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Sample records for quark yukawa coupling

  1. Indirect handle on the down-quark Yukawa coupling.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Florian

    2014-12-31

    To measure the Yukawa couplings of the up and down quarks, Yu,d, seems to be far beyond the capabilities of current and (near) future experiments in particle physics. By performing a general analysis of the potential misalignment between quark masses and Yukawa couplings, we derive predictions for the magnitude of induced flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs), depending on the shift in the physical Yukawa coupling of first-generation quarks. We find that a change of more than 50% in Yd would generically result in ds transitions in conflict with kaon physics. This could already be seen as evidence for a nonvanishing direct coupling of the down quark to the newly discovered Higgs boson. The nonobservation of certain--already well-constrained--processes is thus turned into a powerful indirect measure of otherwise basically unaccessible physical parameters of the effective standard model. Similarly, improvements in limits on FCNCs in the up-type quark sector can lead to valuable information on Yu. PMID:25615309

  2. Why should we care about the top quark Yukawa coupling?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shapshnikov, Mikhail; Bezrukov, Fedor

    2015-04-15

    In the cosmological context, for the Standard Model to be valid up to the scale of inflation, the top quark Yukawa coupling yt should not exceed the critical value ytcrit , coinciding with good precision (about 0.2‰) with the requirement of the stability of the electroweak vacuum. So, the exact measurements of yt may give an insight on the possible existence and the energy scale of new physics above 100 GeV, which is extremely sensitive to yt. In this study, we overview the most recent theoretical computations of and the experimental measurements of ytcrit and the experimental measurements ofmore » yt. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties in yt, the required scale of new physics varies from 10⁷ GeV to the Planck scale, urging for precise determination of the top quark Yukawa coupling.« less

  3. Why should we care about the top quark Yukawa coupling?

    SciTech Connect

    Bezrukov, F.; Shaposhnikov, M.

    2015-03-15

    In the cosmological context, for the Standard Model to be valid up to the scale of inflation, the top quark Yukawa coupling y{sub t} should not exceed the critical value y{sub t}{sup crit}, coinciding with good precision (about 0.2‰) with the requirement of the stability of the electroweak vacuum. So, the exact measurements of y{sub t} may give an insight on the possible existence and the energy scale of new physics above 100 GeV, which is extremely sensitive to y{sub t}. We overview the most recent theoretical computations of and the experimental measurements of y{sub t}{sup crit} and the experimental measurements of y{sub t}. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties in y{sub t}, the required scale of new physics varies from 10{sup 7} GeV to the Planck scale, urging for precise determination of the top quark Yukawa coupling.

  4. Why should we care about the top quark Yukawa coupling?

    SciTech Connect

    Shapshnikov, Mikhail; Bezrukov, Fedor

    2015-04-15

    In the cosmological context, for the Standard Model to be valid up to the scale of inflation, the top quark Yukawa coupling yt should not exceed the critical value ytcrit , coinciding with good precision (about 0.2‰) with the requirement of the stability of the electroweak vacuum. So, the exact measurements of yt may give an insight on the possible existence and the energy scale of new physics above 100 GeV, which is extremely sensitive to yt. In this study, we overview the most recent theoretical computations of and the experimental measurements of ytcrit and the experimental measurements of yt. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties in yt, the required scale of new physics varies from 10⁷ GeV to the Planck scale, urging for precise determination of the top quark Yukawa coupling.

  5. Constraining the charm Yukawa and Higgs-quark coupling universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Stamou, Emmanuel; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2015-08-01

    We introduce four different types of data-driven analyses with different levels of robustness that constrain the size of the Higgs-charm Yukawa coupling: (i) Recasting the vector-boson associated V h analyses that search for the bottom-pair final state. We use this mode to directly and model independently constrain the Higgs-to-charm coupling, yc/ycSM≲234 . (ii) The direct measurement of the total width, yc/ycSM≲120 - 140 . (iii) The search for h →J /ψ γ , yc/ycSM≲220 . (iv) A global fit to the Higgs signal strengths, yc/ycSM≲6.2 . A comparison with t t ¯h data allows us to show that the Higgs does not couple to quarks in a universal way, as is expected in the Standard Model. Finally, we demonstrate how the experimental collaborations can further improve our direct bound by roughly an order of magnitude by charm tagging, as is already used in new-physics searches.

  6. Exclusive radiative Higgs decays as probes of light-quark Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the rare exclusive Higgs boson decays into a single vector meson and a photon and investigate the possibility of using these processes to probe the light-quark Yukawa couplings. We work with an effective Lagrangian with modified Higgs couplings to account for possible new-physics effects in a model-independent way. The h → Vγ decay rate is governed by the destructive interference of two amplitudes, one of which involves the Higgs coupling to the quark anti-quark pair inside the vector meson. We derive this amplitude at next-to-leading order in α s using QCD factorization, including the resummation of large logarithmic corrections and accounting for the effects of flavor mixing. The high factorization scale μ ˜ m h ensures that our results are rather insensitive to the hadronic parameters characterizing the light-cone distribution amplitude of the vector meson. The second amplitude arises from the loop-induced effective hγγ * and hγZ * couplings, where the off-shell gauge boson converts into the vector meson. We devise a strategy to eliminate theoretical uncertainties related to this amplitude to almost arbitrary precision. This opens up the possibility to probe for modifications of the c- and b-quark Yukawa couplings and modifications of the s-quark Yukawa coupling in the high-luminosity LHC run. In particular, we show that measurements of the ratios Br( h → Υ( nS) γ)/Br( h → γγ) and can provide complementary information on the real and imaginary parts of the b-quark Yukawa coupling. More accurate measurements would be possible at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.

  7. Towards a precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Juste, A.

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling is of great importance, since it may shed light on the mechanism of EWSB. We study the prospects of such measurement during the first phase of the ILC at {radical}s = 500 GeV, focusing in particular on recent theoretical developments as well as the potential benefits of beam polarization. It is shown that both yield improvements that could possibly lead to a measurement competitive with the LHC.

  8. Probing the Charm Quark Yukawa Coupling in Higgs+Charm Production.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Ilaria; Goertz, Florian; Isidori, Gino

    2015-11-20

    We propose a new method for determining the coupling of the Higgs boson to charm quarks, via Higgs production in association with a charm-tagged jet: pp→hc. As a first estimate, we find that at the LHC with 3000 fb^{-1}, it should be possible to derive a constraint of order one, relative to the standard model (SM) value of the charm Yukawa coupling. As a by-product of this analysis, we present an estimate of the exclusive pp→hD^{(*)} electroweak cross section. Within the SM, the latter turns out to be not accessible at the LHC even in the high-luminosity phase. PMID:26636844

  9. Yukawa Couplings in Heterotic Compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Grayson, Dan; He, Yang-Hui; Lukas, André

    2010-07-01

    We present a practical, algebraic method for efficiently calculating the Yukawa couplings of a large class of heterotic compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds with non-standard embeddings. Our methodology covers all of, though is not restricted to, the recently classified positive monads over favourable complete intersection Calabi-Yau three-folds. Since the algorithm is based on manipulating polynomials it can be easily implemented on a computer. This makes the automated investigation of Yukawa couplings for large classes of smooth heterotic compactifications a viable possibility.

  10. Exclusive window onto Higgs Yukawa couplings.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Alexander L; Perez, Gilad; Petriello, Frank; Soreq, Yotam; Stoynev, Stoyan; Zupan, Jure

    2015-03-13

    We show that both flavor-conserving and flavor-violating Yukawa couplings of the Higgs boson to first- and second-generation quarks can be probed by measuring rare decays of the form h→MV, where M denotes a vector meson and V indicates either γ, W or Z. We calculate the branching ratios for these processes in both the standard model and its possible extensions. We discuss the experimental prospects for their observation. The possibility of accessing these Higgs couplings appears to be unique to the high-luminosity LHC and future hadron colliders, providing further motivation for those machines. PMID:25815924

  11. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings in heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesneag, Stefan; Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Candelas, Philip; Lukas, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We develop techniques, based on differential geometry, to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic line bundle models on Calabi-Yau manifolds defined as complete intersections in projective spaces. It is shown explicitly how these techniques relate to algebraic methods for computing holomorphic Yukawa couplings. We apply our methods to various examples and evaluate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings explicitly as functions of the complex structure moduli. It is shown that the rank of the Yukawa matrix can decrease at specific loci in complex structure moduli space. In particular, we compute the up Yukawa coupling and the singlet-Higgs-lepton trilinear coupling in the heterotic standard model described in ref. [32].

  12. Renormalization group invariant of lepton Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyuki, Takanao

    2015-04-01

    By using quark Yukawa matrices only, we can construct renormalization invariants that are exact at the one-loop level in the standard model. One of them, Iq, is accidentally consistent with unity, even though quark masses are strongly hierarchical. We calculate a lepton version of the invariant Il for Dirac and Majorana neutrino cases and find that Il can also be close to unity. For the Dirac neutrino and inverted hierarchy case, if the lightest neutrino mass is 3.0 meV to 8.8 meV, an equality Iq=Il can be satisfied. These invariants are not changed even if new particles couple to the standard model particles, as long as those couplings are generation independent.

  13. Nonstandard Yukawa couplings and Higgs portal dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Fady; Brod, Joachim; Uttarayat, Patipan; Zupan, Jure

    2016-01-01

    We study the implications of non-standard Higgs Yukawa couplings to light quarks on Higgs-portal dark matter phenomenology. Saturating the present experimental bounds on up-quark, down-quark, or strange-quark Yukawa couplings, the predicted direct dark matter detection scattering rate can increase by up to four orders of magnitude. The effect on the dark matter annihilation cross-section, on the other hand, is subleading unless the dark matter is very light — a scenario that is already excluded by measurements of the Higgs invisible decay width. We investigate the expected size of corrections in multi-Higgs-doublet models with natural flavor conservation, the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model, the Giudice-Lebedev model of light quark masses, minimal flavor violation new physics models, Randall-Sundrum, and composite Higgs models. We find that an enhancement in the dark matter scattering rate of an order of magnitude is possible. Finally, we point out that a discovery of Higgs-portal dark matter could lead to interesting bounds on the light-quark Yukawa couplings.

  14. Nonstandard Yukawa couplings and Higgs portal dark matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bishara, Fady; Brod, Joachim; Uttayarat, Patipan; Zupan, Jure

    2016-01-04

    We study the implications of non-standard Higgs Yukawa couplings to light quarks on Higgs-portal dark matter phenomenology. Saturating the present experimental bounds on up-quark, down-quark, or strange-quark Yukawa couplings, the predicted direct dark matter detection scattering rate can increase by up to four orders of magnitude. The effect on the dark matter annihilation cross-section, on the other hand, is subleading unless the dark matter is very light — a scenario that is already excluded by measurements of the Higgs invisible decay width. We investigate the expected size of corrections in multi-Higgs-doublet models with natural flavor conservation, the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model,more » the Giudice-Lebedev model of light quark masses, minimal flavor violation new physics models, Randall-Sundrum, and composite Higgs models. We find that an enhancement in the dark matter scattering rate of an order of magnitude is possible. In conclusion, we point out that a discovery of Higgs-portal dark matter could lead to interesting bounds on the light-quark Yukawa couplings.« less

  15. Search for H → γγ produced in association with top quarks and constraints on the Yukawa coupling between the top quark and the Higgs boson using data taken at 7 TeV and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Dobos, D.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. 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G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. 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A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-01-01

    A search is performed for Higgs bosons produced in association with top quarks using the diphoton decay mode of the Higgs boson. Selection requirements are optimized separately for leptonic and fully hadronic final states from the top quark decays. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess over the background prediction is observed and upper limits are set on the t t bar H production cross section. The observed exclusion upper limit at 95% confidence level is 6.7 times the predicted Standard Model cross section value. In addition, limits are set on the strength of the Yukawa coupling between the top quark and the Higgs boson, taking into account the dependence of the t t bar H and tH cross sections as well as the H → γγ branching fraction on the Yukawa coupling. Lower and upper limits at 95% confidence level are set at -1.3 and +8.0 times the Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  16. Nonperturbative Yukawa Couplings from String Instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Cvetic, Mirjam; Richter, Robert; Weigand, Timo; Luest, Dieter

    2008-02-15

    Nonperturbative D-brane instantons can generate perturbatively absent though phenomenologically relevant couplings for type II orientifold compactifications with D-branes. We discuss the generation of the perturbatively vanishing SU(5) GUT Yukawa coupling of type <10 10 5{sub H}>. Moreover, for a simple globally consistent intersecting D6-brane model, we discuss the generation of mass terms for matter fields. This can serve as a mechanism for decoupling exotic matter.

  17. Remarkable coincidence for the top Yukawa coupling and an approximately massless bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2009-08-01

    We calculate, with several corrections, the nonrelativistic binding by Higgs exchange and gluon exchange between six top and six antitop quarks (actually replaced by left-handed b quarks from time to time). The remarkable result is that, within our calculational accuracy of the order of 14% in the top-quark Yukawa coupling g{sub t}, the experimental running top-quark Yukawa coupling g{sub t}=0.935 happens to have just that value which gives a perfect cancellation of the unbound mass=12 top-quark masses by this binding energy. In other words the bound state is massless to the accuracy of our calculation. Our calculation is in disagreement with a similar calculation by Kuchiev et al., but this deviation may be explained by a phase transition. We and Kuchiev et al. compute on different sides of this phase transition.

  18. Running of the Yukawa Couplings in a Two Higgs Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Montes de Oca Y, J. H.; Juarez W, S. R.; Kielanowski, P.

    2008-07-02

    We solve the one loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGE) for the Yukawa couplings in the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets. In the RGE we include the contributions of the up and down quarks. In this approximation we explore universality and unification assumptions to study the mass-hierarchy problem through the running of the vacuum expectation values.

  19. Measuring the top Yukawa coupling at 100 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Plehn, Tilman; Reimitz, Peter; Schell, Torben; Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    We propose a measurement of the top Yukawa coupling at a 100 TeV hadron collider, based on boosted Higgs and top decays. We find that the top Yukawa coupling can be measured to 1%, with excellent handles for reducing systematic and theoretical uncertainties, both from side bands and from t\\bar{t}H/t\\bar{t}Z ratios.

  20. Examining the identity of Yukawa with gauge couplings in supersymmetric QCD at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ayres; Skands, Peter Z.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P.M.; /DESY

    2007-03-01

    The identity of the quark-squark-gluino Yukawa coupling with the corresponding quark-quark-gluon QCD coupling in supersymmetric theories can be examined experimentally at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Extending earlier investigations of like-sign di-lepton final states, we include jets in the analysis of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, adding squark-gluino and gluino-pair production to squark-pair production. Moreover we expand the method towards model-independent analyses which cover more general scenarios. In all cases, squark decays to light charginos and neutralinos persist to play a dominant role.

  1. Yukawa couplings in string theory: the case for F-theory GUT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Anamaría

    2015-11-01

    We study the pattern of Yukawa couplings in local F-theory SU(5) GUT's. Couplings for the third family of quarks and leptons appear at the perturbative level, but to reproduce the observed couplings for the lighter families requires non-perturbative dynamics. We show that corrections due to instanton effects do lead to a Yukawa matrix with a hierarchical structure. Our results apply to both down-like and up- like 10 × 10 × 5 couplings. The models include magnetic fluxes needed for a chiral spectrum and for symmetry breaking down to the Standard Model. We compute the holomorphic couplings via residues and then obtain the physical couplings taking into account the normalization of wavefunction profiles. Combining non-perturbative corrections and magnetic fluxes allows to fit the measured masses and hierarchies of the third and second generations in the Standard Model.

  2. Top Yukawa coupling measurement with indefinite CP Higgs in e+e-→tt¯Φ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Garg, Sumit K.; Kim, C. S.; Lahiri, Jayita; Poulose, P.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the issue of the top quark Yukawa coupling measurement in a model-independent and general case with the inclusion of CP violation in the coupling. Arguably the best process to study this coupling is the associated production of the Higgs boson along with a tt¯ pair in a machine like the International Linear Collider (ILC). While detailed analyses of the sensitivity of the measurement—assuming a Standard Model (SM)-like coupling is available in the context of the ILC—conclude that the coupling could be pinned down to about a 10% level with modest luminosity, our investigations show that the scenario could be different in the case of a more general coupling. The modified Lorentz structure resulting in a changed functional dependence of the cross section on the coupling, along with the difference in the cross section itself leads to considerable deviation in the sensitivity. Our studies of the ILC with center-of-mass energies of 500 GeV, 800 GeV, and 1000 GeV show that moderate CP mixing in the Higgs sector could change the sensitivity to about 20%, while it could be worsened to 75% in cases which could accommodate more dramatic changes in the coupling. Detailed considerations of the decay distributions point to a need for a relook at the analysis strategy followed for the case of the SM, such as for a model-independent analysis of the top quark Yukawa coupling measurement. This study strongly suggests that a joint analysis of the CP properties and the Yukawa coupling measurement would be the way forward at the ILC and that caution must be exercised in the measurement of the Yukawa couplings and the conclusions drawn from it.

  3. Masses of third family vectorlike quarks and leptons in Yukawa-unified E6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, Aditya; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2016-06-01

    In supersymmetric E6 the masses of the third family quarks and charged lepton, t -b -τ , as well as the masses of the vectorlike quarks and leptons, D -D ¯ and L -L ¯, may arise from the coupling 2 73×2 73×2 7H, where 2 73 and 2 7H denote the third family matter and Higgs multiplets, respectively. We assume that the SO(10) singlet component in 2 7H acquires a TeV-scale vacuum expectation value that spontaneously breaks U (1 )ψ and provides masses to the vectorlike particles in 2 73, while the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model doublets in 2 7H provide masses to t , b , and τ . Imposing Yukawa coupling unification ht=hb=hτ=hD=hL at MGUT and employing the ATLAS and CMS constraints on the Zψ' boson mass, we estimate the lower bounds on the third family vectorlike particles D -D ¯ and L -L ¯ masses to be around 5.85 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively. These bounds apply in the supersymmetric limit.

  4. Prospects for measuring the Higgs boson coupling to light quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Stamou, Emmanuel; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the prospects to probe the light-quark Yukawa couplings to the Higgs boson. The Higgs coupling to the charm quark can be probed both via inclusive and exclusive approaches. On the inclusive frontier, we use our recently proposed method together with published experimental studies for the sensitivity of the Higgs coupling to bottom quarks to find that the high-luminosity LHC can be sensitive to modifications of the charm Yukawa of the order of a few times its standard model (SM) value. We also present a preliminary study of this mode for a 100 TeV hadronic machine (with similar luminosity) and find that the bound can be further improved, possibly within the reach of the expected signal in the SM. On the exclusive frontier, we use the recent ATLAS search for charmonia and photon final state. This study yields the first measurement of the background relevant to these modes. Using this background measurement we project that at the high-luminosity LHC, unless the analysis strategy is changed, the sensitivity of the exclusive final state to the charm Yukawa to the charm Yukawa will be rather poor, of the order of 50 times the SM coupling. We then use a Monte-Carlo study to rescale the above backgrounds to the h →ϕ γ case and obtain a much weaker sensitivity to the strange Yukawa, of order of 3000 times the SM value. We briefly speculate what would be required to improve the prospects of the exclusive modes.

  5. Scalar decay constant and Yukawa coupling in walking gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2011-05-01

    We propose an approach for the calculation of the Yukawa coupling through the scalar decay constant and the chiral condensate in the context of the extended technicolor . We perform the nonperturbative computation of the Yukawa coupling based on the improved ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation. It turns out that the Yukawa coupling can be larger or smaller than the standard model value, depending on the number N{sub D} of the weak doublets for each technicolor (TC) index. It is thus nontrivial whether or not the huge enhancement of the production of the scalar via the gluon fusion takes place even for a walking TC model with a colored techni-fermion. For the typical one-family TC model near conformality, it is found that the Yukawa coupling is slightly larger than the standard model one, where the expected mass of the scalar bound state is around 500 GeV. In this case, the production cross section via the gluon fusion is considerably enhanced, as naively expected, and hence such a scalar can be discovered/excluded at the early stage of the LHC.

  6. Practical thermodynamics of Yukawa systems at strong coupling.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, Sergey A; Kryuchkov, Nikita P; Yurchenko, Stanislav O; Thomas, Hubertus M

    2015-05-21

    Simple practical approach to estimate thermodynamic properties of strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases, is presented. The accuracy of the approach is tested by extensive comparison with direct computer simulation results (for fluids and solids) and the recently proposed shortest-graph method (for solids). Possible applications to other systems of softly repulsive particles are briefly discussed. PMID:26001480

  7. Practical thermodynamics of Yukawa systems at strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Kryuchkov, Nikita P.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2015-05-21

    Simple practical approach to estimate thermodynamic properties of strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases, is presented. The accuracy of the approach is tested by extensive comparison with direct computer simulation results (for fluids and solids) and the recently proposed shortest-graph method (for solids). Possible applications to other systems of softly repulsive particles are briefly discussed.

  8. Radiative symmetry breaking, fermion masses and mixing angles, and large Yukawa couplings in N - 1 SUSY-GUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    The effect of large third generation Yukawa couplings on radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in N = 1 SUSY-GUTS is reported. Limits on tan {beta}, and on the amount of fine tuning necessary for consistent symmetry breaking in the MSSM are derived. Predictions for fermion masses and mixing angles from GUT scale textures are also discussed. The effect of large Yukawa couplings on the running of the DHR texture is used to determine limits on the top quark valid for all values of tan {beta}.

  9. Infrared fixed point of the top Yukawa coupling in split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huitu, Katri; Laamanen, Jari; Roy, Probir; Roy, Sourov

    2005-09-01

    The severe constraints imposed on the parameter space of the minimal split supersymmetry model by the infrared fixed point solution of the top Yukawa coupling Y{sub t} are studied in detail in terms of the value of the top-quark mass measured at the Tevatron together with the lower bound on the lightest Higgs mass established by LEP. The dependence of the Higgsino mass parameter {mu}, the gaugino coupling strengths g-tilde{sub u,d}, g-tilde{sub u,d}{sup '} and of the Higgs quartic self-coupling {lambda} on the value of Y{sub t} in the vicinity of the Landau pole is discussed. A few interesting features emerge, though the model is found to be disfavored within the infrared fixed point scenario because of the need to have several unnatural cancellations at work on account of the requirement of a low upper bound on tan{beta}.

  10. Nonlinear mode coupling and vibrational energy transfer in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling and the subsequent vibrational energy transfer that results is an important topic in chemical physics research, ranging from small molecules consisting of several atoms to macromolecules such as those found in proteins and DNA. Nonlinear mode coupling is recognized as the mechanism leading to ergodicity, which is a foundational tenet of statistical mechanics. Over the past two decades, Yukawa systems of particles such as those found in complex plasma, have been shown to be an effective model across a large number of physical systems. In this research, nonlinear mode coupling in Yukawa clusters consisting of 3-10 particles is examined via numerical simulation of the vibrational energy transfer between modes starting from an initial excited state. The relationship between the energy transfer process and the internal resonance between modes having a specified frequency ratio and the temporal evolution of the system to a state of equal energy across all modes, i.e., the state of ergodicity, will be discussed. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  12. Aspect of Fermion Mass Hierarchy within Flavor Democracy for Yukawa Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Katsuichi; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    We discuss the fermion mass hierarchy by including vector-like fermions which are accommodated in E6 GUTs within flavor democracy for Yukawa couplings. In this framework, all Yukawa couplings for the standard Higgs doublet have the same strength, and all Yukawa couplings for the singlet Higgs have the same strength (New ansatz). In addition, singlet Higgs and right-handed neutrinos exist. Under this condition, the mass hierarchy mt ≫ mb ˜ mτ as well as mt ≫ mc, mu can be naturally explained.

  13. Instanton induced Yukawa couplings from distant E3 and E(-1) instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate non-perturbative contributions to Yukawa couplings on D3-branes at orbifold singularities due to E3 and fractional E(-1) instantons which do not intersect the visible sector branes. While distant E3 instantons on bulk cycles typically contribute to Yukawa couplings, we find that distant fractional E(-1) can also give rise to new Yukawa couplings. However, fractional E(-1) instantons only induce Yukawa couplings if they are located at a singularity which shares a collapsed homologous two-cycle with the singularity supporting the visible sector. The non-perturbative contributions to Yukawa couplings exhibit a different flavour structure than the tree-level Yukawa couplings and, as a result, they can be sources of flavour violation. This is particularly relevant for schemes of moduli stabilisation which rely on superpotential contributions from E3 instantons, such as KKLT or the Large Volume Scenario. As a byproduct of our analysis, we shed some new light on the properties of annulus diagrams with matter field insertions in stringy instanton calculus.

  14. Flavor-changing neutral current in production and decay of pseudoscalar mesons in a type III two-Higgs-doublet-model with four-texture Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Bock, M.; Lopez-Castro, G.; Lopez-Lozano, L.; Rosado, A.

    2009-09-01

    We study flavor-violating processes in the production or decay of a neutral pseudoscalar meson P{sup 0} in the framework of a type-III two Higgs doublet model with four-texture Yukawa couplings. We use a version of the model where Yukawa interactions of neutral Higgs bosons allow for flavor change at the tree-level, but conserve CP symmetry. The physical Yukawa couplings respect CP-invariance due to the Hermiticity conditions that we impose on the fermion mass matrices. We focus on all possible {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sup {+-}}P{sup 0} and P{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup '-} decay channels, where l, l{sup '} are charged leptons. We find that these processes provide complementary information on quark and lepton flavor-changing neutral current Yukawa couplings. In particular flavor-violating parameters in the quark sector, {chi}{sub sb} and {chi}{sub db}, are significantly constrained by present experimental data, whereas the corresponding parameters in the leptonic sector are less constrained.

  15. Non-minimal coupling in Higgs–Yukawa model with asymptotically safe gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Kin-ya; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-06-01

    We study the fixed-point structure of the Higgs–Yukawa model, with its scalar being non-minimally coupled to the asymptotically safe gravity, using the functional renormalization group. We have obtained the renormalization group equations for the cosmological and Newton constants, the scalar mass squared and quartic coupling constant, and the Yukawa and non-minimal coupling constants, taking into account all the scalar, fermion, and graviton loops. We find that switching on the fermionic quantum fluctuations makes the non-minimal coupling constant irrelevant around the Gaussian-matter fixed point with asymptotically safe gravity.

  16. Flavor constraints on two-Higgs-doublet models with general diagonal Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, F.

    2010-02-01

    We consider constraints from flavor physics on two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) with general, flavor-diagonal, Yukawa couplings. Analyzing the charged Higgs contribution to different observables, we find that b{yields}s{gamma} transitions and {Delta}M{sub B{sub d}} restrict the coupling {lambda}{sub tt} of the top quark (corresponding to cot{beta} in models with a Z{sub 2} symmetry) to |{lambda}{sub tt}|<1 for m{sub H}{sup +} < or approx. 500 GeV. Stringent constraints from B meson decays are obtained also on the other third generation couplings {lambda}{sub bb} and {lambda}{sub {tau}{tau},} but with stronger dependence on m{sub H}{sup +}. For the second generation, we obtain constraints on combinations of {lambda}{sub ss}, {lambda}{sub cc}, and {lambda}{sub {mu}{mu}}from leptonic K and D{sub s} decays. The limits on the general couplings are translated to the common 2HDM types I-IV with a Z{sub 2} symmetry, and presented on the (m{sub H}{sup +},tan{beta}) plane. The flavor constraints are most excluding in the type II model which lacks a decoupling limit in tan{beta}. We obtain a lower limit m{sub H}{sup +} > or approx. 300 GeV in models of type II and III, while no lower bound on m{sub H}{sup +} is found for types I and IV.

  17. Quasi-localized wavefunctions on magnetized tori and tiny neutrino Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Keigo

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that, a quasi-localization of wavefunctions in toroidal compactifications with magnetic fluxes can lead to a strong suppression for relevant Yukawa couplings, and it is applicable to obtain tiny neutrino masses. Although it is known that magnetic fluxes lead to a Gaussian profile of zero-modes on a torus and that can yield a suppressed coupling in higher-dimensional supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theories, the largest (diagonal) entry of Yukawa matrices is always of O(1) . In this paper, we propose a way to induce an absolutely tiny global factor of Yukawa matrices. In two SYM theories defined in different dimensional spacetime, their bifundamental representations must be localized as a point in some directions. Overlaps of such point-like localized wavefunctions and Gaussian zero-modes give a global factor of Yukawa matrices, and it can be a strong suppression factor or a usual O(1) factor, corresponding to their distance. Our numerical analysis shows that it is possible to obtain a suppression strong enough to realize the tiny neutrino masses without a fine-tuning. Furthermore, we propose a concrete model in a magnetized SYM system and demonstrate the mechanism to generate the tiny neutrino Yukawa couplings.

  18. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  19. Minimal SUSY SO(10) and Yukawa unification

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2013-05-23

    The minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) SO(10) model, where only two Higgs multiplets {l_brace}10 Circled-Plus 126-bar{r_brace} are utilized for Yukawa couplings with matter fields, can nicely fit the neutrino oscillation parameters as well as charged fermion masses and mixing angles. In the fitting of the fermion mass matrix data, the largest element in the Yukawa coupling with the 126-bar -plet Higgs (Y{sup 126}) is found to be of order one, so that the right see-saw scale should be provided by Higgs vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of {beta}(10{sup 14}GeV). This fact causes a serious problem, namely, the gauge coupling unification is spoiled because of the presence of many exotic Higgs multiples emerging at the see-saw scale. In order to solve this problem, we consider a unification between bottom-quark and tau Yukawa couplings (b - {tau} Yukawa coupling unification) at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, due to threshold corrections of superpartners to the Yukawa couplings at the 1 TeV scale. When the b - {tau} Yukawa coupling unification is very accurate, the largest element in Y{sub 126} can become {beta}(0.01), so that the right see-saw scale is realized by the GUT scale VEV and the usual gauge coupling unification is maintained. Since the b - {tau} Yukawa unification alters the Yukawa coupling data at the GUT scale, we re-analyze the fitting of the fermion mass matrix data by taking all the relevant free parameters into account. Unfortunately, we find that no parameter region shows up to give a nice fit for the current neutrino oscillation data and therefore, the usual picture of the gauge coupling unification cannot accommodate the fermion mass matrix data fitting in our procedure.

  20. Blowup results for the KGS system with higher order Yukawa coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Qi-Hong; Li, Wan-Tong; Wang, Shu

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the Klein-Gordon-Schrödinger (KGS) system with higher order Yukawa coupling in spatial dimensions N ≥ 3. We establish a perturbed virial type identity and prove blowup results relied on Lyapunov functionals for KGS system with a negative energy level. Additionally, we give a result with respect to the blowup rate in finite time for the radial solution in 3 spatial dimensions.

  1. Dependence of Yukawa couplings on the axionic background moduli of ZN orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, J.; Jungnickel, D.; Lauer, J.

    1992-05-01

    The metrical and axionic background moduli which determine a general symmetric ZN orbifold model are chosen in such a way that the rotational twist leaves the underlying σ model action invariant. A thorough analysis of this condition is given. We notice that it plays a key role in the evaluation of the four-point correlation functions of ground states which belong to the lowest twisted sectors. Having fixed the normalization of these functions we factorize them with respect to the twisted intermediate channel. This method yields the moduli-dependent part of the twisted sector Yukawa couplings of an orbifoldized heterotic string model. We then perform various discrete mappings (axionic shifts, duality) on the space of background moduli and recognize that the induced linear transformations of the Yukawa couplings are essentially independent of the choice of a specific background. If compensating unitary redefinitions of the twist fields are applied then orbifold models whose backgrounds are related by one of the above mappings cannot be distinguished. For many twist orders we arrive at an explicit form of the phase factors needed to redefine twist fields in order that a general discrete axionic shift can be undone. The requirement of duality invariance is sufficient to determine the moduli dependence of the Yukawa couplings. Hence one may even bypass the evaluation of instanton actions.

  2. Weak quark couplings induced by gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavela, M. B.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Oliver, L.; Pène, O.; Raynal, J. C.

    1980-12-01

    We compute the quark couplings in flavor-changing semileptonic transitions induced by lowest-order gluon corrections. We investigate the consequences of these radiative corrections for the quark axial-vector coupling, the deviations from Cabibbo universality for the axial-vector relative to the vector current, and the induced couplings (first-class pseudoscalar and anomalous magnetic moment, and second-class scalar and pseudotensor). The correction lowers the axial-vector coupling and increases the magnetic moment. We study the dependence of the couplings on the quark mass difference. Some of these results, true to all orders in αs, generalize the theorem of Ademollo and Gatto. The effective current is pure V-A to a very good approximation for transitions of heavy quarks (m>~5 GeV).

  3. Vortical flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids under external forcing - A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Rajaraman; Charan, Harish

    2016-07-01

    Understanding vortical flows under external forcing in two dimensional (2D) fluids is a fundamental paradigm for structure formation in driven, dissipative systems. Considering Yukawa liquid as a prototype for strongly correlated or strongly coupled plasmas characterized by coupling strength (Γ, the ratio of average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of mean inter-particle distance to shielding length), we address two important problems: 1. Onset of Rayleigh Benard convection cell (RBCC) in 2D Yukawa liquids subject to gravity and external temperature gradient 2. Onset of von Karman vortices in 2D Yukawa liquid under external pressure head, using large scale, first principles molecular dynamics simulations. For typical values of (Γ,κ), existence of a critical external temperature difference is demonstrated, beyond which RBCC are seen to set in. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, hitherto unsuspected linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ,κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down to a steady state RBCC τ_s, is found to be maximum close to the above said critical external temperature difference and is seen to reduce with increasing external temperature difference. For the range of values of (Γ, κ) considered here, τ_s ≃ 10 000-20 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, where ω_{pd} is dust plasma frequency. As Γ is increased to very high values, due to strong coupling effects, RBC cells are seen to be in a transient state without attaining a steady state for as long as 100 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, even for a very high external temperature difference. In the second part, we address the existence of universal relation between Strouhal (St) and Rayleigh (Ry) numbers for Yukawa liquid using first principles based classical molecular dynamics. The flow past an obstacle is seen to indeed

  4. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, , in collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization , and . This estimate improves to if the 1 sample is assumed to be fully in the configuration.

  5. Effective Yukawa couplings and flavor-changing Higgs boson decays at linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, E.; Mele, B.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the advantages of a linear-collider program for testing a recent theoretical proposal where the Higgs boson Yukawa couplings are radiatively generated, keeping unchanged the standard-model mechanism for electroweak-gauge-symmetry breaking. Fermion masses arise at a large energy scale through an unknown mechanism, and the standard model at the electroweak scale is regarded as an effective field theory. In this scenario, Higgs boson decays into photons and electroweak gauge-boson pairs are considerably enhanced for a light Higgs boson, which makes a signal observation at the LHC straightforward. On the other hand, the clean environment of a linear collider is required to directly probe the radiative fermionic sector of the Higgs boson couplings. Also, we show that the flavor-changing Higgs boson decays are dramatically enhanced with respect to the standard model. In particular, we find a measurable branching ratio in the range (10{sup -4}-10{sup -3}) for the decay H{yields}bs for a Higgs boson lighter than 140 GeV, depending on the high-energy scale where Yukawa couplings vanish. We present a detailed analysis of the Higgs boson production cross sections at linear colliders for interesting decay signatures, as well as branching-ratio correlations for different flavor-conserving/nonconserving fermionic decays.

  6. Do we have the Explanation for the Families and Their Properties, for the Higgs and Yukawa Couplings, for the Gauge Vector Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoč Borštnik, Norma Susana

    2015-03-01

    Most physicists declare the Higgs as the last missing particle to be confirmed. But can this at all be true? Shouldn't we understand the origin of families before being able to understand the origin of the Yukawa couplings, for the explanation of which additional scalar fields are needed? The spin-charge-family theory is offering a possible explanation for the origin of families, for several scalar fields manifesting effectively at low energies as the Higgs and the Yukawa couplings, for the fact that the scalar fields are doublets with respect to the weak charge, while they are triplets with respect to the family groups, and also for other assumptions of the standard model. The theory predicts at the observable regime two decoupled groups of four families. The fourth family, coupled to the measured three, will be observed at the LHC. The fifth family is explaining the dark matter. The accuracy with which the fourth family masses can in this theory be predicted depends strongly on the accuracy with which the mixing 3 × 3 sub matrices of the quark and lepton mixing matrices are measured.

  7. Alignment, reverse alignment, and wrong sign Yukawa couplings in two Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ambalika; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2016-06-01

    We consider two Higgs doublet models with a softly broken U(1) symmetry, for various limiting values of the scalar mixing angles α and β . These correspond to the Standard Model Higgs particle being the lighter C P -even scalar (alignment) or the heavier C P -even scalar (reverse alignment), and also the limit in which some of the Yukawa couplings of this particle are the opposite sign of the vector boson couplings (wrong sign). In these limits we impose a criterion for naturalness by demanding that quadratic divergences cancel at one loop. We plot the allowed masses of the remaining physical scalars based on naturalness, stability, perturbative unitarity, and constraints coming from the ρ parameter. We also calculate the h →γ γ decay width in the wrong sign limit.

  8. Quark mean field approach with derivative coupling for nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, M.; Akiyama, S.; Futami, Y.; Nakasone, T.; Yukino, T.

    2008-05-15

    We propose the quark mean field model including derivative coupling between quarks and scalar mesons in nuclear matter. This model concisely interprets an increasing size of the nucleon as well as a modification of coupling constant in the nuclear environment.

  9. Constraining the Higgs boson coupling to light quarks in the H →Z Z final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaofu

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the Higgs boson (Yukawa) coupling to quarks in the first two generations in the H →Z Z final states. Deviation of these couplings from the Standard Model values leads to changes in the Higgs boson width and in the cross sections of relevant processes. In the Higgs boson resonance region, an increased light Yukawa coupling leads to an increased Higgs boson width, which in turn leads to a decreased cross section. In the off-shell region, increased Yukawa couplings result in an enhancement of the Higgs boson signal through q q ¯ annihilation. With the assumption of scaling one Yukawa coupling at a time, this study is conceptually simple and yields results with the same order of magnitude as the tightest in the literature. The study is based on results published by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2014, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy √{s }=7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV.

  10. Yukawa multipole electrostatics and nontrivial coupling between electrostatic and dispersion interactions in electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellander, Roland; Ramirez, Rosa

    2008-12-01

    An exact treatment of screened electrostatics in electrolyte solutions is presented. In electrolytes the anisotropy of the exponentially decaying electrostatic potential from a molecule extends to the far field region. The full directional dependence of the electrostatic potential from a charged or uncharged molecule remains in the longest range tail (i.e. from all multipole moments). In particular, the range of the potential from an ion and that from an electroneutral polar particle is generally exactly the same. This is in contrast to the case in vacuum or pure polar liquids, where the potential from a single charge is longer ranged than that from a dipole, which is, itself, longer ranged than the one from a quadrupole etc. The orientational dependence of the exponentially screened electrostatic interaction between two molecules in electrolytes is therefore rather complex even at long distances. These facts are formalized in Yukawa multipole expansions of the electrostatic potential and the pair interaction free energy based on the Yukawa function family exp(-κr)/rm, where r is the distance, κ is a decay parameter and m is a positive integer. The expansion is formally exact for electrolytes with molecular solvent and in the primitive model, provided the non-Coulombic interactions between the particles are sufficiently short ranged. The results can also be applied in the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Differences and similarities to the ordinary multipole expansion of electrostatics are pointed out. On the other hand, when the non-Coulombic interactions between the constituent particles of the electrolyte solution contain a dispersion 1/r6 potential, the electrostatic potential from a molecule decays like a power law for long distances rather than as a Yukawa function. This is due to nontrivial coupling between the electrostatic and dispersion interactions. There remains an exponentially decaying component in the electrostatic potential, but it becomes

  11. Strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.

    2006-07-01

    We propose that the reason for the non-ideal behaviour seen in lattice simulation of quark gluon plasma (QGP) and ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision experiments is that the QGP near Tc and above is a strongly coupled plasma (SCP), i.e., a strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP). It is remarkable that the widely used equation of state of SCP in QED (quantum electrodynamics) very nicely fits lattice results on all QGP systems, with proper modifications to include colour degrees of freedom and the running coupling constant. Results on pressure in pure gauge, 2-flavours and 3-flavours QGP can all be explained by treating QGP as SCQGP, as demonstrated here. Energy density and speed of sound are also presented for all three systems. We further extend the model to systems with finite quark mass and reasonably good fits to lattice results are obtained for (2+1)-flavours and 4-flavours QGP. Hence it is a unified model, namely SCQGP, to explain the non-ideal QGP seen in lattice simulations with just two system dependent parameters.

  12. Cage correlation and diffusion in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Dzhumagulova, K N; Masheyeva, R U; Ott, T; Hartmann, P; Ramazanov, T S; Bonitz, M; Donkó, Z

    2016-06-01

    The influence of an external homogeneous magnetic field on the quasilocalization of the particles-characterized quantitatively by cage correlation functions-in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems is investigated via molecular dynamics computer simulations over a wide domain of the system parameters (coupling and screening strengths, and magnetic field). The caging time is found to be enhanced by the magnetic field B. The anisotropic migration of the particles in the presence of magnetic field is quantified via computing directional correlation functions, which indicate a more significant increase of localization in the direction perpendicular to B, while a moderate increase is also found along the B field lines. Associating the particles' escapes from the cages with jumps of a characteristic length, a connection is found with the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficients derived from the decay time of the directional correlation functions in both the directions perpendicular to and parallel with B are in very good agreement with respective diffusion coefficients values obtained from their usual computation based on the mean-squared displacement of the particles. PMID:27415379

  13. Cage correlation and diffusion in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Masheyeva, R. U.; Ott, T.; Hartmann, P.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bonitz, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of an external homogeneous magnetic field on the quasilocalization of the particles—characterized quantitatively by cage correlation functions—in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems is investigated via molecular dynamics computer simulations over a wide domain of the system parameters (coupling and screening strengths, and magnetic field). The caging time is found to be enhanced by the magnetic field B . The anisotropic migration of the particles in the presence of magnetic field is quantified via computing directional correlation functions, which indicate a more significant increase of localization in the direction perpendicular to B , while a moderate increase is also found along the B field lines. Associating the particles' escapes from the cages with jumps of a characteristic length, a connection is found with the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficients derived from the decay time of the directional correlation functions in both the directions perpendicular to and parallel with B are in very good agreement with respective diffusion coefficients values obtained from their usual computation based on the mean-squared displacement of the particles.

  14. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standardmore » deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.« less

  15. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standard deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  16. Quark and pion effective couplings from polarization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2016-05-01

    A flavor SU(2) effective model for pions and quarks is derived by considering polarization effects departing from the usual quark-quark effective interaction induced by dressed gluon exchange, i.e. a global color model for QCD. For that, the quark field is decomposed into a component that yields light mesons and the quark-antiquark condensate, being integrated out by means of the auxiliary field method, and another component which yields constituent quarks, which is basically a background quark field. Within a long-wavelength and weak quark field expansion (or large quark effective mass expansion) of a quark determinant, the leading terms are found up to the second order in a zero-order derivative expansion, by neglecting vector mesons that are considerably heavier than the pion. Pions are considered in the structureless limit and, besides the chiral invariant terms that reproduce previously derived expressions, symmetry breaking terms are also presented. The leading chiral quark-quark effective couplings are also found corresponding to a NJL and a vector-NJL couplings. All the resulting effective coupling constants and parameters are expressed in terms of the current and constituent quark masses and of the coupling g.

  17. Generalized Yukawa PPPM for molecular dynamics simulation of strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharuman, Gautham; Stanton, Liam; Glosli, James; Verboncoeur, John; Christlieb, Andrew; Murillo, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-Particle-Particle-Mesh (PPPM) method is an efficient way of treating the Ewald sum for long range interactions in a periodic system. It makes use of the Fast-Fourier-Transform algorithm that scales as O(N logN). In this work we have applied the PPPM method to long range interactions in the weak screening limit of generalized Yukawa interaction to identify the range of screening over which PPPM is computationally more efficient than the minimum image method which is usually usedfor the well-known Yukawa interactions. Generalized Yukawa interaction is obtained by including arbitrary linear dielectric screening in the Yukawa model. In the PPPM method the Fourier space part of the Ewald sum is treated by assigning charges to a mesh and computing the potential using an optimized Green's function that minimizes the discretization errors introduced in the forces.

  18. 3D dust clouds (Yukawa Balls) in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Melzer, A.; Passvogel, M.; Miksch, T.; Ikkurthi, V. R.; Schneider, R.; Block, D.; Piel, A.

    2010-06-16

    Three-dimensional finite systems of charged dust particles confined to concentric spherical shells in a dusty plasma, so-called 'Yukawa balls', have been studied with respect to their static and dynamic properties. Here, we review the charging of particles in a dusty plasma discharge by computer simulations and the respective particle arrangements. The normal mode spectrum of Yukawa balls is measured from the 3D thermal Brownian motion of the dust particles around their equilibrium positions.

  19. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  20. Shear viscosity of strongly coupled Yukawa systems on finite length scales.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; Murillo, M S

    2001-02-12

    The Yukawa shear viscosity has been calculated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. Near the viscosity minimum, we find exponential decay consistent with the Navier-Stokes equation, with significant deviations on finite length scales for larger viscosity values. The viscosity is determined to be nonlocal on a scale length consistent with the correlation length, revealing the length scales necessary for obtaining transport coefficients in the hydrodynamic limit by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods. Our results are quasiuniversal with respect to excess entropy for excess entropies well below unity. PMID:11178047

  1. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improvesmore » to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.« less

  2. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improves to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.

  3. Textures of Yukawa coupling matrices in the 2HDM type III

    SciTech Connect

    Carcamo, A. E.; Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis

    2008-07-02

    The quark mass matrices ansatze proposed by Fritzsch, Du-Xing and Fukuyama-Nishiura in the framework of the general two Higgs doublet model are studied. The corresponding Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements are computed in all cases and compared with their experimental values. The complex phases of the anstaze are taken into account and the CP violating phase {delta} is computed. Finally some phenomenology is discussed.

  4. Determination of the quark coupling strength |Vub| using baryonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Mohr, R. Casanova; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; de Bruyn, K.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Silva, W.; de Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; di Canto, A.; di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Pardiñas, J. García; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the strength of the couplings of the b quark to the u and c quarks, |Vub| and |Vcb|, are governed by the coupling of the quarks to the Higgs boson. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, the probability for the Λb0 baryon to decay into the p final state relative to the final state is measured. Combined with theoretical calculations of the strong interaction and a previously measured value of |Vcb|, the first |Vub| measurement to use a baryonic decay is performed. This measurement is consistent with previous determinations of |Vub| using B meson decays to specific final states and confirms the existing incompatibility with those using an inclusive sample of final states.

  5. Quark-meson coupling model with the cloudy bag

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, S.; Miyatsu, T.; Saito, Kenji; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Using the volume coupling version of the cloudy bag model, the quark-meson coupling model is extended to study the role of pion field and the properties of nuclear matter. The extended model includes the effect of gluon exchange as well as the pion-cloud effect, and provides a good description of the nuclear matter properties. The relationship between the extended model and the EFT approach to nuclear matter is also discussed.

  6. Charge and color breaking constraints in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model associated with the bottom Yukawa coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Testing the stability of the electroweak vacuum in any extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector is of great importance to verify the consistency of the theory. Multi-scalar extensions as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model generically lead to unstable configurations in certain regions of parameter space. An exact minimization of the scalar potential is rather an impossible analytic task. To give handy analytic constraints, a specific direction in field space has to be considered which is a simplification that tends to miss excluded regions, however good to quickly check parameter points. We describe a yet undescribed class of charge and color breaking minima as they appear in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, exemplarily for the case of non-vanishing bottom squark vacuum expectation values constraining the combination μYb in a non-trivial way. Contrary to famous A-parameter bounds, we relate the bottom Yukawa coupling with the supersymmetry breaking masses. Another bound can be found relating soft breaking masses and μ only. The exclusions follow from the tree-level minimization and can change dramatically using the one-loop potential. Estimates of the lifetime of unstable configurations show that they are either extremely short- or long-lived.

  7. Light colored scalar as messenger of up-quark flavor dynamics in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsner, Ilja; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Kosnik, Nejc

    2010-11-01

    The measured forward-backward asymmetry in the tt production at the Tevatron might be explained by the additional exchange of a colored weak singlet scalar. Such state appears in some of the grand unified theories, and its interactions with the up-quarks are purely antisymmetric in flavor space. We systematically investigate the resulting impact on charm and top quark physics. The constraints on the relevant Yukawa couplings come from the experimentally measured observables related to D{sup 0}-D{sup 0} oscillations, as well as dijet and single-top production measurements at the Tevatron. After fully constraining the relevant Yukawa couplings, we predict possible signatures of this model in rare top quark decays. In a class of grand unified models we demonstrate how the obtained information enables to constrain the Yukawa couplings of the up-quarks at very high energy scale.

  8. B *B π coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Samways, B.; van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the B*B π coupling in three-flavor lattice QCD. This coupling, defined from the strong-interaction matrix element ⟨B π |B*⟩, is related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory. We carry out our calculation directly at the b -quark mass using a nonperturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |p →a | and (m a )n for all n . Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a-1=1.729 (25 ) GeV , a-1=2.281 (28 ) GeV , and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the coupling gb=0.56 (3 )stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. This is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b -quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.

  9. B*Bπ coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Samways, B.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2016-01-27

    Here, we report on a calculation of the B*Bπ coupling in three-flavor lattice QCD. This coupling, defined from the strong-interaction matrix element , is related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a nonperturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |more » $$\\vec{p}$$a| and (ma)n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a-1=1.729(25) GeV, a-1=2.281(28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the coupling gb=0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. Moreover, this is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.« less

  10. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Devetak, Erik; Nomerotski, Andrei; Peskin, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    We present a study of the experimental determination of the forward-backward asymmetry in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} t{bar t} and in the subsequent t {yields} Wb decay, studied in the context of the International Linear Collider. This process probes the elementary couplings of the top quark to the photon, the Z and the W bosons at a level of precision that is difficult to achieve at hadron colliders. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry requires excellent b quark identification and determination of the quark charge. The study reported here is performed in the most challenging all-hadronic channel e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b}q{bar q}q{bar q}. It includes realistic details of the experimental environment, a full Monte Carlo simulation of the detector, based on the Silicon Detector concept, and realistic event reconstruction. The forward-backward asymmetries are determined to a precision of approximately 1% for each of two choices of beam polarization. We analyze the implications for the determination of the t{bar t}Z and Wt{bar b} couplings.

  11. B*Bπ coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Samways, B.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2016-01-27

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bπ coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element (Bπ|B*) is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMΧPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |p→a| and (ma)n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a–1 = 1.729(25) GeV, a–1 = 2.281 (28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down tomore » 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMΧPT coupling gb = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. Furthermore, this is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.« less

  12. The B*Bπ coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J. M.; Fritzsch, P.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Samways, B.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-06-23

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bπ coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element (Bπ|B*) is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMΧPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order |pa| and (ma)n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of a–1 = 1.729(25) GeV, a–1 = 2.281 (28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMΧPT coupling gb = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. Furthermore, this is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.

  13. Quantum simulations of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filinov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Bonitz, M.; Levashov, P. R.; Fortov, V. E.

    2011-09-15

    A strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP) of heavy constituent quasiparticles is studied by a path-integral Monte-Carlo method. This approach is a quantum generalization of the model developed by B.A. Gelman, E.V. Shuryak, and I. Zahed. It is shown that this method is able to reproduce the QCD lattice equation of state and also yields valuable insight into the internal structure of the QGP. The results indicate that the QGP reveals liquid-like rather than gas-like properties. At temperatures just above the critical one it was found that bound quark-antiquark states still survive. These states are bound by effective string-like forces and turn out to be colorless. At the temperature as large as twice the critical one no bound states are observed. Quantum effects turned out to be of prime importance in these simulations.

  14. Yukawa unification: The good, the bad, and the ugly

    SciTech Connect

    Rattazzi, R.; Sarid, U.; Hall, L.J.

    1993-05-01

    We analyze some consequences of grand unification of the third-generation Yukawa couplings, in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We address two issues: the prediction of the top quark mass, and the generation of the top-bottom mass hierarchy through a hierarchy of Higgs vacuum expectation values. The top mass is strongly dependent on a certain ratio of superpartner masses. And the VEV hierarchy always entails some tuning of the GUT-scale parameters. We study the RG equations and their semi-analytic solutions, which exhibit several interesting features, such as a focusing effect for a large Yukawa coupling in the limit of certain symmetries and a correlation between the A terms (which contribute to b {yields} s{gamma}) and the gaugino masses. This study shows that non-universal soft-SUSY-breaking masses are favored (in particular for splitting the Higgs-doublets via D-terms and for allowing more natural scenarios of symmetry breaking), and hints at features desired in Yukawa-unified models. Several phenomenological implications are also revealed.

  15. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  16. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-15

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  17. Hypernuclei in the quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima, P. A. M. Guichon

    2010-07-01

    We present results of hypernuclei calculated in the latest quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, where the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the one-gluon exchange hyperfine interaction, is also included self-consistently. The extra repulsion associated with this increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for {\\Sigma} hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier version of QMC they were bound by an amount similar to {\\Lambda} hypernuclei, they are unbound in the latest version of QMC, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states.

  18. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  19. Quark spectral density and a strongly-coupled quark-gluon plasma.

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Chang, L.; Liu, Y.; Roberts, C. D.

    2011-07-13

    The maximum entropy method is used to compute the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent numerical solution of a rainbow truncation of QCD's gap equation at temperatures above that for which chiral symmetry is restored. In addition to the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function also exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode for temperatures extending to 1.4-1.8 times the critical temperature, T{sub c}. In the neighborhood of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength and as long as this mode persists, the system may fairly be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  20. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Reinhard, P. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  1. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter. PMID:26991171

  2. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  3. Finite Hypernuclei in the Latest Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre A. M. Guichon; Anthony W. Thomas; Kazuo Tsushima

    2007-12-12

    The most recent development of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, in which the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the hyperfine interaction is also included self-consistently, is used to compute the properties of finite hypernuclei. The calculations for $\\Lambda$ and $\\Xi$ hypernuclei are of comparable quality to earlier QMC results without the additional parameter needed there. Even more significantly, the additional repulsion associated with the increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for $\\Sigma$ hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier work they were bound by an amount similar to $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, here they are unbound, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states. The equivalent non-relativistic potential felt by the $\\Sigma$ is repulsive inside the nuclear interior and weakly attractive in the nuclear surface, as suggested by the analysis of $\\Sigma$-atoms.

  4. Renormalization Group Analysis of Yukawa Parameters with One and Two Higgs Doublets, and Flavor Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, G.; Kim, C. S.

    We assume that the standard model (SM) breaks down around some energy Λ and is replaced there by a new (Higgsless) flavor gauge theory (FGT) with fewer input parameters in the interactions corresponding to the Yukawa sector of SM. This would imply more symmetry for the values of the Yukawa (running) parameters of SM at E Λ, possibly by a (approximate) flavor democracy (for the quark mass sector). We investigate this possibility by studying the renormalization group equations (RGE's) for the quark Yukawa couplings of SM with one and two Higgs doublets, by running them from the known physical values at low energies (E 1 GeV) to Λ (> 1 TeV) and comparing the resulting quark masses mq (E Λ) for various mt and υU/υD. Unlike previous investigations of these RGE's, we do not implement the requirement mt(Λpole) = ∞. We found that SM with two Higgs doublets (type 2) is most likely to experience a gradual transition to FGT. Our results also shed more light on the adequacy and deficiencies of the usual RGE approaches within TMSM and related models. We also found that, independent of the assumption of a transition mechanism to FGT, mt phy< ˜ 200 GeV for Λpole≪ ΛPlanck in most cases of SM with two Higgs doublets.

  5. Yukawa sector in minimal D-brane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennadifi, Salah Eddine

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the Yukawa couplings sector in the minimal gauge theory U(3) × U(2) × U(1) with the Standard Model chiral and Higgs spectrum based on three stacks of intersecting D-branes. In this model, stringy corrections are required to induce the missing Yukawa couplings and generate hierarchical pattern. Under the known data, we assign the realistic Yukawa texture and then bound their strengths.

  6. rule, and in and models with FCNC quark couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; De Fazio, Fulvia; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    The experimental value for the isospin amplitude in decays has been successfully explained within the standard model (SM), both within the large approach to QCD and by QCD lattice calculations. On the other hand within the large approach the value of is by at least below the data. While this deficit could be the result of theoretical uncertainties in this approach and could be removed by future precise QCD lattice calculations, it cannot be excluded that the missing piece in comes from new physics (NP). We demonstrate that this deficit can be significantly softened by tree-level FCNC transitions mediated by a heavy colourless gauge boson with a flavour-violating left-handed coupling and an approximately universal flavour diagonal right-handed coupling to the quarks. The approximate flavour universality of the latter coupling assures negligible NP contributions to . This property, together with the breakdown of the GIM mechanisms at tree level, allows one to enhance significantly the contribution of the leading QCD-penguin operator to . A large fraction of the missing piece in the rule can be explained in this manner for in the reach of the LHC, while satisfying the constraints from , , , LEP-II and the LHC. The presence of a small right-handed flavour-violating coupling and of enhanced matrix elements of left-right operators allows one to satisfy simultaneously the constraints from and , although this requires some fine-tuning. We identify the quartic correlation between contributions to , , and . The tests of this proposal will require much improved evaluations of and within the SM, of as well as precise tree-level determinations of and . We present correlations between , and with and without the rule constraint and generalise the whole analysis to with colour () and with FCNC couplings. In the latter case no improvement on can be achieved without destroying the agreement of the SM with the data on . Moreover, this scenario is very tightly constrained by . On the

  7. Quarkonium in a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vairo, Antonio

    2010-12-22

    We report about a recent calculation of the heavy quarkonium mass and decay width in a quark-gluon plasma, whose temperature T and screening mass m{sub D} satisfy the hierarchy m{alpha}{sub s}>>T>>m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}>>m{sub D}, m being the heavy-quark mass, up to order m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}. The calculation may be relevant to understand the behavior of the {Upsilon}(1S) in a quark-gluon plasma at present-day colliders.

  8. Towards a fully stringy computation of Yukawa couplings on non-factorized tori and non-abelian twist correlators (I): The classical solution and action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesando, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We consider the simplest possible setting of non-abelian twist fields which corresponds to SU (2) monodromies. We first review the theory of hypergeometric function and of the solutions of the most general Fuchsian second order equation with three singularities. Then we solve the problem of writing the general solution with prescribed U (2) monodromies. We use this result to compute the classical string solution corresponding to three D2 branes in R4. Despite the fact that the configuration is supersymmetric the classical string solution is not holomorphic. Using the equation of motion and not the KLT approach we give a very simple expression for the classical action of the string. We find that the classical action is not proportional to the area of the triangle determined by the branes intersection points since the solution is not holomorphic. Phenomenologically this means that the Yukawa couplings for these supersymmetric configurations on non-factorized tori are suppressed with respect to the factorized case.

  9. {lambda}{sub c} Enhancement from Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su Houng; Ohnishi, Kazuaki; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yoo, In-Kwon; Ko, Che Ming

    2008-06-06

    We propose the enhancement of {lambda}{sub c} as a novel quark-gluon plasma signal in heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Assuming a stable bound diquark state in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma near the critical temperature, we argue that the direct two-body collision between a c quark and a [ud] diquark would lead to an enhanced {lambda}{sub c} production in comparison with the normal three-body collision among independent c, u, and d quarks. In the coalescence model, we find that the {lambda}{sub c}/D yield ratio is enhanced substantially due to the diquark correlation.

  10. Isovector channel of quark-meson-coupling model and its effect on symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Qi, C.; Xu, F. R.

    2011-08-01

    The non-relativistic approximation of the quark-meson-coupling model has been discussed and compared with the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model which includes spin exchanges. Calculations show that the spin-exchange interaction has important effect on the descriptions of finite nuclei and nuclear matter through the Fock exchange. Also in the quark-meson-coupling model, it is the Fock exchange that leads to a nonlinear density-dependent isovector channel and changes the density-dependent behavior of the symmetry energy.

  11. Vectorlike W± -boson coupling at TeV and third family fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In the third fermion family and gauge symmetry of the Standard Model, we study the quark-quark, lepton-lepton and quark-lepton four-fermion operators in an effective theory at high energies. These operators have nontrivial contributions to the Schwinger-Dyson equations for fermion self-energy functions and the W±-boson coupling vertex. As a result, the top-quark mass is generated via the spontaneous symmetry breaking of ⟨t ¯t ⟩-condensate and the W±-boson coupling becomes approximately vectorlike at TeV scale. The bottom-quark, tau-lepton and tau-neutrino masses are generated via the explicit symmetry breaking of W±-contributions and quark-lepton interactions. Their masses and Yukawa couplings are functions of the top-quark mass and Yukawa coupling. We qualitatively show the hierarchy of fermion masses and Yukawa couplings of the third fermion family. We also discuss the possible collider signatures due to the vectorlike (parity-restoration) feature of W±-boson coupling at high energies.

  12. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  13. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho-Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-01

    We compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥ , in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B , respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs . We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αse B ≪T2≪e B , so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κ⊥LO∝αs2T e B in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1 +1 )-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets no contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κ∥LO come from the two separate effects: (1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and (2) a finite light-quark mass mq . The former leads to κ∥LO ,gluon∝αs2T3 and the latter to κ∥LO ,massive∝αs(αse B )1 /2mq2 . Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥≫κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.

  14. Yukawa unification predictions for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Raby, Stuart; Wingerter, Akın

    2013-03-01

    This paper is divided into two parts. In the first part we analyze the consequences, for the LHC, of gauge and third-family Yukawa coupling unification with a particular set of boundary conditions defined at the grand unification scale. We perform a global χ2 analysis including the observables MW, MZ, GF, αem-1, αs(MZ), Mt, mb(mb), Mτ, BR(B→Xsγ), BR(Bs→μ+μ-), and Mh. The fit is performed in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model in terms of nine grand unification-scale parameters, while tan⁡β and μ are fixed at the weak scale. Good fits suggest an upper bound on the gluino mass, Mg˜≲2TeV. This constraint comes predominantly from fitting the bottom-quark and Higgs masses (assuming a 125 GeV Higgs). Gluinos should be visible at the LHC in the 14 TeV run but they cannot be described by the typical simplified models. This is because the branching ratios for g˜→tt¯χ˜1,20, bb¯χ˜1,20, tb¯χ˜1,2-, bt¯χ˜1,2+, gχ˜1,2,3,40 are comparable. Top squarks and sbottoms may also be visible. Charginos and neutralinos can be light, with the lightest supersymmetric particle predominantly bino-like. In the second part of the paper we analyze a complete three-family model and discuss the quality of the global χ2 fits and the differences between the third-family analysis and the full three-family analysis for overlapping observables. We note that the light Higgs in our model couples to matter like the Standard Model Higgs. Any deviation from this would rule out this model.

  15. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  16. Ion sphere model for Yukawa systems (dusty plasmas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Khrapak, A. G.; Ivlev, A. V.; Thomas, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Application of the ion sphere model (ISM), well known in the context of the one-component-plasma, to estimate thermodynamic properties of model Yukawa systems is discussed. It is shown that the ISM approximation provides fairly good estimate of the internal energy of the strongly coupled Yukawa systems, in both fluid and solid phases. Simple expressions for the excess pressure and isothermal compressibility are derived, which can be particularly useful in connection to wave phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas. It is also shown that in the regime of strong screening a simple consideration of neighboring particles interactions can be sufficient to obtain quite accurate estimates of thermodynamic properties of Yukawa systems.

  17. Massive quark scattering at strong coupling from AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Edwin; Vaman, Diana

    2010-06-15

    We extend the analysis of Alday and Maldacena for obtaining gluon scattering amplitudes at strong coupling to include external massive quark states. Our quarks are actually the N=2 hypermultiplets which arise when D7-brane probes are included in the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} geometry. We work in the quenched approximation, treating the N=2 matter multiplets as external sources coupled to the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills fields. We first derive appropriate massive-particle boundary conditions for the string scattering world sheets. We then find an exact world sheet which corresponds to the scattering of two massive quarks and two massless gluons and extract from this the associated scattering amplitude. We also find the world sheet and amplitude for the scattering of four massive quarks. Our world sheet solutions reduce to the four massless gluon solution of Alday and Maldacena in the limit of zero quark mass. The amplitudes we compute can also be interpreted in terms of 2-2 scattering involving gluons and massive W bosons.

  18. Radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant in the chiral soliton quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Duck, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Second-order radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant from gluon, pion, and sigma meson exchange are calculated in the chiral soliton quark model. Many apparent processes are found not to contribute. The soliton is elastically decoupled from meson radiative corrections which are dominated by a gluon exchange contribution equivalent to a gluonic hybrid component of the nucleon. A 30% radiative reduction of the axial coupling strength is indicated.

  19. Quark CP-phase and Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Chuichiro; Matsuda, Masahisa; Matsunaga, Mamoru; Matsuoka, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, we study quark flavor mixings in the SU (6) × SU (2)R model. The characteristic structure of the CKM matrix is attributed to the hierarchical effective Yukawa couplings due to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism and also to the state-mixings beyond the MSSM. We elucidate the detailed form of the CKM matrix elements and find interesting relations between the CP violating phase and three mixing angles. Taking the existing data of three mixing angles, we estimate the quark CP-phase at δ = (75 ± 3) °. This result is in accord with observations.

  20. Biography of Hideki Yukawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2008-06-01

    Life history of Hideki Yukawa is described, together with that of Sin-itiro Tomonaga. They grew upiin Kyoto city and were classmate. Their independency and collaboration had contributed to the growth of physics research in Japan after the end of WWII.

  1. Energy Loss of Heavy Quarks in a QGP with a Running Coupling Constant Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J.

    2009-11-01

    We show that the effective running coupling constant, α, and the effective regulator, κm˜D2, which we used recently to calculate the energy loss, dEdx, and the elliptic flow, v, of heavy quarks in an expanding quark gluon plasma plasma (QGP) [P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C78, 014904 (2008), [arXiv:0802.2525], P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, J. Phys. G36 (2009) 064028, [arXiv:0901.2462], P. B. Gossiaux, R. Bierkandt and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C79 (2009) 044906 [arXiv:0901.0946

  2. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  3. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. I. Model and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2006-10-15

    We propose a model for the description of strongly interacting quarks and gluon quasiparticles at T=(1-3)T{sub c} as a classical and nonrelativistic colored Coulomb gas. The sign and strength of the interparticle interactions are fixed by the scalar product of their classical color vectors subject to Wong's equations. The model displays a number of phases as the Coulomb coupling is increased ranging from a gas, to a liquid, to a crystal with antiferromagnetic-like color ordering. We analyze the model using molecular dynamics simulations and discuss the density-density correlator in real time. We extract pertinent decorrelation times, diffusion, and viscosity constants for all phases. The classical results when extrapolated to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma suggest that the phase is liquid-like, with a diffusion constant D{approx_equal}0.1/T and a shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s{approx_equal}1/3.

  4. Complex spectrum of finite-density lattice QCD with static quarks at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the spectrum of transfer matrix eigenvalues associated with Polyakov loops in finite-density lattice QCD with static quarks. These eigenvalues determine the spatial behavior of Polyakov loop correlation functions. Our results are valid for all values of the gauge coupling in 1 +1 dimensions and in the strong-coupling region for any number of dimensions. When the quark chemical potential μ is nonzero, the spatial transfer matrix Ts is non-Hermitian. The appearance of complex eigenvalues in Ts is a manifestation of the sign problem in finite-density QCD. The invariance of finite-density QCD under the combined action of charge conjugation C and complex conjugation K implies that the eigenvalues of Ts are either real or part of a complex pair. Calculation of the spectrum confirms the existence of complex pairs in much of the temperature-chemical potential plane. Many features of the spectrum for static quarks are determined by a particle-hole symmetry. For μ that is small compared to the quark mass M , we typically find real eigenvalues for the lowest-lying states. At somewhat larger values of μ , pairs of eigenvalues may form complex-conjugate pairs, leading to damped oscillatory behavior in Polyakov loop correlation functions. However, near μ =M , the low-lying spectrum becomes real again. This is a direct consequence of the approximate particle-hole symmetry at μ =M for heavy quarks. This behavior of the eigenvalues should be observable in lattice simulations and can be used as a test of lattice algorithms. Our results provide independent confirmation of results we have previously obtained in Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models using complex saddle points.

  5. Density functional theory for Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatlo, Marius M.; Banerjee, Priyanka; Forsman, Jan; Lue, Leo

    2012-08-01

    We develop an approximate field theory for particles interacting with a generalized Yukawa potential. This theory improves and extends a previous splitting field theory, originally developed for counterions around a fixed charge distribution. The resulting theory bridges between the second virial approximation, which is accurate at low particle densities, and the mean-field approximation, accurate at high densities. We apply this theory to charged, screened ions in bulk solution, modeled to interact with a Yukawa potential; the theory is able to accurately reproduce the thermodynamic properties of the system over a broad range of conditions. The theory is also applied to "dressed counterions," interacting with a screened electrostatic potential, contained between charged plates. It is found to work well from the weak coupling to the strong coupling limits. The theory is able to reproduce the counterion profiles and force curves for closed and open systems obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson in + Z production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We study top quark pair production in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and investigate the prospects of measuring the couplings of top quarks to the Z boson. To date these couplings have not been constrained in direct measurements. Such a determination will be possible for the first time at the LHC. Our calculation improves previous coupling studies through the inclusion of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in production and decays of all unstable particles. We treat top quarks in the narrow-width approximation and retain all NLO spin correlations. To determine the sensitivity of a coupling measurement we perform a binned log-likelihood ratio test based on normalization and shape information of the angle between the leptons from the Z boson decay. The obtained limits account for statistical uncertainties as well as leading theoretical systematics from residual scale dependence and parton distribution functions. We use current CMS data to place the first direct constraints on the couplings. We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 fb-1 of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial coupling can be constrained at the 95% confidence level to and , where the central values are the Standard Model predictions. This is a reduction of uncertainties by 25% and 42%, respectively, compared to an analysis based on leading-order predictions. We also translate these results into limits on dimension-six operators contributing to the interactions beyond the Standard Model.

  7. Search for heavy vector-like quarks coupling to light quarks in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Böser, S.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Fopma, J.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. 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W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, H. S.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    This Letter presents a search for singly produced vector-like quarks, Q, coupling to light quarks, q. The search is sensitive to both charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) processes, pp → Qq → Wqq‧ and pp → Qq → Zqq‧ with a leptonic decay of the vector gauge boson. In 1.04 fb-1 of data taken in 2011 by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy √{ s} = 7 TeV, no evidence of such heavy vector-like quarks is observed above the expected Standard Model background. Limits on the heavy vector-like quark production cross section times branching ratio as a function of mass mQ are obtained. For a coupling κqQ = v /mQ, where v is the Higgs vacuum expectation value, 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of a vector-like quark are set at 900 GeV and 760 GeV from CC and NC processes, respectively.

  8. Probing top quark neutral couplings in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory at NLO in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylund, Olga Bessidskaia; Maltoni, Fabio; Tsinikos, Ioannis; Vryonidou, Eleni; Zhang, Cen

    2016-05-01

    Top quark pair production in association with a Z-boson or a photon at the LHC directly probes neutral top-quark couplings. We present predictions for these two processes in the Standard Model (SM) Effective Field Theory (EFT) at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. We include the full set of CP-even dimension-six operators that enter the top-quark interactions with the SM gauge bosons. For comparison, we also present predictions in the SMEFT for top loop-induced HZ production at the LHC and for toverline{t} production at the ILC at NLO in QCD. Results for total cross sections and differential distributions are obtained and uncertainties coming from missing higher orders in the strong coupling and in the EFT expansions are discussed. NLO results matched to the parton shower are available, allowing for event generation to be directly employed in an experimental analyses. Our framework provides a solid basis for the interpretation of current and future measurements in the SMEFT, with improved accuracy and precision.

  9. Properties of quark matter in a new quasiparticle model with QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, ZhenYan; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng; Zhang, ShiPeng

    2016-06-01

    The running of the QCD coupling in the effective mass causes thermodynamic inconsistency problem in the conventional quasiparticle model. We provide a novel treatment which removes the inconsistency by an effective bag constant. The chemical potential dependence of the renormalization subtraction point is constrained by the Cauchy condition in the chemical potential space. The stability and microscopic properties of strange quark matter are then studied within the completely self-consistent quasiparticle model, and the obtained equation of state of quark matter is applied to the investigation of strange stars. It is found that our improved model can describe well compact stars with mass about two times the solar mass, which indicates that such massive compact stars could be strange stars.

  10. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  11. Energy loss, equilibration, and thermodynamics of a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Ficnar, Andrej; Finazzo, Stefano I.; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Lattice data for the QCD equation of state and the baryon susceptibility near the crossover phase transition (at zero baryon density) are used to determine the input parameters of a 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model that provides a consistent holographic framework to study both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium properties of a hot and baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We compare our holographic equation of state computed at nonzero baryon chemical potential, μ B , with recent lattice calculations and find quantitative agreement for the pressure and the speed of sound for μ B ≤ 400 MeV. This holographic model is used to obtain holographic predictions for the temperature and μ B dependence of the drag force and the Langevin diffusion coefficients associated with heavy quark jet propagation as well as the jet quenching parameter q and the shooting string energy loss of light quarks in the baryon dense plasma. We find that the energy loss of heavy and light quarks generally displays a nontrivial, fast-varying behavior as a function of the temperature near the crossover. Moreover, energy loss is also found to generally increase due to nonzero baryon density effects even though this strongly coupled liquid cannot be described in terms of well defined quasiparticle excitations. Furthermore, to get a glimpse of how thermalization occurs in a hot and baryon dense QGP, we study how the lowest quasinormal mode of an external massless scalar disturbance in the bulk is affected by a nonzero baryon charge. We find that the equilibration time associated with the lowest quasinormal mode decreases in a dense medium.

  12. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  13. Yukawa unification predictions with effective "mirage" mediation.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Raby, Stuart

    2013-11-22

    In this Letter we analyze the consequences, for the LHC, of gauge and third family Yukawa coupling unification with a particular set of boundary conditions defined at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, which we characterize as effective "mirage" mediation. We perform a global χ2 analysis including the observables M(W), M(Z), G(F), α(em)(-1), α(s)(M(Z)), M(t), m(b)(m(b)), M(τ), BR(B→X(s)γ), BR(B(s)→μ(+)μ(-)), and M(h). The fit is performed in the minimal supersymmetric standard model in terms of 10 GUT scale parameters, while tanβ and μ are fixed at the weak scale. We find good fits to the low energy data and a supersymmetry spectrum which is dramatically different than previously studied in the context of Yukawa unification. PMID:24313477

  14. Yukawa Unification Predictions with Effective ``Mirage'' Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Raby, Stuart

    2013-11-01

    In this Letter we analyze the consequences, for the LHC, of gauge and third family Yukawa coupling unification with a particular set of boundary conditions defined at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale, which we characterize as effective “mirage” mediation. We perform a global χ2 analysis including the observables MW, MZ, GF, αem-1, αs(MZ), Mt, mb(mb), Mτ, BR(B→Xsγ), BR(Bs→μ+μ-), and Mh. The fit is performed in the minimal supersymmetric standard model in terms of 10 GUT scale parameters, while tan⁡β and μ are fixed at the weak scale. We find good fits to the low energy data and a supersymmetry spectrum which is dramatically different than previously studied in the context of Yukawa unification.

  15. Cold Uniform Matter and Neutron Stars in the Quark-Meson-Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Stone; P.A.M. Guichon; H.H. Matevosyan; A.W. Thomas

    2007-08-01

    A new density dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction has been recently derived from the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model, offering impressive results in application to finite nuclei and dense baryon matter. This self-consistent, relativistic quark-level approach is used to construct the Equation of State (EoS) and to calculate key properties of high density matter and cold, slowly rotating neutron stars. The results include predictions for the maximum mass of neutron star models, together with the corresponding radius and central density, as well the properties of neutron stars with mass of order 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}. The cooling mechanism allowed by the QMC EoS is explored and the parameters relevant to slow rotation, namely the moment of inertia and the period of rotation investigated. The results of the calculation, which are found to be in good agreement with available observational data, are compared with the predictions of more traditional EoS, based on the A18+{delta}v+UIX* and modified Reid soft core potentials, the Skyrme SkM* interaction and two relativistic mean field (RMF) models for a hybrid stars including quark matter. The QMC EoS provides cold neutron star models with maximum mass 1.9-2.1 M{sub {circle_dot}}, with central density less than 6 times nuclear saturation density (n{sub 0} = 0.16 fm{sup -3}) and offers a consistent description of the stellar mass up to this density limit. In contrast with other models, QMC predicts no hyperon contribution at densities lower than 3n{sub 0}, for matter in {beta}-equilibrium. At higher densities, {Xi}{sup -,0} and {Lambda} hyperons are present. The absence of lighter {Sigma}{sup {+-},0} hyperons is understood as a consequence of antisymmetrization, together with the implementation of the color hyperfine interaction in the response of the quark bag to the nuclear scalar field.

  16. Yukawa alignment in the two-Higgs-doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, Antonio; Tuzon, Paula

    2009-11-01

    In multi-Higgs-doublet models the alignment in flavor space of the relevant Yukawa matrices guarantees the absence of tree-level flavor-changing couplings of the neutral scalar fields. We analyze the consequences of this condition within the two-Higgs-doublet model and show that it leads to a generic Yukawa structure which contains as particular cases all known specific implementations of the model based on Z{sub 2} symmetries. All possible freedom in the Yukawa sector gets parametrized in terms of three complex couplings {sigma}{sub f}. In spite of having flavor conservation in the neutral scalar couplings, the phases of these three parameters represent potential new sources of CP violation.

  17. Five easy pieces: The dynamics of quarks in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Mohammed; Dasgupta, Keshav; Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong

    2010-11-01

    We revisit the analysis of the drag a massive quark experiences and the wake it creates at a temperature T while moving through a plasma using a gravity dual that captures the renormalisation group runnings in the dual gauge theory. Our gravity dual has a black hole and seven branes embedded via Ouyang embedding, but the geometry is a deformation of the usual conifold metric. In particular the gravity dual has squashed two spheres, and a small resolution at the IR. Using this background we show that the drag of a massive quark receives corrections that are proportional to powers of log T when compared with the drag computed using AdS/QCD correspondence. The massive quarks map to fundamental strings in the dual gravity theory, and we use this to analyse their behavior at strong 't Hooft coupling. We also study the shear viscosity in the theory with running couplings, analyse the viscosity to entropy ratio and compare the result with the bound derived from AdS backgrounds. In the presence of higher order curvature square corrections from the back-reactions of the embedded D7 branes, we argue the possibility of the entropy to viscosity bound being violated. Finally, we show that our set-up could in-principle allow us to study a family of gauge theories at the boundary by cutting off the dual geometry respectively at various points in the radial direction. All these gauge theories can have well-defined UV completions, and more interestingly, we demonstrate that any thermodynamical quantities derived from these theories would be completely independent of the cut-off scale and only depend on the temperature at which we define these theories. Such a result would justify the holographic renormalisabilities of these theories which we, in turn, also demonstrate. We give physical interpretations of these results and compare them with more realistic scenarios.

  18. Equilibration Rates in a Strongly Coupled Nonconformal Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Buchel, Alex; Heller, Michal P; Myers, Robert C

    2015-06-26

    We initiate the study of equilibration rates of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas in the absence of conformal symmetry. We primarily consider a supersymmetric mass deformation within N=2^{*} gauge theory and use holography to compute quasinormal modes of a variety of scalar operators, as well as the energy-momentum tensor. In each case, the lowest quasinormal frequency, which provides an approximate upper bound on the thermalization time, is proportional to temperature, up to a prefactor with only a mild temperature dependence. We find similar behavior in other holographic plasmas, where the model contains an additional scale beyond the temperature. Hence, our study suggests that the thermalization time is generically set by the temperature, irrespective of any other scales, in strongly coupled gauge theories. PMID:26197117

  19. Search for production of single top quarks via tcg and tug flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-01

    We search for the production of single top quarks via flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings of a gluon to the top quark and a charm (c) or up (u) quark. We analyze 230 pb{-1} of lepton+jets data from pp[over] collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe no significant deviation from standard model predictions, and hence set upper limits on the anomalous coupling parameters kappa{g}{c}/Lambda and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda, where kappa{g} define the strength of tcg and tug couplings, and Lambda defines the scale of new physics. The limits at 95% C.L. are kappa{g}{c}/Lambda<0.15 TeV-1 and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda<0.037 TeV-1. PMID:18233063

  20. Phase diagram of chiral quark matter: From weakly to strongly coupled Fulde-Ferrell phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakian, Armen; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the phase diagram of two-flavor quark matter within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model in the temperature-flavor asymmetry plane in the case where there are three competing phases: the homogeneous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) phase, the unpaired phase, and a phase with broken spatial symmetry, which is here taken to be the counterpart of the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase in condensed matter physics. The system belongs to the universality class of paramagnetic-ferromagnetic-helical systems, and therefore contains a tricritical Lifshitz point in its phase diagram, where the momentum scale characterizing the breaking of translational invariance has a critical exponent of 1/2 to leading order. Upon varying the coupling constant of the theory we find that in weak coupling, the FFLO phase is favored at arbitrary flavor asymmetries for sufficiently low temperatures; at intermediate coupling its occupancy domain is shifted towards larger asymmetries. Strong coupling features a new regime of an inhomogeneous FF state, which we identify with a current-carrying Bose-Einstein condensate of tightly bound up and down quarks. The temperature and asymmetry dependence of the gap function is studied. It is shown that the anomalous temperature dependence of the gap in the homogeneous, flavor-asymmetric phase is transformed into a normal dependence (self-similar to the BCS phase) at arbitrary coupling, once the FF phase is allowed for. We analyze the occupation numbers and the Cooper-pair wave function and show that when the condensate momentum is orthogonal to the particle momentum the minority component contains a blocking region (breach) around the Fermi sphere in the weak-coupling limit, which engulfs more low-momentum modes as the coupling is increased, and eventually leads to a topological change in strong coupling, where the minority Fermi sphere contains either two occupied strips or an empty sphere. For nonorthogonal momenta, the blocking

  1. SUSY Threshold Effects on Quark and Lepton Masses at the GUT Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the impact of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the GUT scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the MSSM. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons which can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters and discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings. This is a brief summary of the work of Ref. [1].

  2. Quark and lepton masses at the GUT scale including supersymmetric threshold corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the effect of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons and show that they can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters. We discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings.

  3. Effects of the symmetry energy on the kaon condensates in the quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Prafulla K.; Menezes, Débora P.; Providência, Constança

    2014-04-01

    In this work we investigate protoneutron star properties within a modified version of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model that incorporates an ω-ρ interaction plus kaon condensed matter at finite temperature. Fixed entropy and trapped neutrinos are taken into account. Our results are compared with the ones obtained with the GM1 parametrization of the nonlinear Walecka model for similar values of the symmetry energy slope. Contrary to GM1, within the QMC model the formation of low mass black holes during cooling are not probable. It is shown that the evolution of the protoneutron star may include the melting of the kaon condensate driven by the neutrino diffusion, followed by the formation of a second condensate after cooling. The signature of this complex process could be a neutrino signal followed by a gamma ray burst. We have seen that both models can, in general, describe very massive stars.

  4. Binding of hypernuclei, and phtoproduction of $\\Lambda$-hypernuclei in the latest quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima, P. A. M. Guichon, R. Shyam, A. W. Thomas

    2010-12-01

    We study the binding of hypernuclei based on the latest version of quark-meson coupling model, and estimate the phtoproduction cross sections for the {sup 12}C({gamma},K{sup +}){sub {Lambda}}{sup 12}B reaction using the bound {Lambda} spinors obtained in the model.

  5. On the shear viscosity of 3D Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.; Hartmann, P.

    2008-09-07

    We report calculations of the shear viscosity of three-dimensional strongly-coupled Yukawa liquids, based on two different non-equilibrium molecular dynamics methods. The present simulations intend to improve the accuracy of shear viscosity data, compared to those obtained in earlier studies.

  6. Testing realistic quark mass matrices in the custodial Randall-Sundrum model with flavor changing top decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2008-11-01

    We study quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with bulk symmetry SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)B-L. The Yukawa couplings are assumed to be within an order of magnitude of each other, and perturbative. We find that quark mass matrices of the symmetrical form proposed by Koide et al. [Y. Koide, H. Nishiura, K. Matsuda, T. Kikuchi, and T. Fukuyama, Phys. Rev. D 66, 093006 (2002)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.66.093006] can be accommodated in the RS framework with the assumption of hierarchyless Yukawa couplings, but not the Hermitian Fritzsch-type mass matrices. General asymmetrical mass matrices are also found which fit well simultaneously with the quark masses and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Both left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) quark rotation matrices are obtained that allow analysis of flavor changing decay of both LH and RH top quarks. At a warped down scale of 1.65 TeV, the total branching ratio of t→Z+jets can be as high as ˜5×10-6 for symmetrical mass matrices and ˜2×10-5 for asymmetrical ones. This level of signal is within reach of the LHC.

  7. Search for W' boson resonances decaying to a top and a bottom quark and probing anomalous Wtb couplings with 1 fb{sup -1} of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Badaud, Frederique

    2008-11-23

    With the first evidence for single top quark production in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp-bar collider, the single top quark cross section is measured, limits on the masses of heavy W' boson resonances are set and anomalous Wtb couplings are studied.

  8. Jet-medium interactions at NLO in a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo; Moore, Guy D.; Teaney, Derek

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension to next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant g of the AMY effective kinetic approach to the energy loss of high momentum particles in the quark-gluon plasma. At leading order, the transport of jet-like particles is determined by elastic scattering with the thermal constituents, and by inelastic collinear splittings induced by the medium. We reorganize this description into collinear splittings, high-momentum-transfer scatterings, drag and diffusion, and particle conversions (momentum-preserving identity-changing processes). We show that this reorganized description remains valid to NLO in g, and compute the appropriate modifications of the drag, diffusion, particle conversion, and inelastic splitting coefficients. In addition, a new kinematic regime opens at NLO for wider-angle collinear bremsstrahlung. These semi-collinear emissions smoothly interpolate between the leading order high-momentum-transfer scatterings and collinear splittings. To organize the calculation, we introduce a set of Wilson line operators on the light-cone which determine the diffusion and identity changing coefficients, and we show how to evaluate these operators at NLO.

  9. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-01

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2 +1 ) -flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130 MeV ≤T ≤300 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0 ≤μB≤400 MeV . Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  10. Coupling Hydrodynamics to Nonequilibrium Degrees of Freedom in Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Michal P.; Janik, Romuald A.; Spaliński, Michał; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of quark-gluon plasma play a pivotal role in our understanding of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. They are based on a phenomenological description due to Müller, Israel, Stewart (MIS) and others, which incorporates viscous effects and ensures a well-posed initial value problem. Focusing on the case of conformal plasma we propose a generalization which includes, in addition, the dynamics of the least damped far-from-equilibrium degree of freedom found in strongly coupled plasmas through the AdS/CFT correspondence. We formulate new evolution equations for general flows and then test them in the case of N =4 super Yang-Mills plasma by comparing their solutions alongside solutions of MIS theory with numerical computations of isotropization and boost-invariant flow based on holography. In these tests the new equations reproduce the results of MIS theory when initialized close to the hydrodynamic stage of evolution, but give a more accurate description of the dynamics when initial conditions are set in the preequilibrium regime.

  11. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan. PMID:26613433

  12. Coupling hydrodynamics to nonequilibrium degrees of freedom in strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Heller, Michal P; Janik, Romuald A; Spaliński, Michał; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2014-12-31

    Relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of quark-gluon plasma play a pivotal role in our understanding of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. They are based on a phenomenological description due to Müller, Israel, Stewart (MIS) and others, which incorporates viscous effects and ensures a well-posed initial value problem. Focusing on the case of conformal plasma we propose a generalization which includes, in addition, the dynamics of the least damped far-from-equilibrium degree of freedom found in strongly coupled plasmas through the AdS/CFT correspondence. We formulate new evolution equations for general flows and then test them in the case of N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma by comparing their solutions alongside solutions of MIS theory with numerical computations of isotropization and boost-invariant flow based on holography. In these tests the new equations reproduce the results of MIS theory when initialized close to the hydrodynamic stage of evolution, but give a more accurate description of the dynamics when initial conditions are set in the preequilibrium regime. PMID:25615302

  13. Axial coupling constant of the nucleon for two flavors of dynamical quarks in finite and infinite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A. Ali; Goeckeler, M.; Schaefer, A.; Haegler, Ph.; Hemmert, T. R.; Wollenweber, T.; Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. M.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.

    2006-11-01

    We present data for the axial coupling constant g{sub A} of the nucleon obtained in lattice QCD with two degenerate flavors of dynamical nonperturbatively improved Wilson quarks. The renormalization is also performed nonperturbatively. For the analysis we give a chiral extrapolation formula for g{sub A} based on the small scale expansion scheme of chiral effective field theory for two degenerate quark flavors. Applying this formalism in a finite volume, we derive a formula that allows us to extrapolate our data simultaneously to the infinite volume and to the chiral limit. Using the additional lattice data in finite volume, we are able to determine the axial coupling of the nucleon in the chiral limit without imposing the known value at the physical point.

  14. Madelung energy of Yukawa lattices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P C N; Apolinario, S W S

    2012-10-01

    We propose a method to obtain an approximate closed form expression for the Madelung energy (ME) of Yukawa lattices. Such a method is applied for lattices of different topologies and dimensions. The obtained Madelung energies have a satisfactory accuracy for all ranges of the screening parameter κ of the Yukawa potential, and it becomes exact in the asymptotic limits κ→0 and κ→+∞. For instance, for the triangular lattice, the maximum relative error of the ME given by the method is about 0.0047. Also, satisfactory results are obtained for the one-component plasma limit. The Madelung constants of the two-dimensional hexagonal BN and square NaCl and the three-dimensional cubic NaCl crystals are estimated with a relative error of 0.004, 0.006, and 0.03, respectively. Finally, different ways to improve the method are presented and discussed. PMID:23214705

  15. Higgs production in heavy-quark annihilation through next-to-next-to-leading order QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Robert V.

    2016-05-01

    The total inclusive cross section for charged and neutral Higgs production in heavy-quark annihilation is presented through NNLO QCD. It is shown that, aside from an overall factor, the partonic cross section is independent of the initial-state quark flavors, and that any interference terms involving two different Yukawa couplings vanish. A simple criterion for defining the central renormalization and factorization scale is proposed. Its application to the bbar{b}φ process yields results which are compatible with the values usually adopted for this process. Remarkably, we find little variation in these values for the other initial-state quark flavors. Finally, we disentangle the impact of the different parton luminosities from genuine hard NNLO effects and find that, for the central scales, a naive rescaling by the parton luminosities approximates the full result remarkably well.

  16. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  17. Triple point of Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Farouki, R. T.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    1997-10-01

    The molecular dynamics simulations of Yukawa (i.e., screened-Coulomb) systems that were applied to the regime of weak screening in an earlier study [S. Hamaguchi, R. T. Farouki, and D. H. E. Dubin, J. Chem. Phys. 105, 7641 (1996)] are extended to the strong screening regime. Transition temperatures at the fluid-solid phase boundary and the solid-solid phase boundary are obtained as functions of the screening parameter κ=a/λD (i.e., the ratio of the Wigner-Seitz radius a to the Debye length λD). The resulting phase diagram also covers the triple point-the intersection of the fluid-solid and solid-solid phase boundaries-at κ=4.28 and Γ=5.6×103, where Γ is the ratio of the Coulomb potential energy to the kinetic energy per particle (i.e., Γ=Q2/4πɛ0akT, where Q is the charge of each Yukawa particle and T is the system temperature). Yukawa systems serve as models for plasmas and colloidal suspensions of charged particulates.

  18. Practical expressions for the internal energy and pressure of Yukawa fluids.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, Sergey A; Thomas, Hubertus M

    2015-02-01

    Simple practical expressions that allow estimation of thermodynamic properties of Yukawa fluids in a wide range of coupling, up to the fluid-solid phase transition, are presented. These expressions demonstrate excellent agreement with the available results from numerical simulations. The approach provides simple and accurate tools to estimate thermodynamic properties of Yukawa fluids and related systems in a broad range of parameters. PMID:25768619

  19. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in Yukawa and Wess-Zumino models

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Diaz Cruz, J. L.

    1999-10-25

    We study dynamical mass generation for fermions in the Yukawa and the supersymmetric Wess-Zumino (WZ) models. It is found that above a critical coupling fermion mass can be generated dynamically in the Yukawa model, whereas in the WZ model the fermion does not acquire mass. We also show that the supersymmetry (SUSY) preserving solution is permitted and hence the scalars may not acquire mass either.

  20. Three-dimensional stereoscopy of Yukawa (Coulomb) balls in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, Sebastian; Melzer, Andre

    2006-09-15

    A stereoscopic approach with standard video cameras for positioning and tracking of micrometer sized polymer particles in a radio-frequency gas discharge is presented. The stereoscopy is applied to simultaneously determine the positions of all particles in a three-dimensional strongly coupled spherical dusty plasma (Yukawa ball). The accuracy of the stereoscopic method is discussed. The shell structure and the occupation number of various Yukawa balls are determined and compared to recent simulations and models.

  1. Does dark matter consist of baryons of new stable family quarks?

    SciTech Connect

    Bregar, G.; Mankoc Borstnik, N. S.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter consists of clusters of the heavy family quarks and leptons with zero Yukawa couplings to the lower families. Such a family is predicted by the approach unifying spin and charges as the fifth family. We make a rough estimation of properties of baryons of these new family members, of their behavior during the evolution of the Universe and when scattering on the ordinary matter, and study possible limitations on the family properties due to the cosmological and direct experimental evidences.

  2. Search for mirror quarks at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakdar, Shreyashi; Ghosh, K.; Hoang, V.; Hung, P. Q.; Nandi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Observation of nonzero neutrino masses at a scale ˜1 0-1- 1 0-2 eV is a major problem in the otherwise highly successful Standard Model. The most elegant mechanism to explain such tiny neutrino masses is the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos. However, the required seesaw scale is so high, ˜1014 GeV , it will not have any collider implications. Recently, an explicit model has been constructed to realize the seesaw mechanism with the right-handed neutrinos at the electroweak scale. The model has a mirror symmetry, having both the left and right lepton and quark doublets and singlets for the same S U (2 )W gauge symmetry. Additional Higgs multiplets have been introduced to realize this scenario. It turns out that these extra Higgs fields also help to satisfy the precision electroweak tests, and other observables. Because the scale of the symmetry breaking is electroweak, both the mirror quark and the mirror leptons have masses in the electroweak scale in the range ˜150 - 800 GeV . The mirror quarks/leptons decay to ordinary quarks/leptons plus very light neutral scalars. In this work, we calculate the final-state signals arising from the pair productions of these mirror quarks and their subsequent decays. We find that these signals are well observable over the Standard Model background for the 13 TeV LHC. Depending on the associated Yukawa couplings, these decays can also give rise to displaced vertices with long decay lengths, very different from the usual displaced vertices associated with b decays.

  3. Study of the top-quark pair production in association with a bottom-quark pair from fast simulations at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young Kwon; Choi, Su Yong; Roh, Youn Jung; Kim, Tae Jeong

    2015-09-01

    A large number of top quarks will be produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the Run II period. This will allow us to measure the rare processes from the top sector in great details. We present a study of top-quark pair production in association with a bottom-quark pair (tbar tbbar b) from fast simulations for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The differential distributions of tbar tbbar b are compared with the top-quark pair production with two additional jets (tbar tjj) and with the production in association with the Higgs (tbar tH), where the Higgs decays to a bottom-quark pair. The significances of the tbar tbbar b process in the dileptonic and the semileptonic decay modes are calculated with the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1, which is foreseen to be collected in the early Run II period. This study will provide an important input in searching for new physics beyond the standard model, as well as in searching for the tbar tH process where the Yukawa coupling with the top quark can be directly measured.

  4. Higgs mass and unified gauge coupling in the NMSSM with vector matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Buttazzo, Dario; Hall, Lawrence J.; Marzocca, David

    2016-07-01

    We consider the NMSSM extended to include one vector-like family of quarks and leptons. If (some of) these vector-like matter particles, as the Higgs doublets, have Yukawa couplings to the singlet S that exceed unity at about the same scale Λ ≲ 103 TeV, this gives the order 40% enhancement of the tree level Higgs boson mass required in the MSSM to reach 125 GeV. It is conceivable that the Yukawa couplings to the singlet S, although naively blowing up close to Λ, will not spoil gauge coupling unification. In such a case the unified coupling α X could be interestingly led to a value not far from unity, thus providing a possible explanation for the number of generations. The characteristic signal is an enhanced resonant production of neutral spin zero particles at LHC, that could even explain the putative diphoton resonance hinted by the recent LHC data at 750 GeV.

  5. Effective Hamiltonian for bound states in Yukawa theory

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Axel

    2013-07-15

    A generalization of the Gell-Mann–Low theorem is applied to lowest nontrivial order to determine an effective Hamiltonian for two-fermion states in relativistic Yukawa theory. The consistency of the corresponding effective Schrödinger equation is thoroughly investigated in various aspects, among others the nonrelativistic and one-body limits, and the small-distance or large-momentum regime of the bound state solutions is discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •A generalization of the Gell-Mann–Low theorem is applied to Yukawa theory. •The effective Hamiltonian for two-fermion states is derived to lowest order. •The nonrelativistic and one-body limits are consistent. •The large-momentum behavior of the bound-state solutions is analyzed. •A critical value for the coupling constant is determined.

  6. Is Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Victor; Moon, Russell

    2006-10-01

    Reexamining Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force using the principles of the Quark Theory and the Vortex Theory, it was discovered that it is possible for a virtual particle to be passed back and forth between the proton and the neutron. This discovery creates a new and revolutionary explanation of the strong force of nature. The creation of the strong force appears to be the combination of four processes at work in the nucleus: virtual particles, intrinsic magnetism, ``nuclear gravity'', and gluons. 1. V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The bases of the vortex theory, Book of abstracts The 53 International Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear structure St. Petersburg, Russia, 2003, p.251. 2. H. Yukawa, Tabibito, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1982), p. 190-202. 3. K. Gridnev, V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The Photon Acceleration Effect, Book of abstracts, OMEGA 5 -- Symposium on Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies, Nov 8-11, University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan. 4. R.G. Moon, V.V. Vasiliev. Explanation of the Conservation of Lepton Number, Book of abstracts LV. National Conference on Nuclear Physics, Frontiers in the Physics of Nucleus, June 28-July 1, 2005, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 2005, p. 347.5. .

  7. Is Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Victor; Moon, Russell

    2006-11-01

    Reexamining Hideki Yukawa's explanation of the strong force using the principles of the Quark Theory and the Vortex Theory, it was discovered that it is possible for a virtual particle to be passed back and forth between the proton and the neutron. This discovery creates a new and revolutionary explanation of the strong force of nature. The creation of the strong force appears to be the combination of four processes at work in the nucleus: virtual particles, intrinsic magnetism, ``nuclear gravity'', and gluons. 1. V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The bases of the vortex theory, Book of abstracts The 53 International Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear structure St. Petersburg, Russia, 2003, p.251. 2. H. Yukawa, Tabibito, (World Scientific, Singapore, 1982), p. 190-202. 3. K. Gridnev, V.V. Vasiliev, R.G. Moon, The Photon Acceleration Effect, Book of abstracts, OMEGA 5 -- Symposium on Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies, Nov 8-11, University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan. 4. R.G. Moon, V.V. Vasiliev. Explanation of the Conservation of Lepton Number, Book of abstracts LV. National Conference on Nuclear Physics, Frontiers in the Physics of Nucleus, June 28-July 1, 2005, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 2005, p. 347.5. .

  8. Universality in the Equilibration of Quenched Yukawa One Component Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; McQuillen, Patrick; Strickler, Trevor; Maksimovic, Nikola; Pohl, Thomas; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We study the equilibration of a Yukawa One Component Plasma (OCP) after a rapid change in the screening parameter from κ0 = ∞ to κf (n ,Te) , which is realized by photoionizing a laser cooled (T ~ 10 mK), uncorrelated gas of 88Sr atoms with density n between 1014 m-3 and 3 ×1016 m-3 using a two photon process in which the energy of one of the photons is adjustable. The excess photon energy above the ionization threshold sets the electron temperature, Te, and thus gives us control of κf. The resultant plasma is a classical plasma with strongly coupled ions, and is therefore described by the Yukawa OCP model with the electrons treated as a screening background. After photoionization, the ions develop spatial correlations to minimize their interaction energy, thus heating the ions. Since the dynamics of a Yukawa OCP depend solely on κ, we expect the heating process to be uniquely determined by κf. We verify this behavior by measuring the ion heating curve and comparing it to molecular dynamics simulations. We also report on how this behavior can be used to accurately measure n given a measured equilibration curve at a known Te. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (PHY-0714603), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550- 12-1-0267), and the Department of Defense (DoD) through the NDSEG Program.

  9. Higgs singlet boson as a diphoton resonance in a vectorlike quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbrik, R.; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-03-01

    ATLAS and CMS recently showed the first results from run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at √{s }=13 TeV . A resonant bump at a mass of around 750 GeV in the diphoton invariant mass spectrum was indicated and the corresponding diphoton production cross section is around 3-10 fb. Motivated by the LHC diphoton excess, we propose that the possible resonance candidate is a Higgs singlet. To produce the Higgs singlet via the gluon-gluon fusion process, we embed the Higgs singlet in the framework of the vector-like triplet quark (VLTQ) model. As a result, the Higgs singlet decaying to the diphoton final state is via VLTQ loops. Using the enhanced number of new quarks and new Yukawa couplings of the VLTQs and Higgs singlet, we successfully explain the diphoton production cross section. We find that the width of the Higgs singlet is below 1 GeV, its production cross section can be of the order of 1 pb at √{s }=13 TeV , and the branching ratio for it decaying to a diphoton is around 0.017 and is insensitive to the masses of VLTQs and new Yukawa couplings. We find a strong correlation between the Higgs Yukawa couplings to s -b and c -t ; the resulted branching ratio for t →c h can be 1.1 ×10-4 when the constraint from Bs oscillation is applied. With the constrained parameter values, the signal strength for the standard model Higgs decaying to a diphoton is μγ γ<1.18 , which is consistent with the current measurements at ATLAS and CMS.

  10. The Legacies of Yukawa and His Disciples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Yoichiro

    2008-06-01

    I review and discuss the historical roles Hideki Yukawa and his disciples, Shoichi Sakata in particular, played in developing what we now call particle physics, including their personal and cultural aspects.

  11. Top-quark pole mass in the tadpole-free MS ¯ scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    The complex pole mass of the top quark is presented at full two-loop order in the Standard Model, augmenting the known four-loop QCD contributions. The input parameters are the MS ¯ Yukawa and gauge couplings, the Higgs self-coupling, and the Higgs vacuum expectation value (VEV). Here, the VEV is defined as the minimum of the full effective potential in Landau gauge, so that tadpoles vanish. This is an alternative to earlier results that instead minimize the tree-level potential, resulting in a VEV that is gauge-fixing independent but accompanied by negative powers of the Higgs self-coupling in perturbative expansions. The effects of nonzero Goldstone boson mass are eliminated by resummation. I also study the renormalization scale dependence of the calculated pole mass.

  12. Glass-transition properties of Yukawa potentials: from charged point particles to hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Ivlev, Alexei; Khrapak, Sergey; Thomas, Hubertus; Morfill, Gregor E; Löwen, Hartmut; Wysocki, Adam; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The glass transition is investigated in three dimensions for single and double Yukawa potentials for the full range of control parameters. For vanishing screening parameter, the limit of the one-component plasma is obtained; for large screening parameters and high coupling strengths, the glass-transition properties cross over to the hard-sphere system. Between the two limits, the entire transition diagram can be described by analytical functions. Unlike other potentials, the glass-transition and melting lines for Yukawa potentials are found to follow shifted but otherwise identical curves in control-parameter space. PMID:25019902

  13. B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} constraints on the top quark anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Xingbo; Hao Yang; Yang Yadng

    2011-01-01

    Observation of the top quark flavor changing neutral process t{yields}c+{gamma} at the LHC would be the signal of physics beyond the standard model. If anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling exists, it will affect the precisely measured B(B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}). In this paper, we study the effects of a dimension 5 anomalous tc{gamma} operator in B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay to derive constraints on its possible strength. It is found that, for real anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}, the constraints correspond to the upper bounds B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<6.54x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}>0) and B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<8.52x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}<0), respectively, which are about the same order as the 5{sigma} discovery potential of ATLAS (9.4x10{sup -5}) and slightly lower than that of CMS (4.1x10{sup -4}) with 10 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity operating at {radical}(s)=14 TeV.

  14. Measuring the Higgs-bottom coupling in weak boson fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Mattelaer, Olivier; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We study Higgs production through weak boson fusion with subsequent decay to bottom quarks. By combining jet substructure techniques and matrix element methods in different limits we motivate this channel as a probe of the bottom-Yukawa interactions in the boosted regime. In particular we ameliorate the "no-go" results of cut-and-count analyses in this channel. After applying a data-driven reconstruction approach we find that the Higgs-bottom coupling can be limited to 0.82

  15. Polarization of top quark as a probe of its chromomagnetic and chromoelectric couplings in tW production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindani, Saurabh D.; Sharma, Pankaj; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2015-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to top quark chromomagnetic (CMDM) and chromoelectric (CEDM) dipole moments and W tb effective couplings in single-top production in association with a W - boson, followed by semileptonic decay of the top. The W t single-top production mode helps to isolate the anomalous ttg and W tb couplings, in contrast to top-pair production and other single-top production modes, where other new-physics effects can also contribute. We calculate the top polarization and the effects of these anomalous couplings on it at two centre-of-mass (cm) energies, 8 TeV and 14 TeV. As a measure of top polarization, we look at decay-lepton angular distributions in the laboratory frame, without requiring reconstruction of the rest frame of the top, and study the effect of the anomalous couplings on these distributions. We construct certain asymmetries to study the sensitivity of these distributions to top-quark couplings. We determine individual limits on the dominant couplings, viz., the real part of the CMDM Re ρ 2, the imaginary part of the CEDM Im ρ 3, and the real part of the tensor W tb coupling Ref2R, which may be obtained by utilizing these asymmetries at the LHC. We also obtain simultaneous limits on pairs of these couplings taking two couplings to be non-zero at a time.

  16. The effects of hyper-spherical approximation of Yukawa potential to diffusion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gee; Murillo, Michael S.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Yukawa potential to the diffusion properties of binary ionic mixtures are investigated in terms of both the classical molecular dynamics and the kinetic theory. The Yukawa interatomic potential is treated by means of the hyper-spherical approximation, which replaces the Ewald summation by a multiple of the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and the lattice summation of screening. The influence of the hyper-spherical approximation of the Yukawa potential is able to be understood through the calculations of transport coefficients with the relationship to Coulomb logarithm. Numerical studies over a various range of the Debye-Hückel screening parameter and of the plasma coupling parameter to binary ionic mixtures will be provided. We consider primarily the interdiffusion coefficients and then discuss about the mixing properties of self-diffusion coefficients.

  17. Yukawa unification in heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Constantin, Andrei; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Yukawa unification in the context of E8×E8 heterotic Calabi-Yau models which rely on breaking to a grand unified theory (GUT) via a nonflat gauge bundle and subsequent Wilson line breaking to the standard model. Our focus is on underlying GUT theories with gauge group S U (5 ) or S O (10 ). We provide a detailed analysis of the fact that, in contrast to traditional field theory GUTs, the underlying GUT symmetry of these models does not enforce Yukawa unification. Using this formalism, we present various scenarios where Yukawa unification can occur as a consequence of additional symmetries. These additional symmetries arise naturally in some heterotic constructions, and we present an explicit heterotic line bundle model which realizes one of these scenarios.

  18. Statistical understanding of quark and lepton masses in Gaussian landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Salem, Michael P.; Watari, Taizan

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental theory of nature may allow a large landscape of vacua. Even if the theory contains a unified gauge symmetry, the 22 flavor parameters of the standard model, including neutrino masses, may be largely determined by the statistics of this landscape, and not by any symmetry. Then the measured values of the flavor parameters do not lead to any fundamental symmetries, but are statistical accidents; their precise values do not provide any insights into the fundamental theory, rather the overall pattern of flavor reflects the underlying landscape. We investigate whether random selection from the statistics of a simple landscape can explain the broad patterns of quark, charged lepton, and neutrino masses and mixings. We propose Gaussian landscapes as simplified models of landscapes where Yukawa couplings result from overlap integrals of zero-mode wave functions in higher-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories. In terms of just five free parameters, such landscapes can account for all gross features of flavor, including the hierarchy of quark and charged-lepton masses; small quark mixing angles in the basis with quarks arranged according to mass, with 13 mixing less than 12 and 23 mixing; very light Majorana neutrino masses, with the solar to atmospheric neutrino mass ratio consistent with data; distributions for leptonic mixings sin2{theta}{sub 12} and sin2{theta}{sub 23} that are peaked at large values, while the distribution for sin2{theta}{sub 13} is peaked at low values; and order unity CP-violating phases in both the quark and lepton sectors. While the statistical distributions for flavor parameters are broad, the distributions are robust to changes in the geometry of the extra dimensions. Constraining the distributions by loose cuts about observed values leads to narrower distributions for neutrino measurements of {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  19. Advances in Dusty Plasmas 5.Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    We review thermodynamical and dynamical properties of strongly coupled dusty plasmas, focusing on the recent development of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the present paper, dusty plasmas are modeled by the Yukawa system, which is a collection of particles interacting through Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb) potentials. The phase diagram, wave dispersion relations and some transport coefficients of Yukawa systems are discussed.

  20. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  1. Invariants in the Yukawa system's thermodynamic phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhorst, Arno A.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-07-01

    This paper shows that several known properties of the Yukawa system can be derived from the isomorph theory, which applies to any system that has strong correlations between its virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations. Such "Roskilde-simple" systems have a simplified thermodynamic phase diagram deriving from the fact that they have curves (isomorphs) along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. We show that the Yukawa system has strong virial potential-energy correlations and identify its isomorphs by two different methods. One method, the so-called direct isomorph check, identifies isomorphs numerically from jumps of relatively small density changes (here 10%). The second method identifies isomorphs analytically from the pair potential. The curves obtained by the two methods are close to each other; these curves are confirmed to be isomorphs by demonstrating the invariance of the radial distribution function, the static structure factor, the mean-square displacement as a function of time, and the incoherent intermediate scattering function. Since the melting line is predicted to be an isomorph, the theory provides a derivation of a known approximate analytical expression for this line in the temperature-density phase diagram. The paper's results give the first demonstration that the isomorph theory can be applied to systems like dense colloidal suspensions and strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  2. Split sfermion families, Yukawa unification and muon g - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2014-05-01

    We consider two distinct classes of Yukawa unified supersymmetric SO(10) models with non-universal and universal soft supersymmetry breaking (SSB) gaugino masses at M GUT. In both cases, we assume that the third family SSB sfermion masses at M GUT are different from the corresponding sfermion masses of the first two families (which are equal). For the SO(10) model with essentially arbitrary (non-universal) gaugino masses at M GUT, it is shown that t- b- τ Yukawa coupling unification is compatible, among other things, with the 125 GeV Higgs boson mass, the WMAP relic dark matter density, and with the resolution of the apparent muon g - 2 anomaly. The colored sparticles in this case all turn out to be quite heavy, of order 5 TeV or more, but the sleptons (smuon and stau) can be very light, of order 200 GeV or so. For the SO(10) model with universal gaugino masses and NUHM2 boundary conditions, the muon g - 2 anomaly cannot be resolved. However, the gluino in this class of models is not too heavy, ≲ 3 TeV, and therefore may be found at the LHC.

  3. Invariants in the Yukawa system's thermodynamic phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhorst, Arno A. Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-07-15

    This paper shows that several known properties of the Yukawa system can be derived from the isomorph theory, which applies to any system that has strong correlations between its virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations. Such “Roskilde-simple” systems have a simplified thermodynamic phase diagram deriving from the fact that they have curves (isomorphs) along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. We show that the Yukawa system has strong virial potential-energy correlations and identify its isomorphs by two different methods. One method, the so-called direct isomorph check, identifies isomorphs numerically from jumps of relatively small density changes (here 10%). The second method identifies isomorphs analytically from the pair potential. The curves obtained by the two methods are close to each other; these curves are confirmed to be isomorphs by demonstrating the invariance of the radial distribution function, the static structure factor, the mean-square displacement as a function of time, and the incoherent intermediate scattering function. Since the melting line is predicted to be an isomorph, the theory provides a derivation of a known approximate analytical expression for this line in the temperature-density phase diagram. The paper's results give the first demonstration that the isomorph theory can be applied to systems like dense colloidal suspensions and strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  4. Erratum to: Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson in $$ t\\overline{t} $$ + Z production at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-09-21

    We study top quark pair production in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and investigate the prospects of measuring the couplings of top quarks to the Z boson. To date these couplings have not been constrained in direct measurements. Such a determination will be possible for the first time at the LHC. Our calculation improves previous coupling studies through the inclusion of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in production and decays of all unstable particles. We treat top quarks in the narrow-width approximation and retain all NLO spin correlations. To determine the sensitivity of amore » coupling measurement we perform a binned log-likelihood ratio test based on normalization and shape information of the angle between the leptons from the Z boson decay. The obtained limits account for statistical uncertainties as well as leading theoretical systematics from residual scale dependence and parton distribution functions. We use current CMS data to place the first direct constraints on the ttbZ couplings. We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 inverse fb of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial ttbZ couplings can be constrained at the 95% confidence level to C_V=0.24^{+0.39}_{-0.85} and C_A=-0.60^{+0.14}_{-0.18}, where the central values are the Standard Model predictions. This is a reduction of uncertainties by 25% and 42%, respectively, compared to an analysis based on leading-order predictions. We also translate these results into limits on dimension-six operators contributing to the ttbZ interactions beyond the Standard Model.« less

  5. Erratum to: Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson in $ t\\overline{t} $ + Z production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-09-21

    We study top quark pair production in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and investigate the prospects of measuring the couplings of top quarks to the Z boson. To date these couplings have not been constrained in direct measurements. Such a determination will be possible for the first time at the LHC. Our calculation improves previous coupling studies through the inclusion of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections in production and decays of all unstable particles. We treat top quarks in the narrow-width approximation and retain all NLO spin correlations. To determine the sensitivity of a coupling measurement we perform a binned log-likelihood ratio test based on normalization and shape information of the angle between the leptons from the Z boson decay. The obtained limits account for statistical uncertainties as well as leading theoretical systematics from residual scale dependence and parton distribution functions. We use current CMS data to place the first direct constraints on the ttbZ couplings. We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 inverse fb of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial ttbZ couplings can be constrained at the 95% confidence level to C_V=0.24^{+0.39}_{-0.85} and C_A=-0.60^{+0.14}_{-0.18}, where the central values are the Standard Model predictions. This is a reduction of uncertainties by 25% and 42%, respectively, compared to an analysis based on leading-order predictions. We also translate these results into limits on dimension-six operators contributing to the ttbZ interactions beyond the Standard Model.

  6. On the estimation of sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, I. L. Thomas, H. M.; Khrapak, S. A.

    2015-11-15

    The longitudinal sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids is estimated using the conventional hydrodynamic expression supplemented by appropriate thermodynamic functions proposed recently by Khrapak et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 083706 (2015)]. In contrast to the existing approaches, such as quasi-localized charge approximation (QLCA) and molecular dynamics simulations, our model provides a relatively simple estimate for the sound speed over a wide range of parameters of interest. At strong coupling, our results are shown to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the QLCA approach and those derived from the phonon spectrum for the triangular lattice. On the other hand, our model is also expected to remain accurate at moderate values of the coupling strength. In addition, the obtained results are used to discuss the influence of the strong coupling effects on the adiabatic index of two-dimensional Yukawa fluids.

  7. Molecular shear heating and vortex dynamics in thermostatted two dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that two-dimensional macroscale shear flows are susceptible to instabilities leading to macroscale vortical structures. The linear and nonlinear fate of such a macroscale flow in a strongly coupled medium is a fundamental problem. A popular example of a strongly coupled medium is a dusty plasma, often modelled as a Yukawa liquid. Recently, laboratory experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) studies of shear flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids indicated the occurrence of strong molecular shear heating, which is found to reduce the coupling strength exponentially leading to the destruction of macroscale vorticity. To understand the vortex dynamics of strongly coupled molecular fluids undergoing macroscale shear flows and molecular shear heating, MD simulation has been performed, which allows the macroscopic vortex dynamics to evolve, while at the same time "removes" the microscopically generated heat without using the velocity degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that by using a configurational thermostat in a novel way, the microscale heat generated by shear flow can be thermostatted out efficiently without compromising the large scale vortex dynamics. In the present work, using MD simulations, a comparative study of shear flow evolution in Yukawa liquids in the presence and absence of molecular or microscopic heating is presented for a prototype shear flow, namely, Kolmogorov flow.

  8. Production of heavy Higgs bosons and decay into top quarks at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernreuther, W.; Galler, P.; Mellein, C.; Si, Z.-G.; Uwer, P.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the production of heavy, neutral Higgs boson resonances and their decays to top-quark top-antiquark (t t ¯) pairs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the strong coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The NLO corrections to heavy Higgs boson production and the Higgs-QCD interference are calculated in the large mt limit with an effective K-factor rescaling. The nonresonant t t ¯ background is taken into account at NLO QCD including weak-interaction corrections. In order to consistently determine the total decay widths of the heavy Higgs bosons, we consider for definiteness the type-II two-Higgs-doublet extension of the standard model and choose three parameter scenarios that entail two heavy neutral Higgs bosons with masses above the t t ¯ threshold and unsuppressed Yukawa couplings to top quarks. For these three scenarios we compute, for the LHC operating at 13 TeV, the t t ¯ cross section and the distributions of the t t ¯ invariant mass, of the transverse top-quark momentum and rapidity, and of the cosine of the Collins-Soper angle with and without the two heavy Higgs resonances. For selected Mt t ¯ bins we estimate the significances for detecting a heavy Higgs signal in the t t ¯ dileptonic and lepton plus jets decay channels.

  9. On the light quark mass effects in Higgs boson production in gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Kirill; Penin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Production of Higgs bosons at the LHC is affected by the contribution of light quarks, that mediate the gg → Hg transition. Although their impact is suppressed by small Yukawa couplings, it is enhanced by large logarithms of the ratio of the Higgs boson mass or its transverse momentum to light quark masses. We study the origin of this enhancement, focusing on the abelian corrections to gg → Hg amplitudes of the form {({C}_F{α}_s{mathcal{L}}^2)}^n , where mathcal{L}in \\{ ln (s/{m}_b^2),kern0.5em ln ({p}_{perp}^2/{m}_b^2)\\} . We show how these non-Sudakov double logarithmic terms can be resummed to all orders in the strong coupling constant. Interestingly, we find that the transverse momentum dependence of these corrections is very weak due to a peculiar cancellation between different logarithmic terms. Although the abelian part of QCD corrections is not expected to be dominant, it can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections to light quark contributions to Higgs boson production at the LHC.

  10. Leading QCD-induced four-loop contributions to the β-function of the Higgs self-coupling in the SM and vacuum stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetyrkin, K. G.; Zoller, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    We present analytical results for the leading top-Yukawa and QCD contribution to the β-function for the Higgs self-coupling λ of the Standard Model at four-loop level, namely the part ∝ y t 4 g s 6 independently confirming a result given in [1]. We also give the contribution ∝ y t 2 g s 6 of the anomalous dimension of the Higgs field as well as the terms ∝ y t g s 8 to the top-Yukawa β-function which can also be derived from the anomalous dimension of the top quark mass. We compare the results with the RG functions of the correlators of two and four scalar currents in pure QCD and find a new relation between the anomalous dimension γ 0 of the QCD vacuum energy and the anomalous dimension γ m SS appearing in the RG equation of the correlator of two scalar currents. Together with the recently computed top-Yukawa and QCD contributions to β gs [2, 3] the β-functions presented here constitute the leading four-loop contributions to the evolution of the Higgs self-coupling. A numerical estimate of these terms at the scale of the top-quark mass is presented as well as an analysis of the impact on the evolution of λ up to the Planck scale and the vacuum stability problem.

  11. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to mDM = 300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass mDM ~ 38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  12. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to m{sub DM} = 300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass m{sub DM} ∼ 38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  13. A precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of D{Ø} Run II data

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huanzhao

    2015-05-16

    The top quark is a very special fundamental particle in the Standard Model (SM) mainly due to its heavy mass. The top quark has extremely short lifetime and decays before hadronization. This reduces the complexity for the measurement of its mass. The top quark couples very strongly to the Higgs boson since the fermion-Higgs Yukawa coupling linearly depends on the fermion’s mass. Therefore, the top quark is also heavily involved in Higgs production and related study. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is very important, as it allows for self-consistency check of the SM, and also gives a insight about the stability of our universe in the SM context. This dissertation presents my work on the measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states of t$\\bar{t}$ events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the full DØ Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron. I extracted the top quark mass by reconstructing event kinematics, and integrating over expected neutrino rapidity distributions to obtain solutions over a scanned range of top quark mass hypotheses. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization that I made to minimize the expected statistical uncertainty. I also improve the calibration of jets in dilepton events by using the calibration determined in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton+jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. The measured mass is 173.11 ± 1.34(stat)+0.83 -0.72(sys) GeV .

  14. Signatures from scalar dark matter with a vector-like quark mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacchino, Federica; Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez Honorez, Laura; Tytgat, Michel H. G.; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a model where the dark matter is composed of a singlet real scalar that couples to the Standard Model predominantly via a Yukawa interaction with a light quark and a colored vector-like fermion. A distinctive feature of this scenario is that thermal freeze-out in the early universe may be driven by annihilation both into gluon pairs at one-loop (gg) and by virtual internal Bremsstrahlung of a gluon (qbar q g). Such a dark matter candidate may also be tested through direct and indirect detection and at the LHC; viable candidates have either a mass nearly degenerate with that of the fermionic mediator or a mass above about 2 TeV.

  15. Collective modes in strongly correlated yukawa liquids: waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kalman, G; Rosenberg, M; DeWitt, H E

    2000-06-26

    We determine the collective mode structure of a strongly correlated Yukawa fluid, with the purpose of analyzing wave propagation in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. We identify a longitudinal plasmon and a transverse shear mode. The dispersion is characterized by a low- k acoustic behavior, a frequency maximum well below the plasma frequency, and a high- k merging of the two modes around the Einstein frequency of localized oscillations. The damping effect of collisions between neutrals and dust grains is estimated. PMID:10991116

  16. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sehwook

    2011-01-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t$\\bar{t}$ events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from π0 decay are discussed in this thesis.

  17. Cold quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2010-05-15

    We perform an O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) perturbative calculation of the equation of state of cold but dense QCD matter with two massless and one massive quark flavor, finding that perturbation theory converges reasonably well for quark chemical potentials above 1 GeV. Using a running coupling constant and strange quark mass, and allowing for further nonperturbative effects, our results point to a narrow range where absolutely stable strange quark matter may exist. Absent stable strange quark matter, our findings suggest that quark matter in (slowly rotating) compact star cores becomes confined to hadrons only slightly above the density of atomic nuclei. Finally, we show that equations of state including quark matter lead to hybrid star masses up to M{approx}2M{sub {center_dot},} in agreement with current observations. For strange stars, we find maximal masses of M{approx}2.75M{sub {center_dot}}and conclude that confirmed observations of compact stars with M>2M{sub {center_dot}}would strongly favor the existence of stable strange quark matter.

  18. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  19. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-06-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner–Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas.

  20. Energy loss of a nonaccelerating quark moving through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills vacuum or plasma in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.

    2016-08-01

    Using AdS /CFT correspondence, we find that a massless quark moving at the speed of light v =1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) vacuum at T =0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B , loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/} 6 π B . We also show that a heavy quark of mass M ≠0 moving at near the speed of light v2=v*2=1 -4/π2T2 B ≃1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 SYM plasma at finite temperature T ≠0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B ≫T2, loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/}6 π B v*2≃-√{λ/}6 π B . Moreover, we argue that, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD theories (when the adjoint QCD theory has four flavors of Weyl fermions and is at its conformal IR fixed point λ =λ*) have the same microscopic degrees of freedom (i.e., gluons and lowest Landau levels of Weyl fermions) even though they have quite different microscopic degrees of freedom in the UV when we consider higher Landau levels. Therefore, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties of N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD plasmas, as well as the rates of energy loss of a quark moving through the plasmas, should be the same.

  1. Phase diagram and dynamics of Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark. O.; Kremer, Kurt; Grest, Gary S.

    1988-03-01

    The phase diagram and dynamical properties of systems of particles interacting through a repulsive screened Coulomb (Yukawa) potential have been calculated using molecular and lattice dynamics techniques. The phase diagram contains both a melting transition and a transition from fcc to bcc crystalline phases. These phase transitions have been studied as a function of potential shape (screening length) and compared to phenomenological criteria for transition temperatures such as those of Lindemann and of Hansen and Verlet. The transition from fcc to bcc with increasing temperature is shown to result from a higher entropy in the bcc phase because of its softer shear modes. Even when the stable solid phase below the melting temperature is fcc, bcc-like local order is found in the liquid phase. This may substantially slow crystallization. The calculated phase diagram and shear modulus are in good agreement with experiments on colloidal suspensions of polystyrene spheres. The single particle dynamics of Yukawa systems show several unusual features. There is a pronounced subdiffusive regime in liquids near and below the melting temperature. This regime reflects the existence of two time scales: a typical phonon period, and the time for a particle to feel a new environment. The second time scale becomes longer as the temperature is lowered or the range of interaction (screening length) increases.

  2. Thermodynamics of Yukawa fluids near the one-component-plasma limit

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Semenov, Igor L.; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Couëdel, Lénaïc

    2015-08-15

    Thermodynamics of weakly screened (near the one-component-plasma limit) Yukawa fluids in two and three dimensions is analyzed in detail. It is shown that the thermal component of the excess internal energy of these fluids, when expressed in terms of the properly normalized coupling strength, exhibits the scaling pertinent to the corresponding one-component-plasma limit (the scalings differ considerably between the two- and three-dimensional situations). This provides us with a simple and accurate practical tool to estimate thermodynamic properties of weakly screened Yukawa fluids. Particular attention is paid to the two-dimensional fluids, for which several important thermodynamic quantities are calculated to illustrate the application of the approach.

  3. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  4. The {rho} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} and {omega} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} decays in quark-model approach and estimation of coupling for pion emission by quark

    SciTech Connect

    Anisovich, A. V.; Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2010-03-15

    In the framework of the relativistic and gauge-invariant spectral integral technique, we calculate radiative decays {rho}(770) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) and {omega}(780) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) supposing all mesons ({pi}, {rho}, and {omega}) to be quark-antiquark states. The qq-bar wave functions found for mesons and photon lead to a reasonably good description of data ( {Gamma} (exp){rho} {+-} to {gamma} {pi} 68 {+-} 30 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {rho} 0 to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 77 {+-} 28 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {omega} to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 776 {+-} 45 keV) which makes it possible to estimate the coupling for the bremsstrahlung emission of pion by quarks g{sub {pi} {identical_to}} g{sub {pi}}(u {sup {yields}}d{pi}). We have found two values for the pion bremsstrahlung coupling: vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 16.7 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.3}{sup +0.1} (Solution I) and vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 3.0 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.1}{sup +0.1} (Solution II). Within SU(6) symmetry for nucleons, Solution I gives us for {pi}NN coupling the value 16.4 {<=} g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}(4{pi}) {<=} 23.2, which is in qualitative agreement with the {pi}N scattering data, g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}/(4{pi}) {r_brace}{approx} 14. For excited states, we have estimated the partial widths in Solution I as follows: {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup {+-} {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({omega}{sub 2S} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 60-1080 keV. The large uncertainties emphasize the necessity to carry out measurements of the meson radiative processes in the region of large masses.

  5. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  6. Top quark physics: Future Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond; Gerdes, David; Jaros, John; Vejcik, Steve; Berger, Edmond L.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cuypers, Frank; Drell, Persis S.; Fero, Michael; Hadley, Nicholas; Han, Tao; Heinson, Ann P.; Knuteson, Bruce; Larios, Francisco; Miettinen, Hannu; Orr, Lynne H.; Peskin, Michael E.; Rizzo, Thomas; Sarid, Uri; Schmidt, Carl; Stelzer, Tim; Sullivan, Zack

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  7. Non-perturbative Calculation of the Scalar Yukawa Theory in Four-Body Truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Karmanov, V. A.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    The quenched scalar Yukawa theory is solved in the light-front Tamm-Dancoff approach including up to four constituents (one scalar nucleon, three scalar pions). The Fock sector dependent renormalization is implemented. By studying the Fock sector norms, we find that the lowest two Fock sectors dominate the state even in the large-coupling region. The one-body sector shows convergence with respect to the Fock sector truncation. However, the four-body norm exceeds the three-body norm at the coupling.

  8. A Cloudy Quark Bag Model of S, P, and D wave interactions for the coupled channel antikaon-nucleon system

    SciTech Connect

    He, Guangliang.

    1992-05-15

    The Cloudy Quark Bag Model is extended from S-wave to P- and D-wave. The parameters of the model are determined by K{sup {minus}}p scattering cross section data, K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Sigma}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data, K{sup {minus}}p threshold branching ratio data, and K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Lambda}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data. The resonance structure of the {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) are studied in the model. The shift and width of kaonic hydrogen are calculated using the model.

  9. Shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert E.; Cabot, William H.; Graziani, Frank R.

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 1025 ions/cc. The motion of 30 000-120 000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We systematically study different mixtures through a series of simulations with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. In the more strongly coupled plasmas, the kinetic theory does not agree well with the MD results. We develop a simple model that interpolates between classical kinetic theories at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated, ranging from moderately weakly coupled to moderately strongly coupled asymmetric plasma mixtures.

  10. Shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert E; Cabot, William H; Graziani, Frank R

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 10^{25} ions/cc. The motion of 30,000-120,000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We systematically study different mixtures through a series of simulations with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. In the more strongly coupled plasmas, the kinetic theory does not agree well with the MD results. We develop a simple model that interpolates between classical kinetic theories at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated, ranging from moderately weakly coupled to moderately strongly coupled asymmetric plasma mixtures. PMID:26651805

  11. Heavy Higgs boson coupled to vectorlike quarks: Strong C P problem and search prospects at the 14 TeV LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Camargo, Daniel A.; Dias, Alex G.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by a solution to the strong C P problem, we propose a model where a new heavy neutral C P -even Higgs boson couples to vectorlike quarks enhancing its production cross section whose dominant decays are into weak bosons. The masses of the vectorlike quarks are generated through interactions with a singlet scalar field charged under a broken global U (1 ) symmetry, providing a solution to the strong C P problem by means of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism. The diboson excess observed by the ATLAS Collaboration is discussed as the new heavy Higgs boson is a candidate to explain a possible signal in this channel. We also show that the 14 TeV LHC is capable of discovering this heavy Higgs with masses up to 1 TeV in the H →Z Z →ℓ+ℓ,SUP- ℓ'+ℓ'- search channel using boosted decision trees to better discriminate between signals and backgrounds and to tame systematic uncertainties in the background rates.

  12. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  13. Models of Yukawa interaction in the two Higgs doublet model, and their collider phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Yagyu, Kei; Tsumura, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Possible models of Yukawa interaction are discussed in the two Higgs doublet model (THDM) under the discrete symmetry imposed to avoid the flavor changing neutral current at the leading order. It is known that there are four types of such models corresponding to the possible different assignment of charges for the discrete symmetry on quarks and leptons. We first examine the decay properties of Higgs bosons in each type model, and summarize constraints on the models from current experimental data. We then shed light on the differences among these models in collider phenomenology. In particular, we mainly discuss the so-called type-II THDM and type-X THDM. The type-II THDM corresponds to the model with the same Yukawa interaction as the minimal supersymmetric standard model. On the other hand, in the type-X THDM, additional Higgs bosons can predominantly decay into leptons. This scenario may be interesting because of the motivation for a light charged Higgs boson scenario such as in the TeV-scale model of neutrinos, dark matter, and baryogenesis. We study how we can distinguish the type-X THDM from the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider.

  14. Estimation of Species Diffusivities in Dense Plasma Mixtures Modeled with the Yukawa Interionic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert; Jackson, Julie; Surh, Michael; Cabot, William; Caspersen, Kyle; Greenough, Jeffrey; Graziani, Frank; Miller, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We employ classical molecular dynamics (MD) to investigate species diffusivity in binary Yukawa mixtures. The Yukawa potential is used to describe the screened Coulomb interaction between the ions, providing the basis for models of dense stellar materials, inertial confined plasmas, and colloidal particles in electrolytes. We use Green-Kubo techniques to calculate self-diffusivities and the Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities, and evaluate the validity of the Darken relation over a range of thermodynamic conditions of the mixture. The inter-diffusivity (or mutual diffusivity) can then be related to the Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities through the thermodynamic factor. The latter requires knowledge of the equation of state of the mixture. To test these Green-Kubo approaches and to estimate the activity contribution we have also employed large-scale non-equilibrium MD. In these simulations we can extract the inter-diffusivity value by calculating the rate of broadening of the interface in a diffusion couple. We also explore thermodynamic conditions for possible non-Fickian diffusivity. The main motivation in this work is to build a model that describes the transport coefficients in binary Yukawa mixtures over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions up to 1keV.

  15. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  16. Structural arrest transitions in fluids described by two Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianlan; Liu, Yun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Cao, Jianshu; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2004-11-01

    We study a model colloidal system where particles interact via short-range attractive and long-range repulsive Yukawa potentials. Using the structure factor calculated from the mean-spherical approximation as the input, the kinetic phase diagrams as functions of the attraction depth and the volume fraction are obtained by calculating the Debye-Waller factors in the framework of the mode-coupling theory for three different heights of the repulsive barrier. The glass-glass reentrance phenomenon in the attractive colloidal case is also observed in the presence of the long-range repulsive barrier, which results in the lower and upper glass regimes. Competition between the short-range attraction and the long-range repulsion gives rise to new regimes associated with clusters such as “static cluster glass” and “dynamic cluster glass,” which appear in the lower glass regime. Along the liquid-glass transition line between the liquid regime and the lower glass regime, crossover points separating different glass states are identified.

  17. Non-perturbative Renormalization in Truncated Yukawa Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    An approach to non-perturbative calculations in the light-front quantum field theory and its new developments are briefly reviewed. We start with the decomposition of the state vector in Fock components. After truncation of this decomposition (main approximation in this approach), the eigenvalue equation for the light-front Hamiltonian generates, in Minkowski space, a finite system of integral equations for the Fock components. Solving this system numerically and performing the non-perturbative renormalization, we find the state vector of fermion in the quenched scalar Yukawa model, up to the four-body truncation (one fermion + three bosons), for rather large values of the coupling constant. With the state vector, found in this way, the fermion electromagnetic form factors are calculated. Comparing results obtained in the four-body truncation with those found in the previous, three-body truncation, we discover very good convergence relative to truncation, that indicates that we are close to the exact non-perturbative solution in this field-theoretical model. The approach can be extended to more realistic field theories and, after further development, it could constitute an alternative to the lattice calculations.

  18. Quark and lepton masses and mixing in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Even if quark and lepton masses are not uniquely predicted by the fundamental theory, as may be the case in the string theory landscape, nevertheless their pattern may reveal features of the underlying theory. We use statistical techniques to show that the observed masses appear to be representative of a scale-invariant distribution, {rho}(m){approx}1/m. If we extend this distribution to include all the Yukawa couplings, we show that the resulting Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements typically show a hierarchical pattern similar to observations. The Jarlskog invariant measuring the amount of CP violation is also well reproduced in magnitude. We also apply this framework to neutrinos using the seesaw mechanism. The neutrino results are ambiguous, with the observed pattern being statistically allowed even though the framework does not provide a natural explanation for the observed two large mixing angles. Our framework highly favors a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses. We also are able to make statistical predictions in the neutrino sector when we specialize to situations consistent with the known mass differences and two large mixing angles. Within our framework, we show that with 95% confidence the presently unmeasured Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing angle sin{theta}{sub 13} is larger than 0.04 and typically of order 0.1. The leptonic Jarlskog invariant is found to be typically of order 10{sup -2} and the magnitude of the effective Majorana mass m{sub ee} is typically of order 0.001 eV.

  19. Hierarchy plus anarchy in quark masses and mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce a parametrization of the effect of unknown corrections from new physics on quark and lepton mass matrices. This parametrization is used in order to study how the hierarchies of quark masses and mixing angles are modified by random perturbations of the Yukawa matrices. We discuss several examples of flavor relations predicted by different textures, analyzing how these relations are influenced by the random perturbations. We also comment on the unlikely possibility that unknown corrections contribute significantly to the hierarchy of masses and mixings.

  20. The Non-Perturbative Scalar Yukawa Theory on the Light Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Karmanov, Vladimir; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James

    2015-04-01

    We present a non-perturbative calculation of the scalar Yukawa model in light-front dynamics with a Fock sector dependent renormalization. The Fock space is truncated to four particles and then the ab initio Hamiltonian approach is applied. We compute the electromagnetic form factor and compare it with the results obtained from the lower Fock sector truncations. We find that the one- and two-body contributions dominate the Fock space even in the non-perturbative region. However, the four-body contribution exceeds the three-body one as the coupling constant increases. Nevertheless, the form factor shows a good converge as the number of constituent bosons increases.

  1. Collective Modes in Strongly Correlated Yukawa Liquids: Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.; Rosenberg, M.; DeWitt, H. E.

    2000-06-26

    We determine the collective mode structure of a strongly correlated Yukawa fluid, with the purpose of analyzing wave propagation in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. We identify a longitudinal plasmon and a transverse shear mode. The dispersion is characterized by a low-k acoustic behavior, a frequency maximum well below the plasma frequency, and a high-k merging of the two modes around the Einstein frequency of localized oscillations. The damping effect of collisions between neutrals and dust grains is estimated. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Numerical studies of the melting transition in 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kalman, G. J.

    2008-09-07

    We present the latest results of our systematic studies of the solid--liquid phase transition in 2D classical many-particle systems interacting with the Yukawa potential. Our previous work is extended by applying the molecular dynamic simulations to systems with up to 1.6 million particles in the computational box (for {kappa} = 2 case). Equilibrium simulations are performed for different coupling parameters in the vicinity of the expected melting transition ({gamma}{sub m}{sup {kappa}}{sup ={sup 2}}{approx_equal}415) and a wide range of observables are averaged over uncorrelated samples of the micro-canonical ensemble generated by the simulations.

  3. Yukawa couplings in superstring compactification. [in quantum gravity theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strominger, A.

    1985-01-01

    A topological formula is given for the entire tree-level contribution to the low-energy effective action of a Calabi-Yau superstring compactification. The constraints on proton lifetime in the Calabi-Yau compactification are discussed in detail.

  4. Study of shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert; Cabot, William; Graziani, Frank

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 1025 ions/cc. The motion of 30000-120000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We study different mixtures with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. We introduce a model that interpolates between a screened-plasma kinetic theory at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Confining quark condensate model of the nucleon.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Michael; Tandy, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We obtain a mean-field solution for the nucleon as a quark-meson soliton obtained from the action of the global color-symmetry model of QCD. All dynamics is generated from an effective interaction of quark currents. At the quark-meson level there are two novel features: (1) absolute confinement is produced from the space-time structure of the dynamical self-energy in the vacuum quark propagator; and (2) the related scalar meson field is an extended q-barq composite that couples nonlocally to quarks. The influence of these features upon the nucleon mass contributions and other nucleon properties is presented.

  6. Conformal gauge-Yukawa theories away from four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Langæble, Kasper; Litim, Daniel F.; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We present the phase diagram and associated fixed points for a wide class of Gauge-Yukawa theories in d = 4 + ɛ dimensions. The theories we investigate involve non-abelian gauge fields, fermions and scalars in the Veneziano-Witten limit. The analysis is performed in steps, we start with QCD d and then we add Yukawa interactions and scalars which we study at next-to- and next-to-next-to-leading order. Interacting infrared fixed points naturally emerge in dimensions lower than four while ultraviolet ones appear above four. We also analyse the stability of the scalar potential for the discovered fixed points. We argue for a very rich phase diagram in three dimensions while in dimensions higher than four certain Gauge-Yukawa theories are ultraviolet complete because of the emergence of an asymptotically safe fixed point.

  7. Zero-temperature phase diagram of Yukawa bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osychenko, O. N.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Mazzanti, F.; Boronat, J.

    2012-06-01

    We study the zero-temperature phase diagram of bosons interacting via screened Coulomb (Yukawa) potential by means of the diffusion Monte Carlo method. The Yukawa potential is used as a model interaction in the neutron matter, dusty plasmas, and charged colloids. As shown by Petrov [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.130407 99, 130407 (2007)], interactions between weakly bound molecules of heavy and light fermionic atoms are described by an effective Yukawa potential with a strength related to the heavy-light mass ratio M/m, which might lead to crystallization in a two-dimensional geometry if the mass ratio of heavy-light fermions exceeds a certain critical value. In the present work we do a thorough study of the quantum three-dimensional Yukawa system. For strong interactions (equivalently, large mass ratios) the system experiences several phase transitions as the density is increased, passing from gas to solid and to gas phase again. Weakly interacting Yukawa particles do not crystallize at any density. We find the minimal interaction strength at which the crystallization happens. In terms of the two-component fermionic system, this strength corresponds to a heavy-light mass ratio of M/m˜180, so that it is impossible to realize the gas-crystal transition in a conventional bulk system. For the Yukawa model of fermionic mixtures we also analyze the possibility of building molecular systems with very large effective mass ratios by confining the heavy component to a sufficiently deep optical lattice. We show how the effective mass of the heavy component can be made arbitrarily large by increasing the lattice depth, thus leading to a tunable effective mass ratio that can be used to realize a molecular superlattice.

  8. Beam-Plasma Interaction and Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G.; Rosenberg, M.

    2008-11-01

    In a complex plasma, penetrating charged particle beams may lead to beam-plasma instabilities. When either the plasma, the beam, or both, are strongly interacting [1], the features of the instability are different from those in a weakly coupled plasma. We consider the case when a 2D dusty plasma forms a lattice, and the beam is moving in the lattice plane. Both the grains and the beam particles interact through a Yukawa potential; the beam particles are weakly coupled to each other and to the lattice. The system develops both a longitudinal and a transverse instability. Based on the phonon spectrum of a 2D hexagonal Yukawa lattice [2], we determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. As a function of the wavenumber, the growth rates exhibit remarkable gaps, where no instability is excited. The gap locations are governed by the ratio of the lattice and the beam plasma frequencies. The behavior of the growth rates also depends on the direction of the beam and on the relationship between the beam speed and the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds. [1] GJ Kalman, M Rosenberg, JPA 36, 5963 (2003). [2] T Sullivan, GJ Kalman, S Kyrkos, P Bakshi, M Rosenberg, Z Donko, JPA 39, 4607 (2006).

  9. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR DARK MATTER INTERACTING THROUGH A YUKAWA POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M. H.

    2013-05-20

    Recent observations in galaxies and clusters indicate that dark matter density profiles exhibit core-like structures which contradict the numerical simulation results of collisionless cold dark matter (CDM). On the other hand, it has been shown that CDM particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the cores in dwarf galaxies. In this Letter, I use the Yukawa potential interacting dark matter model to derive two simple scaling relations on the galactic and cluster scales, respectively, which give excellent agreements with observations. Also, in our model, the masses of the force carrier and dark matter particle can be constrained by the observational data.

  10. Longitudinal viscosity of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal viscosity ηl is obtained for a two-dimensional (2D) liquid using a Green-Kubo method with a molecular dynamics simulation. The interparticle potential used has the Debye-Hückel or Yukawa form, which models a 2D dusty plasma. The longitudinal ηl and shear ηs viscosities are found to have values that match very closely, with only negligible differences for the entire range of temperatures that is considered. For a 2D Yukawa liquid, the bulk viscosity ηb is determined to be either negligibly small or not a meaningful transport coefficient.

  11. Ground state of a confined Yukawa plasma including correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Filinov, A.; Piel, A.; Bonitz, M.

    2007-09-01

    The ground state of an externally confined one-component Yukawa plasma is derived analytically using the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, the radial density profile is computed. The results are compared with the recently obtained mean-field (MF) density profile [Henning , Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)]. While the MF results are more accurate for weak screening, the LDA with correlations included yields the proper description for large screening. By comparison with first-principles simulations for three-dimensional spherical Yukawa crystals, we demonstrate that the two approximations complement each other. Together they accurately describe the density profile in the full range of screening parameters.

  12. Yukawa and the Birth of Meson Theory: Fiftieth Anniversary for Nuclear Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1935 physicist Hideki Yukawa proposed the meson theory of nuclear forces. Background, influences, and chronology of Yukawa's work are presented and discussed. Yukawa was supported in his meson idea by Japan's strong emphasis on intuitive and creative approaches which are also evident in subsequent developments in that country. (DH)

  13. Accurate momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.

    2014-04-15

    Accurate expression for the momentum transfer cross section for the attractive Yukawa potential is proposed. This simple analytic expression agrees with the numerical results better than to within ±2% in the regime relevant for ion-particle collisions in complex (dusty) plasmas.

  14. Ab initio approach to the non-perturbative scalar Yukawa model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Karmanov, V. A.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first non-perturbative calculation of the scalar Yukawa model in the single-nucleon sector up to four-body Fock sector truncation (one "scalar nucleon" and three "scalar pions"). The light-front Hamiltonian approach with a systematic non-perturbative renormalization is applied. We study the n-body norms and the electromagnetic form factor. We find that the one- and two-body contributions dominate up to coupling α ≈ 1.7. As we approach the coupling α ≈ 2.2, we discover that the four-body contribution rises rapidly and overtakes the two- and three-body contributions. By comparing with lower sector truncations, we show that the form factor converges with respect to the Fock sector expansion.

  15. Equilibrium properties and phase diagram of two-dimensional Yukawa systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, P.; Kalman, G. J.; Donkó, Z.; Kutasi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Properties of two-dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa systems are explored through molecular dynamics simulations. An effective coupling coefficient Γ* for the liquid phase is introduced on the basis of the constancy of the first peak amplitude of the pair-correlation functions. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated from the pair-correlation function. The solid-liquid transition of the system is investigated through the analysis of the bond-angular order parameter. The static structure function satisfies consistency relation, attesting to the reliability of the computational method. The response is shown to be governed by the correlational part of the inverse compressibility. An analysis of the velocity autocorrelation demonstrates that this latter also exhibits a universal behavior.

  16. Equilibrium properties and phase diagram of two-dimensional Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kutasi, K.; Kalman, G.J.

    2005-08-01

    Properties of two-dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa systems are explored through molecular dynamics simulations. An effective coupling coefficient {gamma}{sup *} for the liquid phase is introduced on the basis of the constancy of the first peak amplitude of the pair-correlation functions. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated from the pair-correlation function. The solid-liquid transition of the system is investigated through the analysis of the bond-angular order parameter. The static structure function satisfies consistency relation, attesting to the reliability of the computational method. The response is shown to be governed by the correlational part of the inverse compressibility. An analysis of the velocity autocorrelation demonstrates that this latter also exhibits a universal behavior.

  17. Yukawa Meson, Sakata Model and Baryon-Lepton Symmetry Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, R. E.

    It is difficult for me to grasp that this symposium is celebrating the jubilee of meson theory since I was a junior at Columbia College in 1935. I recall hearing a colloquium by Paul Dirac that year telling an enraptured audience about the infinite sea of negative energy states but I do not recall any special note being taken of the birth of an equally revolutionary concept, the Yukawa meson. Perhaps the reason was the publication of Hideki Yukawa's paper in an inaccessible Japanese journal, perhaps Dirac's electron theory was dealing with the well-known electromagnetic force whereas Yukawa' meson theory was put forth to understand the nature of two new forces - the nuclear and the weak. Whatever the reason, the situation changed drastically when I migrated to Cornell (to do my thesis under Hans Bethe during the years 1937sim39) and found a deep interest in meson theory. Thus, my own scientific career has almost spanned the period since the birth of meson theory but, what is more to the point, it has been strongly influenced by the work of Yukawa and his collaborators. It therefore gives me great pleasure to be able to talk at this MESON 50 symposium. As one of the oldest speakers, I shall respond in a loose way to Professor Maki's invitation to cover ``topics concerning the historical developments of hadron physics''. I shall select several major themes from the Japanese work that have had special interest for me. My remarks will fall under the four headings: (A) Yukawa Meson; (B) Sakata Model; (C) Baryon-Lepton Symmetry; and (D) Extensions of Baryon-Lepton Symmetry.

  18. Finite and Gauge-Yukawa unified theories: Theory and predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, J.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1999-10-25

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 GUTs in which a complete reduction of couplings has been achieved. FUTs realize an old field theoretical dream and have remarkable predictive power. Reduction of dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exists RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of the {beta}- functions in certain N=1 supersymmetric GUTS even to all orders. Recent developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking (SSB) sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations also in this sector of the theories. Of particular interest is a RGI sum rule for the soft scalar masses holding to all orders. The characteristic features of SU(5) models that have been constructed based on the above tools are: a) the old agreement of the top quark prediction with the measured value remains unchanged, b) the lightest Higgs boson is predicted to be around 120 GeV, c) the s-spectrum starts above several hundreds of GeV.

  19. Dynamical breakdown of Abelian gauge chiral symmetry by strong Yukawa interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, Petr; Brauner, Tomas; Hosek, Jiri

    2007-03-01

    We consider a model with anomaly-free Abelian gauge axial-vector symmetry, which is intended to mimic the standard electroweak gauge chiral SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} theory. Within this model we demonstrate: (1) Strong Yukawa interactions between massless fermion fields and a massive scalar field carrying the axial charge generate dynamically the fermion and boson proper self-energies, which are ultraviolet-finite and chirally noninvariant. (2) Solutions of the underlying Schwinger-Dyson equations found numerically exhibit a huge amplification of the fermion mass ratios as a response to mild changes of the ratios of the Yukawa couplings. (3) The 'would-be' Nambu-Goldstone boson is a composite of both the fermion and scalar fields, and it gives rise to the mass of the axial-vector gauge boson. (4) Spontaneous breakdown of the gauge symmetry further manifests by mass splitting of the complex scalar and by new symmetry-breaking vertices, generated at one loop. In particular, we work out in detail the cubic vertex of the Abelian gauge boson.

  20. Properties of gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa systems—A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman Joy, Ashwin

    2014-04-15

    Using 2D Molecular Dynamics simulation, the equilibrium and dynamical properties of a gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa liquid are investigated. We observe that due to asymmetry introduced in one direction by gravity, several interesting features arise. For example, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ, screening parameter κ, and according to a chosen value of gravitational force g (say in y-direction), the system is seen to exhibit super-, sub- or normal diffusion. Interestingly, x-averaged density profiles, unlike a barotropic fluid, acquires sharp, free surface with scale free linear y-dependence. As can be expected for a system with macroscopic gradients, self-diffusion calculated from Green-Kubo’s formalism does not agree with that obtained from Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion. A 2D angular-radial pair correlation function g(r, θ) clearly indicates asymmetric features induced by gravity. We observe that due to compression in y-direction, though in liquid state for all values of gravity considered, the transverse mode is found to predominant as compared to the longitudinal mode, leading to a novel Anisotropic Solid-like Yukawa liquid.

  1. Single Top Quarks at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, Ann P.; /UC, Riverside

    2008-09-01

    After many years searching for electroweak production of top quarks, the Tevatron collider experiments have now moved from obtaining first evidence for single top quark production to an impressive array of measurements that test the standard model in several directions. This paper describes measurements of the single top quark cross sections, limits set on the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, searches for production of single top quarks produced via flavor-changing neutral currents and from heavy W-prime and H+ boson resonances, and studies of anomalous Wtb couplings. It concludes with projections for future expected significance as the analyzed datasets grow.

  2. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  3. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  4. Effective multipoles and Yukawa electrostatics in dressed molecule theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Rosa; Kjellander, Roland

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we derive the multipolar expansion of the screened Coulomb potential in electrolyte solutions with molecular solvent. The solute and solvent molecules can have arbitrary sizes, shapes, and internal charge distributions. We use the exact statistical mechanical definition of renormalized charge distributions coming from "dressed molecule theory" to determine the effective multipoles of a molecule immersed in an electrolyte. The effects of many-body correlations are fully included in our formally exact theory. We restrict ourselves to sufficiently dilute solutions so the screened Coulomb potential decays for large distances like a Yukawa function, exp(-κr )/r, where r is the distance and 1/κ is the decay length (it is normally different from the Debye length). The resulting "Yukawa electrostatics" differ in many respects from ordinary, unscreened electrostatics. The "Yukawa charge" of a molecule (the lowest order moment in the multipolar expansion) is in general not equal to its Coulombic charge and it is not the integral of the renormalized charge distribution of the molecule. Moreover, as shown in this paper, the multipolar expansion of the Yukawa potential does not correspond, contrary to the case of the Coulomb potential, to its asymptotic expansion for large r. As a consequence, the charge term in the multipolar expansion is not the leading term in the asymptotic expansion. Instead, for large r values, multipoles of all orders contribute to the leading asymptotic term. Thus, the electrostatic potential from, for example, an electroneutral solvent molecule in an electrolyte solution has generally the same range as that from an ion. The proper asymptotic expansion for electrostatic interactions in electrolytes is derived. It is briefly shown how the multipole expansion formalism can also be applied in the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation for primitive model electrolytes.

  5. Effective multipoles and Yukawa electrostatics in dressed molecule theory.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Rosa; Kjellander, Roland

    2006-10-14

    In this paper we derive the multipolar expansion of the screened Coulomb potential in electrolyte solutions with molecular solvent. The solute and solvent molecules can have arbitrary sizes, shapes, and internal charge distributions. We use the exact statistical mechanical definition of renormalized charge distributions coming from "dressed molecule theory" to determine the effective multipoles of a molecule immersed in an electrolyte. The effects of many-body correlations are fully included in our formally exact theory. We restrict ourselves to sufficiently dilute solutions so the screened Coulomb potential decays for large distances like a Yukawa function, exp(-kappa r)/r, where r is the distance and 1/kappa is the decay length (it is normally different from the Debye length). The resulting "Yukawa electrostatics" differ in many respects from ordinary, unscreened electrostatics. The "Yukawa charge" of a molecule (the lowest order moment in the multipolar expansion) is in general not equal to its Coulombic charge and it is not the integral of the renormalized charge distribution of the molecule. Moreover, as shown in this paper, the multipolar expansion of the Yukawa potential does not correspond, contrary to the case of the Coulomb potential, to its asymptotic expansion for large r. As a consequence, the charge term in the multipolar expansion is not the leading term in the asymptotic expansion. Instead, for large r values, multipoles of all orders contribute to the leading asymptotic term. Thus, the electrostatic potential from, for example, an electroneutral solvent molecule in an electrolyte solution has generally the same range as that from an ion. The proper asymptotic expansion for electrostatic interactions in electrolytes is derived. It is briefly shown how the multipole expansion formalism can also be applied in the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation for primitive model electrolytes. PMID:17042582

  6. Higgs Boson Mass in Yukawa Unified SUSY SO(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2012-09-01

    We employ third family Yukawa unification, predicted by simple supersymmetric SO(10) models, to estimate the lightest MSSM Higgs boson mass. For μ > 0 (or μ < 0) and mt = 173.1 GeV, the Higgs mass is estimated to lie close to 123-124 GeV. The theoretical uncertainty in this estimate is ±3 GeV. We highlight some LHC testable benchmark points which also display the presence of neutralino-stau coannihilation channel.

  7. Quark Interchange Model of Baryon Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslow, Joel Neal

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point -like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and we assume that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (qq) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of Yn scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  8. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  9. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s}=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured to be 0 .37 ± 0 .07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0 .014 π ± 0 .036 π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0 .15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .36 , 0 .10] and Im[ g R /V L] ∈ [-0 .17 , 0 .23] with a correlation of 0 .11. The results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  11. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass,more » $$m_t^{pole}$$, or the strong coupling constant, $$\\alpha_S$$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$$ GeV is obtained when constraining $$\\alpha_S$$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $$m_t^{pole}$$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $$\\alpha_S(m_Z)$$ = 0.1151$$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $$\\alpha_S$$ using events from top-quark production.« less

  12. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass, $m_t^{pole}$, or the strong coupling constant, $\\alpha_S$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$ GeV is obtained when constraining $\\alpha_S$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $m_t^{pole}$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $\\alpha_S(m_Z)$ = 0.1151$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $\\alpha_S$ using events from top-quark production.

  13. Hideki Yukawa ---January 23, 1907 - September 8, 1981---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Y.

    1981-10-01

    Hideki Yukawa took the first step in his research in 1929 as an associate at Kyoto Imperial University (nowadays called Kyoto University). Most Japanese physicists of those days were isolated far from Western centers of physical science, where the `Sturm und Drang' of astonighing developments in the twentieth century physics had been roaring. There were only a handful of physicists in Japan who had already set to work in quantum physics, but never any one working on the quantum field theory and theoretical nuclear physics. Yukawa had to initiate his study of these frontiers of physical science by himself, without any teacher or senior scholar in this field. In 1935, Yukawa published his first paper with the title ``On the Interaction of Elementary Particles. I'', in which he developed the revolutionary idea of the meson theory. Although even the term `elementary particle' was not so popular in those days, the meson theory was proposed as a unified theory of interactions of elementary particles. His theory opened up a new fundamental view of Nature. This event might be regarded as a miracle in the history of Japanese physics. Through all of his works and thoughts, we are impressed by the simplicity of approach, the unfailing intuition and the creativity of a great master, which are deep-rooted in his culture. A sketch of his life, mainly based on his autobiographical material and partly based on the present writer's personal recollection, is presented to show his thought and activity.

  14. The mean spherical approximation for a dipolar Yukawa fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Douglas; Boda, Dezső; Szalai, István; Chan, Kwong-Yu

    1999-04-01

    The dipolar hard sphere fluid (DHSF) is a useful model of a polar fluid. However, the DHSF lacks a vapor-liquid transition due to the formation of chain-like structures. Such chains are not characteristic of real polar fluids. A more realistic model of a polar fluid is obtained by adding a Lennard-Jones potential to the intermolecular potential. Very similar results are obtained by adding a Yukawa potential, instead of the Lennard-Jones potential. We call this fluid the dipolar Yukawa fluid (DYF). We show that an analytical solution of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) can be obtained for the DYF. Thus, the DYF has many of the attractive features of the DHSF. We find that, within the MSA, the Yukawa potential modifies only the spherically averaged distribution function. Thus, although the thermodynamic properties of the DYF differ from those of the DHSF, the MSA dielectric constant of the DYF is the same as that of the DHSF. This result, and some other predictions, are tested by simulations and are found to be good approximations.

  15. Cool Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-01

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O (g5) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  16. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium. PMID:27494468

  17. Quaternion family symmetry of quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, Michele; Ma, Ernest; Kaneko, Satoru; Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2005-01-01

    To a first approximation, the quark mixing matrix has {theta}{sub 13}{sup q}={theta}{sub 23}{sup q}=0, whereas the lepton mixing matrix has {theta}{sub 23}{sup l}={pi}/4. We show how this structure may be understood if the family symmetry is Q{sub 8}, the quaternion group of eight elements. We find three viable scenarios for the Majorana neutrino mass matrix, each depending on four parameters and predicting a specific mass spectrum. The phenomenology of the two Higgs doublets which generate the Yukawa sector is analyzed and testable predictions are derived. We discuss also the closely related model based on D{sub 4}, the symmetry group of the square.

  18. Ground states of finite spherical Yukawa crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, H.; Asmus, D.; Golubnychiy, V.; Ludwig, P.; Kählert, H.; Bonitz, M.

    2008-09-01

    Small three-dimensional strongly coupled clusters of charged particles in a spherical confinement potential arrange themselves in nested concentric shells. If the particles are immersed into a background plasma the interaction is screened. The cluster shell configuration is known to be sensitive to the screening strength. With increased screening, an increased population of the inner shell(s) is observed. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the ground state shell configurations and configuration changes in a wide range of screening parameters for clusters with particle numbers N in the range of 11 to 60. We report three types of anomalous behaviors which are observed upon increase of screening, at fixed N or for an increase of N at fixed screening. The results are obtained by means of extensive first principle molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Enhanced thj signal at the LHC with h → γγ decay and CP-violating top-Higgs coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jason

    2015-05-01

    We study the observability of non-standard top Yukawa couplings in the pp → t (→ ℓνℓ b) h (→ γγ) j channel at 14 TeV high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The small diphoton branching ratio is enhanced when the CP-violating phase, ξ, of the top-Higgs interaction is non-zero. When the modulus of the top-Higgs interaction assumes the SM value, yt = ytSM, we find that the signal significance reaches 2.7σ (7.7 σ) when ξ = 0.25 π (0.5 π). Furthermore, the different couplings modify the polarisation of the top quark, and can subsequently be distinguished via asymmetries in spin correlations with the final state leptons. The diphoton decay mode is found to be significantly more promising than the previously considered pp → t (→ ℓνℓ b) h (→ bbbar) j channel.

  20. New GUT predictions for quark and lepton mass ratios confronted with phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2009-05-01

    Group theoretical factors from grand unified theory (GUT) symmetry breaking can lead to predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton masses (or Yukawa couplings) at the unification scale. Because of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections the viability of such predictions can depend strongly on the SUSY parameters. For three common minimal SUSY breaking scenarios with anomaly, gauge, and gravity mediation we investigate which GUT scale ratios m{sub e}/m{sub d}, m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}, and y{sub t}/y{sub b} are allowed when phenomenological constraints from electroweak precision observables, B physics, (g-2){sub {mu}}, mass limits on sparticles from direct searches as well as, optionally, dark matter constraints are taken into account. We derive possible new predictions for the GUT scale mass ratios and compare them with the phenomenologically allowed ranges. We find that new GUT scale predictions such as m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}=9/2 or 6 and y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}=3/2 or 2 are often favored compared to the ubiquitous relations m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}=3 or y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}=1. They are viable for characteristic SUSY scenarios, testable at the CERN LHC and future colliders.

  1. Fluid approach to evaluate sound velocity in Yukawa systems and complex plasmas.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, Sergey A; Thomas, Hubertus M

    2015-03-01

    The conventional fluid description of multicomponent plasma, supplemented by an appropriate equation of state for the macroparticle component, is used to evaluate the longitudinal sound velocity of Yukawa fluids. The obtained results are in very good agreement with those obtained earlier employing the quasilocalized charge approximation and molecular dynamics simulations in a rather broad parameter regime. Thus, a simple yet accurate tool to estimate the sound velocity across coupling regimes is proposed, which can be particularly helpful in estimating the dust-acoustic velocity in strongly coupled dusty (complex) plasmas. It is shown that, within the present approach, the sound velocity is completely determined by particle-particle correlations and the neutralizing medium (plasma), apart from providing screening of the Coulomb interaction, has no other effect on the sound propagation. The ratio of the actual sound velocity to its "ideal gas" (weak coupling) scale only weakly depends on the coupling strength in the fluid regime but exhibits a pronounced decrease with the increase of the screening strength. The limitations of the present approach in applications to real complex plasmas are briefly discussed. PMID:25871227

  2. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    Our paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark, using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centerof-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. Furthermore, our analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model and corresponding to a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported.

  3. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark (tHq), using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. The analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model, corresponding to a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  5. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  6. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green-Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  7. Memorial Archival Libraries of Yukawa, Tomonaga, and Sakata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaiwa, Yoshinobu; Bando, Masako; Gotoh, Haruyoshi; Hayakawa, Hisao; Hirata, Kohji; Ito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kenji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Konagaya, Daisuke; Konuma, Michiji; Kugo, Taichiro; Namba, Chusei; Nishitani, Tadashi; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kio; Tanaka, Sho; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    Brief history of the memorial archival libraries of Hideki Yukawa, Sin-itiro Tomonaga, and Shoichi Sakata, the great pioneers of nuclear and particle physics in Japan, is described. A recent project of maintaining the archival libraries is going on and the catalog databases of their documents are now almost ready for public access using Internet. In the project it is tried to make use of recent knowledge and technologies of archival science and the databases, and thus the documents themselves, willbe made accessible easier than before and may attract the interest of much broader range of audiences. Some interesting documents are picked up for demonstration.

  8. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  9. QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Datta, Saumen; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Sugar, Robert

    2001-09-01

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks -- two light and one strange -- and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a by-product we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0{sup ++} (a{sub 0}) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  10. Quark and Lepton Masses from Gaussian Landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Salem, Michael P.; Watari, Taizan

    2008-04-11

    The flavor structure of the standard model (SM) might arise from random selection on a landscape. We propose a class of simple models, 'Gaussian landscapes', where Yukawa couplings derive from overlap integrals of Gaussian wave functions on extra-dimensions. Statistics of vacua are generated by scanning the peak positions of these zero-modes, giving probability distributions for all flavor observables. Gaussian landscapes can account for all observed flavor patterns with few free parameters. Although they give broad probability distributions, the predictions are correlated and accounting for measured parameters sharpens the distributions of future neutrino measurements.