memory colours, as a portion of the colour regions for colour preference adjustment, are especially important for preference colour reproduction. Identifying memory colours or modelling the memory colour region is a basic step to study preferred memory colour enhancement. In this study, we first created gamut for each memory colour region represented as a convex hull, and then used the convex hull to guide mathematical modelling to formulate the colour region for colour enhancement.

  13. Colour association and "colour amnesia" in aphasia.

    PubMed Central

    Varney, N R

    1982-01-01

    "Colour association" performance of 50 aphasic patients was investigated by means of a test in which they identified the characteristic colours of objects shown in line drawings. All aphasics with defects in colour association were impaired in reading comprehension. However, some (33%) retained normal aural comprehension. Approximately half the aphasics with receptive language impairment performed normally in colour association. The findings suggest that "colour amnesia" may be the result of a specific cognitive disturbance which is also responsible for a subtype of aphasic alexia. PMID:7086445

  14. Synaesthesia and colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Holly; Mattingley, Jason B; Arnold, Derek H

    2013-04-01

    Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by the perception of colours when reading achromatic text. We investigated the level of colour processing responsible for these experiences. To do so, we tapped a central characteristic of colour perception. In different lighting conditions the same wavelength of light can prompt the perception of different colours. This helps humans recognize distinctive coloured objects despite changes in illumination. We wanted to see if synaesthetic colours were generated at a neural locus that was susceptible to colour constancy analyses. We used colour matching and naming tasks to examine interactions between simulated coloured illuminants and synaesthetic colours. Neither synaesthetic colour matching or naming was impacted. This contrasted with non-synaesthetic control participants, who performed the colour-matching task with graphemes physically coloured to mimic synaesthesia. Our data suggest that synaesthetic colour signals are not generated at lower-levels of colour processing, but are introduced at higher levels of analysis and are therefore not impacted by the processes responsible for perceptual constancy. PMID:22487049

  15. Colour Perception in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Ruppert, Sinje; Tannock, Rosemary; Albrecht, Bjorn; Becker, Andreas; Uebel, Henrik; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2006-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with unexplained impairments on speeded naming of coloured stimuli. These deficits may reflect hypofunctioning retinal dopaminergic mechanisms impairing particularly blue-yellow colour discrimination. Colour perception and rapid colour naming ability were investigated in 14 children…

  16. Does chaos assist localization or delocalization?

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jintao; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua; Lu, Gengbiao

    2014-12-01

    We aim at a long-standing contradiction between chaos-assisted tunneling and chaos-related localization study quantum transport of a single particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice. We find some near-resonant regions crossing chaotic and regular regions in the parameter space, and demonstrate that chaos can heighten velocity of delocalization in the chaos-resonance overlapping regions, while chaos may aid localization in the other chaotic regions. The degree of localization enhances with increasing the distance between parameter points and near-resonant regions. The results could be useful for experimentally manipulating chaos-assisted transport of single particles in optical or solid-state lattices.

  17. Rethinking Colour Constancy

    PubMed Central

    Logvinenko, Alexander D.; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching’s effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions—metamer mismatching and colour constancy—must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy’s false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object. PMID:26356217

  18. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object. PMID:26356217

  19. Glimpsing Colour in a World of Black and White

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Pennington

    2012-09-01

    The past 40 years have taught us that nucleons are built of constituents that carry colour charges with interactions governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). How experiments (past, present and future) at Jefferson Lab probe colourless nuclei to map out these internal colour degrees of freedom is presented. When combined with theoretical calculations, these will paint a picture of how the confinement of quarks and gluons, and the structure of the QCD vacuum, determine the properties of all (light) strongly interacting states.

  20. Does Colour Preference Have a Role in Colour Term Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitchford, Nicola J.; Davis, Emma E.; Scerif, Gaia

    2009-01-01

    A developmental association exists between colour preference and emerging colour term acquisition in young children. Colour preference might influence colour term acquisition by directing attention towards or away from a particular colour, making it more or less memorable. To investigate the role that colour preference may have in the acquisition…

  1. Delocalization and new phase in Americium: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    1999-04-23

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the high pressure behavior of Am. At about 80 kbar (8 GPa) calculations reveal a monoclinic phase similar to the ground state structure of plutonium ({alpha}-Pu). The experimentally suggested {alpha}-U structure is found to be substantially higher in energy. The phase transition from fcc to the low symmetry structure is shown to originate from a drastic change in the nature of the electronic structure induced by the elevated pressure. A calculated volume collapse of about 25% is associated with the transition. For the low density phase, an orbital polarization correction to the local spin density (LSD) theory was applied. Gradient terms of the electron density were included in the calculation of the exchange/correlation energy and potential, according to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The results are consistent with a Mott transition; the 5f electrons are delocalized and bonding on the high density side of the transition and chemically inert and non-bonding (localized) on the other. Theory compares rather well with recent experimental data which implies that electron correlation effects are reasonably modeled in our orbital polarization scheme.

  2. Electron Delocalization Range in Atoms and on Molecular Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Wiberg, Kenneth B; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2016-07-12

    The electron delocalization range function EDR(r⃗; d) (J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 144104) quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r⃗ in a calculated wave function delocalizes over distance d. This work illustrates how atomic averages of the EDR, and plots of the EDR on molecule surfaces, provide a chemically intuitive picture of the sizes of occupied orbital lobes in different regions. We show how the surface and atomic delocalization distinguish aminophosphine ligand's hard N and soft P lone pairs, distinguish the site preference for Ag(+) cation binding to conjugated oligomers, and provide information that is different from and complementary to conjugation lengths. Applications to strong correlation and the prototropic tautomerization of phosphinylidenes R1R2HPO illustrates how the surface and atomic delocalization can work with other tools to provide a nuanced picture of reactivity. PMID:27284687

  3. Is colour cognitive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupski, Peter; Chittka, Lars

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, colour-vision abilities have been rather generously ascribed to various invertebrates and even bacteria. This uncertainty of when to diagnose colour vision stems in part from confusing what colour vision can do with what it is. What colour vision can do is discriminate wavelength independent of intensity. However, if we take this as a definition of what colour vision is, then we might be obliged to conclude that some plants and bacteria have colour vision. Moreover, there is a similar confusion of what are necessary and what are sufficient mechanisms and behavioural abilities for colour vision. To humans, seeing in colour means seeing an image in which objects/lights have chromatic attributes—in contrast to the sensation that we have when viewing monochrome movies, or our experience in dim light when only rod vision is possible. The necessary basic equipment for this is to have at least two types of photoreceptors that differ in spectral sensitivity, and at least one type of spectrally opponent cell to compare the signals from the photoreceptors. Clearly, however, a necessary additional prerequisite for colour vision is to have vision, which entails the identification of shapes, sizes and locations of objects in the world. Thus, if an animal has colour vision, it should see an image in which distinct objects/lights have colour attributes. This distinguishes colour vision from wavelength discrimination, but also from what has historically been called wavelength-specific behaviour: a type of behaviour triggered by fixed configurations of spectral receptor signals; however, we discuss difficulties in diagnosing wavelength-specific behaviour as an indicator of the absence of colour vision. Finally, we discuss whether colour vision, by definition, contains a cognitive dimension for ordering and classifying perceptual experience.

  4. Paramagnetism in colour superconductivity and compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    2007-06-01

    It is quite plausible that colour superconductivity occurs in the inner regions of neutron stars. At the same time, it is known that strong magnetic fields exist in the interior of these compact objects. In this paper we discuss some important effects that can occur in the colour superconducting core of compact stars due to the presence of the stars' magnetic field. In particular, we consider the modification of the gluon dynamics for a colour superconductor with three massless quark flavours in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that the long-range component of the external magnetic field that penetrates the colour-flavour locked phase produces an instability for field values larger than the charged gluons' Meissner mass. As a consequence, the ground state is restructured forming a vortex state characterized by the condensation of charged gluons and the creation of magnetic flux tubes. In the vortex state the magnetic field outside the flux tubes is equal to the applied one, while inside the tubes its strength increases by an amount that depends on the amplitude of the gluon condensate. This paramagnetic behaviour of the colour superconductor can be relevant for the physics of compact stars.

  5. Stabilization of a Strained Heteroradialene by Peripheral Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Mehr, S Hessam M; Patrick, Brian O; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2016-04-15

    Dimethylamine and 2,4,6-triformylphloroglucinol react to form a product with a highly contorted nonplanar geometry due to favorable electron delocalization. This new heteroradialene compound has been studied by X-ray diffraction, variable-temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations. Electron delocalization throughout the periphery of the central ring leads to a structure that retains very little of the aromatic characteristics of the starting material. PMID:27031736

  6. Colour constancy in insects.

    PubMed

    Chittka, Lars; Faruq, Samia; Skorupski, Peter; Werner, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Colour constancy is the perceptual phenomenon that the colour of an object appears largely unchanged, even if the spectral composition of the illuminating light changes. Colour constancy has been found in all insect species so far tested. Especially the pollinating insects offer a remarkable opportunity to study the ecological significance of colour constancy since they spend much of their adult lives identifying and choosing between colour targets (flowers) under continuously changing ambient lighting conditions. In bees, whose colour vision is best studied among the insects, the compensation provided by colour constancy is only partial and its efficiency depends on the area of colour space. There is no evidence for complete 'discounting' of the illuminant in bees, and the spectral composition of the light can itself be used as adaptive information. In patchy illumination, bees adjust their spatial foraging to minimise transitions between variously illuminated zones. Modelling allows the quantification of the adaptive benefits of various colour constancy mechanisms in the economy of nature. We also discuss the neural mechanisms and cognitive operations that might underpin colour constancy in insects. PMID:24647930

  7. The colour preference control based on two-colour combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ji Young; Kwak, Youngshin; Park, Du-Sik; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2008-02-01

    This paper proposes a framework of colour preference control to satisfy the consumer's colour related emotion. A colour harmony algorithm based on two-colour combinations is developed for displaying the images with several complementary colour pairs as the relationship of two-colour combination. The colours of pixels belonging to complementary colour areas in HSV colour space are shifted toward the target hue colours and there is no colour change for the other pixels. According to the developed technique, dynamic emotions by the proposed hue conversion can be improved and the controlled output image shows improved colour emotions in the preference of the human viewer. The psychophysical experiments are conducted to investigate the optimal model parameters to produce the most pleasant image to the users in the respect of colour emotions.

  8. Delocalization in weakly coupled disordered wires: application to conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Martens, H C F

    2006-02-24

    It is well known that even for minimal disorder one-dimensional wires are insulators: all 1D electron states are localized. Here, the influence of interwire coupling on delocalization of 1D states is examined. Based on perturbation theoretic arguments for the formation of 3D states in coupled wires and subsequent scaling analysis, practical expressions for the microscopic conditions of electronic delocalization and coherent conductivity of coupled 1D wires are obtained. The model quantitatively explains the temperature dependent dc conductivity in conducting polymers at both sides of the metal-insulator transition and links the experimental data to microscopic material parameters. PMID:16606118

  9. Breaking the symmetry for enhanced higher-order mode delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzki, Fabian; Jansen, Florian; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Large-pitch fibers (LPFs) have enabled the current records for average power, pulse energy and pulse peak power in ultra-fast fiber laser systems. In this paper the working principle of LPFs, which is based on higher-order mode delocalization, is numerically analyzed paying special attention to thermal effects and index mismatch. An enhanced design concept is proposed with a reduced symmetry to improve the delocalization of higher-order modes. This enhanced design has been obtained by transferring the most important characteristics of spiral geometries to a common hexagonal lattice.

  10. Disorder-enhanced exciton delocalization in an extended dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    The exciton dynamics in a disordered extended dendrimer is investigated numerically. Because a homogeneous dendrimer exhibits few highly degenerate energy levels, a dynamical localization arises when the exciton is initially located on the periphery. However, it is shown that the disorder lifts the degeneracy and favors a delocalization-relocalization transition. Weak disorder enhances the delocalized nature of the exciton and improves any quantum communication, whereas strong disorder prevents the exciton from propagating in accordance with the well-known Anderson theory. PMID:25215792

  11. Electron delocalization index based on bond order orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanik, Dariusz W.; Żak, Emil; Dyduch, Karol; Mrozek, Janusz

    2014-02-01

    A new index of electron delocalization in atomic rings is introduced and briefly discussed. The newly proposed delocalization descriptor is defined as an atom averaged measure of the effectiveness of forming linear combinations from two-center bond-order orbitals for a given sequence of bonded atomic triplets, and corresponds directly to electron population analysis; it allows one to get very compact and intuitive description of π-conjugation effects without additional parametrization and calibration to the reference molecular systems. The numerical results of illustrative calculations for several typical aromatic and homoaromatic compounds seem to validate the presented methodology and definitions.

  12. Effects of memory colour on colour constancy for unknown coloured objects

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, Jeroen J M; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2012-01-01

    The perception of an object's colour remains constant despite large variations in the chromaticity of the illumination—colour constancy. Hering suggested that memory colours, the typical colours of objects, could help in estimating the illuminant's colour and therefore be an important factor in establishing colour constancy. Here we test whether the presence of objects with diagnostical colours (fruits, vegetables, etc) within a scene influence colour constancy for unknown coloured objects in the scene. Subjects matched one of four Munsell papers placed in a scene illuminated under either a reddish or a greenish lamp with the Munsell book of colour illuminated by a neutral lamp. The Munsell papers were embedded in four different scenes—one scene containing diagnostically coloured objects, one scene containing incongruent coloured objects, a third scene with geometrical objects of the same colour as the diagnostically coloured objects, and one scene containing non-diagnostically coloured objects (eg, a yellow coffee mug). All objects were placed against a black background. Colour constancy was on average significantly higher for the scene containing the diagnostically coloured objects compared with the other scenes tested. We conclude that the colours of familiar objects help in obtaining colour constancy for unknown objects. PMID:23145282

  13. Unconventional colour vision.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Justin; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2014-12-15

    Butterflies and stomatopods are certainly outliers in their unconventional colour sense and despite some similarities at first glance, in fact sample the world of colour very differently. In one way, butterflies are relatively conventional, possessing either tri-or tetrachromatic colour vision, then just adding one or several task-specific sub-mechanisms onto this. It is the stomatopods so far that have really pushed the boat out into a different colour vision mechanism. Over 400 million years of independent evolution they have arrived at a solution with more in common with the way a satellite sensor examines the colours of the earth than other animals. Remember, however, that unconventional colour vision is not just the realm of the serially polychromatic. Apparently waterfleas with four classes of spectral receptors living in ponds operate a task-specific spectral sense with no need, or indeed neural processing power, to construct a complex discriminatory mechanism. It seems they have the butterfly added-extra set without the more complex comparative chromatic mechanisms, although in truth, conclusive behavioural proof is lacking. Behavioural observation of colour vision in the ecological context of each animal is vital before making the distinction between conventional and unconventional. Just counting spectral sensitivities is never enough. PMID:25514002

  14. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians. PMID:23664831

  15. Object knowledge modulates colour appearance

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Christoph; Valkova, Hanna; Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the memory colour effect for colour diagnostic artificial objects. Since knowledge about these objects and their colours has been learned in everyday life, these stimuli allow the investigation of the influence of acquired object knowledge on colour appearance. These investigations are relevant for questions about how object and colour information in high-level vision interact as well as for research about the influence of learning and experience on perception in general. In order to identify suitable artificial objects, we developed a reaction time paradigm that measures (subjective) colour diagnosticity. In the main experiment, participants adjusted sixteen such objects to their typical colour as well as to grey. If the achromatic object appears in its typical colour, then participants should adjust it to the opponent colour in order to subjectively perceive it as grey. We found that knowledge about the typical colour influences the colour appearance of artificial objects. This effect was particularly strong along the daylight axis. PMID:23145224

  16. Colour Mixing Based on Daylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Colour science is based on the sensation of monochromatic light. In contrast to that, surface colours are caused by reflection of wide sections of the daylight spectrum. Non-spectral colours like magenta and purple appear homologous to colours with spectral hue, if the approach of mixing monochromatic light is abandoned. It is shown that a large…

  17. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  18. Ultrasonic colour flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Wells, P N

    1994-12-01

    Real-time ultrasonic colour flow imaging, which was first demonstrated to be feasible only about a decade ago, has come into widespread clinical use. Ultrasound is scattered by ensembles of red blood cells. The ultrasonic frequency that gives the best signal-to-noise ratio for backscattering from blood depends on the required penetration. The frequency of ultrasound backscattered from flowing blood is shifted by the Doppler effect. The direction of flow can be determined by phase quadrature detection, and range selectivity can be provided by pulse-echo time-delay measurements. The Doppler frequency spectrum can be determined by Fourier analysis. Early two- and three-dimensional flow-imaging systems used slow manual scanning; velocity colour coding was introduced. Real-time colour flow imaging first became feasible when autocorrelation detection was used to extract the Doppler signal. Time-domain processing, which is a broad-band technique, was also soon shown to be practicable, for analysing both radio-frequency pulse-echo wavetrains and two-dimensional image speckle. Frequency- and time-domain processing both require effective cancellation of stationary echoes. The time-domain approach seems to have advantages in relation to both aliasing and the effects of attenuation in overlying tissues. Colour-coding schemes that can be interpreted without the need to refer to keys have been adopted, for both velocity and flow disturbance. Colour coding according to signal power has also been reintroduced. Three-dimensional display has been demonstrated. In interpreting colour flow images, it is important to understand the functions of critical system controls and the origins of artifacts. Various strategies can be adopted to increase the image frame rate. The problems of performance measurement and safety need to be kept under review. There are numerous opportunities for further development of ultrasonic colour flow imaging, including improvements in system design, methods of

  19. Localization-delocalization wavepacket transition in Pythagorean aperiodic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Changming; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a composite optical lattice created by two mutually rotated square patterns and allowing observation of continuous transformation between incommensurate and completely periodic structures upon variation of the rotation angle θ. Such lattices acquire periodicity only for rotation angles cos θ = a/c, sin θ = b/c, set by Pythagorean triples of natural numbers (a, b, c). While linear eigenmodes supported by lattices associated with Pythagorean triples are always extended, composite patterns generated for intermediate rotation angles allow observation of the localization-delocalization transition of eigenmodes upon modification of the relative strength of two sublattices forming the composite pattern. Sharp delocalization of supported modes for certain θ values can be used for visualization of Pythagorean triples. The effects predicted here are general and also take place in composite structures generated by two rotated hexagonal lattices. PMID:27586011

  20. Localization-delocalization wavepacket transition in Pythagorean aperiodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changming; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a composite optical lattice created by two mutually rotated square patterns and allowing observation of continuous transformation between incommensurate and completely periodic structures upon variation of the rotation angle θ. Such lattices acquire periodicity only for rotation angles cos θ = a/c, sin θ = b/c, set by Pythagorean triples of natural numbers (a, b, c). While linear eigenmodes supported by lattices associated with Pythagorean triples are always extended, composite patterns generated for intermediate rotation angles allow observation of the localization-delocalization transition of eigenmodes upon modification of the relative strength of two sublattices forming the composite pattern. Sharp delocalization of supported modes for certain θ values can be used for visualization of Pythagorean triples. The effects predicted here are general and also take place in composite structures generated by two rotated hexagonal lattices. PMID:27586011

  1. Polymer theta-point as a knot delocalization transition.

    PubMed

    Orlandini, E; Stella, A L; Vanderzande, C

    2003-09-01

    We study numerically the tightness of prime flat knots in a model of self-attracting polymers with excluded volume. We find that these knots are localized in the high temperature swollen regime, but become delocalized in the low temperature globular phase. Precisely at the collapse transition, the knots are weakly localized. Some of our results can be interpreted in terms of the theory of polymer networks, which allows one to conjecture exact exponents for the knot length probability distributions. PMID:14524795

  2. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  3. Colour in flux: describing and printing colour in art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2008-01-01

    This presentation will describe artists, practitioners and scientists, who were interested in developing a deeper psychological, emotional and practical understanding of the human visual system who were working with wavelength, paint and other materials. From a selection of prints at The Prints and Drawings Department at Tate London, the presentation will refer to artists who were motivated by issues relating to how colour pigment was mixed and printed, to interrogate and explain colour perception and colour science, and in art, how artists have used colour to challenge the viewer and how a viewer might describe their experience of colour. The title Colour in Flux refers, not only to the perceptual effect of the juxtaposition of one colour pigment with another, but also to the changes and challenges for the print industry. In the light of screenprinted examples from the 60s and 70s, the presentation will discuss 21 st century ideas on colour and how these notions have informed the Centre for Fine Print Research's (CFPR) practical research in colour printing. The latter part of this presentation will discuss the implications for the need to change methods in mixing inks that moves away from existing colour spaces, from non intuitive colour mixing to bespoke ink sets, colour mixing approaches and colour mixing methods that are not reliant on RGB or CMYK.

  4. Longitudinal viscous hydrodynamic evolution for the shattered colour glass condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Akihiko; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2011-09-01

    We investigate hydrodynamic evolution of the quark-gluon plasma for the colour glass condensate type initial conditions. We solve full second-order viscous hydrodynamic equations in the longitudinal direction to find that non-boost invariant expansion leads to visible deformation on the initial rapidity distribution. The results indicate that hydrodynamic evolution with entropy production from viscosity plays an important role in determining parameters for the initial distributions.

  5. Exploration of exciton delocalization in organic crystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Kim; Manning, Lane; Rawat, Naveen; Ainsworth, Victoria; Furis, Madalina

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors play a crucial role in designing new materials for specific applications. Our group recently found evidence for a rotation of molecular planes in phthalocyanines that is responsible for the disappearance of a delocalized exciton in these systems for T >150K.................()().......1 In this study, we attempt to tune the exciton delocalization of small organic molecules using strain effects and alloying different molecules in the same family. The exciton behavior is monitored using time- and polarization resolved photolumniscence (PL) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. Specifically, organic crystalline thin films of octabutoxy phthalocyanine (H2OBPc), octyloxy phthalocyanines and H-bonded semiconductors such as the quinacridone and indigo derivatives are deposited on flexible substrates (i.e. Kapton and PEN) using an in-house developed pen-writing method.........2 that results in crystalline films with macroscopic long range order. The room temperature PL studies show redshift and changes in polarization upon bending of the film. Crystalline thin films of alloyed H2OBPc and octabutoxy naphthalocyanine with ratios ranging from 1:1 to 100:1 fabricated on both sapphire and flexible substrates are also explored using the same PL spectroscopy to elucidate the behaviors of delocalized excitons. .1N. Rawat, et al., J Phys Chem Lett 6, 1834 (2015). 2R. L. Headrick, et al., Applied Physics Letters 92, 063302 (2008). NSF DMR-1056589, NSF DMR-1062966.

  6. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  7. Colour-Octet-Annihilation in Leading Neutral Systems of Gluon Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Buschbeck, B.; Mandl, F.

    2007-11-19

    Using data of the DELPHI collaboration the electric charges of Leading Systems (defined by a rapidity gap) in quark and gluon jets are measured and are compared with the results from Monte Carlo simulations which do not contain colour-octet neutralistion processes. In the data an enhanced production of neutral Leading Systems compared to the Monte Carlo predictions is found in gluon jets. This excess and its location at low masses ({<=}2 GeV/c{sup 2}) of the neutral Leading System is expected for colour-octet neutralistion. The quark jets are found to be in agreement with the simulation.

  8. Fun with Colour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum: Science for Year 5 includes "recognising that the colour of an object depends on the properties of the object and the color of the light source". This article shows how much more can be done with color in the science laboratory. Activities include using a prism to explore white light, using a hand lens to…

  9. Specifying colour and maintaining colour accuracy for 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna; Walters, Peter; Reid, Brendan; Huson, David

    2008-02-01

    Advances in rapid prototyping technologies have led to the emergence of three-dimensional printers which can fabricate physical artefacts, including the application of surface colours. In light of these developments, this paper asserts that the need to print colour accurately is just as important for designers using three-dimensional colour printing as it is for two-dimensional inkjet printing. Parallels can be made with two-dimensional digital Inkjet printing and 2D common problems include: on screen previsualisation, colour management methods, colour gamut and maintaining colour accuracy. However, for three dimensional colour printed objects, there are more variables that will affect the finished colour. These are: the powder and process inks, unevenness of the surface, wax post-processing and other infiltration media and procedures. Furthermore, in some 3D printers, the K channel is replaced by the binder and so the printer is only using the cyan, magenta and yellow channels. The paper will suggest methods for improving pre-visualisation and accurate pre-viewing of the colours through the manufacture of three-dimensional colour charts as a reference guide for designers so that they can make accurate coloured artefacts. A series of case studies will be demonstrated.

  10. False-colour palette generation using a reference colour gamut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Monochrome images are often converted to false-colour images, in which arbitrary colours are assigned to regions of the image to aid recognition of features within the image. Criteria for selection of colour palettes vary according to the application, but may include distinctiveness, extensibility, consistency, preference, meaningfulness and universality. A method for defining a palette from colours on the surface of a reference gamut is described, which ensures that all colours in the palette have the maximum chroma available for the given hue angle in the reference gamut. The palette can be re-targeted to a reproduction medium as needed using colour management, and this method ensures consistency between cross-media colour reproductions using the palette.

  11. Exciton localization-delocalization transition in an extended dendrimer

    SciTech Connect

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2013-12-21

    Exciton-mediated quantum state transfer between the periphery and the core of an extended dendrimer is investigated numerically. By mapping the dynamics onto that of a linear chain, it is shown that a localization-delocalization transition arises for a critical value of the generation number G{sub c} ≈ 5. This transition originates in the quantum interferences experienced by the excitonic wave due to the multiple scatterings that arise each time the wave tunnels from one generation to another. These results suggest that only small-size dendrimers could be used for designing an efficient quantum communication protocol.

  12. [ALCHEMI formulated for delocalization and anti-site defects

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1994-06-01

    ALCHEMI (atom location by channeling enhanced microanalysis) provides a useful method for determining the site distributions of impurity atoms in crystals with multiple sublattices. Delocalization of low energy excitations and the dubious statistical confidence level of the technique are problems; a recent formulation of ALCHEMI analysis (Walls, 1992) addresses both problems. This paper extends this analysis for the distribution of atoms over two sublattices; expressions are derived for the fit parameters that are exact given the assumptions of the model, which allows for arbitrary localization constants, and for the possibility of anti-site defects.

  13. Evidence for Contact Delocalization in Atomic Scale Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, D. G.; Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2007-10-01

    We analyze an advanced two-spring model with an ultralow effective tip mass to predict nontrivial and physically rich “fine structure” in the atomic stick-slip motion in friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments. We demonstrate that this fine structure is present in recent, puzzling experiments. This shows that the tip apex can be completely or partially delocalized, thus shedding new light on what is measured in FFM and, possibly, what can happen with the asperities that establish the contact between macroscopic sliding bodies.

  14. Novel pseudo-delocalized anions for lithium battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Erlendur; Armand, Michel; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-05-01

    A novel anion concept of pseudo-delocalized anions, anions with distinct positive and negative charge regions, has been studied by a computer aided synthesis using DFT calculations. With the aim to find safer and better performing lithium salts for lithium battery electrolytes two factors have been evaluated: the cation-anion interaction strength via the dissociation reaction LiAn ⇌ Li(+) + An(-) and the anion oxidative stability via a vertical ionisation from anion to radical. Based on our computational results some of these anions have shown promise to perform well as lithium salts for modern lithium batteries and should be interesting synthetic targets for future research. PMID:22441354

  15. An Analog of electrically induced transparency via surface delocalized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Bingpu; Wang, Xinke; He, Jingwen; Hou, Bo; Zhang, Yan; Wen, Weijia

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally an interesting opaque state, which is based on an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in mechanism, in a metal hole array of the dimer lattice. By introducing a small difference to the dimer holes of each unit cell, the surface delocalized modes launching out from the dimer holes can have destructive interferences. Consequently, a narrow opaque window in the transparent background can be observed in the transmission spectrum. This surface-mode-induced opacity (SMIO) state is very sensitive to the difference of the dimer holes, which will promise various applications.

  16. 4f electron delocalization and volume collapse in praseodymium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph A.; Moore, Kevin T.; Lipp, Magnus J.; Mattern, Brian A.; Pacold, Joseph I.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Chow, Paul; Rod, Eric; Xiao, Yuming; Evans, William J.

    2012-04-17

    We study the pressure evolution of the 4f electrons in elemental praseodymium metal compressed through several crystallographic phases, including the large volume-collapse transition at 20 GPa. Using resonant x-ray emission, we directly and quantitatively measure the development of multiple electronic configurations with differing 4f occupation numbers, the key quantum observable related to the delocalization of the strongly correlated 4f electrons. These results provide a high-fidelity test of prior predictions by dynamical mean-field theory, and support the hypothesis of a strong connection between electronic and structural degrees of freedom at the volume-collapse transition.

  17. Delocalized correlations in twin light beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Marino, A M; Boyer, V; Pooser, R C; Lett, P D; Lemons, K; Jones, K M

    2008-08-29

    We generate intensity-difference-squeezed Laguerre-Gauss twin beams of light carrying orbital angular momentum by using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. The conservation of orbital angular momentum in the four-wave mixing process is studied as well as the spatial distribution of the quantum correlations obtained with different configurations of orbital angular momentum. Intensity-difference squeezing of up to -6.7 dB is demonstrated with beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Delocalized spatial correlations between the twin beams are observed. PMID:18851611

  18. Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Arntsen, Christopher D.; Reslan, Randa; Hernandez, Samuel; Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-08-05

    A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer calculations. The individual monomers in noncentrosymmetric dimers experience different chemical environments, so that the dimers do not necessarily represent bulk-like molecules. Therefore, we apply a delocalizing bias directly to the Fock matrix of the dimer system, and verify that this is almost as accurate as self-consistent solvation. As large molecules like fullerenes have a plethora of excited states, the initially excited state orbitals are thermally populated, so that the rate is obtained as a thermal average over Marcus thermal transfers.

  19. Colour vision in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Justin; Carleton, Karen L; Cronin, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Colour vision in the marine environment is on average simpler than in terrestrial environments with simple or no colour vision through monochromacy or dichromacy. Monochromacy is found in marine mammals and elasmobranchs, including whales and sharks, but not some rays. Conversely, there is also a greater diversity of colour vision in the ocean than on land, examples being the polyspectral stomatopods and the many colour vision solutions found among reef fish. Recent advances in sequencing reveal more opsin (visual pigment) types than functionally useful at any one time. This diversity arises through opsin duplication and conversion. Such mechanisms allow pick-and-mix adaptation that tunes colour vision on a variety of very short non-evolutionary timescales. At least some of the diversity in marine colour vision is best explained as unconventional colour vision or as neutral drift. PMID:25725325

  20. Present problems of food colours.

    PubMed

    Kläui, H

    1980-01-01

    Food colours belong to those food additives which have been most carefully evaluated toxicologically. The colours which are accepted today by international bodies, like the FAO/WHO and Codex Alimentarius, offer an extraordinary high degree of safety. Within these toxicologically accepted colours, the group of colours which naturally occur in foods (for long periods of time) deserves special attention: such colours combine in an ideal way a very long practical human experience with scientific examination under experimental and animal test conditions, and they offer, therefore, a maximum degree of safety. Colours which naturally occur in foods and which are also of industrial importance are: caramel, carotenoids, grape skin extracts and some colouring spices. PMID:7447918

  1. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  2. Probing charge delocalization in a semi-crystalline supramolecular polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katrina; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Heeney, Martin; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Various doping methods have achieved metallic conductivity in π-conjugated polymer but most of them suffer from dopant-induced-disorder. We developed a simple and effective method of doping a high mobility semi-crystalline polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT) by forming a bi-layer with a small-molecule acceptor, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ). The doping realizes an efficient charge-transfer between pBTTT and F4-TCNQ (conductivity over 150 S/cm), while preserving the structural order of a pristine pBTTT. The charges are discovered to be sufficiently delocalized to give rise to a nearly-ideal Hall effect, and therefore, a coherent transport in a wide temperature range, with a high Hall mobility of 1.8 cm2/Vs at room temperature. The combination of a Pauli magnetic susceptibility and magnetoconductance signatures strengthen the evidence of weak localization in the supramolecular system. Comparison with other amorphous conducting polymers elucidates the role of structural order as an indicator of the degree of charge delocalization.

  3. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H. Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K.; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions. PMID:24706874

  4. Orbital Delocalization and Enhancement of Magnetic Interactions in Perovskite Oxyhydrides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Hou, Yusheng; Gong, Xingao; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments showed that some perovskite oxyhydrides have surprisingly high magnetic-transition temperature. In order to unveil the origin of this interesting phenomenon, we investigate the magnetism in SrCrO2H and SrVO2H on the basis of first-principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. Our work indicates that the Cr-O-Cr superexchange interaction in SrCrO2H is unexpectedly strong. Different from the previous explanation in terms of the H− ion substitution induced increase of the Cr-O-Cr bond angle, we reveal instead that this is mainly because the 3d orbitals in perovskite oxyhydrides becomes more delocalized since H− ions have weaker electronegativity and less electrons than O2− ions. The delocalized 3d orbitals result in stronger Cr-O interactions and enhance the magnetic-transition temperature. This novel mechanism is also applicable to the case of SrVO2H. Furthermore, we predict that SrFeO2H will have unprecedented high Neel temperature because of the extraordinarily strong Fe-H-Fe σ-type interactions. Our work suggests the anion substitution can be used to effectively manipulate the magnetic properties of perovskite compounds. PMID:26804825

  5. Orbital Delocalization and Enhancement of Magnetic Interactions in Perovskite Oxyhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Hou, Yusheng; Gong, Xingao; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments showed that some perovskite oxyhydrides have surprisingly high magnetic-transition temperature. In order to unveil the origin of this interesting phenomenon, we investigate the magnetism in SrCrO2H and SrVO2H on the basis of first-principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. Our work indicates that the Cr-O-Cr superexchange interaction in SrCrO2H is unexpectedly strong. Different from the previous explanation in terms of the H- ion substitution induced increase of the Cr-O-Cr bond angle, we reveal instead that this is mainly because the 3d orbitals in perovskite oxyhydrides becomes more delocalized since H- ions have weaker electronegativity and less electrons than O2- ions. The delocalized 3d orbitals result in stronger Cr-O interactions and enhance the magnetic-transition temperature. This novel mechanism is also applicable to the case of SrVO2H. Furthermore, we predict that SrFeO2H will have unprecedented high Neel temperature because of the extraordinarily strong Fe-H-Fe σ-type interactions. Our work suggests the anion substitution can be used to effectively manipulate the magnetic properties of perovskite compounds.

  6. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness.

    PubMed

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d') and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object's stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain. PMID:27023274

  7. Colour Terms Affect Detection of Colour and Colour-Associated Objects Suppressed from Visual Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Forder, Lewis; Taylor, Olivia; Mankin, Helen; Scott, Ryan B.; Franklin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The idea that language can affect how we see the world continues to create controversy. A potentially important study in this field has shown that when an object is suppressed from visual awareness using continuous flash suppression (a form of binocular rivalry), detection of the object is differently affected by a preceding word prime depending on whether the prime matches or does not match the object. This may suggest that language can affect early stages of vision. We replicated this paradigm and further investigated whether colour terms likewise influence the detection of colours or colour-associated object images suppressed from visual awareness by continuous flash suppression. This method presents rapidly changing visual noise to one eye while the target stimulus is presented to the other. It has been shown to delay conscious perception of a target for up to several minutes. In Experiment 1 we presented greyscale photos of objects. They were either preceded by a congruent object label, an incongruent label, or white noise. Detection sensitivity (d’) and hit rates were significantly poorer for suppressed objects preceded by an incongruent label compared to a congruent label or noise. In Experiment 2, targets were coloured discs preceded by a colour term. Detection sensitivity was significantly worse for suppressed colour patches preceded by an incongruent colour term as compared to a congruent term or white noise. In Experiment 3 targets were suppressed greyscale object images preceded by an auditory presentation of a colour term. On congruent trials the colour term matched the object’s stereotypical colour and on incongruent trials the colour term mismatched. Detection sensitivity was significantly poorer on incongruent trials than congruent trials. Overall, these findings suggest that colour terms affect awareness of coloured stimuli and colour- associated objects, and provide new evidence for language-perception interaction in the brain. PMID:27023274

  8. Colour detection thresholds in faces and colour patches.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Wei; Stephen, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Human facial skin colour reflects individuals' underlying health (Stephen et al 2011 Evolution & Human Behavior 32 216-227); and enhanced facial skin CIELab b* (yellowness), a* (redness), and L* (lightness) are perceived as healthy (also Stephen et al 2009a International Journal of Primatology 30 845-857). Here, we examine Malaysian Chinese participants' detection thresholds for CIELab L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) colour changes in Asian, African, and Caucasian faces and skin coloured patches. Twelve face photos and three skin coloured patches were transformed to produce four pairs of images of each individual face and colour patch with different amounts of red, yellow, or lightness, from very subtle (deltaE = 1.2) to quite large differences (deltaE = 9.6). Participants were asked to decide which of sequentially displayed, paired same-face images or colour patches were lighter, redder, or yellower. Changes in facial redness, followed by changes in yellowness, were more easily discriminated than changes in luminance. However, visual sensitivity was not greater for redness and yellowness in nonface stimuli, suggesting red facial skin colour special salience. Participants were also significantly better at recognizing colour differences in own-race (Asian) and Caucasian faces than in African faces, suggesting the existence of cross-race effect in discriminating facial colours. Humans' colour vision may have been selected for skin colour signalling (Changizi et al 2006 Biology Letters 2 217-221), enabling individuals to perceive subtle changes in skin colour, reflecting health and emotional status. PMID:24344549

  9. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  10. Complementary colours for a physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Vitomir; Čepič, Mojca

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing colours and their physically exact complements using cellophane is presented. The origin of the colours lies in the transmission of polarized light through the birefringent cellophane, and therefore the optics of birefringent materials is briefly presented. A set-up which will be described in the following can be used in a laboratory experiment at an undergraduate level.

  11. Ionization delocalization and ALCHEMI of B2-ordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1995-06-01

    Purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the major assumption underlying the ALCHEMI formulation is justified: that the degree of ionization localization of an elemental shell can be accounted for by a linear coefficient; and to introduce a potential method, which would be applicable to B2-ordered alloys, of independently extracting the ratio of coefficients L{sub jk} necessary for delocalization correction. A Cr-doped FeAl alloy and a series of Fe-doped NiAl alloys with 0.25-12 at. % Fe were analyzed. Excellent linearity of the data substantiates the use of linear coefficients to model ionization localization. It was investigated whether the L{sub jk} acquired at a (110) systematics orientation could be accurately applied to ALCHEMI data acquired at (200).

  12. Extreme electron polaron spatial delocalization in π-conjugated materials

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jeff; Angiolillo, Paul J.; Therien, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The electron polaron, a spin-1/2 excitation, is the fundamental negative charge carrier in π-conjugated organic materials. Large polaron spatial dimensions result from weak electron-lattice coupling and thus identify materials with unusually low barriers for the charge transfer reactions that are central to electronic device applications. Here we demonstrate electron polarons in π-conjugated multiporphyrin arrays that feature vast areal delocalization. This finding is evidenced by concurrent optical and electron spin resonance measurements, coupled with electronic structure calculations that suggest atypically small reorganization energies for one-electron reduction of these materials. Because the electron polaron dimension can be linked to key performance metrics in organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, and a host of other devices, these findings identify conjugated materials with exceptional optical, electronic, and spintronic properties. PMID:26512097

  13. Non-Gaussian normal diffusion induced by delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjin; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Non-Gaussian normal diffusion, i.e., the probability density function (PDF) is non-Gaussian but the mean squared displacement (MSD) depends on time linearly, has been observed in particle motions. Here we show by numerical simulations that this phenomenon may manifest itself in energy diffusion along a lattice at a nonzero, finite temperature. The studied model is a one-dimensional disordered lattice with on-site potential. We find that the energy density fluctuations are spatially localized if the nonlinear interaction is suppressed, but may spread with a non-Gaussian PDF and a linear time-dependent MSD when the nonlinear interaction is turned on. Our analysis suggests that the mechanism lies in the delocalization properties of the localized modes.

  14. Across light: through colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Richardson, Martin; Bernardo, Luis Miguel

    2012-03-01

    The speed at which our world is changing is reflected in the shifting way artistic images are created and produced. Holography can be used as a medium to express the perception of space with light and colour and to make the material and the immaterial experiments with optical and digital holography. This paper intends to be a reflection on the final product of that process surrounding a debate of ideas for new experimental methodologies applied to holographic images. Holography is a time-based medium and the irretrievable linear flow of time is responsible for a drama, unique to traditional cinematography. If the viewers move to left or right, they see glimpses of the next scene or the previous one perceived a second ago. This interaction of synthetic space arises questions such as: can we see, in "reality", two forms in the same space? Trying to answer this question, a series of works has been created. These concepts are embryonic to a series of digital art holograms and lenticulars technique's titled "Across Light: Through Colour". They required some technical research and comparison between effects from different camera types, using Canon IS3 and Sony HDR CX105.

  15. Digital colour management system for colour parameters reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, Karol; Lasmanowicz, Piotr; Assis, Lucas M. N.; Pawlicka, Agnieszka; Januszko, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Digital Colour Management System (DCMS) and its application to new adaptive camouflage system are presented in this paper. The DCMS is a digital colour rendering method which would allow for transformation of a real image into a set of colour pixels displayed on a computer monitor. Consequently, it can analyse pixels' colour which comprise images of the environment such as desert, semi-desert, jungle, farmland or rocky mountain in order to prepare an adaptive camouflage pattern most suited for the terrain. This system is described in present work as well as the use the subtractive colours mixing method to construct the real time colour changing electrochromic window/pixel (ECD) for camouflage purpose. The ECD with glass/ITO/Prussian Blue(PB)/electrolyte/CeO2-TiO2/ITO/glass configuration was assembled and characterized. The ECD switched between green and yellow after +/-1.5 V application and the colours have been controlled by Digital Colour Management System and described by CIE LAB parameters.

  16. Evidence of Delocalization in Charge-Transfer State Manifold for Donor:Acceptor Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhiqiang; Li, Ho-Wa; Zhang, Jinfeng; Cheng, Yuanhang; Yang, Qingdan; Lo, Ming-Fai; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Tsang, Sai-Wing; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-08-24

    How charge-transfer states (CTSs) assist charge separation of a Coulombically bound exciton in organic photovoltaics has been a hot topic. It is believed that the delocalization feature of a CTS plays a crucial role in the charge separation process. However, the delocalization of the "hot" and the "relaxed" CTSs is still under debate. Here, with a novel frequency dependent charge-modulated electroabsorption spectroscopy (CMEAS) technique, we elucidate clearly that both "hot" and "relaxed" CTSs are loosely bound and delocalized states. This is confirmed by comparing the CMEAS results of CTSs with those of localized polaron states. Our results reveal the role of CTS delocalization on charge separation and indicate that no substantial delocalization gradient exists in CTSs. PMID:27482867

  17. Linguistic determinants of word colouring in grapheme-colour synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Simner, Julia; Glover, Louise; Mowat, Alice

    2006-02-01

    Previous studies of grapheme-colour synaesthesia have suggested that words tend to be coloured by their initial letter or initial vowel (e.g., Baron-Cohen et al., 1993; Ward et al., 2005). We examine this assumption in two ways. First, we show that letter position and syllable stress have been confounded, such that the initial letters of a word are often in stressed position (e.g., 'wo-man, 'ta-ble, 'ha-ppy). With participant JW, we separate these factors (e.g., with stress homographs such as 'con-vict vs. con-'vict) and show that the primary determinant of word colour is syllable stress, with only a secondary influence of letter position. We show that this effect derives from conceptual rather than perceptual stress, and that the effect is more prominent for synaesthetes whose words are coloured by vowels than by consonants. We examine, too, the time course of word colour generation. Slower colour naming occurs for spoken versus written stimuli, as we might expect from the additional requirement of grapheme conversion in the former. Reaction time data provide evidence, too, of incremental processing, since word colour is generated faster when the dominant grapheme is flagged early rather than late in the spoken word. Finally, we examine the role of non-dominant graphemes in word colouring and show faster colour naming when later graphemes match the dominant grapheme (e.g., ether) compared to when they do not (e.g., ethos). Taken together, our findings suggest that words are coloured incrementally by a process of competition between constituent graphemes, in which stressed graphemes and word-initial graphemes are disproportionately weighted. PMID:16683502

  18. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry. PMID:24495279

  19. Characterization of Caramel Colour IV.

    PubMed

    Licht, B H; Shaw, K; Smith, C; Mendoza, M; Orr, J; Myers, D V

    1992-05-01

    A large number of commercial Caramel Colour IV samples were characterized in order to assess the uniformity of the class and to provide data to be used in specifications development. Owing to the chemical and physical complexity of caramel colour it was not feasible to perform detailed analysis of all constituents for assessment of uniformity. Instead, selected parameters were evaluated and judgements were made with respect to compositional uniformity based on the similarities of these parameters among the various samples. As Caramel Colour IV is required by the food industry in a range of colour intensities, there must be a range of properties that differ from sample to sample, but that are sufficiently similar for the material to still be considered as part of the Caramel Colour IV class. Fractions as well as whole caramel were analysed using selected spectrophotometric, chromatographic and chemical techniques. Samples were fractionated based on molecular weight and polarity. The data presented here provide evidence for the uniformity in composition of Caramel Colour IV with respect to molecular weight distribution, to nitrogen and sulphur content and their distribution throughout the fractions, to absorbance properties and to specific low molecular weight compounds. Thus, it can be concluded that Caramel Colour IV exhibits compositional uniformity within the range of colour intensity required by the food industry worldwide. PMID:1644377

  20. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  1. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  2. Transition waves in bistable structures. I. Delocalization of damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkaev, Andrej; Cherkaev, Elena; Slepyan, Leonid

    2005-02-01

    We consider chains of dimensionless masses connected by breakable bistable links. A non-monotonic piecewise linear constitutive relation for each link consists of two stable branches separated by a gap of zero resistance. Mechanically, this model can be envisioned as a "twin-element" structure which consists of two links (rods or strands) of different lengths joined by the ends. The longer link does not resist to the loading until the shorter link breaks. We call this construction the waiting link structure. We show that the chain of such strongly non-linear elements has an increased in-the-large stability under extension in comparison with a conventional chain, and can absorb a large amount of energy. This is achieved by two reasons. One is an increase of dissipation in the form of high-frequency waves transferring the mechanical energy to heat; this is a manifestation of the inner instabilities of the bonds. The other is delocalization of the damage of the chain. The increased stability is a consequence of the distribution of a partial damage over a large volume of the body instead of its localization, as in the case of a single neck formation in a conventional chain. We optimize parameters of the structure in order to improve its resistance to a slow loading and show that it can be increased significantly by delocalizing a damage process. In particular, we show that the dissipation is a function of the gap between the stable branches and find an optimal gap corresponding to maximum energy consumption under quasi-static extension. The results of numerical simulations of the dynamic behavior of bistable chains show that these chains can withstand without breaking the force which is several times larger than the force sustained by a conventional chain. The formulation and results are also related to the modelling of compressive destruction of a porous material or a frame construction which can be described by a two-branched diagram with a large gap between the

  3. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  4. Generating colour and texture verniers.

    PubMed

    Brelstaff, G J; Wilson, J B

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes computer graphics techniques for presenting visual stimuli in a vernier format composed out of coloured texture patterns. Such stimuli can be used to investigate the performance at the task of localising boundaries mediated by changes in colour and/or texture. We summarise the contents as follows: (1) Techniques for presenting visual stimuli are reviewed with a view to how they might be used to present colour and texture verniers. (2) The design of the vernier stimuli for the localisation task is considered. (3) Significant elements of this design are: (a) the use of non-isoplanatic textures to avoid interference effects at boundaries, (b) the modulation of the texture patterns along axes in MacLeod-Boynton colour space so that relative retinal cone contributions are controlled, and (c) the use of double-buffering, colour map manipulation, and contrast randomisation techniques to avoid problems commonly encountered when presenting computer graphics stimuli on colour monitors. (4) Results of a psychophysical experiment that presents colour and texture verniers are reported elsewhere. PMID:8089039

  5. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  6. Delocalization and Valence Tautomerism in Vanadium Tris(iminosemiquinone) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Jesper; Clark, Kensha Marie

    2016-02-18

    To survey the noninnocence of bis(arylimino) acenaphthene (BIAN) ligands (L) in complexes with early metals, the homoleptic vanadium complex, [V(L)3 ] (1), and its monocation, [V(L)3 ]PF6 (2), were synthesized. These complexes were found to have a very rich electronic behavior, whereby 1 displays strong electronic delocalization and 2 can be observed in unprecedented valence tautomeric forms. The oxidation states of the metal and ligand components in these complexes were assigned by using spectroscopic, crystallographic, and magnetic analyses. Complex 1 was identified as [V(IV) (L(red) )(L(.) )2 ] (L(red) =N,N'-bis(3,5-dimethylphenylamido)acenaphthylene; L(.) =N,N'-bis(3,5-dimethylphenylimino)acenaphthenesemiquinonate). Complex 2 was determined to be [V(V) (L(red) )(L(.) )2 ](+) at T<150 K and [V(IV) (L(.) )3 ](+) at T>150 K. Cyclic voltammetry experiments reveal six quasi-reversible processes, thus indicating the potential of this metal-ligand combination in catalysis or materials applications. PMID:26799365

  7. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context. PMID:21660323

  8. Communication: Spectroscopic consequences of proton delocalization in OCHCO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Yu, Qi; Mancini, John S.; Bowman, Joel M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Klemperer, William F.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-01

    Even though quartic force fields (QFFs) and highly accurate coupled cluster computations describe the OCHCO+ cation at equilibrium as a complex between carbon monoxide and the formyl cation, two notable and typical interstellar and atmospheric molecules, the prediction from the present study is that the equilibrium C∞v structure is less relevant to observables than the saddle-point D∞h structure. This is the conclusion from diffusion Monte Carlo and vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations utilizing a semi-global potential energy surface. These calculations demonstrate that the proton "rattle" motion (ν6) has centrosymmetric delocalization of the proton over the D∞h barrier lying only 393.6 cm-1 above the double-well OCHCO+ C∞v minima. As a result, this molecule will likely appear D∞h, and the rotational spectrum will be significantly dimmer than the computed equilibrium 2.975 D center-of-mass dipole moment indicates. However, the proton transfer fundamental, determined to be at roughly 300 cm-1, has a very strong intensity. This prediction as well as those of other fundamentals should provide useful guides for laboratory detection of this cation. Finally, it is shown that the two highest energy QFF-determined modes are actually in good agreement with their vibrational configuration interaction counterparts. These high-level quantum chemical methods provide novel insights into this fascinating and potentially common interstellar molecule.

  9. Delocalization of mechanical waves in the ladder chain of DNA with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzadian, O.; Niry, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Localization-delocalization transition of mechanical vibrations in a ladder chain with correlated disorder is studied analytically and numerically. An exact analytical analysis is carried out for the delocalization properties of the waves in the ladder chain. This analysis predicts resonance frequencies at which the waves can propagate in the entire chain like DNA. Our analytical results in prediction of extended modes are confirmed by numerical simulations using the transfer matrix method. Finally we consider the entropy of disorder as a control parameter for localization-delocalization transition in chain with correlated disorder.

  10. Recurrent Delocalization and Quasiequilibration of Photons in Coupled Systems in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Kim, M. S.; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2016-04-01

    We explore the photon population dynamics in two coupled circuit QED systems. For a sufficiently weak intercavity photon hopping, as the photon-cavity coupling increases, the dynamics undergoes double transitions first from a delocalized to a localized phase and then from the localized to another delocalized phase. The latter delocalized phase is distinguished from the former one; instead of oscillating between the two cavities, the photons rapidly quasiequilibrate over the two cavities. These intriguing features are attributed to an interplay between two qualitatively distinctive nonlinear behaviors of the circuit QED systems in the utrastrong coupling regime, whose distinction has been widely overlooked.

  11. Effects of interaction symmetry on delocalization and energy transport in one-dimensional disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjin; He, Dahai; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    We study effects of interaction symmetry in one-dimensional, momentum-conserving disordered lattices. It is found that asymmetric and symmetric interparticle interactions may result in significant difference: localized modes can be delocalized by very weak asymmetric interactions but survive much stronger symmetric interactions. Moreover, in the delocalization regime, asymmetric and symmetric interactions also have qualitatively different effects on transport: the former (the latter) may lead to a fast decaying (slow power-law decaying) heat current correlation function and in turn a convergent (divergent) heat conductivity. A method for detecting delocalization in systems at a nonzero temperature is proposed as well.

  12. Recurrent Delocalization and Quasiequilibration of Photons in Coupled Systems in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Kim, M S; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2016-04-15

    We explore the photon population dynamics in two coupled circuit QED systems. For a sufficiently weak intercavity photon hopping, as the photon-cavity coupling increases, the dynamics undergoes double transitions first from a delocalized to a localized phase and then from the localized to another delocalized phase. The latter delocalized phase is distinguished from the former one; instead of oscillating between the two cavities, the photons rapidly quasiequilibrate over the two cavities. These intriguing features are attributed to an interplay between two qualitatively distinctive nonlinear behaviors of the circuit QED systems in the utrastrong coupling regime, whose distinction has been widely overlooked. PMID:27127967

  13. Colour Reconnection in WW Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, J.

    2003-07-01

    Preliminary results are presented for a measurement of the κ parameter used in the JETSET SK-I model of Colour Reconnection in {W}+{W}^- -> qbar {q}'bar {q}q^' events at LEP2. An update on the investigation of Colour Reconnection effects in hadronic decays of W pairs, using the particle flow in DELPHI is presented. A second method is based on the observation that two different mW estimators have different sensitivity to the parametrised Colour Reconnection effect. Hence the difference between them is an observable with information content about κ.

  14. What Colour Is a Shadow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    What colour is a shadow? Black, grey, or some other colour? This article describes how to use a digital camera to test the hypothesis that a shadow under a clear blue sky has a blue tint. A white sheet of A4 paper was photographed in full sunlight and in shadow under a clear blue sky. The images were analysed using a shareware program called…

  15. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, V; Pranculis, V; Melianas, A; Inganäs, O; Gulbinas, V; Abramavicius, D

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  16. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  17. Distinguishing the roles of energy funnelling and delocalization in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-03-14

    Photosynthetic complexes improve the transfer of excitation energy from peripheral antennas to reaction centers in several ways. In particular, a downward energy funnel can direct excitons in the right direction, while coherent excitonic delocalization can enhance transfer rates through the cooperative phenomenon of supertransfer. However, isolating the role of purely coherent effects is difficult because any change to the delocalization also changes the energy landscape. Here, we show that the relative importance of the two processes can be determined by comparing the natural light-harvesting apparatus with counterfactual models in which the delocalization and the energy landscape are altered. Applied to the example of purple bacteria, our approach shows that although supertransfer does enhance the rates somewhat, the energetic funnelling plays the decisive role. Because delocalization has a minor role (and is sometimes detrimental), it is most likely not adaptive, being a side-effect of the dense chlorophyll packing that evolved to increase light absorption per reaction center. PMID:26899714

  18. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  19. Communication: Spectroscopic consequences of proton delocalization in OCHCO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Yu, Qi; Mancini, John S.; Bowman, Joel M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Crawford, T. Daniel; Klemperer, William F.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-21

    Even though quartic force fields (QFFs) and highly accurate coupled cluster computations describe the OCHCO{sup +} cation at equilibrium as a complex between carbon monoxide and the formyl cation, two notable and typical interstellar and atmospheric molecules, the prediction from the present study is that the equilibrium C{sub ∞v} structure is less relevant to observables than the saddle-point D{sub ∞h} structure. This is the conclusion from diffusion Monte Carlo and vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations utilizing a semi-global potential energy surface. These calculations demonstrate that the proton “rattle” motion (ν{sub 6}) has centrosymmetric delocalization of the proton over the D{sub ∞h} barrier lying only 393.6 cm{sup −1} above the double-well OCHCO{sup +} C{sub ∞v} minima. As a result, this molecule will likely appear D{sub ∞h}, and the rotational spectrum will be significantly dimmer than the computed equilibrium 2.975 D center-of-mass dipole moment indicates. However, the proton transfer fundamental, determined to be at roughly 300 cm{sup −1}, has a very strong intensity. This prediction as well as those of other fundamentals should provide useful guides for laboratory detection of this cation. Finally, it is shown that the two highest energy QFF-determined modes are actually in good agreement with their vibrational configuration interaction counterparts. These high-level quantum chemical methods provide novel insights into this fascinating and potentially common interstellar molecule.

  20. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  1. Composite quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J.

    1982-01-01

    Calculability of quark and lepton masses and mixing angles is stressed as the primary motivation for constructing models in which quarks and leptons are composite particles. A general strategy for constructing such models is outlined, in which quarks and leptons are kept light compared to their inverse sizes by approximate chiral symmetries. The origin of multiple families is discussed, and an unrealistic model is exhibited which has several generations and a complicated pattern of masses and generation-mixing angles. The new physics responsible for binding quarks and leptons tends to induce various rare processes at rates which are potentially too large.

  2. Quark distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Catara, F.; Sambataro, M. Italy Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita, 95129 Catania )

    1992-08-01

    By making use of a mapping procedure recently proposed, we construct the nucleon image of the one-body quark density operator in the framework of the nonrelativistic quark model of the nucleons. We evaluate the expectation value of this operator in the ground state of the doubly magic nuclei {sup 4}He, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca described within the nuclear shell model. We analyze the role of quark exchanges between nucleons. We also investigate the effect on the quark density of short-range correlations in the nuclear wave functions as well as of variations in the nucleon size.

  3. QCD breaks Lorentz invariance and colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, A. P.

    2016-03-01

    In the previous work [A. P. Balachandran and S. Vaidya, Eur. Phys. J. Plus 128, 118 (2013)], we have argued that the algebra of non-Abelian superselection rules is spontaneously broken to its maximal Abelian subalgebra, that is, the algebra generated by its completing commuting set (the two Casimirs, isospin and a basis of its Cartan subalgebra). In this paper, alternative arguments confirming these results are presented. In addition, Lorentz invariance is shown to be broken in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), just as it is in quantum electrodynamics (QED). The experimental consequences of these results include fuzzy mass and spin shells of coloured particles like quarks, and decay life times which depend on the frame of observation [D. Buchholz, Phys. Lett. B 174, 331 (1986); D. Buchholz and K. Fredenhagen, Commun. Math. Phys. 84, 1 (1982; J. Fröhlich, G. Morchio and F. Strocchi, Phys. Lett. B 89, 61 (1979); A. P. Balachandran, S. Kürkçüoğlu, A. R. de Queiroz and S. Vaidya, Eur. Phys. J. C 75, 89 (2015); A. P. Balachandran, S. Kürkçüoğlu and A. R. de Queiroz, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 28, 1350028 (2013)]. In a paper under preparation, these results are extended to the ADM Poincaré group and the local Lorentz group of frames. The renormalisation of the ADM energy by infrared gravitons is also studied and estimated.

  4. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  5. Applications of Colour Processing In Optical Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, W. V.; Connolly, C.

    1986-11-01

    Humans are endowed with the facility to perceive colour. This not only provides an additional aesthetic dimension but also helps perform visual tasks efficiently. There are many occupations, including inspection, not open to those with defective colour vision. Todays machine vision systems are virtually all colour-blind. Yet there are applications where colour is intrinsic. Consider for example the inspection and grading of fruit, vegetables, biscuits and other food products. Consider also the widespread use of colour coding for wiring and components in the electrical and electronic industries. Automatic optical inspection of such things cannot be done without relating to colour. There are other applications where colour is not directly relevant but the additional information provided can help simplify and speed up the processing task. This paper reviews the nature of colour, relating the psychophysical aspects of colour perception and the physical properties of available sensors to the needs of an automatic inspection system. The theory of colour perception is based on the tri-stimulus theory which says that any colour may be matched using appropriate proportions of three primary colours. Although later experiments have suggested human colour perception is more complex, most electronic video sensors employ a three colour system. Usually the red, green and blue primary components are derived and may be used directly as sensory inputs to a vision system. However the primary representation of colour is not the most efficient means of encoding nor is it the most useful basis for interpretive processing. The R,G and B primary signals may be simply transformed into a new coordinate system where one of the axes represents true object colour or hue. Using this new colour space simplifies processing. These ideas are illustrated by an inspection example. The colour coded wires of a European power cable are identified to ensure that a power plug is safely wired. For this

  6. Strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.

    2006-07-01

    We propose that the reason for the non-ideal behaviour seen in lattice simulation of quark gluon plasma (QGP) and ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision experiments is that the QGP near Tc and above is a strongly coupled plasma (SCP), i.e., a strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP). It is remarkable that the widely used equation of state of SCP in QED (quantum electrodynamics) very nicely fits lattice results on all QGP systems, with proper modifications to include colour degrees of freedom and the running coupling constant. Results on pressure in pure gauge, 2-flavours and 3-flavours QGP can all be explained by treating QGP as SCQGP, as demonstrated here. Energy density and speed of sound are also presented for all three systems. We further extend the model to systems with finite quark mass and reasonably good fits to lattice results are obtained for (2+1)-flavours and 4-flavours QGP. Hence it is a unified model, namely SCQGP, to explain the non-ideal QGP seen in lattice simulations with just two system dependent parameters.

  7. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  8. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  9. The Quantum Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction; 2. Symmetry; 3. The quantum world; 4. Towards QCD; 5. The one number of QCD; 6. The gregarious gluon; 7. Quarks and hadrons; 8. Quarks under the microscope; 9. Much ado about nothing; 10. Checkerboard QCD; Appendix 1. A QCD chronology; Appendix 2. Greek alphabet and SI prefixes; Appendix 3. Glossary; Appendix 4. Further reading; Index.

  10. Cold quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2010-05-15

    We perform an O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) perturbative calculation of the equation of state of cold but dense QCD matter with two massless and one massive quark flavor, finding that perturbation theory converges reasonably well for quark chemical potentials above 1 GeV. Using a running coupling constant and strange quark mass, and allowing for further nonperturbative effects, our results point to a narrow range where absolutely stable strange quark matter may exist. Absent stable strange quark matter, our findings suggest that quark matter in (slowly rotating) compact star cores becomes confined to hadrons only slightly above the density of atomic nuclei. Finally, we show that equations of state including quark matter lead to hybrid star masses up to M{approx}2M{sub {center_dot},} in agreement with current observations. For strange stars, we find maximal masses of M{approx}2.75M{sub {center_dot}}and conclude that confirmed observations of compact stars with M>2M{sub {center_dot}}would strongly favor the existence of stable strange quark matter.

  11. The colour of an avifauna: A quantitative analysis of the colour of Australian birds

    PubMed Central

    Delhey, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Animal coloration is a poorly-understood aspect of phenotypic variability. Here I expand initial studies of the colour gamut of birds by providing the first quantitative description of the colour variation of an entire avifauna: Australian landbirds (555 species). The colour of Australian birds occupies a small fraction (19%) of the entire possible colour space and colour variation is extremely uneven. Most colours are unsaturated, concentrated in the centre of colour space and based on the deposition of melanins. Other mechanisms of colour production are less common but account for larger portions of colour space and for most saturated colours. Male colours occupy 45–25% more colour space than female colours, indicating that sexual dichromatism translates into a broader range of male colours. Male-exclusive colours are often saturated, at the edge of chromatic space, and have most likely evolved for signalling. While most clades of birds occupy expected or lower-than-expected colour volumes, parrots and cockatoos (Order Psittaciformes) occupy a much larger volume than expected. This uneven distribution of colour variation across mechanisms of colour production, sexes and clades is probably shared by avifaunas in other parts of the world, but this remains to be tested with comparable data. PMID:26679370

  12. The colour of an avifauna: A quantitative analysis of the colour of Australian birds.

    PubMed

    Delhey, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Animal coloration is a poorly-understood aspect of phenotypic variability. Here I expand initial studies of the colour gamut of birds by providing the first quantitative description of the colour variation of an entire avifauna: Australian landbirds (555 species). The colour of Australian birds occupies a small fraction (19%) of the entire possible colour space and colour variation is extremely uneven. Most colours are unsaturated, concentrated in the centre of colour space and based on the deposition of melanins. Other mechanisms of colour production are less common but account for larger portions of colour space and for most saturated colours. Male colours occupy 45-25% more colour space than female colours, indicating that sexual dichromatism translates into a broader range of male colours. Male-exclusive colours are often saturated, at the edge of chromatic space, and have most likely evolved for signalling. While most clades of birds occupy expected or lower-than-expected colour volumes, parrots and cockatoos (Order Psittaciformes) occupy a much larger volume than expected. This uneven distribution of colour variation across mechanisms of colour production, sexes and clades is probably shared by avifaunas in other parts of the world, but this remains to be tested with comparable data. PMID:26679370

  13. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, Robin D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-10-01

    While the top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron, a decade later they still have very little information about the top. As the heaviest particle yet discovered, the top quark is interesting in and of itself, but some speculate that it may play a special role in physics beyond the Standard Model. With Run 2 of the Tevatron well underway, they have the opportunity to study top quark properties with much better sensitivity, and to test whether top quarks behave as predicted by current theories. This article focuses on the basics of top quark physics at the Tevatron, highlighting only a sample of the many recent measurements, as new results are being released monthly, and constantly changing the landscape of our knowledge of top.

  14. A fuzzy-atom analysis of electron delocalization on hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Guillaumes, L; Salvador, P; Simon, S

    2014-02-13

    The extent of electron delocalization is quantified for set of cyclic complexes exhibiting two or more hydrogen bonds (HBs). In particular, the delocalization index (DI) between the atoms directly involved in the HB, and the ING (a normalized n-center delocalization index) have been evaluated using several fuzzy-atom schemes, namely Becke, Becke-ρ, Hirshfeld, and Hirshfeld-Iterative. The results have been compared with the widely used Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic definition. The DI values are found to correlate very well with geometrical or topological descriptors widely used in the literature to characterize HB systems. Among all fuzzy-atom methods, the ones that can better accommodate the different partial ionic character of the bonds perform particularly well. The best performing fuzzy-atom scheme for both pairwise and n-center electron delocalization is found to be the Becke-ρ method, for which similar results to QTAIM model are obtained with a much reduced computational cost. These results open up a wide range of applications of such electron delocalization descriptors based on fuzzy-atoms for noncovalent interactions in more complex and larger systems. PMID:24444143

  15. Functionalized Thiophene-Based [7]Helicene: Chirooptical Properties versus Electron Delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Pink, Maren; Xiao, Shuzhang; Miyasaka, Makoto; Rajca, Suchada; Das, Kausik; Plessel, Kristin

    2009-11-04

    The functionalized, enantiomerically pure [7]helicene 1 derived from bis(benzodithiophene) functionalized with four heptyl groups is prepared from 1,8-dibromo-4,5-diheptylbenzo[1,2-b:4,3-b']dithiophene building block 2. Such [7]helicene structure, functionalized with bromines at the terminal positions of the helicene inner rim and multiple solubilizing alkyl groups, is an attractive building block for long [n]helicenes and oligo[7]helicenes. Chirooptical properties and the degree of electron delocalization are determined and compared to those of analogous carbon-sulfur [7]helicene and [7]helicenes derived from benzodithiophene to provide a correlation between chirooptical properties and the degree of electron delocalization. [7]Helicene 1 possesses a moderately increased electron delocalization, but its chirooptical properties are similar to those for analogous [7]helicenes with relatively lower electron delocalization, indicating that chirooptical properties are not significantly affected by electron delocalization for this series of [7]helicenes. Molecular structures of racemic [7]helicene 1 and its benzodithiophene building block 2 are confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Crystals of 2 are chiral and adopt the shape of long, flexible, flat needles that can be readily bent.

  16. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  17. Structural colour in Chondrus crispus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Chris J.; Wilts, Bodo D.; Vignolini, Silvia; Brodie, Juliet; Steiner, Ullrich; Rudall, Paula J.; Glover, Beverley J.; Gregory, Thomas; Walker, Rachel H.

    2015-07-01

    The marine world is incredibly rich in brilliant and intense colours. Photonic structures are found in many different species and provide extremely complex optical responses that cannot be achieved solely by pigments. In this study we examine the cuticular structure of the red alga Chondrus crispus (Irish Moss) using anatomical and optical approaches. We experimentally measure the optical response of the multilayer structure in the cuticle. Using finite-difference time-domain modelling, we demonstrate conclusively for the first time that the dimensions and organisation of lamellae are responsible for the blue structural colouration on the surface of the fronds. Comparison of material along the apical-basal axis of the frond demonstrates that structural colour is confined to the tips of the thalli and show definitively that a lack of structural colour elsewhere corresponds with a reduction in the number of lamellae and the regularity of their ordering. Moreover, by studying the optical response for different hydration conditions, we demonstrate that the cuticular structure is highly porous and that the presence of water plays a critical role in its ability to act as a structural light reflector.

  18. Structural colour in Chondrus crispus.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Chris J; Wilts, Bodo D; Vignolini, Silvia; Brodie, Juliet; Steiner, Ullrich; Rudall, Paula J; Glover, Beverley J; Gregory, Thomas; Walker, Rachel H

    2015-01-01

    The marine world is incredibly rich in brilliant and intense colours. Photonic structures are found in many different species and provide extremely complex optical responses that cannot be achieved solely by pigments. In this study we examine the cuticular structure of the red alga Chondrus crispus (Irish Moss) using anatomical and optical approaches. We experimentally measure the optical response of the multilayer structure in the cuticle. Using finite-difference time-domain modelling, we demonstrate conclusively for the first time that the dimensions and organisation of lamellae are responsible for the blue structural colouration on the surface of the fronds. Comparison of material along the apical-basal axis of the frond demonstrates that structural colour is confined to the tips of the thalli and show definitively that a lack of structural colour elsewhere corresponds with a reduction in the number of lamellae and the regularity of their ordering. Moreover, by studying the optical response for different hydration conditions, we demonstrate that the cuticular structure is highly porous and that the presence of water plays a critical role in its ability to act as a structural light reflector. PMID:26139470

  19. String formation beyond leading colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jesper R.; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new model for the hadronisation of multi-parton systems, in which colour correlations beyond leading N C are allowed to influence the formation of confining potentials (strings). The multiplet structure of SU(3) is combined with a minimisation of the string potential energy, to decide between which partons strings should form, allowing also for "baryonic" configurations (e.g., two colours can combine coherently to form an anticolour). In e + e -collisions, modifications to the leading-colour picture are small, suppressed by both colour and kinematics factors. But in pp collisions, multi-parton interactions increase the number of possible subleading connections, counteracting their naive 1/ N {/C 2} suppression. Moreover, those that reduce the overall string lengths are kinematically favoured. The model, which we have implemented in the PYTHIA 8 generator, is capable of reaching agreement not only with the important < p ⊥> ( n charged) distribution but also with measured rates (and ratios) of kaons and hyperons, in both ee and pp collisions. Nonetheless, the shape of their p ⊥ spectra remains challenging to explain.

  20. Colour Reconnection at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.

    2002-03-01

    The preliminary results on the search of colour reconnection effects (CR) from the four experiments at LEP, Aleph, Delphi, L3 and Opal, are reviewed. Extreme models are excluded by studies of standard variables, and on going studies of a method first suggested by L3, the particle flow method1, are yet inconclusive.

  1. An RGB approach to prismatic colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilmann, Florian; Grusche, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Teaching prismatic colours usually boils down to establishing the take-home message that white light consists of ‘differently refrangible’ coloured rays. This approach explains the classical spectrum of seven colours but has its limitations, e.g. in discussing spectra from setups with higher resolution or in understanding the well saturated colours of simple edge spectra. Besides, the connection of physical wavelength and colour remains obscure—after all, colour and wavelength are not equivalent. In this paper, we suggest that teachers demonstrate these impressive experiments in the classroom by using a video projector and a prism to disperse black-and-white slit images. We introduce experimental and diagrammatic methods for establishing the connection between the original slit image and the wavelength composition of the resulting spectrum. From this (or any other given) wavelength composition, students can systematically derive the colours with a simple RGB approach, thus gaining a more accurate picture of the relation between wavelength and colour.

  2. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen-bond network of an enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Fried, Stephen D.; Boxer, Steven G.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes use protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here, we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen-bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active-site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen-bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds. PMID:25503367

  3. An RGB Approach to Prismatic Colours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilmann, Florian; Grusche, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching prismatic colours usually boils down to establishing the take-home message that white light consists of "differently refrangible" coloured rays. This approach explains the classical spectrum of seven colours but has its limitations, e.g. in discussing spectra from setups with higher resolution or in understanding the well…

  4. Biological Components of Colour Preference in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Anna; Bevis, Laura; Ling, Yazhu; Hurlbert, Anya

    2010-01-01

    Adult colour preference has been summarized quantitatively in terms of weights on the two fundamental neural processes that underlie early colour encoding: the S-(L+M) ("blue-yellow") and L-M ("red-green") cone-opponent contrast channels ( Ling, Hurlbert & Robinson, 2006; Hurlbert & Ling, 2007). Here, we investigate whether colour preference in…

  5. Nontopological soliton in the Polyakov quark-meson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Mao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Within a mean-field approximation, we study a nontopological soliton solution of the Polyakov quark-meson model in the presence of a fermionic vacuum term with two flavors at finite temperature and density. The profile of the effective potential exhibits a stable soliton solution below a critical temperature T ≤Tχc for both the crossover and the first-order phase transitions, and these solutions are calculated here with appropriate boundary conditions. However, it is found that only if T ≤Tdc is the energy of the soliton MN less than the energy of the three free constituent quarks 3 Mq . As T >Tdc , there is an instant delocalization phase transition from hadron matter to quark matter. The phase diagram together with the location of a critical end point has been obtained in the T and μ plane. We notice that two critical temperatures always satisfy Tdc≤Tχc . Finally, we present and compare the result of thermodynamic pressure at zero chemical potential with lattice data.

  6. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  7. Colour annealing - a toy model of colour reconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhoff, Marisa; Skands, Peter; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    We present a simple toy model for colour reconnections at the nonperturbative level. The model resembles an annealing-type algorithm and is applicable to any collider and process type, though we argue for a possible enhancement of the effect in hadron-hadron collisions. We present a simple application and study of the consequences for semileptonic t{bar t} events at the Tevatron.

  8. Colour vision in diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Balkenius, Anna; Warrant, Eric J

    2003-08-01

    Diurnal and nocturnal hawkmoths (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera) have three spectral types of receptor sensitive to ultraviolet, blue and green light. As avid flower visitors and pollinators, they use olfactory and visual cues to find and recognise flowers. Moths of the diurnal species Macroglossum stellatarum and the nocturnal species Deilephila elpenor, Hyles lineata and Hyles gallii use and learn the colour of flowers. Nocturnal species can discriminate flowers at starlight intensities when humans and honeybees are colour-blind. M. stellatarum can use achromatic, intensity-related cues if colour cues are absent, and this is probably also true for D. elpenor. Both species can recognise colours even under a changed illumination colour. PMID:21680465

  9. Characterisation of the n-colour printing process using the spot colour overprint model.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Kiran; Green, Phil; Pointer, Michael R

    2014-12-29

    This paper is aimed at reproducing the solid spot colours using the n-colour separation. A simplified numerical method, called as the spot colour overprint (SCOP) model, was used for characterising the n-colour printing process. This model was originally developed for estimating the spot colour overprints. It was extended to be used as a generic forward characterisation model for the n-colour printing process. The inverse printer model based on the look-up table was implemented to obtain the colour separation for n-colour printing process. Finally the real-world spot colours were reproduced using 7-colour separation on lithographic offset printing process. The colours printed with 7 inks were compared against the original spot colours to evaluate the accuracy. The results show good accuracy with the mean CIEDE2000 value between the target colours and the printed colours of 2.06. The proposed method can be used successfully to reproduce the spot colours, which can potentially save significant time and cost in the printing and packaging industry. PMID:25607147

  10. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage. PMID:22886173

  11. Carotenoids need structural colours to shine.

    PubMed

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2005-06-22

    The bright colours of feathers are among the most striking displays in nature and are frequently used as sexual signals. Feathers can be coloured by pigments or by ordered tissue, and these mechanisms have traditionally been treated as distinct modes of display. Here we show that some yellow plumage colour is created both by reflection of light from white structural tissue and absorption of light by carotenoids. Thus, structural components of feathers contribute substantially to yellow 'carotenoid' displays, but the effect of variation in structural components on variation in colour displays is, to our knowledge, unstudied. The presence of structural colour in some carotenoid-based colour displays will have to be considered in studies of colour signalling. PMID:17148144

  12. Rare Down Quark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Kwong-Kwai Humphrey

    1992-01-01

    The rare decays bto sX are sensitive to strong interaction corrections. The effects can be estimated by a renormalization group technique which requires the evaluation of QCD mixing among effective operators. In the dimensional reduction and the naive dimensional regularization methods, there are discrepancies in evaluating the QCD mixing of the four-quark operators with the bto sgamma and bto s+gluon dipole operators. In this thesis, the problem is investigated by considering the contributions of the epsilon -scalar field and the epsilon -dimensional operators that distinguish between the two methods. The discrepancies are shown to come from the epsilon-dimensional four-quark operators in dimensional reduction and not from the epsilon -scalar field. In the decay bto sl^+l^ -, the intermediate of cc pairs in the charm-penguin diagram can form the resonance states J/psi and psi^'. In the published literature, there is a sign discrepancy in the Breit-Wigner amplitude for the resonance effects. Here, the sign difference is settled by considering the unitarity limit of the amplitude in the Argand diagram. The effects of the resonances are quite substantial on the invariant mass spectrum for this decay. However, they are shown to be negligible on the dilepton energy spectrum below 0.95 GeV. The energy spectrum is, thus, more useful than the invariant mass spectrum for measurements of the top -quark mass. The decays Bto K^*X are well modeled by the quark-level decays bto sX. In the quark model, the hadronization is done using a nonrelativistic wave function. In the decay B to K^*gamma, the large K ^* recoil creates an uncertainty in calculating the branching ratio using the quark model. The problem is explored by considering other meson processes where data exist. The data on the pi form factor and the omegapi^0 transition form factor suggest the necessity to retain relativistic spinor and meson normalizations in the quark -model; however, the data do not resolve the

  13. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations and Quark Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Thedore

    2002-04-01

    The Standard model currently suggests no relationship between the quark and lepton masses. The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an up quark mass of 237.31 MeV/c2 and a dn quark mass of 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new quarks help explain the numerical relationship between all the quark and lepton masses in a single function. The mass of each SNU-P (quark or lepton) is just the geometric mean of two related SNU-Ps, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.743828 (predicted), 117.3520, 1778.38, 26950.08 MeV. The resulting slope of these masses when plotted on semi log paper is "e" to 5 significant figures using the currently accepted mass for Tau. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these quarks, and lepton.

  14. Assignment of photoelectron spectra of halide-water clusters: Contrasting patterns of delocalization in Dyson orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2013-04-01

    Ab initio electron propagator calculations in various self-energy approximations provide accurate assignments of peaks observed in the photoelectron spectra of complexes that comprise a fluoride or chloride anion and two or three water molecules. More than one minimum structure is found in all four cases. When the halide anion is Cl-, the first three final states may be described as quasi-degenerate 2P chlorine atoms coordinated to water molecules. Higher final states consist of a chloride anion juxtaposed to a positive charge that is delocalized over the water molecules. For the clusters with fluoride anions, most of the final states correspond to Dyson orbitals that are delocalized over the F and O nuclei. A variety of F-O σ and π bonding and antibonding patterns are evident in the Dyson orbitals. The assignment of low-lying spectral peaks to halide p orbital vacancies or to delocalized solvent orbitals is more valid for the chloride clusters than for the fluoride clusters, where a delocalized picture arises from strong bonding interactions between F 2p and H2O 1b1 orbitals.

  15. Extreme density-driven delocalization error for a model solvated-electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Erin R. Otero-de-la-Roza, A. Dale, Stephen G.

    2013-11-14

    Delocalization (or charge-transfer) error is one of the scarce but spectacular failures of density-functional theory. It is particularly apparent in extensively delocalized molecules, and manifests in the calculation of bandgaps, reaction barriers, and dissociation limits. Even though delocalization error is always present in the self-consistent electron density, the differences from reference densities are often quite subtle and the error tends to be driven by the exchange-correlation energy expression. In this article, we propose a model system (the Kevan model) where approximate density functionals predict dramatically different charge distributions because of delocalization error. The model system consists of an electron trapped in a water hexamer and is a finite representation of an experimentally observed class of solids: electrides. The Kevan model is of fundamental interest because it allows the estimation of charge transfer error without recourse to fractional charge calculations, but our results are also relevant in the context of the modeling of confined electrons in density-functional theory.

  16. Put on that colour, it fits your emotion: Colour appropriateness as a function of expressed emotion.

    PubMed

    Dael, Nele; Perseguers, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Cynthia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mohr, Christine

    2016-01-01

    People associate affective meaning with colour, and this may influence decisions about colours. Hue is traditionally considered the most salient descriptor of colour and colour-affect associations, although colour brightness and saturation seem to have particularly strong affective connotations. To test whether colour choices can be driven by emotion, we investigated whether and how colour hue, brightness, and saturation are systematically associated with bodily expressions of positive (joy) and negative (fear) emotions. Twenty-five non-colour-blind participants viewed videos of these expressions and selected for each video the most appropriate colour using colour sliders providing values for hue, brightness, and saturation. The overall colour choices were congruent with the expressed emotion--that is, participants selected brighter and more saturated colours for joy expressions than for fear expressions. Also, colours along the red-yellow spectrum were deemed more appropriate for joy expressions and cyan-bluish hues for fear expressions. The current study adds further support to the role of emotion in colour choices by (a) showing that emotional information is spontaneously used in an unconstrained choice setting, (b) extending to ecologically valid stimuli occurring in everyday encounters (dressed bodies), and PMID:26339950

  17. Halogen Bonding from Dispersion-Corrected Density-Functional Theory: The Role of Delocalization Error.

    PubMed

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R; DiLabio, Gino A

    2014-12-01

    Halogen bonds are formed when a Lewis base interacts with a halogen atom in a different molecule, which acts as an electron acceptor. Due to its charge transfer component, halogen bonding is difficult to model using many common density-functional approximations because they spuriously overstabilize halogen-bonded dimers. It has been suggested that dispersion-corrected density functionals are inadequate to describe halogen bonding. In this work, we show that the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion correction coupled with functionals that minimize delocalization error (for instance, BH&HLYP, but also other half-and-half functionals) accurately model halogen-bonded interactions, with average errors similar to other noncovalent dimers with less charge-transfer effects. The performance of XDM is evaluated for three previously proposed benchmarks (XB18 and XB51 by Kozuch and Martin, and the set proposed by Bauzá et al.) spanning a range of binding energies up to ∼50 kcal/mol. The good performance of BH&HLYP-XDM is comparable to M06-2X, and extends to the "extreme" cases in the Bauzá set. This set contains anionic electron donors where charge transfer occurs even at infinite separation, as well as other charge transfer dimers belonging to the pnictogen and chalcogen bonding classes. We also show that functional delocalization error results in an overly delocalized electron density and exact-exchange hole. We propose intermolecular Bader delocalization indices as an indicator of both the donor-acceptor character of an intermolecular interaction and the delocalization error coming from the underlying functional. PMID:26583227

  18. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  19. The original colours of fossil beetles

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Maria E.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Orr, Patrick J.; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Structural colours, the most intense, reflective and pure colours in nature, are generated when light is scattered by complex nanostructures. Metallic structural colours are widespread among modern insects and can be preserved in their fossil counterparts, but it is unclear whether the colours have been altered during fossilization, and whether the absence of colours is always real. To resolve these issues, we investigated fossil beetles from five Cenozoic biotas. Metallic colours in these specimens are generated by an epicuticular multi-layer reflector; the fidelity of its preservation correlates with that of other key cuticular ultrastructures. Where these other ultrastructures are well preserved in non-metallic fossil specimens, we can infer that the original cuticle lacked a multi-layer reflector; its absence in the fossil is not a preservational artefact. Reconstructions of the original colours of the fossils based on the structure of the multi-layer reflector show that the preserved colours are offset systematically to longer wavelengths; this probably reflects alteration of the refractive index of the epicuticle during fossilization. These findings will allow the former presence, and original hue, of metallic structural colours to be identified in diverse fossil insects, thus providing critical evidence of the evolution of structural colour in this group. PMID:21957131

  20. Structural colour: Colour mixing in wing scales of a butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukusic, P.; Sambles, J. R.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2000-03-01

    Green coloration in the animal kingdom, as seen in birds' feathers and reptile integument, is often an additive mixture of structurally effected blue and pigmentary yellow. Here we investigate the origin of the bright green coloration of the wing scales of the Indonesian male Papilio palinurus butterfly, the microstructure of which generates an extraordinary combination of both yellow and blue iridescence. The dual colour arises from a modulation imposed on the multilayer, producing the blue component as a result of a previously undiscovered retro-reflection process.

  1. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  2. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  3. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  4. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  5. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  6. Quantifying Plant Colour and Colour Difference as Perceived by Humans Using Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Dave; Hauser, Cindy E.; Garrard, Georgia E.; Jellinek, Sacha; Giljohann, Katherine M.; Moore, Joslin L.

    2013-01-01

    Human perception of plant leaf and flower colour can influence species management. Colour and colour contrast may influence the detectability of invasive or rare species during surveys. Quantitative, repeatable measures of plant colour are required for comparison across studies and generalisation across species. We present a standard method for measuring plant leaf and flower colour traits using images taken with digital cameras. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the colour of and colour difference between the flowers of eleven grassland species near Falls Creek, Australia, as part of an invasive species detection experiment. The reliability of the method was tested by measuring the leaf colour of five residential garden shrub species in Ballarat, Australia using five different types of digital camera. Flowers and leaves had overlapping but distinct colour distributions. Calculated colour differences corresponded well with qualitative comparisons. Estimates of proportional cover of yellow flowers identified using colour measurements correlated well with estimates obtained by measuring and counting individual flowers. Digital SLR and mirrorless cameras were superior to phone cameras and point-and-shoot cameras for producing reliable measurements, particularly under variable lighting conditions. The analysis of digital images taken with digital cameras is a practicable method for quantifying plant flower and leaf colour in the field or lab. Quantitative, repeatable measurements allow for comparisons between species and generalisations across species and studies. This allows plant colour to be related to human perception and preferences and, ultimately, species management. PMID:23977275

  7. Quantifying plant colour and colour difference as perceived by humans using digital images.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Dave; Hauser, Cindy E; Garrard, Georgia E; Jellinek, Sacha; Giljohann, Katherine M; Moore, Joslin L

    2013-01-01

    Human perception of plant leaf and flower colour can influence species management. Colour and colour contrast may influence the detectability of invasive or rare species during surveys. Quantitative, repeatable measures of plant colour are required for comparison across studies and generalisation across species. We present a standard method for measuring plant leaf and flower colour traits using images taken with digital cameras. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the colour of and colour difference between the flowers of eleven grassland species near Falls Creek, Australia, as part of an invasive species detection experiment. The reliability of the method was tested by measuring the leaf colour of five residential garden shrub species in Ballarat, Australia using five different types of digital camera. Flowers and leaves had overlapping but distinct colour distributions. Calculated colour differences corresponded well with qualitative comparisons. Estimates of proportional cover of yellow flowers identified using colour measurements correlated well with estimates obtained by measuring and counting individual flowers. Digital SLR and mirrorless cameras were superior to phone cameras and point-and-shoot cameras for producing reliable measurements, particularly under variable lighting conditions. The analysis of digital images taken with digital cameras is a practicable method for quantifying plant flower and leaf colour in the field or lab. Quantitative, repeatable measurements allow for comparisons between species and generalisations across species and studies. This allows plant colour to be related to human perception and preferences and, ultimately, species management. PMID:23977275

  8. Colour Consideration for Waiting areas in hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zraati, Parisa

    2012-08-01

    Colour is one the most important factors in the nature that can have some affects on human behaviour. Many years ago, it was proven that using colour in public place can have some affect on the users. Depend of the darkness and lightness; it can be vary from positive to negative. The research will mainly focus on the colour and psychological influences and physical factors. The statement of problem in this research is what is impact of colour usually applied to waiting area? The overall aim of the study is to explore the visual environment of hospitals and to manage the colour psychological effect of the hospital users in the waiting area by creating a comfortable, pleasant and cozy environment for users while spend their time in waiting areas. The analysisconcentrate on satisfaction and their interesting regarding applied colour in two private hospital waiting area in Malaysia.

  9. Molecular tests for coat colours in horses.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Colour phenotypes may have played a major role during early domestication events and initial selection among domestic animal species. As coat colours mostly follow a relatively simple mode of Mendelian inheritance, they have been among the first traits to be systematically analysed at the molecular level. As a result of the number of genetic tools developed during the past decade, horse coat colour tests have been designed and are now commercially available for some of the basic phenotypes. These tests enable breeders to verify segregation within particular pedigrees, to select specific colour phenotypes according to market demand or studbook policies and to avoid complex inherited diseases associated with some of the colour patterns. This paper reviews the relevance of the topic, describes all currently available tests for coat colours in horses and addresses also ongoing research in this field. PMID:19912415

  10. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  11. Colour Vision Impairment in Young Alcohol Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Brasil, Alódia; Castro, Antônio José O.; Martins, Isabelle Christine V. S.; Lacerda, Eliza Maria C. B.; Souza, Givago S.; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Rosa, Alexandre Antônio M.; Rodrigues, Anderson R.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption among young adults is widely accepted in modern society and may be the starting point for abusive use of alcohol at later stages of life. Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to visual function impairment. In the present study, we investigated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity, colour arrangement ability, and colour discrimination thresholds on young adults that weekly consume alcoholic beverages without clinical concerns. Twenty-four young adults were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and performed three psychophysical tests to evaluate their vision functions. We estimated the spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function at 11 spatial frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 cycles/degree. No difference in contrast sensitivity was observed comparing alcohol consumers and control subjects. For the evaluation of colour vision, we used the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FM 100 test) to test subject’s ability to perform a colour arrangement task and the Mollon-Reffin test (MR test) to measure subject’s colour discrimination thresholds. Alcohol consumers made more mistakes than controls in the FM100 test, and their mistakes were diffusely distributed in the FM colour space without any colour axis preference. Alcohol consumers also performed worse than controls in the MR test and had higher colour discrimination thresholds compared to controls around three different reference points of a perceptually homogeneous colour space, the CIE 1976 chromaticity diagram. There was no colour axis preference in the threshold elevation observed among alcoholic subjects. Young adult weekly alcohol consumers showed subclinical colour vision losses with preservation of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity. Adolescence and young adult age are periods of important neurological development and alcohol exposure during this period of life might be responsible for deficits in visual functions, especially colour vision that is very sensitive to neurotoxicants. PMID

  12. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  13. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit. PMID:27531120

  14. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  15. Charge Separation and Recombination at Polymer-Fullerene Heterojunctions: Delocalization and Hybridization Effects.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2016-02-01

    We address charge separation and recombination in polymer/fullerene solar cells with a multiscale modeling built from accurate atomistic inputs and accounting for disorder, interface electrostatics and genuine quantum effects on equal footings. Our results show that bound localized charge transfer states at the interface coexist with a large majority of thermally accessible delocalized space-separated states that can be also reached by direct photoexcitation, thanks to their strong hybridization with singlet polymer excitons. These findings reconcile the recent experimental reports of ultrafast exciton separation ("hot" process) with the evidence that high quantum yields do not require excess electronic or vibrational energy ("cold" process), and show that delocalization, by shifting the density of charge transfer states toward larger effective electron-hole radii, may reduce energy losses through charge recombination. PMID:26785294

  16. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  17. Localization-delocalization transition in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We address the impact of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the localization-delocalization-transition (LDT) in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic potential. We find that SO coupling significantly alters the threshold depth of the one of sublattices above which the lowest eigenstates transform from delocalizated into localized. For some moderate coupling strengths the threshold is strongly reduced, which is explained by the SO coupling-induced band flattening in one of the sub-lattices. We explain why simultaneous Rabi and SO coupling are necessary ingredients for LDT threshold cancellation and show that strong SO coupling drives the system into the state where its evolution becomes similar to the evolution of a one-component system. We also find that defocusing nonlinearity can lead to localization of the states which are delocalized in the linear limit. PMID:27531120

  18. Colour measurements of all ceramic crown systems.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, S F; Porter, S S; Johnston, W M

    1989-09-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to determine variability among colour parameters of five different ceramic crown systems; and (ii) to measure the effect of using coloured luting agents on restoration colour. The crown systems studied were Cerestore, Dicor, Hi-Ceram, Renaissance, and Vitadur-N. Five crowns for each system were made according to manufacturer's instructions with the same nominal shade (Vita Lumin Vacuum A2) to fit an Ivorine central incisor tooth. Restoration thickness was adjusted to within +/- 0.1 mm (+/- 0.05 mm in the mid-facial area where colour measurements were to be made) with the aid of a dial calliper prior to glazing or, in the case of Dicor, surface staining. Where a core was part of the system this was fabricated to the minimum recommended thickness. The crowns were cemented using luting agents of five different colours in a randomly chosen sequence. The colour of each restoration/cement combination was measured three times using a small-area colorimeter (Minolta CR-121). The variance of each colour parameter (L*, a*, b*) was statistically compared for each crown system using an analysis of variance procedure, as was the effect of the cement. Observed differences were related to visual perception by using the colour difference formula. There were statistically significant differences among the variances of the crown systems and the cements, with significant interactions between crown systems and direction of colour and between cement and direction of colour. Restorations made with different ceramic crown systems had noticeably different colour despite having the same nominal shade. Changing the shade of the luting agent had a perceivable effect on Dicor crowns and, to a lesser extent, on Vitadur-N crowns but not on the other systems due, presumably, to the opacity of their core materials. PMID:2809851

  19. Triplet State Delocalization in a Conjugated Porphyrin Dimer Probed by Transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  20. Dissecting Proton Delocalization in an Enzyme's Hydrogen Bond Network with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufan; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Extended hydrogen bond networks are a common structural motif of enzymes. A recent analysis proposed quantum delocalization of protons as a feature present in the hydrogen bond network spanning a triad of tyrosines (Y(16), Y(32), and Y(57)) in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), contributing to its unusual acidity and large isotope shift. In this study, we utilized amber suppression to substitute each tyrosine residue with 3-chlorotyrosine to test the delocalization model and the proton affinity balance in the triad. X-ray crystal structures of each variant demonstrated that the structure, notably the O-O distances within the triad, was unaffected by 3-chlorotyrosine substitutions. The changes in the cluster's acidity and the acidity's isotope dependence in these variants were assessed via UV-vis spectroscopy and the proton sharing pattern among individual residues with (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Our data show pKa detuning at each triad residue alters the proton delocalization behavior in the H-bond network. The extra stabilization energy necessary for the unusual acidity mainly comes from the strong interactions between Y(57) and Y(16). This is further enabled by Y(32), which maintains the right geometry and matched proton affinity in the triad. This study provides a rich picture of the energetics of the hydrogen bond network in enzymes for further model refinement. PMID:26571340

  1. Delocalization of femtosecond laser radiation in crystalline Si in the mid-IR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavedeev, E. V.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The strong delocalization of the energy of femtosecond pulses in silicon appears to be an essential factor for preventing laser damage inside a crystal and seemingly excludes the possibility of direct laser writing in the bulk, at least in the one- and two-photon absorption (1 PA and 2 PA) wavelength regions. Previously, the prefocal depletion of the pulse energy and laser-induced free-carrier plasma defocusing of the light were considered to be the main causes of the unlocalized dissipation of light energy. Here, we consider whether the delocalization could be significantly reduced by using longer wavelengths, at which the role of 1 PA and 2 PA decreases and higher orders of nonlinearity come into play. We numerically simulate propagation of focused femtosecond pulses at a wavelength of 1.2-5.25 μm. Plasma defocusing was found to be the crucial delocalization mechanism that prevents the enhancement of material excitation, even in the five-photon absorption region.

  2. Brilliant Colours from a White Snow Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Shaw, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Surprisingly colourful views are possible from sparkling white snow. It is well known that similarly colourful features can exist in the sky whenever appropriate ice crystals are around. However, the transition of light reflection and refraction from ice crystals in the air to reflection and refraction from those in snow on the ground is not…

  3. Development of specifications for caramel colours.

    PubMed

    Licht, B H; Shaw, K; Smith, C; Mendoza, M; Orr, J; Myers, D V

    1992-05-01

    Specifications have been developed to define each of the four classes of caramel colour. The specifications were based on analysis of a large database generated during the course of characterization studies of each of the classes. A series of simple and practical tests was developed for the analysis of caramel colour samples to ensure conformity to the specifications. PMID:1644379

  4. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  5. Application of graph colouring to biological networks.

    PubMed

    Khor, S

    2010-05-01

    The author explores the application of graph colouring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, the author finds that given similar conditions (i.e. graph size, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colours are needed to colour disassortative than assortative networks. Fewer colours create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, the author suggests that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science, 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, because graph colouring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node colouring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes (dense subgraphs in PPI networks), is investigated. The author finds that for PPI networks where 1-11% of nodes participate in at least one identified protein complex, such as H. sapien, DSATUR (a well-known complete graph colouring algorithm) node colouring information can improve the quality (homogeneity and separation) of initial candidate complexes. This finding may help improve existing protein complex detection methods, and/or suggest new methods. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:20499999

  6. Representing Object Colour in Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition hold that mentally representing something "red" engages the neural subsystems that respond to environmental perception of that colour. This paper examines whether implicit perceptual information on object colour is represented during sentence comprehension even though doing so does not necessarily facilitate task…

  7. Colour mathematics: with graphs and numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    2009-07-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just attempting to memorize them.

  8. Colour Mathematics: With Graphs and Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The different combinations involved in additive and subtractive colour mixing can often be difficult for students to remember. Using transmission graphs for filters of the primary colours and a numerical scheme to write out the relationships are good exercises in analytical thinking that can help students recall the combinations rather than just…

  9. Colour in insect thermoregulation: empirical and theoretical tests in the colour-changing grasshopper, Kosciuscola tristis.

    PubMed

    Umbers, K D L; Herberstein, M E; Madin, J S

    2013-01-01

    Body colours can result in different internal body temperatures, but evidence for the biological significance of colour-induced temperature differences is inconsistent. We investigated the relationship between body colour and temperature in a model insect species that rapidly changes colour. We used an empirical approach and constructed a heat budget model to quantify whether a colour change from black to turquoise has a role in thermoregulation for the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis). Our study shows that colour change in K. tristis provides relatively small temperature differences that vary greatly with wind speed (0.55 °C at ms(-1) to 0.05 °C at 10 ms(-1)). The biological significance of this difference is unclear and we discuss the requirement for more studies that directly test hypotheses regarding the fitness effects of colour in manipulating body temperature. PMID:23108152

  10. Measurement and prediction of pork colour.

    PubMed

    Van Oeckel, M J; Warnants, N; Boucqué, C V

    1999-08-01

    The extent to which instrumental colour determinations by FOPu (light scattering), Göfo (reflectance) and Labscan II (CIE L*, CIE a* and CIE b*, hue and chroma) are related to the Japanese colour grades was studied. Additionally, four on-line methods: pH1, FOP1, PQM1 (conductivity) and DDLT (Double Density Light Transmission, analogous to Capteur Gras/Maigre), were evaluated for their ability to predict subjectively and objectively colour. One hundred and twenty samples of m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, from animals of different genotypes, were analysed. Of the instrumental colour determinations, CIE L* (r=-0.82), FOPu (r=-0.70) and Göfo (r=0.70) were best correlated with the Japanese colour scores. The Japanese colour grades could be predicted by the on-line instruments, pH1, FOP1, PQM1 and DDLT, with determination coefficients between 15 and 28%. Ultimate meat colour, determined by Japanese colour standards, FOPu, Göfo and CIE L*, was better predicted by DDLT than by the classic on-line instruments: FOP1, pH1 and PQM1, although the standard error of the estimate was similar for all instruments. This means that DDLT, although originally designed for estimating lean meat percentage, can additionally give information about meat quality, in particular colour. However, it must be stressed that the colour estimate by DDLT refers to a population of animals, rather than to individual pigs, because of the number of erroneously assigned samples. PMID:22062695

  11. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations & low Mass Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2003-04-01

    The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an "up" quark of mass 237.31 MeV/c2 and a "dn" quark of mass 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new predicted quarks helped to determine that the masses of the quarks and leptons are all related by a geometric progression relationship. The mass of each quark or lepton is just the "geometric mean" of two related elementary particles, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.74 (predicted), 117.3, 1778.4 (tau), 26950.1 MeV. The geometric ratio of this progression is 15.154 (e to the power e). The mass of the tau in this theory agrees very well with accepted values. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237.31 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these new quarks, and lepton. Ref. Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/ 0008026, @ http://xxx.lanl.gov. Infinite Energy, Vol 5, issue 30.

  12. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; W. Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquarks channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  13. On Anomalous Quark Triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous quark triangles with one axial and two vector currents are studied in special kinematics when one of the vector currents carries a soft momentum. According to the Adler-Bardeen theorem the anomalous longitudinal part of the triangle is not renormalized in the chiral limit. We show that perturbative corrections the transversal part of the triangle is also absent. This nonrenormalization, in difference with the longitudinal part, holds on only perturbatively.

  14. What is a Quark?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon L.; Perry, Malcolm J.

    2015-03-01

    We are used to thinking of quarks as fundamental particles in the same way we think of the electron, or gauge bosons, neutrinos, leptons. In strong theory, these objects are unified with gravitation and the physics of spacetime into what is hoped to be an ultimate theory, string/M theory. The string/M theory paradigm completely changes the way we think of the socalled elementary particles in quantum field theory.

  15. What is a quark?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon L.; Perry, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    We are used to thinking of quarks as fundamental particles in the same way we think of the electron, or gauge bosons, neutrinos, leptons. In strong theory, these objects are unified with gravitation and the physics of spacetime into what is hoped to be an ultimate theory, string/M theory. The string/M theory paradigm completely changes the way we think of the so-called elementary particles in quantum field theory.

  16. Transversity quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transversity quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. Particular attention is paid to comparing our results with the recent experimental extraction of the transversity distributions by Anselmino et al. We also compare our transversity results with earlier spin-independent and helicity quark distributions calculated in the same approach.

  17. String worldsheet for accelerating quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Semenoff, Gordon W.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the AdS bulk dual to an external massive quark in SYM following an arbitrary trajectory on Minkowski background. While a purely outgoing boundary condition on the gluonic field allows one to express the corresponding string worldsheet in a closed form, the setup has curious consequences. In particular, we argue that any quark whose trajectory on flat spacetime approaches that of a light ray in the remote past (as happens e.g. in the case of uniform acceleration) must necessarily be accompanied by an anti-quark. This is puzzling from the field theory standpoint, since one would expect that a sole quark following any timelike trajectory should be allowed. We explain the resolution in terms of boundary and initial conditions. We analyze the configuration in global AdS, which naturally suggests a modification to the boundary conditions allowing for a single accelerated quark without accompanying anti-quark. We contrast this resolution with earlier proposals.

  18. Evolution of colour vision in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Gerald H.

    2009-01-01

    Colour vision allows animals to reliably distinguish differences in the distributions of spectral energies reaching the eye. Although not universal, a capacity for colour vision is sufficiently widespread across the animal kingdom to provide prima facie evidence of its importance as a tool for analysing and interpreting the visual environment. The basic biological mechanisms on which vertebrate colour vision ultimately rests, the cone opsin genes and the photopigments they specify, are highly conserved. Within that constraint, however, the utilization of these basic elements varies in striking ways in that they appear, disappear and emerge in altered form during the course of evolution. These changes, along with other alterations in the visual system, have led to profound variations in the nature and salience of colour vision among the vertebrates. This article concerns the evolution of colour vision among the mammals, viewing that process in the context of relevant biological mechanisms, of variations in mammalian colour vision, and of the utility of colour vision. PMID:19720656

  19. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Samo; Kreft, Marko

    2007-11-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thickness of a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil or an aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some regions of Central Europe, salad dressing is made preferably with the pumpkin seed oil, which has a strong characteristic nut-like taste and remarkable properties of the colour: it appears red in a bottle, but green when served as a salad dressing. The colour of the pumpkin seed oil was previously described as brownish yellow, dark green, dark green to red ochre or dark reddish brown to light yellow green. We elucidated the physicochemical and physiological basis of such dichromatism by Beer-Lambert law and by the characteristics of human colour perception. Our concept was corroborated by the outcome of calculations of colour from spectral properties using colour matching functions. We found that dichromatism is observed if the absorption spectrum of any substance has at least two local minima: one wide but shallow and one narrow but deep local minimum. PMID:17534588

  20. Physicochemical and physiological basis of dichromatic colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Samo; Kreft, Marko

    2007-11-01

    Out of three perceptual characteristics of the colour of any substance, the hue depends mostly on the spectral properties of a substance, while the brightness and saturation depend also on the concentration of a substance and its thickness. Here, we report that evident change of the hue of the colour (i.e., from green to red) is due to a change in concentration or the thickness of a layer in some exceptional substances such as pumpkin seed oil or an aqueous solution of bromophenol blue. In some regions of Central Europe, salad dressing is made preferably with the pumpkin seed oil, which has a strong characteristic nut-like taste and remarkable properties of the colour: it appears red in a bottle, but green when served as a salad dressing. The colour of the pumpkin seed oil was previously described as brownish yellow, dark green, dark green to red ochre or dark reddish brown to light yellow green. We elucidated the physicochemical and physiological basis of such dichromatism by Beer-Lambert law and by the characteristics of human colour perception. Our concept was corroborated by the outcome of calculations of colour from spectral properties using colour matching functions. We found that dichromatism is observed if the absorption spectrum of any substance has at least two local minima: one wide but shallow and one narrow but deep local minimum.

  1. Colour and lighting in hospital design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalke, Hilary; Little, Jenny; Niemann, Elga; Camgoz, Nilgun; Steadman, Guillaume; Hill, Sarah; Stott, Laura

    2006-06-01

    Little information or guidance has been available to assist the development of a hospital's visual environment. A report on lighting and colour design schemes, accessible to non professionals with responsibility for refurbishment strategies, was required by NHS Estates. Firstly, 20 hospitals were audited to establish a picture of current practice and to identify key issues where colour design could broadly enhance the environment for patients, staff and visitors. Critical areas were outlined in this report, where colour design can be utilised and applied, for the benefit of all users, from ambience to essential legal requirements such as colour contrast for the visually impaired. Provision of staff relaxation rooms that are different in terms of colour and lux levels from immediate work spaces, or thoughtfully designed areas for patients awaiting intensive treatment, have been shown to have some beneficial effects on a sense of well being. Colour and design have not been established as a definite cure for sickness and ill health, but certainly monotony and poor conditions in premises that have not been refurbished with any care, have had a detrimental affect on recovery rates and staff morale. The realisation that a well balanced and attractive environment is of major importance to patients' health is, in no way new; Florence Nightingale observed that 'a variety of form and brilliance of colour in the objects presented to patients are an actual means of recovery'.

  2. Artificial selection for food colour preferences

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Gemma L.; Endler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  3. Artificial selection for food colour preferences.

    PubMed

    Cole, Gemma L; Endler, John A

    2015-04-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  4. Colouration and Colour Changes of the Fiddler Crab, Uca capricornis: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Detto, Tanya; Hemmi, Jan M.; Backwell, Patricia R. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Colour changes in animals may be triggered by a variety of social and environmental factors and may occur over a matter of seconds or months. Crustaceans, like fiddler crabs (genus Uca), are particularly adept at changing their colour and have been the focus of numerous studies. However, few of these studies have attempted to quantitatively describe the individual variation in colour and pattern or their adaptive significance. This paper quantitatively describes the colour patterns of the fiddler crab Uca capricornis and their ability to change on a socially significant timescale. The most dramatic changes in colour pattern are associated with moulting. These ontogenetic changes result in a general reduction of the colour pattern with increasing size, although females are more colourful and variable than similarly-sized males. Uca capricornis are also capable of rapid colour changes in response to stress, but show no endogenous rhythms associated with the semilunar and tidal cycles commonly reported in other fiddler crabs. The extreme colour polymorphism and the relative stability of the colour patterns in Uca capricornis are consistent with their use in visually mediated mate recognition. PMID:18286186

  5. Colouration and colour changes of the fiddler crab, Uca capricornis: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Detto, Tanya; Hemmi, Jan M; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2008-01-01

    Colour changes in animals may be triggered by a variety of social and environmental factors and may occur over a matter of seconds or months. Crustaceans, like fiddler crabs (genus Uca), are particularly adept at changing their colour and have been the focus of numerous studies. However, few of these studies have attempted to quantitatively describe the individual variation in colour and pattern or their adaptive significance. This paper quantitatively describes the colour patterns of the fiddler crab Uca capricornis and their ability to change on a socially significant timescale. The most dramatic changes in colour pattern are associated with moulting. These ontogenetic changes result in a general reduction of the colour pattern with increasing size, although females are more colourful and variable than similarly-sized males. Uca capricornis are also capable of rapid colour changes in response to stress, but show no endogenous rhythms associated with the semilunar and tidal cycles commonly reported in other fiddler crabs. The extreme colour polymorphism and the relative stability of the colour patterns in Uca capricornis are consistent with their use in visually mediated mate recognition. PMID:18286186

  6. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  7. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  8. Most and Least Preferred Colours Differ According to Object Context: New Insights from an Unrestricted Colour Range.

    PubMed

    Jonauskaite, Domicele; Mohr, Christine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Spiers, Peter M; Althaus, Betty; Anil, Selin; Dael, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Humans like some colours and dislike others, but which particular colours and why remains to be understood. Empirical studies on colour preferences generally targeted most preferred colours, but rarely least preferred (disliked) colours. In addition, findings are often based on general colour preferences leaving open the question whether results generalise to specific objects. Here, 88 participants selected the colours they preferred most and least for three context conditions (general, interior walls, t-shirt) using a high-precision colour picker. Participants also indicated whether they associated their colour choice to a valenced object or concept. The chosen colours varied widely between individuals and contexts and so did the reasons for their choices. Consistent patterns also emerged, as most preferred colours in general were more chromatic, while for walls they were lighter and for t-shirts they were darker and less chromatic compared to least preferred colours. This meant that general colour preferences could not explain object specific colour preferences. Measures of the selection process further revealed that, compared to most preferred colours, least preferred colours were chosen more quickly and were less often linked to valenced objects or concepts. The high intra- and inter-individual variability in this and previous reports furthers our understanding that colour preferences are determined by subjective experiences and that most and least preferred colours are not processed equally. PMID:27022909

  9. Most and Least Preferred Colours Differ According to Object Context: New Insights from an Unrestricted Colour Range

    PubMed Central

    Jonauskaite, Domicele; Mohr, Christine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Spiers, Peter M.; Althaus, Betty; Anil, Selin; Dael, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Humans like some colours and dislike others, but which particular colours and why remains to be understood. Empirical studies on colour preferences generally targeted most preferred colours, but rarely least preferred (disliked) colours. In addition, findings are often based on general colour preferences leaving open the question whether results generalise to specific objects. Here, 88 participants selected the colours they preferred most and least for three context conditions (general, interior walls, t-shirt) using a high-precision colour picker. Participants also indicated whether they associated their colour choice to a valenced object or concept. The chosen colours varied widely between individuals and contexts and so did the reasons for their choices. Consistent patterns also emerged, as most preferred colours in general were more chromatic, while for walls they were lighter and for t-shirts they were darker and less chromatic compared to least preferred colours. This meant that general colour preferences could not explain object specific colour preferences. Measures of the selection process further revealed that, compared to most preferred colours, least preferred colours were chosen more quickly and were less often linked to valenced objects or concepts. The high intra- and inter-individual variability in this and previous reports furthers our understanding that colour preferences are determined by subjective experiences and that most and least preferred colours are not processed equally. PMID:27022909

  10. The colour wheels of art, perception, science and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Nick

    2006-06-01

    Colour is not the domain of any one discipline be it art, philosophy, psychology or science. Each discipline has its own colour wheel and this presentation examines the origins and philosophies behind the colour circles of Art, Perception, Science and Physiology (after image) with reference to Aristotle, Robert Boyle, Leonardo da Vinci, Goethe, Ewald Hering and Albert Munsell. The paper analyses and discusses the differences between the four colour wheels using the Natural Colour System® notation as the reference for hue (the position of colours within each of the colour wheels). Examination of the colour wheels shows the dominance of blue in the wheels of art, science and physiology particularly at the expense of green. This paper does not consider the three-dimensionality of colour space its goal was to review the hue of a colour with regard to its position on the respective colour wheels.

  11. Valence quark spin distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-09-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the constituent quark model provide a natural explanation for many nucleon properties, including the {Delta} - N splitting, the charge radius of the neutron, and the observation that the proton's quark distribution function ratio d(x)/u(x) {r_arrow} 0 as x {r_arrow} 1. The hyperfine-perturbed quark model also makes predictions for the nucleon spin-dependent distribution functions. Precision measurements of the resulting asymmetries A{sub 1}{sup p}(x) and A{sub 1}{sup n}(x) in the valence region can test this model and thereby the hypothesis that the valence quark spin distributions are ''normal''.

  12. Chirality and the Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson; Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2002-06-07

    The relationship of the quark model to the known chiral properties of QCD is a long-standing problem in the interpretation of low energy QCD. In particular, how can the pion be viewed as both a collective Goldstone boson quasiparticle and as a valence quark antiquark bound state? A comparison of the many-body solution of a simplified model of QCD to the constituent quark model demonstrates that the quark model is sufficiently flexible to describe meson hyperfine splitting provided proper renormalization conditions and correct degrees of freedom are employed consistently.

  13. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  14. Drug-induced hair colour changes.

    PubMed

    Bublin, J G; Thompson, D F

    1992-10-01

    Drug-induced hair colour changes are not a common adverse effect from medications. A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in causing hair colour changes but very few have data to support a true relationship. Of the drugs reported, chloroquine and cancer chemotherapeutic agents have the best evidence to support an association. Other drugs, such as p-aminobenzoic acid, calcium pantothenate, anthralin, chinoform, mephenesin, minoxidil, propofol, valproic acid, and verapamil await confirmatory data. Drug-induced causes should be considered in any patient with unexplained hair colour changes. PMID:1464633

  15. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  16. Why colour in subterranean vertebrates? Exploring the evolution of colour patterns in caecilian amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, K C; Measey, C John

    2009-05-01

    The proximate functions of animal skin colour are difficult to assign as they can result from natural selection, sexual selection or neutral evolution under genetic drift. Most often colour patterns are thought to signal visual stimuli; so,their presence in subterranean taxa is perplexing. We evaluate the adaptive nature of colour patterns in nearly a third of all known species of caecilians, an order of amphibians most of which live in tropical soils and leaf litter. We found that certain colour pattern elements in caecilians can be explained based on characteristics concerning above-ground movement. Our study implies that certain caecilian colour patterns have convergently evolved under selection and we hypothesize their function most likely to be a synergy of aposematism and crypsis, related to periods when individuals move overground. In a wider context, our results suggest that very little exposure to daylight is required to evolve and maintain a varied array of colour patterns in animal skin. PMID:21462404

  17. The degree of π electron delocalization and the formation of 3D-extensible sandwich structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Caixia; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Li, Jia-Jia; Li, Debao; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-04-28

    DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations were performed to examine the feasibility of graphene-like C42H18 and starbenzene C6(BeH)6 (SBz) polymers as ligands of 3D-extensible sandwich compounds (3D-ESCs) with uninterrupted sandwich arrays. The results revealed that sandwich compounds with three or more C42H18 ligands were not feasible. The possible reason may be the localization of π electrons on certain C6 hexagons due to π-metal interactions, which makes the whole ligand lose its electronic structure basis (higher degree of π electron delocalization) to maintain the planar structure. For comparison, with the aid of benzene (Bz) molecules, the SBz polymers can be feasible ligands for designing 3D-ESCs because the C-Be interactions in individual SBz are largely ionic, which will deter the π electrons on one C6 ring from connecting to those on neighbouring C6 rings. This means that high degree of π electron delocalization is not necessary for maintaining the planarity of SBz polymers. Such a locally delocalized π electron structure is desirable for the ligands of 3D-ESCs. Remarkably, the formation of a sandwich compound with SBz is thermodynamically more favourable than that found for bis(Bz)chromium. The assembly of 3D-ESCs is largely exothermic, which will facilitate future experimental synthesis. The different variation trends on the HOMO-LUMO gaps in different directions (relative to the sandwich axes) suggest that they can be developed to form directional conductors or semiconductors, which may be useful in the production of electronic devices. PMID:27004750

  18. Concurrent Effects of Delocalization and Internal Conversion Tune Charge Separation at Regioregular Polythiophene-Fullerene Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-01

    Quantum-dynamical simulations are used to investigate the interplay of exciton delocalization and vibronically induced internal conversion processes in the elementary charge separation steps at regioregular donor-acceptor heterojunctions. Ultrafast internal conversion leads to efficient deexcitation within the excitonic and charge transfer manifolds, thus modifying the charge separation dynamics. We address a model donor-acceptor junction representative of regioregular P3HT-PCBM, using high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations by multiconfigurational methods. While partial trapping into an interfacial charge separated state occurs, long-range charge-separated states are accessed as previously demonstrated in the work of Tamura and Burghardt [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 16364]. For an H-aggregate type, stacked donor species, the initial bright state undergoes ultrafast internal conversion within the excitonic manifold, creating multiple charge transfer pathways before reaching the lowest-energy dark exciton, which is uncoupled from the charge transfer manifold. This process profoundly affects the charge separation mechanism and efficiency. For small energetic offsets between the interfacial excitonic and charge transfer states, a delocalized initial bright state proves less prone to electron-hole capture by the interfacial trap than a localized, vibronic wavepacket close to the interface. For both delocalized and localized initial states, a comparable yield of free carriers is obtained, which is found to be optimal for energetic offsets of the order of the Coulomb barrier to charge separation. Interfacial trapping is significantly reduced as the barrier height decreases with fullerene aggregation. Despite the high-dimensional nature of the system, charge separation is an ultrafast coherent quantum process exhibiting oscillatory features as observed in recent experiments. PMID:26263337

  19. Effect of weak disorder on delocalization properties of gapped graphene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, E. S.; Maksimova, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of weak disorder on the delocalization properties of gapped graphene superlattice (SL) formed by periodically located rectangular potential barriers. We consider two types of the SLs: the SLs with uniform gap and SLs consisting of alternating layers of gapped and gapless graphene regions. Using the perturbative approach we obtain an analytical expression for the inverse localization length (ILL) derived for the case of randomly fluctuating geometric and energetic parameters. In the first case, when the barrier (well) width fluctuates around its mean value, the corresponding equation for the ILL reveals the presence of the Fabry-Perot resonances, at which the localization length diverges. These resonances are exact, i.e., are stored in any degree of disorder. It has been found that the localization properties manifest stronger for the particles with energies lying in the non-resonant bands where our approach is extremely sensitive to the degree of disorder. For the case of weakly fluctuating both barrier and well widths we analytically obtain ILL taking correlations into account. The main effect of the correlations, which lead to an increase (or decrease) in the localization length, was revealed near the double resonance arising at coincidence of two Fabry-Perot resonances associated with barrier and well widths. The random fluctuations of the potential strength also lead to the delocalization resonances. However, they exist only in a weak-disorder approximation. We found that, for an array composed of alternating strips of gapless and gapped graphene modifications these resonances can appear only for normally incident particles in contrast to the SL with a uniform gap. For such particles, the delocalization resonances occur also in the purely random potential. This means, in particular, that in the one-dimensional case, not all the states of the massive Dirac particles are localized in the presence of weak disorder.

  20. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  1. Fast delocalization leads to robust long-range excitonic transfer in a large quantum chlorosome model.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Huh, Joonsuk; Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-03-11

    Chlorosomes are efficient light-harvesting antennas containing up to hundreds of thousands of bacteriochlorophyll molecules. With massively parallel computer hardware, we use a nonperturbative stochastic Schrödinger equation, while including an atomistically derived spectral density, to study excitonic energy transfer in a realistically sized chlorosome model. We find that fast short-range delocalization leads to robust long-range transfer due to the antennae's concentric-roll structure. Additionally, we discover anomalous behavior arising from different initial conditions, and outline general considerations for simulating excitonic systems on the nanometer to micrometer scale. PMID:25694170

  2. Excitation Localization/Delocalization Isomerism in a Strongly Coupled Covalent Dimer of 1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran.

    PubMed

    Schrauben, Joel N; Akdag, Akin; Wen, Jin; Havlas, Zdenek; Ryerson, Joseph L; Smith, Millie B; Michl, Josef; Johnson, Justin C

    2016-05-26

    Two isomers of both the lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) states of the directly para, para'-connected covalent dimer of the singlet-fission chromophore 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran have been observed. In one isomer, excitation is delocalized over both halves of the dimer, and in the other, it is localized on one or the other half. For a covalent dimer in solution, such "excitation isomerism" is extremely rare. The vibrationally relaxed isomers do not interconvert, and their photophysical properties, including singlet fission, differ significantly. PMID:27158903

  3. Excitation migration along oligophenylenevinylene-based chiral stacks: delocalization effects on transport dynamics.

    PubMed

    Beljonne, D; Hennebicq, E; Daniel, C; Herz, L M; Silva, C; Scholes, G D; Hoeben, F J M; Jonkheijm, P; Schenning, A P H J; Meskers, S C J; Phillips, R T; Friend, R H; Meijer, E W

    2005-06-01

    Atomistic models based on quantum-chemical calculations are combined with time-resolved spectroscopic investigations to explore the migration of electronic excitations along oligophenylenevinylene-based chiral stacks. It is found that the usual Pauli master equation (PME) approach relying on uncoherent transport between individual chromophores underestimates the excitation diffusion dynamics, monitored here by the time decay of the transient polarization anisotropy. A better agreement to experiment is achieved when accounting for excitation delocalization among acceptor molecules, as implemented in a modified version of the PME model. The same models are applied to study light harvesting and trapping in guest-host systems built from oligomers of different lengths. PMID:16852286

  4. Subpicosecond hole tunneling by nonresonant delocalization in asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. F.; Ten, S.; McGinnis, B. P.; Hayduk, M. J.; Khitrova, G.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1995-11-01

    We present experimental evidence for subpicosecond hole tunneling in asymmetric double-quantum-well structures. A single tunneling time is observed at low carrier densities indicating that hole tunneling times are at least as fast as electron tunneling times despite the absence of resonances between hole states. We have conducted band-structure and tunneling-time calculations suggesting that nonresonant delocalization of hole wave functions combined with alloy scattering provides an efficient mechanism for fast hole transfer from the narrow well (NW) to the wide well (WW) at finite in-plane momenta. We suggest that holes tunnel to the WW before reaching the bottom of the lowest subband in the NW.

  5. Colour vision: parallel pathways intersect in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Henze, Miriam J

    2013-12-01

    In the last one hundred years, colour vision has been demonstrated in bees and many other insects. But the underlying neural wiring remained elusive. A new study on Drosophila melanogaster combining behavioural and genetic tools yields surprising insights. PMID:24309280

  6. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  7. Cool Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-01

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O (g5) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  8. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium. PMID:27494468

  9. Rockpool Gobies Change Colour for Camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Martin; Lown, Alice E.; Denton, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is found in a wide range of species living in numerous habitat types, offering protection from visually guided predators. This includes many species from the intertidal zone, which must cope with background types diverse in appearance and with multiple predator groups foraging at high and low tide. Many animals are capable of either relatively slow (hours, days, weeks) or rapid (seconds and minutes) colour change in order to better resemble the background against which they are found, but most work has been restricted to a few species or taxa. It is often suggested that many small intertidal fish are capable of colour change for camouflage, yet little experimental work has addressed this. Here, we test rock gobies (Gobius paganellus) for colour change abilities, and whether they can tune their appearance to match the background. In two experiments, we place gobies on backgrounds of different brightness (black or white), and of different colours (red and blue) and use digital image analysis and modelling of predator (avian) vision to quantify colour and luminance (perceived lightness) changes and camouflage. We find that gobies are capable of rapid colour change (occurring within one minute), and that they can change their luminance on lighter or darker backgrounds. When presented on backgrounds of different colours, gobies also change their colour (hue and saturation) while keeping luminance the same. These changes lead to predicted improvements in camouflage match to the background. Our study shows that small rockpool fish are capable of rapid visual change for concealment, and that this may be an important mechanism in many species to avoid predation, especially in complex heterogeneous environments. PMID:25333382

  10. Plants and colour: Flowers and pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Renee; Owens, Simon J.; Rørslett, Bjørn

    2011-03-01

    While there is a range of colours found in plants the predominant colour is green. Pigments in plants have several roles e.g. photosynthesis and signalling. If colour is to be used as a signal then it must stand out from green. However, one should be aware that there are also coloured compounds where we have not yet fully investigated the role of colour in their functions—they may have roles in, for example, defence or heat exchange. In this paper, we will describe the basic chemistry of the major pigments found in plants and especially floral pigments. We will then discuss their locations in parts of the flower (such as sepals, petals, pollen and nectar), the cells in which they are found and their sub-cellular locations. Floral pigments have a large role to play in pollination of flowers by animals. They can and are modified in many ways during the development of flowers in nature, for example, at emergence and post-pollination. There are a range of biochemical mechanisms of colour change both within flowers and in isolated pigments. Some of the factors influencing colour are temperature, co-pigments, pH, metals, sugars, anthocyanin stacking and cell shape. There is a renewed interest in analysing floral pigments and how they are modified partly because of advances in recombinant DNA technologies, but also because of pollinators and their significance to biodiversity and for evolutionary studies. There is continued strong interest from the horticultural industry for the introduction of new colours e.g. the blue rose and for the exploitation of natural dyes. Funding in this area may impact future research in a potentially beneficial way but it must not deflect us from science-based conservation.

  11. Caramel colours--a historical introduction.

    PubMed

    Chappel, C I; Howell, J C

    1992-05-01

    Caramel colours used in the manufacture of a wide variety of foods and beverages have been an item of commerce for more than one hundred years. The regulatory history of these additives in the US, the UK, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and the EC is reviewed, and an introduction to the safety studies of caramel colours in this issue of Food and Chemical Toxicology is provided. PMID:1644375

  12. Rockpool gobies change colour for camouflage.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Martin; Lown, Alice E; Denton, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is found in a wide range of species living in numerous habitat types, offering protection from visually guided predators. This includes many species from the intertidal zone, which must cope with background types diverse in appearance and with multiple predator groups foraging at high and low tide. Many animals are capable of either relatively slow (hours, days, weeks) or rapid (seconds and minutes) colour change in order to better resemble the background against which they are found, but most work has been restricted to a few species or taxa. It is often suggested that many small intertidal fish are capable of colour change for camouflage, yet little experimental work has addressed this. Here, we test rock gobies (Gobius paganellus) for colour change abilities, and whether they can tune their appearance to match the background. In two experiments, we place gobies on backgrounds of different brightness (black or white), and of different colours (red and blue) and use digital image analysis and modelling of predator (avian) vision to quantify colour and luminance (perceived lightness) changes and camouflage. We find that gobies are capable of rapid colour change (occurring within one minute), and that they can change their luminance on lighter or darker backgrounds. When presented on backgrounds of different colours, gobies also change their colour (hue and saturation) while keeping luminance the same. These changes lead to predicted improvements in camouflage match to the background. Our study shows that small rockpool fish are capable of rapid visual change for concealment, and that this may be an important mechanism in many species to avoid predation, especially in complex heterogeneous environments. PMID:25333382

  13. Colour preferences of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Chi, Liang; Tian, Huiqin; Meng, Lingjie; Zheng, Jimeng; Gao, Xiaolong; Liu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    The background colour of aquaculture tanks is normally chosen based on practical experience and/or observations of fish behaviour and the growth rates achieved. However, some farmed species, including turbot, are sentient and can show a preference for a particular environment. In the current study, a self-referent colour preference device was developed and the self-referent colour preference of farmed fish investigated. In experiment 1, the background colour preference of juvenile turbot cultured under a grey background for >3months post-incubation was evaluated. Based on these results, in experiment 2, juvenile turbot were adapted to blue, pink, white, or black backgrounds for 50days and their preferences established. Meanwhile, the growth rates, feed intake, and metabolic rates (including oxygen consumption rate, and ammonia excretion rate) of the turbot were evaluated. The results showed that turbot farmed under a grey background, or after long-term white, blue, pink and black colour adaptation, always displayed a preference for a white background and a dislike for black, red, or brown backgrounds, although their body colour was greyish. Long-term adaptation influenced the frequency of juveniles selecting white, black, pink or blue backgrounds. They showed the highest growth rate, feed intake, and metabolic rates under blue and white backgrounds, and the lowest under a black background in accordance with their preferences shown in experiment 1. Although it is unclear how turbot determine their self-referent colour preferences over such a short period of time, these results indicate that dark colours are unsuitable for the aquaculture of turbot culture in terms of the welfare of the fish. PMID:26792527

  14. THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-06

    In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

  15. Not so colourful after all: eggshell pigments constrain avian eggshell colour space

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Daniel; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip; Hauber, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Birds' eggshells are renowned for their striking colours and varied patterns. Although often considered exceptionally diverse, we report that avian eggshell coloration, sampled here across the full phylogenetic diversity of birds, occupies only 0.08–0.10% of the avian perceivable colour space. The concentrations of the two known tetrapyrrole eggshell pigments (protoporphyrin and biliverdin) are generally poor predictors of colour, both intra- and interspecifically. Here, we show that the constrained diversity of eggshell coloration can be accurately predicted by colour mixing models based on the relative contribution of both pigments and we demonstrate that the models' predictions can be improved by accounting for the reflectance of the eggshell's calcium carbonate matrix. The establishment of these proximate links between pigmentation and colour will enable future tests of hypotheses on the functions of perceived avian eggshell colours that depend on eggshell chemistry. More generally, colour mixing models are not limited to avian eggshell colours but apply to any natural colour. Our approach illustrates how modelling can aid the understanding of constraints on phenotypic diversity. PMID:25994009

  16. Not so colourful after all: eggshell pigments constrain avian eggshell colour space.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip; Hauber, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Birds' eggshells are renowned for their striking colours and varied patterns. Although often considered exceptionally diverse, we report that avian eggshell coloration, sampled here across the full phylogenetic diversity of birds, occupies only 0.08-0.10% of the avian perceivable colour space. The concentrations of the two known tetrapyrrole eggshell pigments (protoporphyrin and biliverdin) are generally poor predictors of colour, both intra- and interspecifically. Here, we show that the constrained diversity of eggshell coloration can be accurately predicted by colour mixing models based on the relative contribution of both pigments and we demonstrate that the models' predictions can be improved by accounting for the reflectance of the eggshell's calcium carbonate matrix. The establishment of these proximate links between pigmentation and colour will enable future tests of hypotheses on the functions of perceived avian eggshell colours that depend on eggshell chemistry. More generally, colour mixing models are not limited to avian eggshell colours but apply to any natural colour. Our approach illustrates how modelling can aid the understanding of constraints on phenotypic diversity. PMID:25994009

  17. Understanding WCAG2.0 Colour Contrast Requirements Through 3D Colour Space Visualisation.

    PubMed

    Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient contrast between text and background is needed to achieve sufficient readability. WCAG2.0 provides a specific definition of sufficient contrast on the web. However, the definition is hard to understand and most designers thus use contrast calculators to validate their colour choices. Often, such checks are performed after design and this may be too late. This paper proposes a colour selection approach based on three-dimensional visualisation of the colour space. The complex non-linear relationships between the colour components become comprehendible when viewed in 3D. The method visualises the available colours in an intuitive manner and allows designers to check a colour against the set of other valid colours. Unlike the contrast calculators, the proposed method is proactive and fun to use. A colour space builder was developed and the resulting models were viewed with a point cloud viewer. The technique can be used as both a design tool and a pedagogical aid to teach colour theory and design. PMID:27534328

  18. Mechanisms, functions and ecology of colour vision in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Hempel de Ibarra, N; Vorobyev, M; Menzel, R

    2014-06-01

    Research in the honeybee has laid the foundations for our understanding of insect colour vision. The trichromatic colour vision of honeybees shares fundamental properties with primate and human colour perception, such as colour constancy, colour opponency, segregation of colour and brightness coding. Laborious efforts to reconstruct the colour vision pathway in the honeybee have provided detailed descriptions of neural connectivity and the properties of photoreceptors and interneurons in the optic lobes of the bee brain. The modelling of colour perception advanced with the establishment of colour discrimination models that were based on experimental data, the Colour-Opponent Coding and Receptor Noise-Limited models, which are important tools for the quantitative assessment of bee colour vision and colour-guided behaviours. Major insights into the visual ecology of bees have been gained combining behavioural experiments and quantitative modelling, and asking how bee vision has influenced the evolution of flower colours and patterns. Recently research has focussed on the discrimination and categorisation of coloured patterns, colourful scenes and various other groupings of coloured stimuli, highlighting the bees' behavioural flexibility. The identification of perceptual mechanisms remains of fundamental importance for the interpretation of their learning strategies and performance in diverse experimental tasks. PMID:24828676

  19. Monozygotic twins' colour-number association: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Peter

    2006-02-01

    A case study of a pair of monozygotic twins, both of whom show a strong and enduring colour-number association, is reported. The origin of the colours, in a jigsaw puzzle, is known. Neither reports conscious photisms typical of synaesthesia, but a Stroop task of naming the colours of digits shows an interference effect with incongruent colours. PMID:16683487

  20. Salience of Primary and Secondary Colours in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Anna; Pitchford, Nicola; Hart, Lynsey; Davies, Ian R. L.; Clausse, Samantha; Jennings, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    Primary colour terms ("black", "white", "red", "green", "yellow", and "blue") are more fundamental in colour language than secondary colour terms ("pink", "purple", "orange", "brown", and "grey"). Here, we assess whether this distinction exists in the absence of language, by investigating whether primary colours attract and sustain preverbal…

  1. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  2. Phenomenology of heavy quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of heavy quark production in {bar p}p, {pi}{sup -}p, and pp interactions at fixed target and collider energies. Calculations of total cross sections and of single quark inclusive differential cross sections d{sup 2}{omega}/dk{sub T}dy are described including contributions through next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. Comparisons with available data on charm and bottom quark production show good agreement for reasonable values of the charm and bottom quark masses and other parameters. Predictions and open issues in the interpretation of results are summarized. A brief discussion is presented of signatures, backgrounds, and expected event rates for top quark production. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Progress in Top Quark Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Evelyn J.

    2006-07-11

    Experimental measurements of the properties of the top quark have improved and will continue to improve significantly, with the excellent operation of the CDF and D0 experiments and the Tevatron pp-bar collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. All of the final state experimental signatures from top quark production and decay are being analysed to test if this most massive quark is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. So far, observations are consistent with the standard model. New techniques have dramatically improved the precision of the top quark mass measurement to 1.7% and set the stage for a sub-1% measurement by 2008. This improved knowledge of the top quark mass sharpens the standard model prediction for the mass of the undiscovered Higgs boson, with implications for Higgs studies at the future LHC and ILC.

  4. Progress in top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Evelyn J.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental measurements of the properties of the top quark have improved and will continue to improve significantly, with the excellent operation of the CDF and D0 experiments and the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. All of the final state experimental signatures from top quark production and decay are being analyzed to test if this most massive quark is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. So far, observations are consistent with the standard model. New techniques have dramatically improved the precision of the top quark mass measurement to 1.7% and set the stage for a sub-1% measurement by 2008. This improved knowledge of the top quark mass sharpens the standard model prediction for the mass of the undiscovered Higgs boson, with implications for Higgs studies at the future LHC and ILC.

  5. Quark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. |; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin.

  6. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. STRANGE GOINGS ON IN QUARK MATTER.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    2001-06-05

    We review recent work on how the superfluid state of three flavor quark matter is affected by non-zero quark masses and chemical potentials. The study of hadronic matter at high baryon density has recently attracted a lot of interest. At zero baryon density chiral symmetry is broken by a quark-anti-quark condensate. At high density condensation in the quark-anti-quark channel is suppressed. Instead, attractive interactions in the color anti-symmetric quark-quark channel favor the formation of diquark condensates. As a consequence, cold dense quark matter is expected to be a color superconductor. The symmetry breaking pattern depends on the density, the number of quark flavors, and their masses. A particularly symmetric phase is the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of three flavor quark matter. This phase is believed to be the true ground state of ordinary matter at very large density.

  8. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jan-e.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Nayak, Tapan; Sinha, Bikash; Viyogi, Yogendra P.

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  9. A Handheld LED Coloured-Light Mixer for Students to Learn Collaboratively the Primary Colours of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny…

  10. The aromatic fluctuation index (FLU): A new aromaticity index based on electron delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matito, Eduard; Duran, Miquel; Solà, Miquel

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the aromatic fluctuation index (FLU) that describes the fluctuation of electronic charge between adjacent atoms in a given ring is introduced as a new aromaticity measure. This new electronic criterion of aromaticity is based on the fact that aromaticity is related to the cyclic delocalized circulation of π electrons. It is defined not only considering the amount of electron sharing between contiguous atoms, which should be substantial in aromatic molecules, but also taking into account the similarity of electron sharing between adjacent atoms. For a series of rings in 15 planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we have found that, in general, FLU is strongly correlated with other widely used indicators of local aromaticity, such as the harmonic-oscillator model of aromaticity, the nucleus independent chemical shift, and the para-delocalization index (PDI). In contrast to PDI, the FLU index can be applied to study the aromaticity of rings with any number of members and it can be used to analyze both the local and global aromatic character of rings and molecules.

  11. Fragment-based treatment of delocalization and static correlation errors in density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important open challenges in modern Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT) is the correct treatment of systems involving fractional electron charges and spins. Approximate exchange-correlation functionals struggle with such systems, leading to pervasive delocalization and static correlation errors. We demonstrate how these errors, which plague density-functional calculations of bond-stretching processes, can be avoided by employing the alternative framework of partition density-functional theory (PDFT) even using the local density approximation for the fragments. Our method is illustrated with explicit calculations on simple systems exhibiting delocalization and static-correlation errors, stretched H2+, H2, He2+, Li2+, and Li2. In all these cases, our method leads to greatly improved dissociation-energy curves. The effective KS potential corresponding to our self-consistent solutions displays key features around the bond midpoint; these are known to be present in the exact KS potential, but are absent from most approximate KS potentials and are essential for the correct description of electron dynamics.

  12. Regulation of charge delocalization in a heteronuclear Fe2 ru system by a stepwise photochromic process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Tao; Li, Bin; Wang, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Dao-Bin; Chen, Zhong-Ning

    2015-02-16

    Heteronuclear complexes FeCp2 -DTE-C≡C-Ru(dppe)2 Cl (1 o; dppe=1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, Cp=cyclopentadienyl, DTE=dithienylethene) and FeCp2-DTE-C≡C-Ru(dppe)2-C≡C-DTE-FeCp2 (2 oo), with redox-active ferrocenyl and ruthenium centers separated by a photochromic DTE moiety, were prepared to achieve photoswitchable charge delocalization and Fe⋅⋅⋅Ru electronic communication. Upon UV-light irradiation of 2 oo, the Fe⋅⋅⋅Ru heterometallic electronic interaction is increasingly facilitated with stepwise photocyclization, 2 oo→2 co→2 cc; this is ascribed to the gradual increase in π-conjugated systems. The near-infrared absorptions in mixed-valence species [2 oo](+) /[2 co](+) /[2 cc](+) are gradually intensified following the conversion of [2 oo](+) →[2 co](+) →[2 cc](+) , which demonstrates that the extent of charge delocalization shows progressive enhancement with stepwise photocyclization. As revealed by electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical studies, complex 2 exhibits nine switchable states through stepwise photochromic and reversible redox processes. PMID:25640650

  13. Fragment-based treatment of delocalization and static correlation errors in density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-12-21

    One of the most important open challenges in modern Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT) is the correct treatment of systems involving fractional electron charges and spins. Approximate exchange-correlation functionals struggle with such systems, leading to pervasive delocalization and static correlation errors. We demonstrate how these errors, which plague density-functional calculations of bond-stretching processes, can be avoided by employing the alternative framework of partition density-functional theory (PDFT) even using the local density approximation for the fragments. Our method is illustrated with explicit calculations on simple systems exhibiting delocalization and static-correlation errors, stretched H2 (+), H2, He2 (+), Li2 (+), and Li2. In all these cases, our method leads to greatly improved dissociation-energy curves. The effective KS potential corresponding to our self-consistent solutions displays key features around the bond midpoint; these are known to be present in the exact KS potential, but are absent from most approximate KS potentials and are essential for the correct description of electron dynamics. PMID:26696044

  14. Electron delocalization and electron density of small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in singlet excited states.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Fregoso, Mar; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2016-04-28

    The four lowest singlet electronic states of benzene, the acenes from naphthalene to pentacene, phenanthrene and pyrene were studied by means of theoretical methods. Their vertical excitation energies from the ground electronic states were computed at the CASPT2 approximation. As an attempt to explain the trends observed in the excitation energies, several descriptors based on the electron density were used and the similarity of these molecules with their ground state counterparts was analyzed. It was found that the changes of the topological properties at the C-C bond critical points do not explain the decreasing trends for the excitation energies with the increase of the number of rings, in part because the small changes that take place in the electron density occur above and below the molecular plane. A similarity index based on electron delocalization between quantum topological atoms was defined to compare a molecule in two different electronic states. It was found that, mainly for the acenes, this index goes in line with the excitation energies to the first excited state. Implications of the changes in electron delocalization on the aromatic character of these molecules are also discussed. In general, local aromaticity decreases upon excitation. PMID:26795361

  15. Diradicals acting through diamagnetic phenylene vinylene bridges: Raman spectroscopy as a probe to characterize spin delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    González, Sandra Rodríguez; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; González Cano, Rafael C.; López Navarrete, Juan T. E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es Casado, Juan E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es; Novoa, Juan J.; Mota, Fernando; Corro, Elena del; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G.

    2014-04-28

    We present a complete Raman spectroscopic study in two structurally well-defined diradical species of different lengths incorporating oligo p-phenylene vinylene bridges between two polychlorinated triphenylmethyl radical units, a disposition that allows sizeable conjugation between the two radicals through and with the bridge. The spectroscopic data are interpreted and supported by quantum chemical calculations. We focus the attention on the Raman frequency changes, interpretable in terms of: (i) bridge length (conjugation length); (ii) bridge conformational structure; and (iii) electronic coupling between the terminal radical units with the bridge and through the bridge, which could delineate through-bond spin polarization, or spin delocalization. These items are addressed by using the “oligomer approach” in conjunction with pressure and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic data. In summary, we have attempted to translate the well-known strategy to study the electron (charge) structure of π−conjugated molecules by Raman spectroscopy to the case of electron (spin) interactions via the spin delocalization mechanism.

  16. Surface plasmon delocalization in silver nanoparticle aggregates revealed by subdiffraction supercontinuum hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Borys, Nicholas J.; Shafran, Eyal; Lupton, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmonic resonances of nanostructured silver films produce exceptional surface enhancement, enabling reproducible single-molecule Raman scattering measurements. Supporting a broad range of plasmonic resonances, these disordered systems are difficult to investigate with conventional far-field spectroscopy. Here, we use nonlinear excitation spectroscopy and polarization anisotropy of single optical hot spots of supercontinuum generation to track the transformation of these plasmon modes as the mesoscopic structure is tuned from a film of discrete nanoparticles to a semicontinuous layer of aggregated particles. We demonstrate how hot spot formation from diffractively-coupled nanoparticles with broad spectral resonances transitions to that from spatially delocalized surface plasmon excitations, exhibiting multiple excitation resonances as narrow as 13 meV. Photon-localization microscopy reveals that the delocalized plasmons are capable of focusing multiple narrow radiation bands over a broadband range to the same spatial region within 6 nm, underscoring the existence of novel plasmonic nanoresonators embedded in highly disordered systems. PMID:23807624

  17. Cyclic π-electron delocalization in non-planar linear acenes.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Michał A; Cyrański, Michał K; Wróbel, Zbigniew

    2016-04-28

    Based on the experimental data of newly determined structures of per-substituted naphthalenes by halogen atoms (F, Cl and Br) and perchloroanthracene, as well as on the molecular modeling we have shown that deviation from planarity leads to relatively small changes in the cyclic π-electron delocalization of acenes. Per-substituted naphthalenes are twisted, whereas perchloroanthracene adopts a boat conformation in the solid state. For the most distorted case - perbromonaphthalene twisted by 34.7°, the geometry-based HOMA index drops down by 0.128 of the unit only, which means ca. 15% reduction of the extent of π-electron delocalization as referred to naphthalene. To account for the changes in the aromatic stabilization energies (ASEs), exaltation of magnetic susceptibilities (Λ) and strain energies (SEs) upon bending we have proposed a set of homodesmotic reactions based on the peri-substituted systems, where the reference compounds have similar conformation to the distorted aromatics. The decrease of aromaticity is smooth, but regular in a rather large range of distortion. Notably, the most extreme case - 1,4,5,8-tetra-t-butylnaphthalene, twisted by 51.7° with an estimated strain energy of 26 kcal mol(-1) - is still aromatic. The ASE, Λ and HOMA decrease by 19.1 kcal mol(-1), 7 cgs-ppm and 0.34 of the unit, respectively, as referred to naphthalene. PMID:26837805

  18. Delocalization effect of the Hubbard repulsion in two dimensions and exact terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulacsi, Zsolt

    2009-03-01

    The physical reasons explaining the delocalization effect of the Hubbard repulsion U leading in 2D to an insulator to metal transition are analyzed. The study is made in exact terms by deducing exact ground states and ground state expectation values of interest based on a positive semidefinite operator technique [1]. First it is shown that always when this effect is observed, U acts on the background of a macroscopic degeneracy present in a multiband type of system. After this step I demonstrate that acting in such conditions, by strongly diminishing the double occupancy, U spreads out the contributions in the ground state wave function, hence strongly increases the one-particle localization length, and consequently extends the one-particle behavior producing conditions for a delocalization effect [2]. [3pt] References: [1] Z. Gulacsi, D. Vollhardt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91,186401(2003); Z. Gulacsi, A. Kampf, D. Vollhardt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99,026404(2007). [2] Z. Gulacsi, Phys. Rev. B77,245113(2008).

  19. A handheld LED coloured-light mixer for students to learn collaboratively the primary colours of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-03-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) producing primary colours are combined with green intensity varying circuitry to generate the standard colour-triangle secondary colours and various shades ranging from yellow to orange and pale blue to cyan. In the laboratory, students worked collaboratively, predicting, observing and explaining, and finally discussing until there was a consensus.

  20. Excitation wavelength-dependent EPR study on the influence of the conformation of multiporphyrin arrays on triplet state delocalization.

    PubMed

    Tait, Claudia E; Neuhaus, Patrik; Peeks, Martin D; Anderson, Harry L; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-02-21

    The optoelectronic properties of conjugated porphyrin arrays render them excellent candidates for use in a variety of molecular electronic devices. Understanding the factors controlling the electron delocalization in these systems is important for further developments in this field. Here, we use transient EPR and ENDOR (Electron Nuclear Double Resonance) to study the extent of electronic delocalization in the photoexcited triplet states of a series of butadiyne-linked porphyrin oligomers. We are able to distinguish between planar and twisted arrangements of adjacent porphyrin units, as the different conformations are preferentially excited at different wavelengths in the visible range. We show that the extent of triplet state delocalization is modulated by the torsional angle between the porphyrins and therefore by the excitation wavelength. These results have implications for the design of supramolecular systems with fine-tuned excitonic interactions and for the control of charge transport. PMID:26814427

  1. Melting hadrons, boiling quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-09-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. The material of this review is complemented by two early and unpublished reports containing the prediction of the different forms of hadron matter, and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the discussion of strangeness, and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP.

  2. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menzione, A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t{bar t} decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity.

  3. Spectroscopic evidence for medium controlled hydrogen bond inhibition of resonance delocalization of charge in complexes of tetrabutylammonium fluoride with phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Cork, David G.; Tinsdale, Julie A.

    Infrared spectra of tetrabutylammonium fluoride complexes of both 4-cyanophenol and methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate but not 3-cyanophenol reveal the presence of two distinct types of hydrogen bond corresponding to charge localized and partially charge delocalized forms. The latter only occur in polar aprotic protophilic solvents at low temperatures. The activation energies for the interconversion of the two forms reflect the relative abilities of the two groups to delocalize charge through resonance. The chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of the complexes are also medium dependent although the precise nature of this medium dependence is less easily understood.

  4. Combined impact of entropy and carrier delocalization on charge transfer exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    Several models of the charge transfer exciton (CTE) have been proposed to explain its dissociation at the donor-acceptor (DA) interface. However, the underlying physics is still under debate. Here, we derive a temperature (T ) dependent tight-binding model for an electron-hole pair at the DA interface. The main finding is the existence of the localization-delocalization transition at a critical T , which can explain the CTE dissociation. The present study highlights the combined effect of entropy (finite T ) and carrier delocalization in the CTE dissociation.

  5. Optically engineered quantum interference of delocalized wave functions in a bulk solid: The example of solid para-hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Hiroyuki; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Ohmori, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    Local excitations of indistinguishable particles in a solid are quantum-mechanically superposed to give delocalized wave functions. Their interference is often so short-lived that it eludes observation and manipulation. Here we have actively controlled interference of delocalized vibrational wave functions in solid para-hydrogen produced by a pair of ultrashort laser pulses. The ultrafast evolution of their interference changes from almost completely constructive (amplification by a factor of ˜4) to destructive when we change the timing of those two laser pulses by only 4 fs. This active control serves as an experimental tool to investigate the spatiotemporal evolution of a wave function in a bulk solid.

  6. Sequential colour mapping system of brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Giard, M H; Peronnet, F; Pernier, J; Mauguiere, F; Bertrand, O

    1985-05-01

    We present a colour mapping system for the visualization of both the spatial scalp distribution and the temporal evolution of brain potentials. The system is applicable to recordings of auditory, visual and somatosensory potentials. It uses a Tektronix 4113 colour terminal connected to a Solar 16 (SEMS) mini-computer. The brain potentials are recorded on up to 16 scalp electrodes. The gain and the baseline are corrected separately on each channel. At each point of the scalp the potential is reconstructed by a linear interpolation of the measured potentials of the four nearest electrodes. Simultaneously n2 (1 less than n less than 8) colour maps can be presented on the screen. This allows the study of the temporal evolution of full scalp evoked potentials. The user chooses the two extreme latencies defining the time window to be explored and the latencies of the maps are regularly time-spaced within this window. In a typical case, in which four maps are desired, the latencies of the maps can be chosen independently. The 16-colour palette is predetermined but the user has three possibilities to establish the correspondence between the electrical potential and the colours. Examples are shown in the visual and somatosensory stimulation modalities. The advantages and limitations of such a representation are discussed. PMID:3849381

  7. A four-colour optical detector circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohannes, Israel; Assaad, Maher

    2013-02-01

    In this article, a new architecture for a four-colour optical detector circuit is presented. The proposed detector uses a photodiode as its basic light transducing element and a mixed signal readout circuit for signal processing and decision making. The readout circuit requires only two comparators, two multiplexers and a few logic gates to produce a digital 4 bit output that represents the right colour detected. The proposed detector is advantageous because the number of required components is fixed even if the number of detected colours is increased. The feature of having a fixed number of elements while increasing the number of detected colours is important especially in component count (i.e. low cost) and low power consumption. The proposed detector can be used as an autonomous and portable real-time pH monitoring applications. The objective of this article is to present a validation of a novel four colour sensor architecture using simulation and experiment as a proof of concept for a future implementation as a CMOS integrated circuit using the Austria Microsystems 350 nm technology.

  8. Colour inputs to random-dot stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Stuart, G W; Edwards, M; Cook, M L

    1992-01-01

    Recently it has been claimed by Livingstone and Hubel that, of three anatomically and functionally distinct visual channels (the magnocellular, parvocellular interblob, and blob channels), only the magnocellular channel is involved in the processing of stereoscopic depth. Since the magnocellular system shows little overt colour opponency, the reported loss of the ability to resolve random-dot stereograms defined only by colour contrast seems consistent with this view. However, Julesz observed that reversed-contrast stereograms could be fused if correlated colour information was added. In the present study, 'noise' (non-corresponding) pixels were injected into random-dot stereograms in order to increase fusion time. All six subjects tested were able to achieve stereopsis in less than three minutes when there was only correspondence in colour and not in luminance, and three when luminance contrast was completely reversed. This ability depends on information about the direction of colour contrast, not just the presence of chromatic borders. When luminance and chromatic contrast are defined in terms of signal-to-noise ratios at the photoreceptor mosaic, chromatic information plays at least as important a role in stereopsis as does luminance information, suggesting that the magnocellular channel is not uniquely involved. PMID:1297976

  9. Quantifying zigzag motion of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, D.; Ribeiro, J. E. F. T.

    2010-03-01

    The quark condensate is calculated in terms of the effective string tension and the constituent quark mass. For 3 colors and 2 light flavors, the constituent mass is bounded from below by the value of 460 MeV. This value is only accessible when the string tension decreases linearly with the Schwinger proper time. For this reason, the Hausdorff dimension of a light-quark trajectory is equal to 4, indicating that these trajectories are similar to branched polymers, which can describe a weak first-order deconfinement phase transition in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. Using this indication, we develop a gluon-chain model based on such trajectories.

  10. Top Quark Production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit

    2010-02-10

    The large data samples of top quark candidate events collected at the Tevatron CDF II experiment allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the production of the top quark. This article discusses recent results of top quark production at CDF presented at the SUSY09 conference, including updates to the top pair production cross section, forward-backward asymmetry in tt-bar production, single top search, search for top resonances and a search for heavy top. The discussed measurements utilize up to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at CDF.