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Sample records for quark mass function

  1. Quark mass functions and pion structure in Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmer P.; Gross, Franz L.; Pena, Maria Teresa; Stadler, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the dressed quark mass function and the pion structure in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). The quark propagators are dressed with the same kernel that describes the interaction between different quarks. We use an interaction kernel in momentum space that is a relativistic generalization of the linear confining q-qbar potential and a constant potential shift that defines the energy scale. The confining interaction has a Lorentz scalar part that is not chirally invariant by itself but decouples from the equations in the chiral limit and therefore allows the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) mechanism to work. We adjust the parameters of our quark mass function calculated in Minkowski-space to agree with LQCD data obtained in Euclidean space. Results of a calculation of the pion electromagnetic form factor in the relativistic impulse approximation using the same mass function are presented and compared with experimental data.

  2. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  3. Off-shell {rho}-{omega} mixing through quark loops with a nonperturbative meson vertex and quark mass functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, A.N.; Yang, K.

    1995-06-01

    The momentum dependence of the off-shell {rho}-{omega} mixing amplitude is calculated through a two-quark loop diagram, using nonperturbative meson-quark vertex functions for the {rho} and {omega} mesons, as well as nonperturbative quark propagators. Both these quantities are generated self-consistently through an interlinked Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) cum Schwinger- Dyson equation (SDE) approach with a 3D support for the BSE kernel with two basic constants that are prechecked against a wide cross section of both meson and baryon spectra within a common structural framework for their respective 3D BSE`s. With the precalibration, the on-shell strength works out at {minus}2.434 {delta}({ital m}{sub {ital q}}{sup 2}) in units of the change in ``constituent mass squared,`` which is consistent with the {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} data for a {ital u}-{ital d} mass difference of 4 MeV, while the relative off-shell strength (0.99{plus_minus}0.01) lies midway between quark-loop and QCD-SR results. We also calculate the photon-mediated {rho}-{omega} propagator whose off-shell structure has an additional pole at {ital q}{sup 2}=0. The implications of these results vis-a-vis related investigations are discussed.

  4. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  5. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations and Quark Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Thedore

    2002-04-01

    The Standard model currently suggests no relationship between the quark and lepton masses. The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an up quark mass of 237.31 MeV/c2 and a dn quark mass of 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new quarks help explain the numerical relationship between all the quark and lepton masses in a single function. The mass of each SNU-P (quark or lepton) is just the geometric mean of two related SNU-Ps, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.743828 (predicted), 117.3520, 1778.38, 26950.08 MeV. The resulting slope of these masses when plotted on semi log paper is "e" to 5 significant figures using the currently accepted mass for Tau. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these quarks, and lepton.

  6. Confinement, quark mass functions, and spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz L.; Pena, Teresa; Stadler, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    We formulate the covariant equations for quark-antiquark bound states in Minkowski space in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory. The quark propagators are dressed with the same kernel that describes the interaction between different quarks. We show that these equations are charge conjugation invariant, and that in the chiral limit of vanishing bare quark mass, a massless pseudoscalar bound state is produced in a Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) mechanism, which is associated with the Goldstone boson of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. In this introductory paper we test the formalism by using a simplified kernel consisting of a momentum-space $\\delta$-function with a vector Lorentz structure, to which one adds a mixed scalar and vector confining interaction. The scalar part of the confining interaction is not chirally invariant by itself, but decouples from the equations in the chiral limit and therefore allows the NJL mechanism to work. With this model we calculate the quark mass function, and we compare our Minkowski-space results to LQCD data obtained in Euclidean space. In a companion paper we apply this formalism to a calculation of the pion form factor.

  7. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  8. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  9. Quark pseudoscalar vertex and quark mass function with clover fermions: Spontaneous symmetry breaking, operator product expansion, symmetry restoration at small volume

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J.-P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-05-01

    We study the quark mass function on hypercubic lattices in a large range of physical volumes and cutoffs. To avoid the very large Wilson term artefact, we exploit the relation between the quark mass function and the pseudoscalar vertex in the continuum. We extrapolate to the chiral limit. In function of the physical volume, we observe a striking discontinuity in the properties of chiral extrapolation around a physical volume L{sub c{approx_equal}}6 GeV{sup -1}=1.2 fm. It is present in the quark mass function, which collapses to zero, as well as in the pion mass and the quark condensate as directly calculated from the pseudoscalar correlator. It is strongly reminiscent of the phenomenon of chiral symmetry restoration observed by Neuberger and Narayanan at N{sub C}={infinity} around the same physical length. In the case of spontaneous symmetry breaking, we confirm that the operator product expansion of the quark mass function, involving the quark condensate, is not operative at the available momenta, even taking into account the unusually large high order corrections to the Wilson coefficient calculated by Chetyrkin and Maier; the gap remains large, around a factor 2, even at the largest momenta available to us (p{approx_equal}6 GeV).

  10. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  12. Viability of carbon-based life as a function of the light quark mass.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G

    2013-03-15

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars that have reached the red giant stage. The close proximity of this state to the triple-alpha threshold is needed for the production of carbon, oxygen, and other elements necessary for life. We investigate whether this life-essential condition is robust or delicately fine-tuned by measuring its dependence on the fundamental constants of nature, specifically the light quark mass and the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. We show that there exist strong correlations between the alpha-particle binding energy and the various energies relevant to the triple-alpha process. We derive limits on the variation of these fundamental parameters from the requirement that sufficient amounts of carbon and oxygen be generated in stars. We also discuss the implications of our results for an anthropic view of the Universe. PMID:25166526

  13. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  14. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations & low Mass Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2003-04-01

    The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an "up" quark of mass 237.31 MeV/c2 and a "dn" quark of mass 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new predicted quarks helped to determine that the masses of the quarks and leptons are all related by a geometric progression relationship. The mass of each quark or lepton is just the "geometric mean" of two related elementary particles, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.74 (predicted), 117.3, 1778.4 (tau), 26950.1 MeV. The geometric ratio of this progression is 15.154 (e to the power e). The mass of the tau in this theory agrees very well with accepted values. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237.31 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these new quarks, and lepton. Ref. Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/ 0008026, @ http://xxx.lanl.gov. Infinite Energy, Vol 5, issue 30.

  15. Quark masses and their hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, M.

    1987-12-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is attributed to dynamical generation of quark masses. Quarks q (and leptons l) are assumed to be produced by hypercolor confinement of preons at an intermediate scale Λ hc. Hierarchies observed in the q mass spectra can be explained by a BCS mechanism if the color interaction is enough asymptotically free and if residual ones emerging by the confinement are medium strong. The former assumption claims that N≦4, where N is the family number of q and l. Dynamical equations to determine q masses and mixings are given, but they require knowledge on the physics at Λ hc. A phenomenological approach is also made on the basis of an SU(7)× SU(7) chiral preon model with N=4. The mass ratio m t/ mb is related to ( m c/ m s)ηB with η B≃1.1 and m t'/ mb' to ( m u/ m d)ηA with η A≃1.4. In this scheme the fourth down quark is the heaviest (˜ 110 GeV) and contributes dominantly to F 2, where F is the Fermi scale.

  16. Valence quark spin distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-09-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the constituent quark model provide a natural explanation for many nucleon properties, including the {Delta} - N splitting, the charge radius of the neutron, and the observation that the proton's quark distribution function ratio d(x)/u(x) {r_arrow} 0 as x {r_arrow} 1. The hyperfine-perturbed quark model also makes predictions for the nucleon spin-dependent distribution functions. Precision measurements of the resulting asymmetries A{sub 1}{sup p}(x) and A{sub 1}{sup n}(x) in the valence region can test this model and thereby the hypothesis that the valence quark spin distributions are ''normal''.

  17. The anomalous gamma -> pi{sup +} pi{sup 0} pi{sup -} form factor and the light-quark mass functions at low momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Dubravko Klabucar; Bojan Bistrovic

    2000-12-01

    The gamma -> 3 pi form factor was calculated in a simple-minded constituent model with a constant quark mass parameter, as well as in the Schwinger-Dyson approach. The comparison of these and various other theoretical results on this anomalous process, as well as the scarce already available data (hopefully to be supplemented by more accurate CEBAF data), seem to favor Schwinger-Dyson modeling which would yield relatively small low-momentum values of the constituent (dynamically dressed) quark mass function.

  18. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Renormalization of quark propagator, vertex functions, and twist-2 operators from twisted-mass lattice QCD at Nf=4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossier, Benoît.; Brinet, Mariane; Guichon, Pierre; Morénas, Vincent; Pène, Olivier; Rodríguez-Quintero, Jose; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-06-01

    We present a precise nonperturbative determination of the renormalization constants in the mass independent RI'-MOM scheme. The lattice implementation uses the Iwasaki gauge action and four degenerate dynamical twisted-mass fermions. The gauge configurations are provided by the ETM Collaboration. Renormalization constants for scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial operators, as well as the quark propagator renormalization, are computed at three different values of the lattice spacing, two volumes and several twisted-mass parameters. The method we developed allows for a precise cross-check of the running, thanks to the particular proper treatment of hypercubic artifacts. Results for the twist-2 operator O44 are also presented.

  20. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  1. Quark ACM with topologically generated gluon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Ishita Dutta; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effect of a small, gauge-invariant mass of the gluon on the anomalous chromomagnetic moment (ACM) of quarks by perturbative calculations at one-loop level. The mass of the gluon is taken to have been generated via a topological mass generation mechanism, in which the gluon acquires a mass through its interaction with an antisymmetric tensor field Bμν. For a small gluon mass ( < 10 MeV), we calculate the ACM at momentum transfer q2 = -M Z2. We compare those with the ACM calculated for the gluon mass arising from a Proca mass term. We find that the ACM of up, down, strange and charm quarks vary significantly with the gluon mass, while the ACM of top and bottom quarks show negligible gluon mass dependence. The mechanism of gluon mass generation is most important for the strange quarks ACM, but not so much for the other quarks. We also show the results at q2 = -m t2. We find that the dependence on gluon mass at q2 = -m t2 is much less than at q2 = -M Z2 for all quarks.

  2. Occam's razor in quark mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-04-01

    From the standpoint of the Occam's razor approach, we consider the minimum number of parameters in the quark mass matrices needed for successful CKM mixing and CP violation. We impose three zeros in the down-quark mass matrix while taking the diagonal up-quark mass matrix to reduce the number of free parameters. The three zeros are maximal zeros in order to have a CP-violating phase in the quark mass matrix. Then, there remain six real parameters and one CP-violating phase, which is the minimal number needed to reproduce the observed data of the down-quark masses and the CKM parameters. Twenty textures with three zeros are examined. Among these, thirteen textures are viable for the down-quark mass matrix. As a representative of these textures, we discuss a texture Md^{(1)} in detail. By using the experimental data on sin 2β , θ _{13}, and θ _{23}, together with the observed quark masses, the Cabibbo angle is predicted to be close to the experimental data. It is found that this surprising result remains unchanged in all other viable textures. We also investigate the correlations between |V_{ub}/V_{cb}|, sin 2β , and J_CP. For all textures, the maximal value of the ratio |V_{ub}/V_{cb}| is 0.09, which is smaller than the upper bound of the experimental data, 0.094. We hope that this prediction will be tested in future experiments.

  3. Bottom quark mass from {Upsilon} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    The bottom quark pole mass M{sub b} is determined using a sum rule which relates the masses and the electronic decay widths of the {Upsilon} mesons to large {ital n} moments of the vacuum polarization function calculated from nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. The complete set of next-to-next-to-leading order [i.e., O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2},{alpha}{sub s}v,v{sup 2}) where v is the bottom quark c.m. velocity] corrections is calculated and leads to a considerable reduction of theoretical uncertainties compared to a pure next-to-leading order analysis. However, the theoretical uncertainties remain much larger than the experimental ones. For a two parameter fit for M{sub b}, and the strong M{bar S} coupling {alpha}{sub s}, and using the scanning method to estimate theoretical uncertainties, the next-to-next-to-leading order analysis yields 4.74 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.87 GeV and 0.096{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.124 if experimental uncertainties are included at the 95{percent} confidence level and if two-loop running for {alpha}{sub s} is employed. M{sub b} and {alpha}{sub s} have a sizable positive correlation. For the running M{bar S} bottom quark mass this leads to 4.09 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.32 GeV. If {alpha}{sub s} is taken as an input, the result for the bottom quark pole mass reads 4.78 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.98 GeVthinsp[4.08 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.28 GeV] for 0.114{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.122. The discrepancies between the results of three previous analyses on the same subject by Voloshin, Jamin, and Pich and K{umlt u}hn {ital et al.} are clarified. A comprehensive review on the calculation of the heavy-quark{endash}antiquark pair production cross section through a vector current at next-to-next-to leading order in the nonrelativistic expansion is presented. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Renormalization of the quark mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S. H.; Kuo, T. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using a set of rephasing-invariant variables, it is shown that the renormalization group equations for quark mixing parameters can be written in a form that is compact, in addition to having simple properties under flavor permutation. We also found approximate solutions to these equations if the quark masses are hierarchical or nearly degenerate.

  5. Heavy quark masses from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, Andrew T.

    2016-07-01

    Progress in quark mass determinations from lattice QCD is reviewed, focusing on results for charm and bottom mass. These are of particular interest for precision Higgs studies. Recent determinations have achieved percent-level uncertainties with controlled systematics. Future prospects for these calculations are also discussed.

  6. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV. PMID:25192088

  7. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limon, P.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Patrick, J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; DellAgnello, S.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; and others

    1998-03-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using a sample of t{bar t} decays into an electron or a muon, a neutrino, and four jets. The data were collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup {minus}1} . We measure the top quark mass to be 175.9{plus_minus}4.8(stat){plus_minus}4.9( syst) GeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Precision Determination of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Movilla Fernandez, Pedro A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-05-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have updated their measurements of the mass of the top quark using proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Tevatron. The uncertainties in each of the top-antitop decay channels have been reduced. The new Tevatron average for the mass of the top quark based on about 1 fb{sup -1} of data per experiment is 170.9 {+-} 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Off-forward quark-quark correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2006-09-01

    The properties of the nonforward quark-quark correlation function are examined. We derive constraints on the correlation function from the transformation properties of the fundamental fields of QCD occurring in its definition. We further develop a method to construct an Ansatz for this correlator. We present the complete leading order set of generalized parton distributions in terms of the amplitudes of the Ansatz. Finally we conclude that the number of independent generalized parton helicity changing distributions is four.

  11. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  12. Variations of nuclear binding with quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Serrano, M. E.; Cloët, I. C.; Tsushima, K.; Thomas, A. W.; Afnan, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the variation with light quark mass of the mass of the nucleon as well as the masses of the mesons commonly used in a one-boson-exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon force. Care is taken to evaluate the meson mass shifts at the kinematic point relevant to that problem. Using these results, we evaluate the corresponding changes in the energy of the 1S0 antibound state and the binding energies of the deuteron, triton, and selected finite nuclei by using a one-boson exchange model. The results are discussed in the context of possible corrections to the standard scenario for Big Bang nucleosynthesis in the case where, as suggested by recent observations of quasar absorption spectra, the quark masses may have changed over the age of the Universe.

  13. World average top-quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes a talk given at the Top2008 Workshop at La Biodola, Isola d Elba, Italy. The status of the world average top-quark mass is discussed. Some comments about the challanges facing the experiments in order to further improve the precision are offered.

  14. D{O} top quark mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on (44-48 pb{sup -1}) of lepton + jets data, we review D0`s initial analysis of the top quark mass. The result, M{sub top} = 199 {+-} 19/21 (stat.) {+-} 22 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, is insensitive to background normalization. The errors are based on ISAJET top Monte Carlo, with its more severe gluon radiation, and allow for ISAJET/HERWIG differences. Good progress is being made in reducing the systematic error. We present a new study based on two-dimensional distributions of reconstructed top quark vs. dijet mass. With 98.7% confidence we observe a peak in the top mass - dijet mass plane. The peak and its projections are similar both in shape and magnitude to expectations based on the decay sequence 1 {yields} bW, W {yields} jj.

  15. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Christ, N. H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R. J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R. D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R. D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D. J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-04-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities (fπ , fK, BK, mu d, ms, t01 /2, w0) obtained from simulations of 2 +1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O (3 )%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum "global fit" with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of mπ, mK and mΩ to determine the two quark masses and the scale—all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with subpercent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including fπ=130.2 (9 ) MeV ; fK=155.5 (8 ) MeV ; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK, in the renormalization group invariant scheme, 0.750(15) and the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  16. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  17. Quark flavor mixings from hierarchical mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rohit; Zhou, Shun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we extend the Fritzsch ansatz of quark mass matrices while retaining their hierarchical structures and show that the main features of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix V, including |V^{}_{us}| ˜eq |V^{}_{cd}|, |V^{}_{cb}| ˜eq |V^{}_{ts}| and |V^{}_{ub}|/|V^{}_{cb}| < |V^{}_{td}|/|V^{}_{ts}|, can be well understood. This agreement is observed especially when the mass matrices have non-vanishing (1, 3) and (3, 1) off-diagonal elements. The phenomenological consequences of these for the allowed texture content and gross structural features of `hierarchical' quark mass matrices are addressed from a model-independent prospective under the assumption of factorizable phases in these. The approximate and analytical expressions of the CKM matrix elements are derived and a detailed analysis reveals that such structures are in good agreement with the observed quark flavor mixing angles and the CP-violating phase at the 1σ level and call upon a further investigation of the realization of these structures from a top-down prospective.

  18. Statistical understanding of quark and lepton masses in Gaussian landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Salem, Michael P.; Watari, Taizan

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental theory of nature may allow a large landscape of vacua. Even if the theory contains a unified gauge symmetry, the 22 flavor parameters of the standard model, including neutrino masses, may be largely determined by the statistics of this landscape, and not by any symmetry. Then the measured values of the flavor parameters do not lead to any fundamental symmetries, but are statistical accidents; their precise values do not provide any insights into the fundamental theory, rather the overall pattern of flavor reflects the underlying landscape. We investigate whether random selection from the statistics of a simple landscape can explain the broad patterns of quark, charged lepton, and neutrino masses and mixings. We propose Gaussian landscapes as simplified models of landscapes where Yukawa couplings result from overlap integrals of zero-mode wave functions in higher-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories. In terms of just five free parameters, such landscapes can account for all gross features of flavor, including the hierarchy of quark and charged-lepton masses; small quark mixing angles in the basis with quarks arranged according to mass, with 13 mixing less than 12 and 23 mixing; very light Majorana neutrino masses, with the solar to atmospheric neutrino mass ratio consistent with data; distributions for leptonic mixings sin2{theta}{sub 12} and sin2{theta}{sub 23} that are peaked at large values, while the distribution for sin2{theta}{sub 13} is peaked at low values; and order unity CP-violating phases in both the quark and lepton sectors. While the statistical distributions for flavor parameters are broad, the distributions are robust to changes in the geometry of the extra dimensions. Constraining the distributions by loose cuts about observed values leads to narrower distributions for neutrino measurements of {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  19. Modified Fragmentation Function from Quark Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Within the framework of the constituent quark model, it isshown that the single hadron fragmentation function of a parton can beexpressed as a convolution of shower diquark or triquark distributionfunction and quark recombination probability, if the interference betweenamplitudes of quark recombination with different momenta is neglected.Therecombination probability is determined by the hadron's wavefunction inthe constituent quark model. The shower diquark or triquark distributionfunctions of a fragmenting jet are defined in terms of overlappingmatrices of constituent quarks and parton field operators. They aresimilar in form to dihadron or trihadron fragmentation functions in termsof parton operator and hadron states. Extending the formalism to thefield theory at finite temperature, we automatically derive contributionsto the effective single hadron fragmentation function from therecombination of shower and thermal constituent quarks. Suchcontributions involve single or diquark distribution functions which inturn can be related to diquark or triquark distribution functions via sumrules. We also derive QCD evolution equations for quark distributionfunctions that in turn determine the evolution of the effective jetfragmentation functions in a thermal medium.

  20. Quark and lepton mass matrices described by charged lepton masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Yoshio; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a unified mass matrix model for quarks and leptons, in which, mass ratios and mixings of the quarks and neutrinos are described by using only the observed charged lepton mass values as family-number-dependent parameters and only six family-number-independent free parameters. In spite of quite few parameters, the model gives remarkable agreement with observed data (i.e. Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing, Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) mixing and mass ratios). Taking this phenomenological success seriously, we give a formulation of the so-called Yukawaon model in detail from a theoretical aspect, especially for the construction of superpotentials and R charge assignments of fields. The model is considerably modified from the previous one, while the phenomenological success is kept unchanged.

  1. Dynamical generation of the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Marko Berislav

    2002-09-01

    I study new physics theories in which the observed mass of the heaviest elementary particle, the top quark, is a result of a dynamical mechanism at the subatomic level. The same mechanism needs to explain the transition of the effective physical description at the largest space-time scales to that at smaller scales. This large-scale description is characterized by non-zero masses for most of the elementary particles and the existence of the familiar electromagnetic interactions. The description at smaller space-time scales is characterized by the presence of a richer set of fundamental interactions, including weak and hypercharge interactions, as well as no masses for the particles. As a minimal consequence of this transition, particle theories commonly predict the existence of a still unobserved particle, called the Higgs, at the largest scales. New physics considered in this thesis includes the following: (1) Models with new fundamental interactions that select the top quark and give an exclusive role to its dynamical mass generation mechanism. I propose one such model, discuss current experimental constraints, and suggest future tests of this idea. (2) Models with new spin one-half particles, not sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles, including the top quark. I discuss the phenomenology, i.e., analyze data from particle colliders, and set limits on the parameters of the models. (3) Models with new spin one-half particles, sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles. I propose the model structure, discuss some of its phenomenology, and suggest further tests of this idea at linear particle accelerators. Finally, I analyze the connection between the Higgs mass (m H) and the space-time scale at which the above-mentioned transition occurs. Without introducing new physics at the smallest scales, I show that due to the very large top mass, the standard description with the Higgs particle fails at small scales

  2. Quark masses, the Dashen phase, and gauge field topology

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2013-12-15

    The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD is predicted by chiral perturbation theory to occur when the up–down quark mass difference becomes sufficiently large at fixed down-quark mass. Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes are expected to behave smoothly with the up-quark mass, even as this mass passes through zero. In Euclidean space, the topological susceptibility of the gauge fields is positive at positive quark masses but diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. A zero in this susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. I discuss potential ambiguities with this determination. -- Highlights: •The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD occurs when the up quark mass becomes sufficiently negative. •Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes behave smoothly with the up-quark mass. •The topological susceptibility of the gauge fields diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. •A zero in the topological susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. •The universality of this definition remains unproven. Potential ambiguities are discussed.

  3. Measurements of the u valence quark distribution function in the proton and u quark fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I. G.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; De Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S. C.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Poensgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schouten, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thenard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; De la Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.; European Muon Collaboration

    1989-07-01

    A new determination of the u valence quark distribution function in the proton is obtained from the analysis of identified charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons produced in muon-proton and muon-deuteron scattering. The comparison with results obtained in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering provides a further test of the quark-parton model. The u quark fragmentation functions into positive and negative pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons are also measured.

  4. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-01

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  5. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-24

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  6. Threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    Threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass are often estimated under the approximation that tan β enhanced contributions are the most dominant. In this work we revisit this common approximation made to the estimation of the supersymmetric thresh-old corrections to the bottom quark mass. We calculate the full one-loop supersymmetric corrections to the bottom quark mass and survey a large part of the phenomenological MSSM parameter space to study the validity of considering only the tan β enhanced corrections. Our analysis demonstrates that this approximation underestimates the size of the threshold corrections by ˜ 12.5% for most of the considered parameter space. We discuss the consequences for fitting the bottom quark mass and for the effective couplings to Higgses. We find that it is important to consider the additional contributions when fitting the bottom quark mass but the modifications to the effective Higgs couplings are typically (few)% for the majority of the parameter space considered.

  7. Measurement of the top quark mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Protopopescu, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample of 93 lepton + 4 or more jets events collected with the D0 detector at the FNAL Tevatron collider. The authors find the top quark mass is 169 {+-} 8(stat.) {+-} 8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The analysis assumes that top quarks are produced as t{anti t} pairs that decay to W bosons and b quarks. The final states result when one W decays to e{nu} or {mu}{nu} and the other W to q{anti q}. More than four jets may be present because of final and initial state radiation.

  8. Relativistic quantum model of confinement and the current quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, L. D.

    1998-08-01

    We consider a relativistic quantum model of confined massive spinning quarks and antiquarks which describes the leading Regge trajectories of mesons. The quarks are described by the Dirac equations and the gluon contribution is approximated by the Nambu-Goto straight-line string. The string tension and the current quark masses are the main parameters of the model. Additional parameters are phenomenological constants which approximate nonstring short-range contributions. A comparison of the measured meson masses with the model predictions allows one to determine the current quark masses (in MeV) to be ms=227+/-5, mc=1440+/-10, and mb=4715+/-20. The chiral SU3 model makes it possible to estimate from here the u- and d-quark masses to be mu=6.2+/-0.2 Mev and md=11.1+/-0.4 Mev.

  9. Light hadron spectroscopy in two-flavor QCD with small sea quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Namekawa, Y.; Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Lesk, V. I.; Umeda, T.; Okawa, M.

    2004-10-01

    We extend the study of the light hadron spectrum and the quark mass in two-flavor QCD to smaller sea quark mass, corresponding to m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.60-0.35. Numerical simulations are carried out using the RG-improved gauge action and the meanfield-improved clover quark action at {beta}=1.8 (a=0.2 fm from {rho} meson mass). We observe that the light hadron spectrum for small sea quark mass does not follow the expectation from chiral extrapolations with quadratic functions made from the region of m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.80-0.55. Whereas fits with either polynomial or continuum chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) fail, the Wilson ChPT (WChPT) that includes a{sup 2} effects associated with explicit chiral symmetry breaking successfully fits the whole data: In particular, WChPT correctly predicts the light quark mass spectrum from simulations for medium heavy quark mass, such as m{sub PS}/m{sub V} > or approx. 0.5. Reanalyzing the previous data with the use of WChPT, we find the mean up and down quark mass being smaller than the previous result from quadratic chiral extrapolation by approximately 10%, m{sub ud}{sup MS-bar}({mu}=2 GeV)=3.11(17) [MeV] in the continuum limit.

  10. Lattice investigation of nucleon structure at light quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, James M.

    2010-07-27

    Lattice simulations of hadronic structure are now reaching a level where they are able to not only complement, but also provide guidance to current and forthcoming experimental programmes at, e.g. Jefferson Lab, COMPASS/CERN and FAIR/GSI. By considering new simulations at low quark masses and on large volumes, we review the recent progress that has been made in this exciting area by the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration. In particular, results obtained close to the physical point for several quantities, including electromagnetic form factors and moments of ordinary parton distribution functions, show some indication of approaching their phenomenological values.

  11. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. They analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} lvbq{bar q}{bar b}). The top quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the t{bar t} final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they achieve the single most precise measurement of the top quark mass, 170.8 {+-} 2.2(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Simple mass matrices of neutrinos and quarks consistent with observed mixings and masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Hiroyuki; Fukuyama, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We propose a simple phenomenological model of quarks-leptons mass matrices having fundamentally universal symmetry structure. These mass matrices consist of democratic and semi-democratic mass matrix terms commonly to the neutrino and the quark sectors and have only eight free parameters. We show that this mass matrix model well reproduces all the observed values of the MNS lepton and the CKM quark mixing angles, the neutrino mass squared difference ratio, and quark mass ratios, with an excellent agreement. The model also predicts δCPℓ = - 94 ° for the leptonic CP violating phase and < m > ≃ 0.0073 eV for the effective Majorana neutrino mass.

  13. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with t{bar t} {yields} {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}b{ell}{prime}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{prime} decays. The likelihood is formed as the convolution of the leading-order matrix element and detector resolution functions. The joint likelihood is the product of likelihoods for each of 33 events collected in 340 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, yielding a top quark mass M{sub t} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This first application of a matrix-element technique to t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, decays gives the most precise single measurement of M{sub t} in dilepton events. Combined with other CDF Run II measurements using dilepton events, we measure M{sub t} = 167.9 {+-} 5.2(stat.) {+-} 3.7(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Debye mass and heavy quark potential in a PNJL quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, J. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    We calculate the Debye mass for the screening of the heavy quark potential in a plasma of massless quarks coupled to the temporal gluon background governed by the Polyakov loop potential within the PNJL model in RPA approximation. We give a physical motivation for a recent phenomenological fit of lattice data by applying the calculated Debye mass with its suppression in the confined phase due to the Polyakov loop to a description of the temperature dependence of the singlet free energy for QCD with a heavy quark pair at infinite separation. We compare the result to lattice data.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, E.W.

    1997-12-31

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} using events recorded during a 125 pb{sup -1} exposure of the D0 detector to {radical}s=1.8 TeV {anti p}p collisions. Six events consistent with the hypothesis t{anti t} {yields} bW{sup +}, {anti b}W{sup -} {yields} b{anti l}{nu}, {anti b}l{anti {nu}} form the dilepton sample. The kinematics of such events may be reconstructed for any assumed mt, and the likelihood of each such solution evaluated. A measurement of m{sub t} based on these relative solution likelihoods gives m{sub t} = 169.9 {+-} 14.8 (stat.) {+-} 3. 8 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. A 2C kinematic fit is performed on a sample of 77 events consistent with t{anti t} {yields} bW{sup +}, {anti b}W{sup -} {yields} b{anti l}{nu}, {anti b}q{anti q} , and this, in combination with an estimate on the likelihood that each event is top, yields m{sub t} = 173.3 {+-} 5.6 (stat.) {+-} 6.2 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} . A combination of these two measurements gives m{sub t} = 173.1 {+-} 5.2 (stat.) {+-} 5.7 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Charm and beauty quark masses in the MMHT2014 global PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Martin, A. D.; Motylinski, P.; Thorne, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the variation in the MMHT2014 PDFs when we allow the heavy-quark masses m_c and m_b to vary away from their default values. We make PDF sets available in steps of Δ m_c =0.05 GeV and Δ m_b =0.25 GeV, and present the variation in the PDFs and in the predictions. We examine the comparison to the HERA data on charm and beauty structure functions and note that in each case the heavy-quark data, and the inclusive data, have a slight preference for lower masses than our default values. We provide PDF sets with three and four active quark flavours, as well as the standard value of five flavours. We use the pole mass definition of the quark masses, as in the default MMHT2014 analysis, but briefly comment on the overline{MS} definition.

  17. Hadron energy spectrum in polarized top-quark decays considering the effects of hadron and bottom quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Balali, Mahboobe

    2016-03-01

    We present the analytical expressions for the next-to-leading order corrections to the partial decay width t(\\uparrow ) rightarrow bW^+, followed by brightarrow H_bX, for nonzero b-quark mass (m_bne 0) in the fixed-flavor-number scheme (FFNs). To make the predictions for the energy distribution of outgoing hadrons H_b, as a function of the normalized H_b-energy fraction x_H, we apply the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme (GM-VFNs) in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization of top quark is evaluated relative to the b-quark momentum. We also study the effects of gluon fragmentation and finite hadron mass on the hadron energy spectrum so that hadron masses are responsible for the low-x_H threshold. In order to describe both the b-quark and the gluon hadronizations in top decays we apply realistic and nonperturbative fragmentation functions extracted through a global fit to the e^+e^- annihilation data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC by relying on their universality and scaling violations.

  18. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.

    2008-12-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of √s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t$\\bar{t}$ pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: Mtop = 171.9 ± 1.7 (stat. + JES) ± 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c2 = 171.9 ± 2.0 GeV/c2. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Kevin Matthew

    2005-05-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a {approx} 230 pb{sup -1} exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p{bar p}) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t{bar t}) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t{bar t} events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t{bar t} events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t{bar t} events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t{bar t} candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is m{sub t} = 169.9 {+-} 5.8(statistical){sub -7.8}{sup +8.0}(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is m{sub t} = 170.6 {+-} 4.2(statistical){sub -6.8}{sup +6.3}(systematic) GeV.

  20. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tmore » $$\\bar{t}$$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$$\\bar{p}$$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  1. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of t$\\bar{t}$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  2. Schwinger functions, light-quark bound states and sigma terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höll, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Wright, S. V.

    2006-11-01

    We explore the viability of using solely spacelike information about a Schwinger function to extract properties of bound states. In a concrete example it is not possible to determine properties of states with masses ≳1.2 GeV. Modern Dyson-Schwinger equation methods supply a well-constrained tool that provides access to hadron masses and σ-terms. We report values of the latter for a range of hadrons. Of interest is an analysis relating to a u,d scalar meson, which is compatible with a picture of the lightest 0 as a bound state of a dressed-quark and -antiquark supplemented by a material pion cloud. A constituent-quark σ-term is defined, which affords a means for assessing the flavour-dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

  3. Pion valence-quark parton distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lei; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2015-10-01

    Within the Dyson-Schwinger equation formulation of QCD, a rainbow ladder truncation is used to calculate the pion valence-quark distribution function (PDF). The gap equation is renormalized at a typical hadronic scale, of order 0.5 GeV, which is also set as the default initial scale for the pion PDF. We implement a corrected leading-order expression for the PDF which ensures that the valence-quarks carry all of the pion's light-front momentum at the initial scale. The scaling behavior of the pion PDF at a typical partonic scale of order 5.2 GeV is found to be (1 - x) ν, with ν ≃ 1.6, as x approaches one.

  4. Running of the bottom quark mass within the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, L.

    2008-11-23

    We compute the exact two-loop matching coefficient for the bottom-quark mass m{sub b}, within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), taking into account O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) contributions from the Supersymmetric Quantum Chromodynamics (SQCD). We find that the three-loop order corrections to the running bottom-quark mass exceed the uncertainty due to the current experimental accuracy. They can reach up to 30% from the tree-level m{sub b}, for models with large values of tan {beta} and relatively light SUSY mass scale.

  5. Hierarchy plus anarchy in quark masses and mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce a parametrization of the effect of unknown corrections from new physics on quark and lepton mass matrices. This parametrization is used in order to study how the hierarchies of quark masses and mixing angles are modified by random perturbations of the Yukawa matrices. We discuss several examples of flavor relations predicted by different textures, analyzing how these relations are influenced by the random perturbations. We also comment on the unlikely possibility that unknown corrections contribute significantly to the hierarchy of masses and mixings.

  6. Quark-hadron duality in structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2011-09-01

    We review recent progress in the study of quark-hadron duality in electron–nucleon structure functions. New developments include insights into the local aspects of duality obtained using truncated moments of structure functions, which allow duality-violating higher-twist contributions to be identified in individual resonance regions. Preliminary studies of pion electropro-duction have also showed the first glimpses of duality in semi-inclusive cross sections, which if confirmed would greatly expand the scope of constraining the flavor and spin dependence of parton distributions.

  7. Quark spectral function and deconfinement at nonzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Si-xue; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2013-09-01

    The maximum entropy method is used to compute the quark spectral function at nonzero temperature. We solve the gap equation of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) self-consistently, employing a rainbow kernel which phenomenologically models results from Dyson-Schwinger equations and lattice QCD. We use the criterion of positivity restoration of the spectral function as a signal for deconfinement. Our calculation indicates that the critical temperature of deconfinement Td is slightly smaller than the one of chiral symmetry restoration Tc: Td˜94%Tc in the chiral limit and Td˜96%Tc with physical light quark masses. Since these deviations are within the systematic error of our approach, it is reasonable to conclude that chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement coincide at zero chemical potential.

  8. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, P; Luu, T; Platter, L

    2010-12-13

    We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created of a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way we use lattice QCD data and an hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured {sup 4}He abundances put a bound of {delta}-1% {approx}< m{sub q}/m{sub 1} {approx}< 0.7%. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Including the bounds on the variation of {eta} coming from WMAP results and some additional assumptions narrows the range of allowed values of {delta}m{sub q}/m{sub q} somewhat.

  9. Quark-mass dependence of the three-flavor QCD phase diagram at zero and imaginary chemical potential: Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    We draw the three-flavor phase diagram as a function of light- and strange-quark masses for both zero and imaginary quark-number chemical potential, using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an effective four-quark vertex depending on the Polyakov loop. The model prediction is qualitatively consistent with 2+1 flavor lattice QCD prediction at zero chemical potential and with degenerate three-flavor lattice QCD prediction at imaginary chemical potential.

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in Dilepton Final States with the Neutrino Weighting Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2012-12-15

    The top quark is the heaviest fundamental particle observed to date. The mass of the top quark is a free parameter in the Standard Model (SM). A precise measurement of its mass is particularly important as it sets an indirect constraint on the mass of the Higgs boson. It is also a useful constraint on contributions from physics beyond the SM and may play a fundamental role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. I present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the Neutrino Weighting Method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector. Kinematically under-constrained dilepton events are analyzed by integrating over neutrino rapidity. Weight distributions of t$\\bar{t}$ signal and background are produced as a function of the top quark mass for different top quark mass hypotheses. The measurement is performed by constructing templates from the moments of the weight distributions and input top quark mass, followed by a subsequent likelihood t to data. The dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration is reduced by using a correction from `+jets channel. To replicate the quark avor dependence of the jet response in data, jets in the simulated events are additionally corrected. The result is combined with our preceding measurement on 1 fb-1 and yields mt = 174.0± 2.4 (stat.) ±1.4 (syst.) GeV.

  11. Calibration of the Top-Quark Monte Carlo Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieseler, Jan; Lipka, Katerina; Moch, Sven-Olaf

    2016-04-01

    We present a method to establish, experimentally, the relation between the top-quark mass mtMC as implemented in Monte Carlo generators and the Lagrangian mass parameter mt in a theoretically well-defined renormalization scheme. We propose a simultaneous fit of mtMC and an observable sensitive to mt, which does not rely on any prior assumptions about the relation between mt and mtMC. The measured observable is independent of mtMC and can be used subsequently for a determination of mt. The analysis strategy is illustrated with examples for the extraction of mt from inclusive and differential cross sections for hadroproduction of top quarks.

  12. Properties of color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars in a new quark mass scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qian; Chen, ShiWu; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng

    2013-09-01

    Considering the effect of one-gluon-exchange interaction between quarks, the color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars are investigated in a new quark mass density-dependent model. It is found that the color-flavor locked strange quark matter can be more stable if the one-gluon-exchange effect is included. The lower density behavior of the sound velocity in this model is different from the previous results. Moreover, the new equation of state leads to a heavier acceptable maximum mass, supporting the recent observation of a compact star mass as large as about 2 times the solar mass.

  13. Nucleon structure functions from constituent quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorramian, Ali N.; Arash, Firooz

    1999-10-01

    We have used a constituent quarks model to describe the nucleon structure function, F2( χ, Q2), for a wide range of χ=[10 -6,1] and Q2 = [0.5, 5000] GeV2. We have found that although F2 rises as χ decreases, but there exists some χ0 ≤ 10 -4 - 10 -5, below which the rise of F2 subsides drastically and hence, exhibits an almost flat behavior, compatible with the latest results from HERA, at least for low Q2.

  14. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Connecting Fermion Masses and Mixings to BSM Physics - Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Terrence; Stephenson, Gerard J., Jr.

    2015-10-01

    The ``democratic'' mass matrix with BSM physics assumptions has been studied without success. We invert the process and use the ``democratic'' mass matrix plus a parametrization of all possible BSM corrections to analyze the implications of the observed masses and CKM weak interaction current mixing for the BSM parameter values for the up-quarks and down-quarks. We observe that the small mixing of the so-called ``third generation'' is directly related to the large mass gap from the two lighter generations. Conversely, the relatively large value of the Cabibbo angle arises because the mass matrices in the light sub-sector (block diagonalized from the full three channel problem) are neither diagonal nor degenerate and differ significantly between the up and down cases. Alt email:t.goldman@gmail.com

  16. Measurement of the top-quark mass with dilepton events selected using neuroevolution at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shekhar, R; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Whiteson, S; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-04-17

    We report a measurement of the top-quark mass M_{t} in the dilepton decay channel tt[over ] --> bl;{'+} nu_{l};{'}b[over ]l;{-}nu[over ]_{l}. Events are selected with a neural network which has been directly optimized for statistical precision in top-quark mass using neuroevolution, a technique modeled on biological evolution. The top-quark mass is extracted from per-event probability densities that are formed by the convolution of leading order matrix elements and detector resolution functions. The joint probability is the product of the probability densities from 344 candidate events in 2.0 fb;{-1} of pp[over ] collisions collected with the CDF II detector, yielding a measurement of M_{t} = 171.2 +/- 2.7(stat) +/- 2.9(syst) GeV / c;{2}. PMID:19518620

  17. Measurement of the top quark mass in lepton+jets events with secondary vertex tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Robert Duane; /Northeastern U.

    2007-02-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton + jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events with single isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), exactly four calorimeter jets, and significant missing transverse energy are selected. Probabilities used to discriminate between signal and background are assumed to be proportional to differential cross-sections, calculated using event kinematics and folding in object resolutions and parton distribution functions. The event likelihoods constructed using these probabilities are varied with the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale, JES, to give the smallest possible combined statistical + JES uncertainty.

  18. Quark masses and the meson spectrum: A holographic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, S. S.; Pusenkov, I. V.

    2015-09-01

    Based on experimental data, we can assume that the radial spectrum of vector mesons with a hidden quark flavor has a Regge form and propose its concrete form. The parameters of the Regge spectrum turn out to depend strongly on the mass of the quarks forming the mesons. We consider the problem of finding the form of these dependences in the framework of the holographic approach to strong interactions. The obtained results agree well with the phenomenology and with models of Veneziano-like dual amplitudes.

  19. A precision measurement of the mass of the top quark.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Davis, G A; De, K; De Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Han, C; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, A; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Rajagopalan, S; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F; Rockwell, T; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Van Kooten, R; Vaniev, V; Varelas, N; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2004-06-10

    The standard model of particle physics contains parameters--such as particle masses--whose origins are still unknown and which cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top quark (M(t)) and W boson (M(W)) constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of M(t) can therefore indicate where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a standard model Higgs is consistent with experimental data. As top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only about 10(-24) s into various final states, reconstructing their masses from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision (of +/- 5.3 GeV/c2) when compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the only other measurements available, the new world average for M(t) becomes 178.0 +/- 4.3 GeV/c2. As a result, the most likely Higgs mass increases from the experimentally excluded value of 96 to 117 GeV/c2, which is beyond current experimental sensitivity. The upper limit on the Higgs mass at the 95% confidence level is raised from 219 to 251 GeV/c2. PMID:15190311

  20. Constituent quark masses obtained from hadron masses with contributions of Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D.; Ignjatovic, S. R.; Jovanovic, P.

    2010-12-01

    We use the color-spin and flavor-spin interaction Hamiltonians with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking to obtain meson and baryon mass formulas. Adjusting these masses with experimental masses we determine the constituent quark masses. We discuss the constituent quark masses obtained from meson and baryon mass fits. The results for constituent quark masses are very similar in the case of two different phenomenological models: Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions.

  1. Quark-jet model for transverse momentum dependent fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, W.; Kotzinian, A.; Matevosyan, H. H.; Ninomiya, Y.; Thomas, A. W.; Yazaki, K.

    2016-08-01

    In order to describe the hadronization of polarized quarks, we discuss an extension of the quark-jet model to transverse momentum dependent fragmentation functions. The description is based on a product ansatz, where each factor in the product represents one of the transverse momentum dependent splitting functions, which can be calculated by using effective quark theories. The resulting integral equations and sum rules are discussed in detail for the case of inclusive pion production. In particular, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional momentum sum rules are satisfied naturally in this transverse momentum dependent quark-jet model. Our results are well suited for numerical calculations in effective quark theories and can be implemented in Monte Carlo simulations of polarized quark hadronization processes.

  2. Measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

    2012-04-01

    The mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb{sup -1} of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of m{sub top} = 173.2 {+-} 0.9 GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of m{sub top} at the Tevatron.

  3. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (tt-->W(+)bW(-)b-->lnubqq'b). The top-quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the tt final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of the top-quark mass, 170.8+/-2.2(stat.)+/-1.4(syst.) GeV/c(2). PMID:17995397

  4. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF Using the Template Method in the Lepton + Jets Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.

    2008-06-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The analysis uses a template method, in which the overconstrained kinematics of the Lepton+Jets channel of the t$\\bar{t}$ system are used to measure a single quantity, the reconstructed top quark mass, that is strongly correlated with the true top quark mass. in addition, the dijet mass of the hadronically decaying W boson is used to constrain in situ the uncertain jet energy scale in the CDF detector. Two-dimensional probability density functions are derived using a kernel density estimate-based machinery. Using 1.9 fb-1 of data, the top quark mass is measured to be 171.8$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(stat.) ± 1.0(syst.)GeV/c2.

  5. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  6. Top quark and Higgs boson masses from wormhole physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.A.; Joshi, G.C. )

    1994-11-01

    We bring together quantum field theory on [ital S][sub 4] with the Coleman wormhole hypothesis, which imposes constraints on terms in the gravitational Lagrangian. In particular, we investigate the effect of matter fields on the trace anomaly, which is related to the (curvature)[sup 2] terms, by the use of the renormalization group equations. We consider a toy model of a nonconformally coupled Higgs boson to a single top'' quark. By numerically solving the renormalization group equations for the couplings of the model, we can find preferred values of the particle masses for various values of the bare nonconformal coupling. By making the [ital ad] [ital hoc] assumption that the tree-level, Higgs boson treace anomaly vanishes on shell, a unique prediction can be made within this model for the masses of both the Higgs boson and the top quark.

  7. Heavy-quark mass effects in Higgs plus jets production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Vryonidou, E.; Wiesemann, M.

    2016-08-01

    We study the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in the gluon-fusion channel at the 13 TeV LHC. Our results are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, bar for the lack of some two-loop amplitudes, for up to two extra jets and are matched to the P ythia8 Monte Carlo. We address the impact, at the level of inclusive rates and of differential distributions, of the merging of samples characterised by different final-state multiplicities, and of the effects induced by top and bottom masses through heavy-quark loop diagrams. We find that both the merging and the heavy-quark masses must be included in the calculation in order to realistically predict observables of experimental interest.

  8. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, Andrew N

    2003-11-01

    The authors describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The posterior probability distribution of the top quark pole mass is calculated using the differential cross-section for the t{bar t} production and decay expressed with respect to observed leptons and jets momenta. The presence of background events in the collected sample is modeled using calculations of the differential cross-sections for major background processes. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, they observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 61.{sub stat} {+-} 3.4{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  11. QUARK ANTIQUARK ENERGIES AND THE SCREENING MASS IN A QUARK-GLUON PLASMA AT LOW AND HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect

    ZANTOW, F.; KACZMAREK, O.

    2005-08-02

    We discuss quark antiquark energies and the screening mass in hot QCD using the non-perturbative lattice approach. For this purpose we analyze properties of quark antiquark energies and entropies at infinitely large separation of the quark antiquark pair at low and high temperatures. In the limit of high temperatures these energies and entropies can be related perturbatively to the temperature dependence of the Debye mass and the coupling. On the one hand our analysis thus suggests that the quark antiquark energies at (infinite) large distances are rather related to the Debye screening mass and the coupling than to the temperature dependence of heavy-light meson masses. On the other hand we find no or only little differences in all mass scales introduced by us when changing from quenched to 2-flavor QCD at temperatures which are only moderately above the phase transition.

  12. Quark and Lepton Masses from Gaussian Landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Salem, Michael P.; Watari, Taizan

    2008-04-11

    The flavor structure of the standard model (SM) might arise from random selection on a landscape. We propose a class of simple models, 'Gaussian landscapes', where Yukawa couplings derive from overlap integrals of Gaussian wave functions on extra-dimensions. Statistics of vacua are generated by scanning the peak positions of these zero-modes, giving probability distributions for all flavor observables. Gaussian landscapes can account for all observed flavor patterns with few free parameters. Although they give broad probability distributions, the predictions are correlated and accounting for measured parameters sharpens the distributions of future neutrino measurements.

  13. Top quark mass measurement at CDF Run-II

    SciTech Connect

    T. Maruyama

    2004-05-11

    CDF has resumed the top quark mass measurement with upgraded detectors and Tevatron complex. High statistics should allow us to determine the top mass with an uncertainty of a few GeV/c{sup 2} by the end of Run II. The current measured value, using an integrated luminosity of {approx} 108 pb{sup -1}, is 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7} (stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} (lepton + jets with one b-jet tagged mode: the current best mode), which is consistent with RunI measurements.

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    The most recent measurements of the mass of the quark top at D0 are reviewed. The analysis methods include the direct measurement by Matrix Element and Weighting method and the indirect measurement from t{bar t} production cross section. They have been applied on different experimental signatures, all including at least one electron or muon. Measurements include from 1 to 3.6 fb{sup -1} of D0 data. The most recent combination of mass measurements from D0 and from CDF are also quoted.

  15. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons using effective quark masses in a chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Aarti; Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model (χ CQM ) with explicit results for the contribution coming from the valence quark polarizations, sea quark polarizations, and their orbital angular momentum. Since the JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have short lifetimes, the experimental information about them is limited. The χ CQM has important implications for chiral symmetry breaking as well as SU(3) symmetry breaking since it works in the region between the QCD confinement scale and the chiral symmetry breaking scale. The predictions in the model not only give a satisfactory fit when compared with the experimental data but also show improvement over the other models. The effect of the confinement on quark masses has also been discussed in detail and the results of χ CQM are found to improve further with the inclusion of effective quark masses.

  16. Many Masses on One Stroke:. Economic Computation of Quark Propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommer, Andreas; Nöckel, Bertold; Güsken, Stephan; Lippert, Thomas; Schilling, Klaus

    The computational effort in the calculation of Wilson fermion quark propagators in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics can be considerably reduced by exploiting the Wilson fermion matrix structure in inversion algorithms based on the non-symmetric Lanczos process. We consider two such methods: QMR (quasi minimal residual) and BCG (biconjugate gradients). Based on the decomposition M/κ = 1/κ-D of the Wilson mass matrix, using QMR, one can carry out inversions on a whole trajectory of masses simultaneously, merely at the computational expense of a single propagator computation. In other words, one has to compute the propagator corresponding to the lightest mass only, while all the heavier masses are given for free, at the price of extra storage. Moreover, the symmetry γ5M = M†γ5 can be used to cut the computational effort in QMR and BCG by a factor of two. We show that both methods then become — in the critical regime of small quark masses — competitive to BiCGStab and significantly better than the standard MR method, with optimal relaxation factor, and CG as applied to the normal equations.

  17. Universal form for quark and lepton mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Preskill, John

    2015-12-01

    We propose a universal form for quark and lepton mass matrices, which applies in a "leading order" approximation where C P -violating phases are ignored. Down-quark mass ratios are successfully predicted in our scheme using the measured Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing angles as input. Assuming an additional discrete symmetry in the neutrino sector, we obtain the "golden ratio" pattern in the leading-order Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) mixing matrix; in addition we predict an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy with m1≃m2≃74 meV , m3≃55 meV , and neutrinoless double beta decay mass parameter m0 ν β β≃33 meV . When C P -violating phases are included, our scheme suggests a residual Z 2 antiunitary symmetry of the neutrino mass matrix, in which the interchange of μ and τ neutrinos is accompanied by a time reversal transformation, thus predicting that the C P -violating angle in the neutrino sector is close to the maximal value δ =±π /2 , and that the diagonal phases in the PMNS matrix are α1≃0 , α2≃π .

  18. Infrared Renormalization-Group Flow for Heavy-Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2008-10-10

    A short-distance heavy-quark mass depends on two parameters: the renormalization scale {mu} and a scale R controlling the absorption of infrared fluctuations. The radius for perturbative corrections that build up the mass beyond its pointlike definition in the pole scheme is {approx}1/R. Treating R as a variable gives a renormalization-group equation. R evolution improves the stability of conversion between short-distance mass schemes, allowing us to avoid large logs and the renormalon. R evolution can also be used to study IR renormalons without using bubble chains, yielding a convergent sum rule for the coefficient of the O({lambda}{sub QCD}) renormalon ambiguity of the pole mass.

  19. Pion and Kaon Masses and Pion Form Factors from Dynamical Chiral-Symmetry Breaking with Light Constituent Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Scadron, Michael D.; Kleefeld, Frieder; Rupp, George

    2007-02-27

    Light constituent quark masses and the corresponding dynamical quark masses are determined by data, the quark-level linear {sigma} model, and infrared QCD. This allows to define effective nonstrange and strange current quark masses, which reproduce the experimental pion and kaon masses very accurately, by simple additivity. In contrast, the usual nonstrange and strange current quarks employed by the Particle Data Group and Chiral Perturbation Theory do not allow a straightforward quantitative explanation of the pion and kaon masses.

  20. Top Quark Mass from the Tevatron and LHC Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigliadori, Luca

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 has been one of the great successes of the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Since then, many measurements of the top quark properties have been performed in different channels and using many methods. The importance of measuring its mass lies in the possibility of verifying the predictions and the consistency of the Standard Model as well as in setting constraints on possible, still unobserved, physics. In 2010, the new CERN experiments, ATLAS and CMS, started to measure the top quark properties exploiting the large amount of data collected at the Large Hadron Collider. In March 2014, the very first combination of measurements from all the four experiments has been performed yielding Mtop = 173.34 ± 0.76 GeV, with a precision below 0.5%. In these proceedings a selected review of the most recent or relevant results obtained by the Tevatron and LHC Collaborations is presented.

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, E.W.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-11-01

    D{null} has measured the top quark mass using a sample of 32 single- lepton events selected from approximately 115 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {ital p}{ital {anti p}} collisions collected from 1992-1996. The result is {ital m}{sub t} = 169 {+-} 8({ital stat}){+-} 8 ({ital syst}) GeV/c{sup 2}. Using a sample of 3 {ital e{mu}} events, D{null} measures {ital m}{sub t} = 158 {+-} 24({ital stat}) {+-} 10({ital syst}) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. GUT predictions for quark and lepton mass ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2010-02-10

    Group theoretical factors from GUT symmetry breaking can lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton masses at the unification scale. Due to supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections the viability of such predictions can depend strongly on the SUSY parameters. We derive possible new predictions for the GUT scale ratios m{sub m}u/m{sub s}, ytau/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} and compare them with the experimentally allowed ranges for three common SUSY breaking scenarios.

  3. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-01

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson's momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as (1 -x )2 when Bjorken-x →1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U (3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion's light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  4. General structure of democratic mass matrix of quark sector in E6 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftci, R.; ćiftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) fermion sector, which is inspired by the E6 Grand Unified Theory (GUT) model, might be a good candidate to explain a number of unanswered questions in SM. Existence of the isosinglet quarks might explain great mass difference of bottom and top quarks. Also, democracy on mass matrix elements is a natural approach in SM. In this study, we have given general structure of Democratic Mass Matrix (DMM) of quark sector in E6 model.

  5. Up, down, strange and charm quark masses with Nf=2+1+1 twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, N.; Deuzeman, A.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Giménez, V.; Herdoiza, G.; Lami, P.; Lubicz, V.; Palao, D.; Picca, E.; Reker, S.; Riggio, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Sanfilippo, F.; Scorzato, L.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; Urbach, C.; Wenger, U.

    2014-10-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the up, down, strange and charm quark masses performed using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2+1+1 dynamical quarks, which include in the sea, besides two light mass degenerate quarks, also the strange and charm quarks with masses close to their physical values. The simulations are based on a unitary setup for the two light quarks and on a mixed action approach for the strange and charm quarks. The analysis uses data at three values of the lattice spacing and pion masses in the range 210-450 MeV, allowing for accurate continuum limit and controlled chiral extrapolation. The quark mass renormalization is carried out non-perturbatively using the RI‧-MOM method. The results for the quark masses converted to the MSbar scheme are: mud(2 GeV)=3.70(17) MeV, ms(2 GeV)=99.6(4.3) MeV and mc(mc)=1.348(46) GeV. We obtain also the quark mass ratios ms/mud=26.66(32) and mc/ms=11.62(16). By studying the mass splitting between the neutral and charged kaons and using available lattice results for the electromagnetic contributions, we evaluate mu/md=0.470(56), leading to mu=2.36(24) MeV and md=5.03(26) MeV.

  6. Integral equation for gauge invariant quark Green's function

    SciTech Connect

    Sazdjian, H.

    2008-08-29

    We consider gauge invariant quark two-point Green's functions in which the gluonic phase factor follows a skew-polygonal line. Using a particular representation for the quark propagator in the presence of an external gluon field, functional relations between Green's functions with different numbers of segments of the polygonal lines are established. An integral equation is obtained for the Green's function having a phase factor along a single straight line. The related kernels involve Wilson loops with skew-polygonal contours and with functional derivatives along the sides of the contours.

  7. Measurements of the top-quark mass and properties at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünser, Marc; CMS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the top-quark mass and other top-quark properties are presented, obtained from the CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and decay channels. The measurements of the top-quark properties include the W helicity in top-quark decays, the search for anomalous couplings, and the ratio of top-quarks decaying to bW over qW in order to gain information on |Vtb| using both t\\bar t and single-top quark event samples. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models. The cross section of t\\bar t events produced in association with a W, Z boson or a photon is also measured.

  8. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul; /UC, Berkeley

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb{sup -1} dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t{bar t} and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb{sup -1} dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 178 GTeV/c{sup 2} and 3.1 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  9. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  10. Hadron Spectra and Quark Mass Dependence in Holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.

    Hadron masses and their quark-mass dependence are imporatant observablesin strongly coupled QCD. We apply holography, a string theory technique, to this problem, and find a qualitative coincidence with observed data of baryon spectra. This talk, presented on 9th Feruary 2010 in ``NFQCD'' workshop at YITP, is based on three papers written with my collaborators [K.~Hashimoto, T.~Hirayama, F.~L.~Lin and H.~U.~Yee, J. High Energy Phys. 07 (2008), 089, arXiv:0803.4192. K.~Hashimoto, T.~Hirayama and D.~K.~Hong, Phys. Rev. D 81 (2010), 045016, arXiv:0906.0402. K.~Hashimoto, N.~Iizuka, T.~Ishii and D.~Kadoh, Phys. Lett. B 691 (2010), 65, arXiv:0910.1179.

  11. The Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Pierluigi

    1997-10-01

    This thesis aims to review the cosmological mass function problem, both from the theoretical and the observational point of view, and to present a new mass function theory, based on realistic approximations for the dynamics of gravitational collapse. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction on gravitational dynamics in cosmological models. Chapter 2 gives a complete review of the mass function theory. Chapters 3 and 4 present the ``dynamical'' mass function theory, based on truncated Lagrangian dynamics and on the excursion set approach. Chapter 5 reviews the observational state-of-the-art and the main applications of the mass function theories described before. Finally, Chapter 6 gives conclusions and future prospects.

  12. 1{sup -+} exotic meson at light quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hedditch, J.N.; Kamleh, W.; Lasscock, B.G.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-12-01

    The mass of the 1{sup -+} exotic meson, created with hybrid interpolating fields, is explored in numerical simulations of quenched QCD on large (20{sup 3}x40) lattices to obtain good control of statistical and finite volume errors. Using the Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action, the properties of the 1{sup -+} are investigated at light quark masses approaching 25 MeV (m{sub {pi}}/m{sub {rho}}{approx_equal}1/3). Under the standard assumption that the coupling to the quenched a{sub 1}{eta}{sup '} channel comes with a negative metric, our results indicate that the 1{sup -+} exotic exhibits significant curvature close to the chiral limit, suggesting previous linear extrapolations have overestimated the mass of the 1{sup -+}. We find for the first time in lattice studies a 1{sup -+} mass consistent with the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) candidate. We also find a strangeness {+-}1 J{sup P}=1{sup -} state with a mass close to 2 GeV.

  13. Quark and lepton masses and mixing in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Even if quark and lepton masses are not uniquely predicted by the fundamental theory, as may be the case in the string theory landscape, nevertheless their pattern may reveal features of the underlying theory. We use statistical techniques to show that the observed masses appear to be representative of a scale-invariant distribution, {rho}(m){approx}1/m. If we extend this distribution to include all the Yukawa couplings, we show that the resulting Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements typically show a hierarchical pattern similar to observations. The Jarlskog invariant measuring the amount of CP violation is also well reproduced in magnitude. We also apply this framework to neutrinos using the seesaw mechanism. The neutrino results are ambiguous, with the observed pattern being statistically allowed even though the framework does not provide a natural explanation for the observed two large mixing angles. Our framework highly favors a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses. We also are able to make statistical predictions in the neutrino sector when we specialize to situations consistent with the known mass differences and two large mixing angles. Within our framework, we show that with 95% confidence the presently unmeasured Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing angle sin{theta}{sub 13} is larger than 0.04 and typically of order 0.1. The leptonic Jarlskog invariant is found to be typically of order 10{sup -2} and the magnitude of the effective Majorana mass m{sub ee} is typically of order 0.001 eV.

  14. Quark fragmentation functions in NJL-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Matevosyan, Hrayr; Thomas, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. Supported by Grant in Aid for Scientific Research, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Project No. 20168769.

  15. Relativistic and binding energy corrections to heavy quark fragmentation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Yusuf, M.A.; Bashir, A.

    1997-11-01

    We calculate the fragmentation function for a charm quark to decay inclusively into S-wave charmonium states, including relativistic and binding energy corrections in powers of the quark relative velocity v. We also use these fragmentation functions to estimate their contribution to the production rate of {eta}{sub c} and J/{psi} in Z{sup 0} decay. These corrections contribute about 38{percent} to the integrated c{r_arrow}J/{psi}+X fragmentation. For {eta}{sub c}, these corrections are found to be small. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Bashir, A.; Roberts, C. D.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-06-16

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  17. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trang; Bashir, Adnan; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2011-06-15

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  18. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trang; Bashir, Adnan; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2011-06-01

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD’s Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to π-N Drell-Yan data for the pion’s u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio uK(x)/uπ(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  19. Isgur-Wise function within a modified heavy-light chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Eeg, Jan O.; Kumericki, Kresimir

    2010-04-01

    We consider the Isgur-Wise function {xi}({omega}) within a new modified version of a heavy-light chiral quark model. While early versions of such models gave an absolute value of the slope that was too small, namely {xi}{sup '}(1){approx_equal}-0.4 to -0.3, we show how extended version(s) may lead to values around -1, in better agreement with recent measurements. This is obtained by introducing a new mass parameter in the heavy-quark propagator. We also shortly comment on the consequences for the decay modes B{yields}DD.

  20. Scalar K{pi} form factor and light-quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Jamin, Matthias; Oller, Jose Antonio; Pich, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Recent experimental improvements on K-decay data allow for a precise extraction of the strangeness-changing scalar K{pi} form factor and the related strange scalar spectral function. On the basis of this scalar as well as the corresponding pseudoscalar spectral function, the strange quark mass is determined to be m{sub s}(2 GeV)=92{+-}9 MeV. Further taking into account chiral perturbation theory mass ratios, the light up and down quark masses turn out to be m{sub u}(2 GeV)=2.7{+-}0.4 MeV as well as m{sub d}(2 GeV)=4.8{+-}0.5 MeV. As a by-product, we also find a value for the Cabibbo angle |V{sub us}|=0.2236(29) and the ratio of meson decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}=1.203(16). Performing a global average of the strange mass by including extractions from other channels as well as lattice QCD results yields m{sub s}(2 GeV)=94{+-}6 MeV.

  1. Quark mass relations to four-loop order in perturbative QCD.

    PubMed

    Marquard, Peter; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Vladimir A; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2015-04-10

    We present results for the relation between a heavy quark mass defined in the on-shell and minimal subtraction (MS[over ¯]) scheme to four-loop order. The method to compute the four-loop on-shell integral is briefly described and the new results are used to establish relations between various short-distance masses and the MS[over ¯] quark mass to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy. These relations play an important role in the accurate determination of the MS[over ¯] heavy quark masses. PMID:25910112

  2. Quark and gluon decay functions in QCD and recombination model

    SciTech Connect

    Change, V.; Hwa, R.C.

    1980-04-01

    Inclusive longitudinal-momentum distributions of pions in jets initiated by quarks and gluons are determined in perturbative QCD and recombination model. The quark and antiquark joint distributions in jets are first calculated in the leading-order approximation at high Q/sup 2/. Gluons in the jets are completely converted to quark pairs. From the overall distribution q anti q pairs with definite quantum numbers then recombine to form pions. The recombination function for the process is well determined in the valon model. No adjustable parameters are involved in these calculations, and no data at low Q/sup 2/ are used as phenomenological input. The result for the quark decay functions can be compared with data on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, and the agreement is very good in both shape and normalization. Predictions for the gluon decay functions are presented, but they cannot yet be checked by experiments. The x and Q/sup 2/ dependences of both types of decay functions have been parametrized in simple form suitable for use in theoretical and experimental applications. 17 figures, 1 table.

  3. Spin Structure Functions in a Covariant Spectator Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, Franz Gross and M. T. Peña

    2010-12-01

    We apply the covariant spectator quark–diquark model, already probed in the description of the nucleon elastic form factors, to the calculation of the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) spin-independent and spin-dependent structure functions of the nucleon. The nucleon wave function is given by a combination of quark–diquark orbital states, corresponding to S, D and P-waves. A simple form for the quark distribution function associated to the P and D waves is tested.

  4. Mass of the b quark and B -meson decay constants from Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted-mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussone, A.; Carrasco, N.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Lami, P.; Lubicz, V.; Picca, E.; Riggio, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; ETM Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present precise lattice computations for the b -quark mass, the quark mass ratios mb/mc and mb/ms as well as the leptonic B -decay constants. We employ gauge configurations with four dynamical quark flavors, up-down, strange and charm, at three values of the lattice spacing (a ˜0.06 - 0.09 fm ) and for pion masses as low as 210 MeV. Interpolation in the heavy quark mass to the bottom quark point is performed using ratios of physical quantities computed at nearby quark masses exploiting the fact that these ratios are exactly known in the static quark mass limit. Our results are also extrapolated to the physical pion mass and to the continuum limit and read mb(MS ¯ ,mb)=4.26 (10 ) GeV , mb/mc=4.42 (8 ), mb/ms=51.4 (1.4 ), fB s=229 (5 ) MeV , fB=193 (6 ) MeV , fB s/fB=1.184 (25 ) and (fB s/fB)/(fK/fπ)=0.997 (17 ).

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W ---> j j calibration at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.; Arguin, J.F.; Bellettini, G.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Chlachidze, G.; Demortier, L.; Gibson, A.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Maruyama, T.; Sato, K.; Shochet, M.; Sinervo, P.; Tomura, T.; Velev, G.; Xie, S.; Yang, U.K.; /Chicago U. /Toronto U. /INFN, Pisa /Dubna, JINR /Rockefeller U. /LBL, Berkeley /Tsukuba U. /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses a dataset with integrated luminosity of 680 pb{sup -1}, containing 360 t{bar t} candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W {yields} jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson mass are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson mass in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  6. Evolution of heavy quark distribution function on quark-gluon plasma: Using the Iterative Laplace Transform Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi Pari, Sharareh; Javidan, Kurosh; Taghavi Shahri, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The "Laplace Transform Method" is used to solve the Fokker-Plank equation for finding the time evolution of the heavy quarks distribution functions such as charm and bottom in quark gluon plasma. These solutions will lead us to calculation of nuclear suppression factor RAA. The results have good agreement with available experiment data from the PHENIX collaboration.

  7. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Leandro G.; Sturm, Christian

    2010-09-01

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the MS scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f}=3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  8. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the RI/SMOM schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, C.; Almeida, L.

    2010-04-26

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the {ovr MS} scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{mu}} schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f} = 3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  9. Di-lepton Top Quark Mass Measurement with the Neutrino Weighting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Simon

    2005-04-01

    We report a measurement of the Top Quark Mass using approximately 340 pb-1 of data from pp collisions at √s = 1.96 GeV at CDF Run II. We select tt candidates that are consistent with two W bosons decaying leptonically. Only one of the two charged leptons is required to be identified as an electron or a muon candidate, while the other is simply a well measured track. Using the Neutrino Weighting Algorithm to reconstruct a top quark mass in each event and comparing the resulting distribution to Monte Carlo templates, we measure the top quark mass.

  10. Quark masses and mixings in the RS1 model with a condensing 4th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Dib, Claudio O.; Neill, Nicolás A.; Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings in a model based on a 5-dimensional spacetime with constant curvature of Randall-Sundrum type with two branes, where the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking is caused dynamically by the condensation of a 4th generation of quarks, due to underlying physics from the 5D bulk and the first KK gluons. We first study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings that can be obtained from purely adjusting the profile localizations, finding that realistic masses are not reproduced unless non trivial hierarchies of underlying 4-fermion interactions from the bulk are included. Then we study global U(1) symmetries that can be imposed in order to obtain non-symmetric modified Fritzsch-like textures in the mass matrices that reproduce reasonably well quark masses and CKM mixings.

  11. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Di-lepton Channel using the Dalitz-Goldstein Method

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, Matthew Frederick

    2010-10-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the mass of the top quark using a method developed by G. Goldstein and R.H. Dalitz. It is based on 2.0 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector Facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories. Di-lepton events were observed from colliding protons with anti-protons with √s = 1.96 TeV in the Tevatron Collider. A total of 145 candidate events were observed with 49 expected to be from background. These events include two neutrinos which elude detection. The method begins by assuming an initial top quark mass and solves for the neutrino momenta using a geometrical construction. The method samples over a range of likely top quark masses choosing the most consistent mass via a likelihood function. An important distinguishing feature of this method from others is its lack of dependence on the missing transverse energy, a quantity that is poorly measured by the experiment. This analysis determines the top quark mass to be Mtop = 172.3 ± 3.4(stat.) ± 2.0(syst.) GeV/c2 (Mtop = 170.5 ± 3.7(stat.) ± 1.8(syst.) GeV/c2 with b-tagging).

  12. Bethe-Salpeter dynamics and the constituent mass concept for heavy quark mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchlas, N.; Stratakis, D.

    2010-06-01

    The definition of a quark as heavy requires a comparison of its mass with the nonperturbative chiral symmetry breaking scale which is about 1 GeV (Λχ˜1GeV) or with the scale ΛQCD˜0.2GeV that characterizes the distinction between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For quark masses significantly larger than these scales, nonperturbative dressing effects, or equivalently nonperturbative self-energy contributions, and relativistic effects are believed to be less important for physical observables. We explore the concept of a constituent mass for heavy quarks in the Dyson-Schwinger equations formalism, for light-heavy and heavy-heavy quark mesons by studying their masses and electroweak decay constants.

  13. Bethe-Salpeter dynamics and the constituent mass concept for heavy quark mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Souchlas, N.; Stratakis, D.

    2010-06-01

    The definition of a quark as heavy requires a comparison of its mass with the nonperturbative chiral symmetry breaking scale which is about 1 GeV ({Lambda}{sub {chi}{approx}1} GeV) or with the scale {Lambda}{sub QCD{approx}}0.2 GeV that characterizes the distinction between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For quark masses significantly larger than these scales, nonperturbative dressing effects, or equivalently nonperturbative self-energy contributions, and relativistic effects are believed to be less important for physical observables. We explore the concept of a constituent mass for heavy quarks in the Dyson-Schwinger equations formalism, for light-heavy and heavy-heavy quark mesons by studying their masses and electroweak decay constants.

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2005-10-01

    We present recent analyses of the top quark mass measurement in dileptonic channel. The measurements use 200-360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF and D0 experiments. The future prospects are discussed as well.

  15. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  16. Broken S flavor symmetry of leptons and quarks: Mass spectra and flavor mixing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Yang, Deshan; Zhou, Shun

    2010-06-01

    We apply the discrete S3 flavor symmetry to both lepton and quark sectors of the Standard Model extended by introducing one Higgs triplet and realizing the type-II seesaw mechanism for finite neutrino masses. The resultant mass matrices of charged leptons (Ml), neutrinos (Mν), up-type quarks (Mu) and down-type quarks (Md) have a universal form consisting of two terms: one is proportional to the identity matrix I and the other is proportional to the democracy matrix D. We argue that the textures of Ml, Mu and Md are dominated by the D term, while that of Mν is dominated by the I term. This hypothesis implies a near mass degeneracy of three neutrinos and can naturally explain why the mass matrices of charged fermions are strongly hierarchical, why the quark mixing matrix is close to I and why the lepton mixing matrix contains two large angles. We discuss a rather simple perturbation ansatz to break the S3 symmetry and obtain more realistic mass spectra of leptons and quarks as well as their flavor mixing patterns. We stress that the I term, which used to be ignored from Ml, Mu and Md, is actually important because it can significantly modify the smallest lepton flavor mixing angle θ13 or three quark flavor mixing angles.

  17. Analysis of the QCD spectrum and chiral symmetry breaking with varying quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2013-04-15

    The meson spectrum of QCD is studied in the framework of nonperturbative QCD as a function of varying quark masses m{sub q}. It is shown that the total spectrum consists of two branches: 1) the standard one, which may be called the flux-tube spectrum, depending approximately linearly on m{sub q}, and 2) the chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) spectrum for pseudoscalar (PS) flavor nonsinglet mesons with mass dependence {radical}m{sub q}. The formalism for PS mesons is derived from the QCD Lagrangian with m{sub q} corrections, and a unified form of the PS propagator was derived. It is shown that the CSB branch of PS mesons joins to the flux-tube branch at around m{sub q} = 200 MeV. All these results are in close correspondence with recent numerical data on large lattices.

  18. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  19. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore » the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  20. Top quark mass in events with two charged leptons at the D0 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boline, Daniel

    The top quark is the most massive observed fundamental subatomic particle, and at the Tevatron accelerator is produced mostly in top-antitop ( tt¯) quark pairs from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Each top quark decays into a bottom quark and a W boson. The W boson can then decay into a pair of quarks, or into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The various decays can be broken up into three different channels based on the number of leptons from the decay of the W bosons: all-jets (with no leptons), lepton+jets (with one lepton), and dilepton (with two leptons). This dissertation will present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel. The dilepton channel is characterized by two leptons, two neutrinos and two b-quarks. The neutrinos are not directly observed, but their absence is felt as missing transverse momentum ( pT / ) in the detector. The combination of two leptons and large pT / produces an easily isolated signal, giving the dilepton channel a high signal over background ratio. Having two neutrinos means that we cannot know what the transverse momenta of either neutrino is. This means that even if we knew the momenta of the leptons and b-quarks perfectly, we would be unable to reconstruct the mass of the top quark. This measurement gets around this problem by scanning over all possible values of the top mass, finding all consistent tt¯ combinations, assigning a kinematic weight to each, and then adding the weights for each combination at a given possible top mass. The lepton momenta, jet momenta, and pT / are only known to within some finite precision, so for a given top mass, I also vary each of these momenta within their resolutions and add the weights for a given possible top mass. After scanning over possible top masses, I choose the top mass with the largest sum of weights mmaxt as an observable for the event. I then perform a template based likelihood fit of mt using mmaxt . I analyze 322 candidate events collected by the

  1. Top Quark Mass in Events with two Charged Leptons at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boline, Daniel Dooley

    2010-01-01

    The top quark is the most massive observed fundamental subatomic particle, and at the Tevatron accelerator is produced mostly in top-antitop (t$\\bar{t}$) quark pairs from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Each top quark decays into a bottom quark and a W boson. The W boson can then decay into a pair of quarks, or into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The various decays can be broken up into three different channels based on the number of leptons from the decay of the W bosons: all-jets (with no leptons), lepton+jets (with one lepton), and dilepton (with two leptons). This dissertation will present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel. The dilepton channel is characterized by two leptons, two neutrinos and two b-quarks. The neutrinos are not directly observed, but their absence is felt as missing transverse momentum (pT) in the detector. The combination of two leptons and large pT produces an easily isolated signal, giving the dilepton channel a high signal over background ratio. Having two neutrinos means that we cannot know what the transverse momenta of either neutrino is. This means that even if we knew the momenta of the leptons and b-quarks perfectly, we would be unable to reconstruct the mass of the top quark. This measurement gets around this problem by scanning over all possible values of the top mass, finding all consistent t{bar t} combinations, assigning a kinematic weight to each, and then adding the weights for each combination at a given possible top mass. The lepton momenta, jet momenta, and pT are only known to within some finite precision, so for a given top mass, I also vary each of these momenta within their resolutions and add the weights for a given possible top mass. After scanning over possible top masses, I choose the top mass with the largest sum of weights mtmax as an observable for the event. I then perform a template based likelihood fit of m

  2. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Results: Assuming ℳg0 ≈ 1011ℳ⊙ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in LB ∝ (1 + z)(2.40 ± 0.03) and ℳg ∝ (1 + z)(1.1 ± 0.2). However, using the GSMF results to calculate the average galactic mass produces ℳg ∝ (1 + z)(- 0.58 ± 0.22). We chose the latter result because it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to finally calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  3. Bottom-Hadron Mass Splittings from Static-Quark Action on 2+1-Flavor Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin, Saul D. Cohen, Nilmani Mathur, Kostas Orginos

    2009-09-01

    We calculate bottom-baryon mass splittings using full QCD with 2+1 flavors of dynamical Kogut-Susskind sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks along with a static heavy quark on a lattice of spatial volume of $(\\sim 2.5\\mbox{ fm})^3$ with lattice spacing of about 0.124~fm over a range of pion masses as low as 291~MeV. We calculate the mass splittings of bottom hadrons with respect to $B_d$ and $\\Lambda_b$. Our results are in agreement with experimental observations and other lattice calculations, within our statistical and systematic errors. In particular, we find the mass of the $\\Omega_b$ to be consistent with the recent CDF measurement. We also predict the mass for the as yet unobserved $\\Xi^\\prime_b$ to be 5955(27)~MeV.

  4. Quark-lepton mass relation in a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model involving a particular quark-lepton mass relation, namely that the ratio of the third family mass to the geometric mean of the first and second family masses are equal for down-type quarks and charged leptons. This relation, which is approximately renormalization group invariant, is usually regarded as arising from the Georgi-Jarlskog relations, but in the present model there is no unification group or supersymmetry. In the neutrino sector we propose a simple modification of the so-called Zee-Wolfenstein mass matrix pattern which allows an acceptable reactor angle along with a deviation of the atmospheric and solar angles from their bi-maximal values. Quark masses, mixing angles and CP violation are well described by a numerical fit.

  5. SUSY Threshold Effects on Quark and Lepton Masses at the GUT Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the impact of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the GUT scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the MSSM. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons which can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters and discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings. This is a brief summary of the work of Ref. [1].

  6. Quark and lepton masses at the GUT scale including supersymmetric threshold corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the effect of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons and show that they can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters. We discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings.

  7. Quark Spectral Function above T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Sixue; Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Roberts, Craig D.

    2011-05-24

    The maximum entropy method is used to calculate the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent solution of the rainbow-truncated gap equation of QCD at temperatures above T{sub c}, the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration. We find that, besides the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode at the temperatures above but near T{sub c}. In the vicinity of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength. So long as this mode persists, the system may reasonably be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  8. Cross-section-constrained top-quark mass measurement from dilepton events at the Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; DeCecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-02-15

    We report the first top-quark mass measurement that uses a cross-section constraint to improve the mass determination. This measurement is made with a dilepton tt event candidate sample collected with the Collider Detector II at Fermilab. From a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.2 fb(-1), we measure a top-quark mass of 170.7(-3.9)(+4.2)(stat)+/-2.6(syst)+/-2.4(theory) GeV/c(2). The measurement without the cross-section constraint is 169.7(-4.9)(+5.2)(stat)+/-3.1(syst) GeV/c(2). PMID:18352461

  9. Hierarchy and anarchy in quark mass matrices, or can hierarchy tolerate anarchy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Rogerio; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2001-09-01

    The consequences of adding random perturbations (anarchy) to a baseline hierarchical model of quark masses and mixings are explored. Even small perturbations of the order of 5% of the smallest non-zero element can already give deviations significantly affecting parameters of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, so any process generating the anarchy should in general be limited to this order of magnitude. The regularities of quark masses and mixings thus appear to be far from a generic feature of randomness in the mass matrices, and more likely indicate an underlying order.

  10. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Precision measurement of the top quark mass from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub t}, in the dilepton decay channel of t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{prime}{sup +} {nu}{sub {ell}}, {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We apply a method that convolutes a leading-order matrix element with detector resolution functions to form event-by-event likelihoods; we have enhanced the leading-order description to describe the effects of initial-state radiation. The joint likelihood is the product of the likelihoods from 78 candidate events in this sample, which yields a measurement of M{sub t} = 164.5 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, the most precise measurement of M{sub t} in the dilepton channel.

  12. First results from $2+1$ dynamical quark flavors on an anisotropic lattice: light-hadron spectroscopy and setting the strange-quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey-Wen; Cohen, Saul; Dudek, Jozef; Edwards, Robert; Joo, Balint; Richards, David; Bulava, John; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin; Engelson, Eric; Wallace, Stephen; Juge, Jimmy; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael; Ryan, Sinead

    2009-02-01

    We present the first light-hadron spectroscopy on a set of $N_f=2+1$ dynamical, anisotropic lattices. A convenient set of coordinates that parameterize the two-dimensional plane of light and strange-quark masses is introduced. These coordinates are used to extrapolate data obtained at the simulated values of the quark masses to the physical light and strange-quark point. A measurement of the Sommer scale on these ensembles is made and the performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm used for generating the ensembles is estimated.

  13. Top-quark mass measurement in the dilepton channel using in situ jet energy scale calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Su

    2012-09-01

    We employ a top-quark mass measurement technique in the dilepton channel with in situ jet energy scale calibration. Three variables having different jet energy scale dependences are used simultaneously to extract not only the top-quark mass but also the energy scale of the jet from a single likelihood fit. Monte Carlo studies with events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb-1 proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider s=7TeV are performed. Our analysis suggests that the overall jet energy scale uncertainty can be significantly reduced and the top-quark mass can be determined with a precision of less than 1GeV/c2, including jet energy scale uncertainty, at the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, we measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.

  15. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore » measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  16. Sensitivity of hyperfine structure to nuclear radius and quark mass variation

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, T. H.; Dunning, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-05-15

    To search for the temporal variation in the fundamental constants, one needs to know dependence of atomic transition frequencies on these constants. We study the dependence of the hyperfine structure of atomic s levels on nuclear radius and, via radius, on quark masses. An analytical formula has been derived and tested by the numerical relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations for Rb, Cd{sup +}, Cs, Yb{sup +}, and Hg{sup +}. The results of this work allow the use of the results of past and future atomic clock experiments and quasar spectra measurements to put constraints on time variation in the quark masses.

  17. Unitarity triangle and quark mass matrices on the nearest-neighbor interaction basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    1997-02-01

    We examine the unitarity triangle of the KM matrix, which is derived from the general quark mass matrices in the NNI basis. The Fritzsch Ansätze are modified by introducing four additional parameters. The KM matrix elements are expressed in terms of quark mass ratios, two phases, and four additional parameters. It is found that the vertex of the unitarity triangle is predicted to be almost in the second quadrant on the ρ-η plane as far as Vus~=-md/mseip+mu/mceiq.

  18. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.

  19. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  20. Measurements of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Decay Channel at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander

    2008-10-01

    We present the most recent measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton decay channel at the D0 experiment using proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron collider. Two different methods have been used: the Neutrino Weighting and the Matrix Element method. The combined results yield a top mass of 174.4 +-3.8 GeV.

  1. Measurements of the top-quark mass using charged particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-10-01

    We present three measurements of the top-quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel with approximately 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector using quantities with minimal dependence on the jet energy scale. One measurement exploits the transverse decay length of b-tagged jets to determine a top-quark mass of 166.9{sub -8.5}{sup +9.5} (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, and another the transverse momentum of electrons and muons from W-boson decays to determine a top-quark mass of 173.5{sub -8.9}{sup +8.8} (stat) {+-} 3.8 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}. These quantities are combined in a third, simultaneous mass measurement to determine a top-quark mass of 170.7 {+-} 6.3 (stat) {+-} 2.6 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Estimating the unquenched strange quark mass from the lattice axial Ward identity

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J.M.; Irving, A.C.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Pleiter, D.; Schierholz, G.; Stueben, H.

    2006-03-01

    We present a determination of the strange quark mass for two flavors (n{sub f}=2) of light dynamical quarks using the axial Ward identity. The calculations are performed on the lattice using O(a) improved Wilson fermions and include a fully nonperturbative determination of the renormalization constant. In the continuum limit we find m{sub s}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=111(6)(4)(6) MeV, using the force scale r{sub 0}=0.467 fm, where the first error is statistical, the second and third are systematic due to the fit and scale uncertainties, respectively. Results are also presented for the light quark mass and the chiral condensate. The corresponding results are also given for r{sub 0}=0.5 fm.

  3. Quark propagators in confinement and deconfinement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Masatoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Saito, Takuya

    2010-05-01

    We study quark propagators near the confinement/deconfinement phase transition temperature in quenched-lattice simulation of QCD. We find that there is no qualitative change for the quark propagators in both phases. In the confinement phase, those effective quark masses in units of the critical temperature behave as a constant as a function of the temperature, while above the critical temperature, the value of the effective quark mass drops to circa half value.

  4. The effect of meson wave function on heavy-quark fragmentation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process-independent fragmentation functions (FFs) for a heavy quark to fragment into heavy mesons considering the effects of meson wave function. In all previous works, where the FFs of heavy mesons or heavy baryons were calculated, a delta function form was approximated for the wave function of hadrons. Here, for the first time, we consider a typical mesonic wave function which is different from the delta function and is the nonrelativistic limit of the solution of Bethe-Salpeter equation with the QCD kernel. We shall present our numerical results for the heavy FFs and show how the proposed wave function improves the previous results. As an example, we focus on the fragmentation function for c -quark to split into S -wave D^0 -meson and compare our results with experimental data from BELLE and CLEO.

  5. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  6. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore » correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  7. A measurement of the mass of the top quark using the ideogram technique

    SciTech Connect

    Houben, Pieter Willem Huib

    2009-06-03

    This thesis describes a measurement of the mass of the top quark on data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron collider in the period from 2002 until 2006. The first chapter describes the Standard Model and the prominent role of the top quark mass. The second chapter gives a description of the D0 detector which is used for this measurement. After the p$\\bar{p}$ collisions have been recorded, reconstruction of physics objects is required, which is described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes how the interesting collisions in which top quarks are produced are separated from the `uninteresting' ones with a set of selection criteria. The method to extract the top quark mass from the sample of selected collisions (also called events), which is based on the ideogram technique, is explained in Chapter 5, followed in Chapter 6 by the description of the calibration of the method using simulation of our most precise knowledge of nature. Chapter 7 shows the result of the measurement together with some cross checks and an estimation of the uncertainty on this measurement. This thesis concludes with a constraint on the Higgs boson mass.

  8. PQChPT with Staggered Sea and Valence Ginsparg-Wilson Quarks: Vector Meson Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Anthony W. Thomas

    2005-09-16

    We consider partially quenched, mixed chiral perturbation theory with staggered sea and Ginsparg-Wilson valence quarks in order to extract a chiral-continuum extrapolation expression for the vector meson mass up to order O(a{sup 2}), at one-loop level. Based on general principles, we accomplish the task without explicitly constructing a sophisticated, heavy vector meson chiral Lagrangian.

  9. Inclusive photoproduction of bottom quarks for low and medium pT in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-02-01

    We present predictions for b-quark production in photoproduction and compare with experimental data from HERA. Our theoretical predictions are obtained at next-to-leading-order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach which takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e+e- data. We find in general good agreement of data with both the GM-VFNS and the FFNS calculations, while the more precise ZEUS data seem to prefer the GM-VFNS predictions.

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton + Jets Events with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Taichi

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method. The data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7fb-1 was collected in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV with the CDF detector at Fermilab Tevatron during the period March 2002-March 2007. We select t$\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring one high energy lepton and four jets, in which at least one of jets must be tagged as a b-jet. In order to reconstruct the top quark mass, we use the dynamical likelihood method based on maximum likelihood method where a likelihood is defined as the differential cross section multiplied by the transfer function from observed quantities to parton quantities, as a function of the top quark mass and the jet energy scale(JES). With this method, we measure the top quark mass to be 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.+ JES) ± 1.3(syst.) = 171.6 ± 2.4 GeV/c2.

  11. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  12. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-07-17

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton$+$jets final states using the full sample of $p\\bar{p}$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $\\sqrt s=1.96 $TeV, corresponding to $9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $t\\bar t$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$ GeV. In conclusion, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  13. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-07-17

    We measure the mass of the top quark in leptonmore » $+$jets final states using the full sample of $$p\\bar{p}$$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $$\\sqrt s=1.96 $$TeV, corresponding to $$9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $$t\\bar t$$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $$m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$$ GeV. In conclusion, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  14. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the mostmore » precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  15. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in lepton + jets final States.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-07-18

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states using the full sample of pp collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure m(t) = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. This constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass. PMID:25083634

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  17. Measurement of the top quark mass in the all hadronic final state at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasinghe, Ayesh

    2013-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest fermion observed to date. A precise measurement of its mass and W boson mass is important to indirect measurements of Higgs boson mass. Furthermore, the top quark mass, W boson mass and Higgs boson mass may test the Standard Model using the correlations between them. Here in this thesis, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in the all hadronic final state using the template method. This final state has the advantage of being fully reconstructed in the detector and having the largest branching fraction. The measurement is performed on 4033 candidate events collected using the DØ detector. The data is collected from pp collisions generated at √s =1.96 GeV by the TEVATRON accelerator, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia IL. This is a two dimensional measurement formulated to extract the top quark mass as well as lower the systematic uncertainty due to the jet energy scale calibration. A kinematic fitter is employed to build the templates of signal and background for various input top quark mass points and jet energy scale variations. These templates are compared to data to obtain the fitted top quark mass, jet energy scale shift and their uncertainties.

  18. Nucleon structure functions and longitudinal spin asymmetries in the chiral quark constituent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the phenomenological dependence of the spin independent (F1p ,n and F2p ,n) and the spin dependent (g1p ,n) structure functions of the nucleon on the Bjorken scaling variable x using the unpolarized distribution functions of the quarks q (x ) and the polarized distribution functions of the quarks Δ q (x ) respectively. The chiral constituent quark model, which is known to provide a satisfactory explanation of the proton spin crisis and related issues in the nonperturbative regime, has been used to compute explicitly the valence and sea quark flavor distribution functions of p and n . In light of the improved precision of the world data, the p and n longitudinal spin asymmetries [A1p(x ) and A1n(x )] have been calculated. The implication of the presence of the sea quarks has been discussed for the ratio of polarized to unpolarized quark distribution functions for up and down quarks in the p and n Δ/up(x ) up(x ) , Δ/dp(x ) dp(x ) , Δ/un(x ) un(x ) , and Δ/dn(x ) dn(x ) . The ratio of the n and p structure functions Rn p(x )=F/2n(x ) F2p(x ) has also been presented. The results have been compared with the recent available experimental observations. The results on the spin sum rule have also been included and compared with data and other recent approaches.

  19. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Krieg, S.; Lellouch, L.; Lippert, Th.; Portelli, A.; Sastre, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Varnhorst, L.; Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on Nf=2 +1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ɛ =0.73 (2 )(5 )(17 ), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, mu=2.27 (6 )(5 )(4 ) and md=4.67 (6 )(5 )(4 ) MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2 G e V and the isospin breaking ratios mu/md=0.485 (11 )(8 )(14 ), R =38.2 (1.1 )(0.8 )(1.4 ), and Q =23.4 (0.4 )(0.3 )(0.4 ). Our results exclude the mu=0 solution to the strong C P problem by more than 24 standard deviations.

  20. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Z; Hoelbling, C; Krieg, S; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K K; Varnhorst, L

    2016-08-19

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on N_{f}=2+1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ϵ=0.73(2)(5)(17), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, m_{u}=2.27(6)(5)(4) and m_{d}=4.67(6)(5)(4)  MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2  GeV and the isospin breaking ratios m_{u}/m_{d}=0.485(11)(8)(14), R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4), and Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4). Our results exclude the m_{u}=0 solution to the strong CP problem by more than 24 standard deviations. PMID:27588847

  1. CHIRAL LIMIT AND LIGHT QUARK MASSES IN 2+1 FLAVOR DOMAIN WALL QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,E.; LIN, M.

    2007-07-30

    We present results for meson masses and decay constants measured on 24{sup 3} x 64 lattices using the domain wall fermion formulation with an extension of the fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 16 for N{sub f} 2 + 1 dynamical quark flavors. The lightest dynamical meson mass in our set-up is around 331MeV. while partially quenched mesons reach masses as low as 250MeV. The applicability of SU(3) x SU(3) and SU(2) x SU(2) (partially quenched) chiral perturbation theory will be compared and we quote values for the low-energy constants from both approaches. We will extract the average light quark and strange quark masses and use a non-perturbative renormalization technique (RI/MOM) to quote their physical values. The pion and kaon decay constants are determined at those values from our chiral fits and their ratio is used to obtain the CKM-matrix element |V{sub us}|. The results presented here include statistical errors only.

  2. Quark masses, chiral symmetry, and the U(1) anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1996-09-17

    The author discusses the mass parameters appearing in the gauge theory of the strong interactions, concentrating on the two flavor case. He shows how the effect of the CP violating parameter {theta} is simply interpreted in terms of the state of the aether via an effective potential for meson fields. For degenerate flavors he shows that a first order phase transition is expected at {theta} = {pi}. The author speculates on the implications of this structure for Wilson`s lattice fermions.

  3. Quark Hadron duality tests on polarized structure functions using CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tony Forest

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive electron-nucleon scattering data from Jefferson Lab's Hall B has been analyzed to test quark-hadron duality for the polarized structure function g1(x,Q{sup 2}) over a Q{sup 2} range from 0.2 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Incident polarized electron beam energies of 1.6 and 5.7 GeV were scattered by polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} and {sup 15}ND{sub 3} targets. The measurements of g1(x,Q{sup 2}) in the resonance region appear to be equivalent to a fit of g1(x,Q{sup 2}) in the deep inelastic scattering region at high Q{sup 2}. A quantitative test comparing the ratio of first moment in the resonance region to the first moment in the deep inelastic region is consistent with unity when Q{sup 2} > 2.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} but substantially departs from unity when Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}.

  4. On the computation of finite bottom-quark mass effects in Higgs boson production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Romain; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem

    2016-08-01

    We present analytic results for the partonic cross-sections contributing to the top-bottom interference in Higgs production via gluon fusion at hadron colliders at NLO accuracy in QCD. We develop a method of expansion in small bottom-mass for master integrals and combine it with the usual infinite top-mass effective theory. Our method of expansion admits a simple algorithmic description and can be easily generalized to any small parameter. These results for the integrated cross-sections will be needed in the computation of the renormalization counter-terms entering the computation of finite bottom-quark mass effects at NNLO.

  5. Parton-distribution functions for the pion and kaon in the gauge-invariant nonlocal chiral-quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Seung-il

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the parton-distribution functions (PDFs) for the positively charged pion and kaon at a low renormalization scale ˜1GeV. To this end, we employ the gauge-invariant effective chiral action from the nonlocal chiral-quark model, resulting in the vector currents being conserved. All the model parameters are determined phenomenologically with the normalization condition for PDF and the empirical values for the pseudoscalar meson weak-decay constants. We consider the momentum dependence of the effective quark mass properly within the model calculations. It turns out that the leading local contribution provides about 70% of the total strength for PDF, whereas the nonlocal one, which is newly taken into account in this work for the gauge invariance, does the rest. High-Q2 evolution to 27GeV2 is performed for the valance-quark distribution function, using the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation. The moments for the pion and kaon valance-quark distribution functions are also computed. The numerical results are compared with the empirical data and theoretical estimations, and show qualitatively agreement with them.

  6. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  7. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  8. Bound-state quark and gluon contributions to structure functions in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1990-08-01

    One can distinguish two types of contributions to the quark and gluon structure functions of hadrons in quantum chromodynamics: intrinsic'' contributions, which are due to the direct scattering on the bound-state constituents, and extrinsic'' contributions, which are derived from particles created in the collision. In this talk, I discussed several aspects of deep inelastic structure functions in which the bound-state structure of the proton plays a crucial role: the properties of the intrinsic gluon distribution associated with the proton bound-state wavefunction; the separation of the quark structure function of the proton onto intrinsic bound-valence'' and extrinsic non-valence'' components which takes into account the Pauli principle; the properties and identification of intrinsic heavy quark structure functions; and a theory of shadowing and anti-shadowing of nuclear structure functions, directly related to quark-nucleon interactions and the gluon saturation phenomenon. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Precision Measurement of the Mass of the Top Quark in p anti-p Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Carlos A.; /Rochester U.

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The analysis is based on p{bar p}{yields}t{bar t}{yields} lepton+jets data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Events were preselected in the e+jets (913 events/pb of data) and in the {mu}+jets (871 events/pb of data) channels. These were analyzed through a comparison of the matrix element for the production and decay of the t{bar t} states with data, using a likelihood method and 'tagged' b quarks from the t {yields} Wb decays.

  10. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  11. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  12. Calibration of the Top-Quark Monte Carlo Mass.

    PubMed

    Kieseler, Jan; Lipka, Katerina; Moch, Sven-Olaf

    2016-04-22

    We present a method to establish, experimentally, the relation between the top-quark mass m_{t}^{MC} as implemented in Monte Carlo generators and the Lagrangian mass parameter m_{t} in a theoretically well-defined renormalization scheme. We propose a simultaneous fit of m_{t}^{MC} and an observable sensitive to m_{t}, which does not rely on any prior assumptions about the relation between m_{t} and m_{t}^{MC}. The measured observable is independent of m_{t}^{MC} and can be used subsequently for a determination of m_{t}. The analysis strategy is illustrated with examples for the extraction of m_{t} from inclusive and differential cross sections for hadroproduction of top quarks. PMID:27152794

  13. Light quark mass dependence of the X(3872) in X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Hammer, H.-W.; Jia, Yu

    2015-10-01

    The X(3872) is a charmonium-like hadron with a mass close to the overline D ^0 D^{*0} threshold. It was first observed in 2003 by the Belle Collaboration and confirmed shortly after by the CDF collaboration. The quantum numbers were recently determined by the LHCb experiment to be JPC = 1++3. Yet, the nature of the X(3872) is not fully understood. In future, lattice QCD calculations should be able to obtain observables and are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the X...

  14. Quark masses, B-parameters, and CP violation parameters {epsilon} and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-01-20

    After a brief introduction to lattice QCD, the author summarizes the results for the light quark masses and the bag parameters B{sub K}, B{sub 6}{sup 1/2}, and B{sub 8}{sup 3/2}. The implications of these results for the standard model estimates of CP violation parameters {epsilon} and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} are also discussed.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass at CDF using the ``neutrino ϕ weighting'' template method on a lepton plus isolated track sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-04-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with t tmacr dilepton events produced in p pmacr collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron (s=1.96TeV) and collected by the CDF II detector. A sample of 328 events with a charged electron or muon and an isolated track, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9fb-1, are selected as t tmacr candidates. To account for the unconstrained event kinematics, we scan over the phase space of the azimuthal angles (ϕν1,ϕν2) of neutrinos and reconstruct the top quark mass for each ϕν1, ϕν2 pair by minimizing a χ2 function in the t tmacr dilepton hypothesis. We assign χ2-dependent weights to the solutions in order to build a preferred mass for each event. Preferred mass distributions (templates) are built from simulated t tmacr and background events, and parametrized in order to provide continuous probability density functions. A likelihood fit to the mass distribution in data as a weighted sum of signal and background probability density functions gives a top quark mass of 165.5-3.3+3.4(stat)±3.1(syst)GeV/c2.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass at CDF using the `neutrino phi weighting' template method on a lepton plus isolated track sample

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with t{bar t} dilepton events produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) and collected by the CDF II detector. A sample of 328 events with a charged electron or muon and an isolated track, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}, are selected as t{bar t} candidates. To account for the unconstrained event kinematics, we scan over the phase space of the azimuthal angles ({phi}{sub {nu}1}, {phi}{sub {nu}2}) of neutrinos and reconstruct the top quark mass for each {phi}{sub {nu}1}, {phi}{sub {nu}2} pair by minimizing a {chi}{sup 2} function in the t{bar t} dilepton hypothesis. We assign {chi}{sup 2}-dependent weights to the solutions in order to build a preferred mass for each event. Preferred mass distributions (templates) are built from simulated t{bar t} and background events, and parameterized in order to provide continuous probability density functions. A likelihood fit to the mass distribution in data as a weighted sum of signal and background probability density functions gives a top quark mass of 165.5{sub -3.3}{sup +3.4}(stat.){+-}3.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2007-04-15

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light-quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three-gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. Within the current model, the more consistent dressed vertex limits the ladder-rainbow truncation error for vector mesons to be never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  18. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-04-01

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. With the more consistent vertex used here, the error in ladder-rainbow truncation for vector mesons is never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  19. Up- and down-quark masses from finite-energy QCD sum rules to five loops

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, C. A.; Nasrallah, N. F.; Roentsch, R. H.; Schilcher, K.

    2009-01-01

    The up- and down-quark masses are determined from an optimized QCD finite-energy sum rule involving the correlator of axial-vector divergences, to five-loop order in perturbative QCD, and including leading nonperturbative QCD and higher order quark-mass corrections. This finite-energy sum rule is designed to reduce considerably the systematic uncertainties arising from the (unmeasured) hadronic resonance sector, which in this framework contributes less than 3-4% to the quark mass. This is achieved by introducing an integration kernel in the form of a second degree polynomial, restricted to vanish at the peak of the two lowest lying resonances. The driving hadronic contribution is then the pion pole, with parameters well known from experiment. The determination is done in the framework of contour improved perturbation theory, which exhibits a very good convergence, leading to a remarkably stable result in the unusually wide window s{sub 0}=1.0-4.0 GeV{sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the radius of the integration contour in the complex energy (squared) plane. The results are m{sub u}(Q=2 GeV)=2.9{+-}0.2 MeV, m{sub d}(Q=2 GeV)=5.3{+-}0.4 MeV, and (m{sub u}+m{sub d})/2=4.1{+-}0.2 MeV (at a scale Q=2 GeV)

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass using template methods on dilepton events in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-02-01

    The authors describe a measurement of the top quark mass from events produced in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They identify t{bar t} candidates where both W bosons from the top quarks decay into leptons (e{nu}, {mu}{nu}, or {tau}{nu}) from a data sample of 360 pb{sup -1}. The top quark mass is reconstructed in each event separately by three different methods, which draw upon simulated distributions of the neutrino pseudorapidity, t{bar t} longitudinal momentum, or neutrino azimuthal angle in order to extract probability distributions for the top quark mass. For each method, representative mass distributions, or templates, are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parameterized to form continuous probability density functions. A likelihood fit incorporating these parameterized templates is then performed on the data sample masses in order to derive a final top quark mass. Combining the three template methods, taking into account correlations in their statistical and systematic uncertainties, results in a top quark mass measurement of 170.1 {+-} 6.0(stat.) {+-} 4.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Mass spectra and leptonic decay widths of heavy quarkonia by using psi function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Salem, L. I.

    2004-10-01

    In this study, a non-relativistic two-body wave equation is used to describe the properties of heavy quark-antiquark systems with a potential proportional to the psgr-function. The wave equation is transformed into a true eigenvalue equation and solved numerically. Both the resonance masses and the leptonic decay widths of c\\bar c and b\\skew{-5}\\barb mesons are calculated. The obtained results showed that the quark-antiquark interaction in these systems could be described adequately by using this simple potential form which contains one adjustable parameter besides the quark masses.

  2. Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets final state with the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with the Matrix Element method in the lepton+jets final state. As the energy scale for calorimeter jets represents the dominant source of systematic uncertainty, the Matrix Element likelihood is extended by an additional parameter, which is defined as a global multiplicative factor applied to the standard energy scale. The top quark mass is obtained from a fit that yields the combined statistical and systematic jet energy scale uncertainty.

  3. Top quark physics experimental results at the LHC: Cross section and mass measurements with the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallinaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    The top quark, the heaviest known elementary particle discovered at the Fermilab Tevatron almost exactly twenty years ago, has taken a central role in the study of fundamental interactions. Its large mass suggests that it may play a special role in Nature. With approximately 25fb-1 of data collected by the CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider in Run 1 (2010-2012), top quark physics is at a turning point from first studies to precision measurements with sensitivity to new physics processes. This report summarizes the latest experimental results on top quark production cross section and mass measurements.

  4. Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and {bar t} quarks using t{bar t} candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}, we measure a mass difference, {Delta}M{sub top} = M{sub t} - M{sub {bar t}} = -3.3 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, approximately two standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference. This is the most precise measurement of a mass difference between t and its {bar t} partner to date.

  5. Masses of third family vectorlike quarks and leptons in Yukawa-unified E6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, Aditya; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2016-06-01

    In supersymmetric E6 the masses of the third family quarks and charged lepton, t -b -τ , as well as the masses of the vectorlike quarks and leptons, D -D ¯ and L -L ¯, may arise from the coupling 2 73×2 73×2 7H, where 2 73 and 2 7H denote the third family matter and Higgs multiplets, respectively. We assume that the SO(10) singlet component in 2 7H acquires a TeV-scale vacuum expectation value that spontaneously breaks U (1 )ψ and provides masses to the vectorlike particles in 2 73, while the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model doublets in 2 7H provide masses to t , b , and τ . Imposing Yukawa coupling unification ht=hb=hτ=hD=hL at MGUT and employing the ATLAS and CMS constraints on the Zψ' boson mass, we estimate the lower bounds on the third family vectorlike particles D -D ¯ and L -L ¯ masses to be around 5.85 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively. These bounds apply in the supersymmetric limit.

  6. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton final state using the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander; /Munich U.

    2008-12-01

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, is the heaviest known fundamental particle. The precise knowledge of its mass yields important constraints on the mass of the yet-unobserved Higgs boson and allows to probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The first measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel with the Matrix Element method at the D0 experiment is presented. After a short description of the experimental environment and the reconstruction chain from hits in the detector to physical objects, a detailed review of the Matrix Element method is given. The Matrix Element method is based on the likelihood to observe a given event under the assumption of the quantity to be measured, e.g. the mass of the top quark. The method has undergone significant modifications and improvements compared to previous measurements in the lepton+jets channel: the two undetected neutrinos require a new reconstruction scheme for the four-momenta of the final state particles, the small event sample demands the modeling of additional jets in the signal likelihood, and a new likelihood is designed to account for the main source of background containing tauonic Z decay. The Matrix Element method is validated on Monte Carlo simulated events at the generator level. For the measurement, calibration curves are derived from events that are run through the full D0 detector simulation. The analysis makes use of the Run II data set recorded between April 2002 and May 2008 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb{sup -1}. A total of 107 t{bar t} candidate events with one electron and one muon in the final state are selected. Applying the Matrix Element method to this data set, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub top}{sup Run IIa} = 170.6 {+-} 6.1(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +2.1}(syst.)GeV; m{sub top}{sup Run IIb} = 174.1 {+-} 4.4(stat.){sub -1.8}{sup +2.5}(syst.)GeV; m{sub top}{sup comb} = 172.9 {+-} 3.6(stat

  7. Measurement of the top quark mass using proton-proton data at √{(}s )=7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.

    2016-04-01

    A new set of measurements of the top quark mass are presented, based on the proton-proton data recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC at √{s }=8 TeV corresponding to a luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The top quark mass is measured using the lepton+jets , all-jets and dilepton decay channels, giving values of 172.35 ±0.16 (stat )±0.48 (syst ) GeV , 172.32 ±0.25 (stat )±0.59 (syst ) GeV , and 172.82 ±0.19 (stat )±1.22 (syst ) GeV , respectively. When combined with the published CMS results at √{s }=7 TeV , they provide a top quark mass measurement of 172.44 ±0.13 (stat )±0.47 (syst ) GeV . The top quark mass is also studied as a function of the event kinematical properties in the lepton+jets decay channel. No indications of a kinematic bias are observed and the collision data are consistent with a range of predictions from current theoretical models of t t ¯ production.

  8. Radiative origin of all quark and lepton masses through dark matter with flavor symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ernest

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental issue of the origin of mass for all quarks and leptons (including Majorana neutrinos) is linked to dark matter, odd under an exactly conserved Z2 symmetry which may or may not be derivable from an U(1)D gauge symmetry. The observable sector interacts with a proposed dark sector which consists of heavy neutral singlet Dirac fermions and suitably chosen new scalars. Flavor symmetry is implemented in a renormalizable context with just the one Higgs doublet (ϕ(+), ϕ(0)) of the standard model in such a way that all observed fermions obtain their masses radiatively through dark matter. PMID:24655241

  9. Top quark mass: Latest CDF results, Tevatron combination and electroweak implications

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas

    2009-10-01

    A summary of the most up-to-date top quark mass measurements at CDF is presented. These analyses use top-antitop candidate events detected in the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider with an integrated luminosity of up to {approx}3/fb. The combination of all those measurements together with the corresponding top mass measurements from the concurrently running D0 experiment at the Tevatron yields a world average of M{sub t} = [173.1 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 1.1(syst.)] GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Structure functions at low Q^2: higher twists and target mass effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2006-05-22

    We review the physics of structure functions at low Q{sup 2}, focusing on the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality and the resonance-scaling transition, both phenomenologically and in the context of quark models. We also present a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x -> 1 limit.

  11. On the light quark mass effects in Higgs boson production in gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Kirill; Penin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Production of Higgs bosons at the LHC is affected by the contribution of light quarks, that mediate the gg → Hg transition. Although their impact is suppressed by small Yukawa couplings, it is enhanced by large logarithms of the ratio of the Higgs boson mass or its transverse momentum to light quark masses. We study the origin of this enhancement, focusing on the abelian corrections to gg → Hg amplitudes of the form {({C}_F{α}_s{mathcal{L}}^2)}^n , where mathcal{L}in \\{ ln (s/{m}_b^2),kern0.5em ln ({p}_{perp}^2/{m}_b^2)\\} . We show how these non-Sudakov double logarithmic terms can be resummed to all orders in the strong coupling constant. Interestingly, we find that the transverse momentum dependence of these corrections is very weak due to a peculiar cancellation between different logarithmic terms. Although the abelian part of QCD corrections is not expected to be dominant, it can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections to light quark contributions to Higgs boson production at the LHC.

  12. Direct measurement of the top quark mass by the DØ Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-09-01

    We determine the top quark mass mt using tt¯ pairs produced in the DØ detector by s=1.8 TeV pp¯ collisions in a 125 pb-1 exposure at the Fermilab Tevatron. We make a two constraint fit to mt in tt¯-->bW+b¯W- final states with one W boson decaying to qq¯ and the other to eν or μν. Likelihood fits to the data yield mt(l+jets)=173.3+/-5.6 (stat) +/- 5.5 (syst) GeV/c2. When this result is combined with an analysis of events in which both W bosons decay into leptons, we obtain mt=172.1+/-5.2 (stat) +/- 4.9 (syst) GeV/c2. An alternate analysis, using three constraint fits to fixed top quark masses, gives mt(l+jets)=176.0+/-7.9 (stat)+/- 4.8 (syst) GeV/c2, consistent with the above result. Studies of kinematic distributions of the top quark candidates are also presented. 14.65.Ha, 13.85.Ni, 13.85.Qk

  13. Quark structure functions measured with the Drell-Yan process

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    The physics relevant to showing that the Drell-Yan process offers the possibility for measuring flavor specific quark momentum distributions of free hadrons and their possible modification in nuclei are presented. The case for flavor specific measurements via use of the Drell-Yan process is developed. 21 refs. (LEW)

  14. Consequences Of Fully Dressing Quark-Gluon Vertex Function With Two-Point Gluon Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-06-18

    We extend recent studies of the effects of quark-gluon vertex dressing upon the solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator. A momentum delta function is used to represent the dominant infrared strength of the effective gluon propagator so that the resulting integral equations become algebraic. The guark-gluon vertex is constructed from the complete set of diagrams involving only 2-point gluon lines. The additional diagrams, including those with crossed gluon lines, are shown to make an important contribution to the DSE solutions for the quark propagator, because of their large color factors and the rapid growth in their number.

  15. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Invariant Mass of Lepton Pairs in Soft Muon b-tagged Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of t{bar t} {yields} {ell}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}q{bar q} events (where {ell} = e, {mu}) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons (soft muon b-tagging). The p{bar p} collision data used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2 fb{sup -1} and was collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is based on a novel technique exploiting the invariant mass of a subset of the decay particles, specifically the lepton from the W boson of the t {yields} Wb decay, and the muon from a semileptonic b decay. We fit template histograms, derived from simulation of t{bar t} events and a modeling of the background, to the mass distribution observed in the data and measure a top quark mass of 180.5 {+-} 12.0(stat.) {+-} 3.6(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, consistent with the current world average.

  16. Hadron spectrum, quark masses, and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R.; Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.

    2007-04-01

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3}48 and for pion masses down to {approx_equal}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho, and nucleon masses; the light and strange quark masses; and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a{approx_equal}0.1 fm and {approx_equal}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well.

  17. Quark-hadron duality and truncated moments of nucleon structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Psaker, A.; Melnitchouk, W.; Christy, M. E.; Keppel, C.

    2008-08-15

    We employ a novel new approach to study local quark-hadron duality using 'truncated' moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to determine the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twist. Because truncated moments obey the same Q{sup 2} evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  18. A Measurement of the Mass of the Top Quark in Lepton + Jets Events at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik Matthews

    2004-12-01

    This document presents a measurement of the top quark mass using the CDF run II detector at Fermilab. Colliding beams of protons and anti-protons at Fermilab's Tevatron ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) produce top/anti-top pairs, which decay to W{sup +}W{sup -} b{bar b}; events are selected where one W decays hadronically, and one W decays to either e or {mu} plus a neutrino. The data sample was collected between March 2002 and September 2003, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb{sup -1}. Thirty-seven candidate t{bar t} events are found with at least one b jet identified by its displaced vertex. In each event, the best fit top quark invariant mass is determined by minimizing a {chi}{sup 2} for the overconstrained kinematic system. A likelihood fit of the reconstructed masses in the data sample to distributions from simulated signal and background events gives a top mass of 174.9{sub -7.7}{sup +7.1}(stat.) {+-} 6.5(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic error is due to uncertainties in the jet energy measurements.

  19. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb -1 recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  20. QCD equation of state at nonzero chemical potential: continuum results with physical quark masses at order μ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Sz.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Ratti, C.; Szabó, K. K.

    2012-08-01

    We determine the equation of state of QCD for nonzero chemical potentials via a Taylor expansion of the pressure. The results are obtained for N f = 2 + 1 flavors of quarks with physical masses, on various lattice spacings. We present results for the pressure, interaction measure, energy density, entropy density, and the speed of sound for small chemical potentials. At low temperatures we compare our results with the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We also express our observables along trajectories of constant entropy over particle number. A simple parameterization is given (the Matlab/Octave script parameterization.m, submitted to the arXiv along with the paper), which can be used to reconstruct the observables as functions of T and μ, or as functions of T and S/N.

  1. Quark-lepton mass relation and CKM mixing in an A4 extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, S.; Nebot, M.; Patel, Ketan M.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2013-08-01

    An interesting mass relation between down-type quarks and charged leptons has been recently predicted within a supersymmetric SU(3)c⊗SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y model based on the A4 flavor symmetry. Here we propose a simple extension which provides an adequate full description of the quark sector. By adding a pair of vectorlike up quarks, we show how the CKM entries Vub, Vcb, Vtd and Vts arise from deviations of the unitarity. We perform an analysis including the most relevant observables in the quark sector, such as oscillations and rare decays of kaons, Bd and Bs mesons. In the lepton sector, the model predicts an inverted hierarchy for the neutrino masses, leading to a potentially observable rate of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  2. Charge balance functions in a scenario of continuing charge production in quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-11-01

    We study the charge balance functions of π+π- and K+K- in a scenario of continuing charge creation in a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, using relativistic hydrodynamics and the lattice QCD results of quark susceptibilities and the equation of state of the QGP. We find that the charge balance functions are dominated by their QGP components because most charges are produced before the hadronic stage. The hadronic component of the balance function of π+π- is small but non-negligible. The balance function of K+K- has a negative hadronic component because the strangeness decreases during the system evolution. The correlation between light and strange quarks leads to small enhancements of the balance functions at small rapidity difference.

  3. Direct determinations of the nucleon and pion σ terms at nearly physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Richtmann, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas; Söldner, Wolfgang; Sternbeck, André; RQCD Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We present a high statistics study of the pion and nucleon light and strange quark sigma terms using Nf=2 dynamical nonperturbatively improved clover fermions with a range of pion masses down to mπ˜150 MeV and several volumes, L mπ=3.4 up to 6.7, and lattice spacings, a =0.06 - 0.08 fm , enabling a study of finite volume and discretization effects for mπ≳260 MeV . Systematics are found to be reasonably under control. For the nucleon we obtain σπ N=35 (6 ) MeV and σs=35 (12 ) MeV , or equivalently in terms of the quark fractions, fTu=0.021 (4 ) , fTd=0.016 (4 ) and fTs=0.037 (13 ) , where the errors include estimates of both the systematic and statistical uncertainties. These values, together with perturbative matching in the heavy quark limit, lead to fTc=0.075(4 ), fT b=0.072 (2 ) and fT t=0.070 (1 ). In addition, through the use of the (inverse) Feynman-Hellmann theorem our results for σπ N are shown to be consistent with the nucleon masses determined in the analysis. For the pion we implement a method which greatly reduces excited state contamination to the scalar matrix elements from states traveling across the temporal boundary. This enables us to demonstrate the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner expectation σπ=mπ/2 over our range of pion masses.

  4. Testing realistic quark mass matrices in the custodial Randall-Sundrum model with flavor changing top decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2008-11-01

    We study quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with bulk symmetry SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)B-L. The Yukawa couplings are assumed to be within an order of magnitude of each other, and perturbative. We find that quark mass matrices of the symmetrical form proposed by Koide et al. [Y. Koide, H. Nishiura, K. Matsuda, T. Kikuchi, and T. Fukuyama, Phys. Rev. D 66, 093006 (2002)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.66.093006] can be accommodated in the RS framework with the assumption of hierarchyless Yukawa couplings, but not the Hermitian Fritzsch-type mass matrices. General asymmetrical mass matrices are also found which fit well simultaneously with the quark masses and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Both left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) quark rotation matrices are obtained that allow analysis of flavor changing decay of both LH and RH top quarks. At a warped down scale of 1.65 TeV, the total branching ratio of t→Z+jets can be as high as ˜5×10-6 for symmetrical mass matrices and ˜2×10-5 for asymmetrical ones. This level of signal is within reach of the LHC.

  5. Top-quark mass measurement in events with jets and missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using the full data set of Tevatron s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7fb-1. The analysis uses events with one semileptonic t or t¯ decay, but without detection of the electron or muon. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and multiple jets. We veto events containing identified electrons or muons. We obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of the two jets from W-boson decays from data and compare these to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. A likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the top-quark mass, Mtop=173.93±1.64(stat)±0.87(syst)GeV/c2. This result is the most precise measurement to date of the mass of the top quark in this event topology.

  6. Two-loop perturbative quark mass renormalization from large {beta} Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Keisuke Jimmy Juge

    2001-02-14

    We present the calculation of heavy Wilson quark mass renormalization constants from large beta Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed at various beta larger than 9, each on several spatial lattice sizes to allow for an infinite volume extrapolation. We use twisted boundary conditions to suppress tunneling and work in Coulomb gauge with appropriate adjustments for the temporal links. The one-loop coefficient obtained from this method is in agreement with the analytical result and a preliminary result for the second order coefficient is reported.

  7. Top-quark pole mass in the tadpole-free MS ¯ scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    The complex pole mass of the top quark is presented at full two-loop order in the Standard Model, augmenting the known four-loop QCD contributions. The input parameters are the MS ¯ Yukawa and gauge couplings, the Higgs self-coupling, and the Higgs vacuum expectation value (VEV). Here, the VEV is defined as the minimum of the full effective potential in Landau gauge, so that tadpoles vanish. This is an alternative to earlier results that instead minimize the tree-level potential, resulting in a VEV that is gauge-fixing independent but accompanied by negative powers of the Higgs self-coupling in perturbative expansions. The effects of nonzero Goldstone boson mass are eliminated by resummation. I also study the renormalization scale dependence of the calculated pole mass.

  8. Ginzburg-Landau phase diagram for dense matter with axial anomaly, strange quark mass, and meson condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Andreas; Stetina, Stephan; Tachibana, Motoi

    2011-02-15

    We discuss the phase structure of dense matter, in particular, the nature of the transition between hadronic and quark matter. Calculations within a Ginzburg-Landau approach show that the axial anomaly can induce a critical point in this transition region. This is possible because in three-flavor quark matter with instanton effects a chiral condensate can be added to the color-flavor locked phase without changing the symmetries of the ground state. In (massless) two-flavor quark matter such a critical point is not possible since the corresponding color superconductor (2SC) does not break chiral symmetry. We study the effects of a nonzero but finite strange quark mass which interpolates between these two cases. Since at ultrahigh density the first reaction of the color-flavor locked phase to a nonzero strange quark mass is to develop a kaon condensate, we extend previous Ginzburg-Landau studies by including such a condensate. We discuss the fate of the critical point systematically and show that the continuity between hadronic and quark matter can be disrupted by the onset of a kaon condensate. Moreover, we identify the mass terms in the Ginzburg-Landau potential which are needed for the 2SC phase to occur in the phase diagram.

  9. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowka, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Jones, S. P.; Kerner, M.; Schlenk, J.; Schubert, U.; Zirke, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  10. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence.

    PubMed

    Borowka, S; Greiner, N; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO. PMID:27419563

  11. Synthesis of baryons from unconfined quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Pati, J.C.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1980-02-15

    We calculate, for a number of cases, the cosmic temperature at which primordial quarks condense into baryons, within a field theory of partially confined quarks that enjoys temporary asymptotic freedom. We assume that the mass of a quark in a dense quark-antiquark medium is a monotonic function of the medium: that is, we assume the validity of the so-called ''Archimedes effect.'' We show that, within such models, unbound-quark lifetimes are larger than the age of the universe at the time of the transition.

  12. Reformulations of the Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Seikou; Shibata, Akihiro; Shinohara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    We propose the reformulations of the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap. In fact, we have given a new framework for reformulating the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory using new field variables. This includes the preceding works given by Cho, Faddeev and Niemi, as a special case called the maximal option in our reformulations. The advantage of our reformulations is that the original non-Abelian gauge field variables can be changed into the new field variables such that one of them called the restricted field gives the dominant contribution to quark confinement in the gauge-independent way. Our reformulations can be combined with the SU (N) extension of the Diakonov-Petrov version of the non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator to give a gauge-invariant definition for the magnetic monopole in the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory without the scalar field. In the so-called minimal option, especially, the restricted field is non-Abelian and involves the non-Abelian magnetic monopole with the stability group U (N- 1). This suggests the non-Abelian dual superconductivity picture for quark confinement. This should be compared with the maximal option: the restricted field is Abelian and involves only the Abelian magnetic monopoles with the stability group U(1)N-1, just like the Abelian projection. We give some applications of this reformulation, e.g., the stability for the homogeneous chromomagnetic condensation of the Savvidy type, the large N treatment for deriving the dimensional transmutation and understanding the mass gap, and also the numerical simulations on a lattice which are given by Dr. Shibata in a subsequent talk.

  13. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  14. Density of saturated nuclear matter at large Nc and heavy quark mass limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Prabal; Cohen, Thomas D.; Datta, Ishaun

    2014-06-01

    We exhibit the existence of stable, saturated nuclear matter in the large Nc and heavy quark mass limits of QCD. In this limit, baryons (with the same spin flavor structure) interact at leading order in Nc via a repulsive interaction due to the Pauli exclusion principle and at subleading order in 1/Nc via the exchange of glueballs. Assuming that the lightest glueball is a scalar, which implies that the subleading baryon interaction is attractive, we find that nuclear matter saturates since the subleading attractive interaction is longer ranged than the leading order repulsive one. We find that the saturated matter is in the form of a crystal with either a face-centered-cubic or a hexagonal-close-packed symmetry with baryon densities of O ({α˜smq[mass and scalar-glueball-baryon coupling in the extreme large Nc limit or heavy quark limit (or both), which we define precisely in this work.

  15. The Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. R.; Iribarrem, A.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-empirical relativistic approach which uses the general model connecting cosmological theory to observational data derived from galaxy surveys (Ribeiro & Stoeger 2003, ApJ, 592, 1) to study the galactic mass evolution. For this purpose we define a new quantity named the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF). We used the FORS Deep Field survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 5.0 and its luminosity function in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar masses. We obtained that the GCMF behaves as a power-law given by ζ (z) ∝ [M_{g}(z)]^{-2.3± 0.4}, where M_{g} is the average galactic mass in the studied redshift interval. This result can be seen as an average of the galaxy stellar mass function pattern found in the literature, where more massive galaxies were assembled earlier than less massive ones.

  16. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-10-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  17. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.

    2010-12-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass mt is obtained using a sample of tt¯ events from pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter ΔJES used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity, a value of mt=173.0±1.2GeV/c2 is measured.

  18. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Gresele, A.; Lazzizzera, I.; Amidei, D.; Campbell, M.

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a value of m{sub t}=173.0{+-}1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  19. Measurement of the mass of the top quark in dilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Bonn U.

    2006-08-01

    In the Standard Model (SM) the top quark mass is a fundamental parameter. Its precise measurement is important to test the self-consistency of the SM. Additionally, it offers sensitivity to New Physics beyond the Standard Model. In proton anti-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV t{bar t} quarks are pair-produced, each decaying into a W boson and a b quark. In the dilepton channel both W bosons decay leptonically. Because of the presence of two neutrinos in the final state the kinematics are underconstrained. A so-called Neutrino Weighting algorithm is used to calculate a weight for the consistency of a hypothesized top quark mass with the event kinematics. To render the problem solvable, the pseudorapidities of the neutrinos are assumed. The Maximum Method, which takes the maximum to the weight distribution as input to infer the top quark mass, is applied to approximately 370 pb{sup -1} of Run-II data, recorded by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron. The e{mu}-channel of the 835 pb{sup -1} dataset is analyzed.

  20. Measurements of the Top Anti-Top Production Cross Section and Top Quark Mass in the Hadronically Decaying Tau + Jets Decay Channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, Daryl Curtis

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the first exclusive observation of the t-t → hadronic τ + jets decay channel. Using these events, we measure the t-t pair production cross section and the top quark mass in 2.2 fb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides collisions of protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and is one of only two accelerators in the world with enough energy to produce top quarks. With a branching fraction of nearly 10%, the hadronic τ + jets decay channel is the third largest t-t decay mode, and it has only been minimally explored. This the first measurement of the t-t pair production cross section in this decay channel at CDF and the first measurement of the top quark mass in this decay channel in the world. The analysis introduces a new method to recover the total momentum of the ν produced in the τ decay and an artificial neural network to reduce the contribution from the largest background source, QCD multijet background. The t-t pair production cross section is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function which compares the number of observed events to the number of expected events for a given t-t cross section. The top quark mass is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function built from signal and ii background probabilities which are based on the matrix elements for t-t production and decay and W + 4 parton production, respectively. Using events selected with exactly 1 hadronically decaying τ, exactly 4 jets with at least 1 identified as having originated from a b quark, and large missing transverse energy, we measure the t-t pair production cross section to be 8.8 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 2.2 (syst.) pb and the top quark mass to be 172.7±9.3 (stat.) ±3.7 (syst.) GeV. We find both values to be in good agreement with

  1. Integral equation for gauge invariant quark two-point Green's function in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sazdjian, H.

    2008-02-15

    Gauge invariant quark two-point Green's functions defined with path-ordered gluon field phase factors along skew-polygonal lines joining the quark to the antiquark are considered. Functional relations between Green's functions with different numbers of path segments are established. An integral equation is obtained for the Green's function defined with a phase factor along a single straight line. The equation implicates an infinite series of two-point Green's functions, having an increasing number of path segments; the related kernels involve Wilson loops with contours corresponding to the skew-polygonal lines of the accompanying Green's function and with functional derivatives along the sides of the contours. The series can be viewed as an expansion in terms of the global number of the functional derivatives of the Wilson loops. The lowest-order kernel, which involves a Wilson loop with two functional derivatives, provides the framework for an approximate resolution of the equation.

  2. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at D0.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-08-19

    We measure the top quark mass (m(t)) in p ̄p collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV using dilepton t ̄t→W(+)bW(-) ̄b→ℓ(+)ν(ℓ)bℓ(-) ̄ν(ℓ) ̄b events, where ℓ denotes an electron, a muon, or a tau that decays leptonically. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We obtain m(t)=174.0±1.8(stat)±2.4(syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the current world average m(t)=173.3±1.1 GeV. This is currently the most precise measurement of m(t) in the dilepton channel. PMID:21929164

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the neutrino weighting algorithm at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Simon

    We measure the top quark mass using approximately 359 pb-1 of data from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 GeV at CDF Run II. We select tt¯ candidates that are consistent with two W bosons decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino following tt¯ → W+W-bb¯ → l+l- nn¯ bb¯. Only one of the two charged leptons is required to be identified as an electron or a muon candidate, while the other is simply a well measured track. We use a neutrino weighting algorithm which weighs each possibility of neutrino direction to reconstruct a top quark mass in each event. We compare the resulting distribution to Monte Carlo templates to obtain a top quark mass of 170.8+6.9-6.5 (stat) +/- 4.6 (syst) GeV/c 2.

  4. COMPASS Measurement of Pion and Kaon Multiplicities and Extraction of Quark Fragmentation Functions into Pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2016-02-01

    We present preliminary COMPASS results on pion and kaon multiplicities produced in semi inclusive deep inelastic scattering of 160GeV muons off an isoscalar (6LiD) target. The results constitute an impressive data set of more than 400 points in p and 400 in K, covering a large x,Q2 and z domain in a fine binning, which will be used in future QCD fits at next to leading order to extract quark fragmentation functions. We show results of a first leading order fit performed to extract the favored and unfavored quark fragmentation functions into pions Dfavπ and Dunfavπ.

  5. Quark production in heavy ion collisions: formalism and boost invariant fermionic light-cone mode functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelis, François; Tanji, Naoto

    2016-02-01

    We revisit the problem of quark production in high energy heavy ion collisions, at leading order in α s in the color glass condensate framework. In this first paper, we setup the formalism and express the quark spectrum in terms of a basis of solutions of the Dirac equation (the mode functions). We determine analytically their initial value in the Fock-Schwinger gauge on a proper time surface Q s τ 0 ≪ 1, in a basis that makes manifest the boost invariance properties of this problem. We also describe a statistical algorithm to perform the sampling of the mode functions.

  6. A Method for the Precision Mass Measurement of the Stop Quark at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Milstene, Caroline; Schmitt, Michael; Sopczak, Andre; /Lancaster U.

    2007-12-01

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). The studies indicate that a precision of {Delta}m{sub {bar t}{sub 1}} = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. They also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and they revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density.

  7. A Method for the Precision Mass Measurement of the Stop Quark at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Milstene, Caroline; Schmitt, Michael; Sopczak, Andre; /Lancaster U.

    2008-06-01

    Many supersymmetric models predict new particles within the reach of the next generation of colliders. For an understanding of the model structure and the mechanism(s) of symmetry breaking, it is important to know the masses of the new particles precisely. In this article the measurement of the mass of the scalar partner of the top quark (stop) at an e+e- collider is studied. A relatively light stop is motivated by attempts to explain electroweak baryogenesis and can play an important role in dark matter relic density. A method is presented which makes use of cross-section measurements near the pair-production threshold as well as at higher center-of-mass energies. It is shown that this method not only increases the statistical precision, but also greatly reduces the systematic uncertainties, which can be important. Numerical results are presented, based on a realistic event simulation, for two signal selection strategies: using conventional selection cuts, and using an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). Our studies indicate that a precision of {Delta}m{tilde t}{sub 1} = 0.42 GeV can be achieved, representing a major improvement over previous studies. While the analysis of stops is particularly challenging due to the possibility of stop hadronization, the general procedure could be applied to the mass measurement of other particles as well. We also comment on the potential of the IDA to discover a stop quark in this scenario, and we revisit the accuracy of the theoretical predictions for the neutralino relic density

  8. Extracting the Light Quark Mass Ratio m{sub u}/m{sub d} from Bottomonia Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fengkun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a new method to extract the light quark mass ratio m{sub u}/m{sub d} using the {Upsilon}(4S){yields}h{sub b{pi}}{sup 0}({eta}) bottomonia transitions. The decay amplitudes are dominated by the light quark mass differences, and the corrections from other effects are rather small, allowing for a precise extraction. We also discuss how to reduce the theoretical uncertainty with the help of future experiments. As a by-product, we show that the decay {Upsilon}(4S){yields}h{sub b{eta}} is expected to be a nice channel for searching for the h{sub b} state.

  9. Transverse Quark Spin Effects and the Flavor Dependence of the Boer-Mulders Function

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard P. Gamberg; Gary R. Goldstein; Marc Schlegel

    2007-07-30

    The naive time reversal odd (T-odd) parton distribution $h_{1}^{\\perp}$, the so-called Boer-Mulders function, for both $u$- and $d$-quarks is considered in the diquark spectator model. While other approaches give evidence that the signs of the Boer-Mulders function for both flavors $u$ and $d$ are the same and negative, previous caculations in the diquark-spectator model found $h_{1}^{\\perp(u)}$ and $h_{1}^{\\perp(d)}$ have differnet signs. The flavor dependence is of significance for the analysis of the azimuthal $\\cos(2\\phi)$ asymmetries in unpolarized SIDIS and DY-processes, as well as for the overall physical understanding of the distribution of transversely polarized quarks in unpolarized nucleons. We find substantial differences with previous work. In particular we obtain estimates of the zeroth, half and first moments of Boer-Mulders functions that are negative over the full range in Bjorken $x$ for both the up and down quarks. In conjunction with the Collins function we then predict the $\\cos(2\\phi)$ azimuthal asymmetry for $\\pi^{+}$ and $\\pi^{-}$ in this framework. We also find that the Sivers up and down quark are negative and postive respectively. As a by-product of the formalism, we calculate the chiral-odd but T-even function $h_{1L}^{\\perp}$ in the spectator framework, which allows us to present a prediction for the single spin asymmetry $A_{UL}^{\\sin(2\\phi)}$ for a longitudinally polarized target in SIDIS.

  10. Quark-mass dependence of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-02-01

    We perform a chiral extrapolation of the baryon octet and decuplet masses in a relativistic formulation of chiral perturbation theory. A partial summation is assumed as implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop diagrams. Upon a chiral expansion, our results are consistent with strict chiral perturbation theory at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. All counter terms are correlated by a large-Nc operator analysis. Our results are confronted with recent results of unquenched three-flavor lattice simulations. We adjust the parameter set to the pion-mass dependence of the nucleon and omega masses as computed by the BMW Collaboration and predict the pion-mass dependence of the remaining baryon octet and decuplet states. The current lattice simulations can be described accurately and smoothly up to pion masses of about 600 MeV. In particular, we recover the recent results of the HSC without any further adjustments.