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Sample records for quasar luminosity function

  1. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  2. Probing the Luminosity Function of Young Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Glikman, E.; Lacy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last year, we have been using the Triple Spec Near-Infrared spectrograph on the Palomar Observatory to identify candidate dust-reddened quasars using the FIRST radio survey, the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and the SDSS optical survey. A previous campaign using the shallow near-infrared 2MASS survey, was very successful in finding dust obscured quasars by finding very red (R-K > 4, J-K > 1.7) radio sources (Glikman et al. 2007). Among them are many young, interacting galaxies (Urrutia, Lacy & Becker 2008) and a large fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (Urrutia et al. 2009), implying that the red quasar population probes a young phase in the lifetime of an AGN. By using the same color criteria on the deeper UKIDSS survey, we are able to probe into higher redshifts and lower luminosity red quasars. This is a first step to build a luminosity function for dust-obscured quasars. We then will be able to answer the question if young quasars are more generally more luminous as their older counterparts, perhaps because of higher accretion efficiency.

  3. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  4. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  5. The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution: A comparison of optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution are discussed, based on comparison of available data on optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs. It is assumed that the red shift of quasars is cosmological and the results are expressed in the framework of the Lambda = 0, Q sub Q = 1 cosmological model. The predictions of various density evolution laws are compared with observations of an optically selected sample of quasars and quasar samples from radio catalogs. The differences between the optical luminosity functions, the red shift distributions and the radio to optical luminosity ratios of optically selected quasars and radio quasars rule out luminosity functions where there is complete absence of correlation between radio and optical luminosities. These differences also imply that Schmidt's (1970) luminosity function, where there exists a statistical correlation between radio and optical luminosities, although may be correct for high red shift objects, disagrees with observation at low red shifts. These differences can be accounted for by postulating existence of two classes (1 and 2) of objects.

  6. Exploring the Quasar Luminosity Function with Quasars Selected by both Color and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christina M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Using a Bayesian selection algorithm, we determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. The color analysis is based on SDSS photometry, and the variability parameters are calculated from power-law fits to the structure functions. Simultaneous color and variability classification improves classification over either color or variability selection alone, with particular improvement in the selection of quasars with colors similar to stars. This method identifies 22,867 new type 1 quasar candidates in SDSS Stripe 82, which can be combined with the WISE and SDSS photometric quasar candidate catalogs. The redshifts of the candidate quasars were estimated using all available bands, weighting each band by smoothing the PDF. We show how to correct the candidate quasar luminosity function (QLF) for the completeness fraction and systematic errors in redshifts. The corrected QLF is comparable to those determined by spectroscopic investigations, suggesting that LSST and other next-generation surveys will be able to accurately determine the QLF in the absence of spectra. Finally, the quasars are divided into high and low Eddington fractions, using delta(g-i) and CIV blueshift as proxies. The candidate QLFs for the two populations are compared to look for changes as a function of redshift. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1411773.

  7. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  8. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Eric; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  9. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 5 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Enoki, M.; Capak, P.; Masters, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Civano, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-09-10

    We present the result of our low-luminosity quasar survey in the redshift range of 4.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5 in the COSMOS field. Using the COSMOS photometric catalog, we selected 15 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 5 that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the same redshift range. We obtained optical spectra for 14 of the 15 candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope and did not identify any low-luminosity type-1 quasars at z {approx} 5, while a low-luminosity type-2 quasar at z {approx} 5.07 was discovered. In order to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5, we calculated the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density of type-1 quasars. As a result, the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits on the quasar space density are {Phi} < 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -24.52 < M{sub 1450} < -23.52 and {Phi} < 2.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -23.52 < M{sub 1450} < -22.52. The inferred 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density are then used to provide constraints on the faint-end slope and the break absolute magnitude of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5. We find that the quasar space density decreases gradually as a function of redshift at low luminosity (M{sub 1450} {approx} -23), being similar to the trend found for quasars with high luminosity (M{sub 1450} < -26). This result is consistent with the so-called downsizing evolution of quasars seen at lower redshifts.

  10. Optical Variability of Quasars as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kwon, T.-Y.; Liang, Y.; Scott, J. H.; Wysota, A.

    1987-09-01

    Various models of the "central engine" in quasars make different predictions of how the degree of variability and its timescale vary with luminosity. In the past there have been conflicting claims about the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar variability. We have examined the photographic light curves obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory (U. of Florida) and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux) for over a hundred quasars (both radio-loud and radio-quiet). We demonstrate how the previously-reported redshift dependence is a consequence of time dilation, and find that, after allowance for this, there is no luminosity dependence in the amplitude of variability. High-luminosity quasars are not less variable than their low-luminosity counterparts. This creates major difficulties for some classes of quasar model with discrete accretion events (e.g., gas cloud or disrupted stars being "swallowed" directly).

  11. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability selection and quasar luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Magneville, Ch.; Yèche, Ch.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Burtin, E.; Dawson, K.; McGreer, I.; Myers, A. D.; Rossi, G.; Schlegel, D.; Schneider, D.; Streblyanska, A.; Tinker, J.

    2016-03-01

    The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, which are unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when z = 2.7-3.5 quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at z< 0.9. We present the variability selection of quasars in eBOSS, focusing on a specific program that led to a sample of 13 876 quasars to gdered = 22.5 over a 94.5 deg2 region in Stripe 82, which has an areal density 1.5 times higher than over the rest of the eBOSS footprint. We use these variability-selected data to provide a new measurement of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) in the redshift range of 0.68 luminosity-function evolution (PLE) with bright-end and faint-end slopes allowed to be different on either side of z = 2.2. The other is a simple PLE at z< 2.2, combined with a model that comprises both luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) at z> 2.2. Both models are constrained to be continuous at z = 2.2. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at high redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3% (resp., 1.1%) to g< 22.5 (resp., g< 23). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.

  12. The Faint End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ~ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat; Bogosavljević, Milan; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Mahabal, Ashish

    2010-02-01

    The evolution of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) is one of the basic cosmological measures providing insight into structure formation and mass assembly in the universe. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey to find faint quasars (-26.0 < M 1450 < -22.0) at redshifts z = 3.8-5.2 in order to measure the faint end of the QLF at these early times. Using available optical imaging data from portions of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and the Deep Lens Survey, we have color-selected quasar candidates in a total area of 3.76 deg2. Thirty candidates have R <= 23 mag. We conducted spectroscopic follow-up for 28 of our candidates and found 23 QSOs, 21 of which are reported here for the first time, in the 3.74 < z < 5.06 redshift range. We estimate our survey completeness through detailed Monte Carlo simulations and derive the first measurement of the density of quasars in this magnitude and redshift interval. We find that the binned luminosity function (LF) is somewhat affected by the K-correction used to compute the rest-frame absolute magnitude at 1450 Å. Considering only our R <= 23 sample, the best-fit single power law (Φ vprop L β) gives a faint-end slope β = -1.6 ± 0.2. If we consider our larger, but highly incomplete sample going 1 mag fainter, we measure a steeper faint-end slope -2 < β < -2.5. In all cases, we consistently find faint-end slopes that are steeper than expected based on measurements at z ~ 3. We combine our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to derive parameters for a double-power-law LF. Our best fit finds a bright-end slope, α = -2.4 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = -2.3 ± 0.2, without a well-constrained break luminosity. This is effectively a single power law, with β = -2.7 ± 0.1. We use these results to place limits on the amount of ultraviolet radiation produced by quasars and find that quasars are able to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts. The data presented herein were obtained at the

  13. Luminosity function and cosmological evolution of X-ray selected quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of a complete sample of 55 X-ray sources is presented as part of the Medium Sensitivity Survey of the Einstein Observatory. A pure luminosity evolutionary law is derived in order to determine the uniform distribution of the sources and the rates of evolution for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) observed by X-ray and optical techniques are compared. A nonparametric representation of the luminosity function is fitted to the observational data. On the basis of the reduced data, it is determined that: (1) AGNs evolve cosmologically; (2) less evolution is required to explain the X-ray data than the optical data; (3) the high-luminosity portion of the X-ray luminosity can be described by a power-law with a slope of gamma = 3.6; and (4) the X-ray luminosity function flattens at low luminosities. Some of the implications of the results for conventional theoretical models of the evolution of quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed.

  14. Selection of High-z Radio-Loud Quasars, and Their Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, D.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Benn, C. R.

    We present the selection techniques based on the use of Neural Networks and on the cross match between FIRST and SDSS that lead to the spectroscopic identification of 15 new Radio Loud QSOs in the redshift range 3. 6 ≤ z ≤ 4. 4. These QSOs did not have previous spectroscopical identification in SDSS or other works. Our selection method is highly complete (97 %) and it allows the estimation of the binned luminosity function of radio-loud quasar at z ˜ 4 with unprecedented accuracy. Our luminosity function is compared with the results of other samples of RL QSOs in similar ranges of redshift and with the whole population of QSOs (RL+RQ). The evolution of the luminosity function with redshift was for many years interpreted as a flattening of the bright end slope, but has recently been re-interpreted as strong evolution of the break luminosity for high-z QSOs and our results, for the radio-loud population, are consistent with this. We also find indications of a constant radio-loud fraction for QSOs at high z. Our next investigation will select RL QSOs candidates in the range of redshift 4. 4 ≤ z ≤ 5. 7, and will make use of data in the radio (FIRST), in the optical (SDSS DR10) and in the infrared (UKIDSS Large Area Survey DR10, and WISE).

  15. The K-Band Quasar Luminosity Function from an SDSS and UKIDSS Matched Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Michael; Ross, N. P.; Schneider, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We match the 1,015,082 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) DR3 to produce a catalog of 130,827 objects with optical (ugriz) and infrared (YJHK) measurements over an area of 1,200 sq. deg. A matching radius of 1'’ is used; the positional standard deviations of SDSS DR6 quasars and UKIDSS LAS is δRA = 0.137'’ and δDec = 0.131''. The catalog contains 74,351 K-band detections and 42,133 objects have coverage in all four NIR bands. In addition to the catalog, we present optical and NIR color-redshift and color-color plots. The photometric vs. spectroscopic redshift plots demonstrate how unreliable high reported photometric redshifts can be. This forces us to focus on z4.6 quasars are compared to our highest redshift objects. The giK color-color plot demonstrates that stellar contamination only affects a small sample of the objects. Distributions for Y,J,H,K and i-bands reveal insights into the flux limits in each magnitude. We investigate the distribution of redshifts from different data sets and investigate the legitimacy of certain measured photometric redshift regions. For in-depth analysis, we focus on the 300 sq. deg area equatorial SDSS region designated as Stripe 82. We measure the observed K-band quasar luminosity function (QLF) for a subset of 9,872, z<2.2 objects. We find the shape of the K-band QLF is very similar to that of the optical QLF, over the considered redshift ranges. Our calculated K-Band QLFs broadly match previous optical QLFs calculated from the SDSS and 2SLAQ QSO surveys and should provide important constraints linking unobscured optical quasars to Mid-Infrared detected, dusty and obscured AGNs at high-redshift.

  16. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply

  17. The Radio luminosity Function of Radio-Loud Quasars from the 7C Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    1998-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 24 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) from the new 7C Redshift Survey. Every quasar with a low-frequency (151 MHz) radio flux-density S(sub 151) > 0.5 Jy in two regions of the sky covering 0.013 sr is included; 23 of these have sufficient extended flux to meet the selection criteria, 18 of these have steep radio spectra (hereafter denoted as SSQs). The key advantage of this sample over most samples of RLQs is the lack of an optical magnitude limit. By combining the 7C and 3CRR samples, we have investigated the properties of RLQs as a function of redshift z and radio luminosity L(sub 151). We derive the radio luminosity function (RLF) of RLQs and find that the data are well fitted by a single power-law with slope alpha(sub 1) = 1.9 +/- 0.1 (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s.Mpc, OMEGA(sub M) = 1, OMEGA(sub DELTA) = 0). We find that there must be a break in the RLQ RLF at log(sub 10)(L(sub 151)/W Hz.sr) approximately < or = 27, in order for the models to be consistent with the 7C and 6C source counts. The z-dependence of the RLF follows a one-tailed gaussian which peaks at z = 1.7 +/- 0.2. We find no evidence for a decline in the co-moving space density of RLQs at higher redshifts. A positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities of SSQs is observed, confirming a result of Serjeant. We are able to rule out this correlation being due to selection effects or biases in our combined sample. The radio-optical correlation and best-fit model RLF enable us to estimate the distribution of optical magnitudes of quasars in samples selected at low radio frequencies, We con- clude that for samples with S(sub 151) approximately < or = 1 Jy one must use optical data significantly deeper than the POSS-I limit (R approximately equal 20), in order to avoid severe incompleteness.

  18. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF FERMI-DETECTED FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M. S.; Romani, R. W.; Costamante, L.; Reimer, A.; Dermer, C. D.; King, O. G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Richards, J. L.; Stevenson, M. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.edu

    2012-06-01

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray-selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similar to that of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. Also, using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs in the 10 keV-300 GeV band and show that there is no correlation between the luminosity at the peak of the {gamma}-ray emission component and its peak frequency. Using this luminosity-independent SED with the derived LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sup +1.6}{sub -1.0}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100 GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sup +3.3}{sub -2.2}, that most are seen within 5 Degree-Sign of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  19. PROBING THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z{approx} 4 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.; Comastri, A.; Enoki, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Murayama, T.; Saito, T.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-02-20

    We searched for quasars that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF). Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope and identified eight low-luminosity quasars at z {approx} 4. In order to derive the QLF based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z {approx} 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope ({beta} = -1.67{sup +0.11}{sub -0.17}) than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  20. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  1. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  2. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  3. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  4. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  5. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  6. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. II. BLACK HOLE MASS AND EDDINGTON RATIO FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Shen, Yue

    2013-02-10

    We employ a flexible Bayesian technique to estimate the black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio functions for Type 1 (i.e., broad line) quasars from a uniformly selected data set of {approx}58, 000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. We find that the SDSS becomes significantly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} or L/L {sub Edd} {approx}< 0.07, and that the number densities of Type 1 quasars continue to increase down to these limits. Both the mass and Eddington ratio functions show evidence of downsizing, with the most massive and highest Eddington ratio BHs experiencing Type 1 quasar phases first, although the Eddington ratio number densities are flat at z < 2. We estimate the maximum Eddington ratio of Type 1 quasars in the observable universe to be L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 3. Consistent with our results in Shen and Kelly, we do not find statistical evidence for a so-called sub-Eddington boundary in the mass-luminosity plane of broad-line quasars, and demonstrate that such an apparent boundary in the observed distribution can be caused by selection effect and errors in virial BH mass estimates. Based on the typical Eddington ratio in a given mass bin, we estimate growth times for the BHs in Type 1 quasars and find that they are comparable to or longer than the age of the universe, implying an earlier phase of accelerated (i.e., with higher Eddington ratios) and possibly obscured growth. The large masses probed by our sample imply that most of our BHs reside in what are locally early-type galaxies, and we interpret our results within the context of models of self-regulated BH growth.

  7. ON THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.

    2011-12-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux-limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multi-variate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities. With this correlation, whether intrinsic or observationally induced accounted for, we find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio-loud (R > 10) and radio-quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution for the range of R values considered. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio-quiet and very radio-loud quasars, but rather a

  8. The Faint End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ~ 4: Implications for Ionization of the Intergalactic Medium and Cosmic Downsizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    We present an updated determination of the z ~ 4 QSO luminosity function (QLF), improving the quality of the determination of the faint end of the QLF presented by Glikman et al. (2010). We have observed an additional 43 candidates from our survey sample, yielding one additional QSO at z = 4.23 and increasing the completeness of our spectroscopic follow-up to 48% for candidates brighter than R = 24 over our survey area of 3.76 deg2. We study the effect of using K-corrections to compute the rest-frame absolute magnitude at 1450 Å compared with measuring M 1450 directly from the object spectra. We find a luminosity-dependent bias: template-based K-corrections overestimate the luminosity of low-luminosity QSOs, likely due to their reliance on templates derived from higher luminosity QSOs. Combining our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and using spectrum-based M 1450 for all the quasars, we fit a double power law to the binned QLF. Our best fit has a bright-end slope, α = 3.3 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = 1.6+0.8 -0.6. Our new data revise the faint-end slope of the QLF down to flatter values similar to those measured at z ~ 3. The break luminosity, though poorly constrained, is at M* = -24.1+0.7 -1.9, approximately 1-1.5 mag fainter than at z ~ 3. This QLF implies that QSOs account for about half the radiation needed to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. The quasar mass-luminosity plane - I. A sub-Eddington limit for quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.; Elvis, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We use 62185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample to explore the relationship between black hole mass and luminosity. Black hole masses were estimated based on the widths of their Hβ, MgII and CIV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. We find that, over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, the most luminous low-mass quasars are at their Eddington luminosity, but the most luminous high-mass quasars in each redshift bin fall short of their Eddington luminosities, with the shortfall of the order of 10 or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ~0.15 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. We also examine the highest mass quasars in every redshift bin in an effort to learn more about quasars that are about to cease their luminous accretion. We conclude that the quasar mass-luminosity locus contains a number of new puzzles that must be explained theoretically.

  10. Evolution and Luminosity Dependendence of the Hosts of Radio-quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, S. E.; Heckman, T.; Lacy, M.

    2004-12-01

    The discovery that the nearest galaxies may all contain supermassive black holes, and that the black hole mass and galactic spheroid mass are strongly correlated, implies that most bulge-dominated massive galaxies went through an early quasar phase. Therefore, quasar activity is probably a natural part of the evolution of typical early-type galaxies. To investigate these links between the formation and evolution of the AGN population and that of galaxies, we have been studying the relationship between these populations at moderate and high redshift, where the quasar luminosity function is reaching a maximum. At z ˜ 2 -- 3, we found that faint radio-quiet quasars seem to be associated with L* galaxies, as opposed to the many times L* galaxies associated with the radio-loud objects at similar redshifts. Although the radio-quiet hosts have luminosities and compactnesses similar to the Lyman-break galaxies, their rest-frame UV-optical colors indicate that they may be less actively forming stars. This is roughly consistent with hierarchical schemes of galaxy formation, with these high-redshift, low AGN-luminosity objects still in the process of formation. In contrast, at z ˜ 1, most high-luminosity quasars seem to have very massive hosts, more comparable to those of the radio-loud objects. To determine whether this difference is due to evolution or to the difference in AGN luminosity, we have obtained deep ACS imaging of a sample of lower-luminosity radio-quiet quasar hosts at z ˜ 1. This allows us to study the host galaxy mass as a function of AGN luminosity (and therefore black hole mass) and as a function of redshift. This work has been funded by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-10762 and NASA/STScI HST grant GO-09902.

  11. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  12. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure Using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Anne H.; Seitz, Stella; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R 200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  13. MEASURING LENSING MAGNIFICATION OF QUASARS BY LARGE SCALE STRUCTURE USING THE VARIABILITY-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-10

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R{sub 200}) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  14. Characterizing Quasar Outflows III: SEDs, and Bolometric Luminosity Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph; Robbins, J. M.; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Christenson, D. H.; Derseweh, J. A.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we add photometry from both the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). 2MASS photometry covers the rest-frame optical regime of these qusars, while the WISE W1, W2, and W3 bands cover the rest-frame wavelength ranges 0.9-1.27 micron, 1.35-1.75 micron, and 2.52-5.51 micron, respectively. The preliminary release of WISE data cover 3800 of our quasars. In an accompnying poster, we have subjectively divided these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). Here, we present average SEDs for these subsamples, estimates of bolometric luminosity, and explore changes in SED based on both outflow properties and quasar physical properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the

  15. Cross-correlation of SDSS DR7 quasars and DR10 BOSS galaxies: The weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at z ∼ 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; McBride, Cameron K.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; White, Martin; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D.; Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasars and 349,608 Data Release 10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey at 0.3 < z < 0.9. The CCF can be reasonably well fit by a power-law model ξ{sub QG}(r) = (r/r {sub 0}){sup –γ} on projected scales of r{sub p} = 2-25 h {sup –1} Mpc with r {sub 0} = 6.61 ± 0.25 h {sup –1} Mpc and γ = 1.69 ± 0.07. We estimate a quasar linear bias of b{sub Q} = 1.38 ± 0.10 at (z) = 0.53 from the CCF measurements, which corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 12} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}, compared with a ∼10{sup 13} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. Based on the clustering measurements, most quasars at z-bar ∼0.5 are not the descendants of their higher luminosity counterparts at higher redshift, which would have evolved into more massive and more biased systems at low redshift. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be db{sub Q} /dlog L = 0.20 ± 0.34 or 0.11 ± 0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities –23.5 > M{sub i} (z = 2) > –25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of clustering for luminous quasars at z-bar ∼0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, halo occupation distribution (HOD) models, and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest that quasars reside in a broad range of host halos. The host halo mass distributions significantly overlap with each other for quasars at different luminosities, implying a poor correlation between halo mass and instantaneous quasar luminosity. We also find that the quasar HOD parameterization is largely degenerate such that different HODs can reproduce the CCF equally well, but with different satellite fractions and host halo mass distributions. These results highlight the limitations

  16. Hints on the Broad Line Region Structure of Quasars at High and Low Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Zamfir, Sebastian; Negrete, C. A.; Dultzin, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    Quasars show a considerable spectroscopic diversity. However, the variety of quasar spectra at low redshifts is non-random: a principal component analysis applied to large samples customarily identifies two main eigenvectors. In this contribution we show that the range of quasar optical spectral properties observed at low-z\\ and associated with the first eigenvector is preserved up to z ≈ 2 in a sample of high luminosity quasars. We also describe two major luminosity effects.

  17. Heavily reddened type 1 quasars at z > 2 - I. Evidence for significant obscured black hole growth at the highest quasar luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Manda; Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new population of z > 2 dust-reddened, type 1 quasars with 0.5 ≲ E(B - V) ≲ 1.5, selected using near-infrared (NIR) imaging data from the UKIDSS-LAS (Large Area Survey), ESO-VHS (European Southern Obseratory-VISTA Hemisphere Survey) and WISE surveys. NIR spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope for 24 new objects bring our total sample of spectroscopically confirmed hyperluminous (>1013 L⊙), high-redshift dusty quasars to 38. There is no evidence for reddened quasars having significantly different Hα equivalent widths relative to unobscured quasars. The average black hole masses (˜109-1010 M⊙) and bolometric luminosities (˜1047 erg s-1) are comparable to the most luminous unobscured quasars at the same redshift, but with a tail extending to very high luminosities of ˜1048 erg s-1. 66 per cent of the reddened quasars are detected at >3σ at 22 μm by WISE. The average 6-μm rest-frame luminosity is log10(L6 μm/ erg s-1) = 47.1 ± 0.4, making the objects among the mid-infrared brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) currently known. The extinction-corrected space density estimate now extends over three magnitudes (-30 < Mi < -27) and demonstrates that the reddened quasar luminosity function is significantly flatter than that of the unobscured quasar population at z = 2-3. At the brightest magnitudes, Mi ≲ -29, the space density of our dust-reddened population exceeds that of unobscured quasars. A model where the probability that a quasar becomes dust reddened increases at high luminosity is consistent with the observations and such a dependence could be explained by an increase in luminosity and extinction during AGN-fuelling phases. The properties of our obscured type 1 quasars are distinct from the heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN that have been identified at much fainter luminosities and we conclude that they likely correspond to a brief evolutionary phase in massive galaxy formation.

  18. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ ‑22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  19. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ∼ ‑22 mag or z AB ∼ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  20. Quasar clustering at intermediate redshift - Analysis of systematics and of luminosity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Kourkchi, Ehsan; DiPompeo, Michael A.; White, Martin; Weinberg, David, H.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Paris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Streblyanska, Alina

    2016-01-01

    We measure the clustering of over 55,000 quasars at redshifts 2.2 < z < 3.4 drawn from the final sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This is by far the largest sample ever used to study quasar clustering at "intermediate" redshifts. We ameliorate the effect of observational systematics on our clustering analyses by weighting our control catalogues of random points by maps of how observational systematics correlate with the BOSS quasar target density. We find that there is no significant evolution in the quasar correlation length and bias over our studied redshift range, implying that the masses of the dark matter halos that host quasars decreases slightly from z~2.2 to z~3.4. Our result also contradicts a monotonic relation between the optical luminosity of quasars near redshift 2.5 and their host halo masses. To begin to study whether this contradiction holds for quasars' bolometric luminosity, we use data from the Wide-field Infra red Survey Explorer (WISE) to study whether the luminosity or detection of BOSS quasars in the mid-IR is correlated with the masses of quasars' host halos. This work was partially supported by NSF award 1211112.

  1. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING WEAK Mg II QUASAR ABSORBERS AND A CURIOUS DEPENDENCE ON QUASAR LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jessica L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified 469 Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet systems having W{sub r} {>=} 0.02 A in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 2.6. Using the largest sample yet of 188 weak Mg II systems (0.02 A {<=}W{sub r} < 0.3 A), we calculate their absorber redshift path density, dN/dz. We find clear evidence of evolution, with dN/dz peaking at z {approx} 1.2, and that the product of the absorber number density and cross section decreases linearly with increasing redshift; weak Mg II absorbers seem to vanish above z {approx_equal} 2.7. If the absorbers are ionized by the UV background, we estimate number densities of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Mpc{sup -3} for spherical geometries and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} Mpc{sup -3} for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (W{sub r} {>=} 1.0 A) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is {approx}25% higher than toward faint quasars (10{sigma} at low redshift, 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, and 4{sigma} at high redshift, 1.4 < z {<=} 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being {approx}20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10{sigma} at low redshift and 4{sigma} at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  2. Evolutionary tracks of individual quasars in the mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.; Elvis, Martin; Amarie, Mihail

    2011-07-01

    Previous work on the quasar mass-luminosity plane indicates the possibility that quasars of the same central black hole mass might follow a common evolutionary track, independent of the properties of the host galaxy. We consider two simple models for the evolution of individual quasars. Requiring these tracks to lie within the observed quasar locus at all redshifts strongly constrains the model parameters, but does allow some solutions. These solutions include a family of tracks with similar shape but different initial masses that might match the observed quasar distributions at all redshifts z < 2.0. This family of solutions is characterized by short (1-2 Gyr) lifetimes, a duty cycle in which the quasar is on at least 25 per cent of the time, and a rapid decline in Eddington ratio, perhaps with LEdd∝ t-6 or steeper.

  3. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  4. THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS. II. THE SDSS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2013-02-10

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R is found to be quite different from the observed one and is smooth with no evidence of a bimodality in radio loudness for log R {>=} -1. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  5. INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald; Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2012-12-20

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L

  6. The 2QDES Pilot: the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Ben; Shanks, T.; Findlay, J.; Metcalfe, N.; Sawangwit, U.; Irwin, M.; González-Solares, E.; Fine, S.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Croom, S.; Jurek, R. J.; Parkinson, D.; Bielby, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ≈10 000 quasars from ≈150 deg2 of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with 0.8 < z < 2.5 and g < 20.5. At fainter magnitudes, optical UVX selection is still required to reach our g ≈ 22.5 limit. Using both these techniques we observed quasar redshifts at sky densities up to 90 deg-2. By comparing 2QDESp with other surveys (SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ) we find that quasar clustering is approximately luminosity independent, with results for all four surveys consistent with a correlation scale of r0 = 6.1 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc, despite their decade range in luminosity. We find a significant redshift dependence of clustering, particularly when BOSS data with r0 = 7.3 ± 0.1 h-1 Mpc are included at z ≈ 2.4. All quasars remain consistent with having a single host halo mass of ≈2 ± 1 × 1012 h-1 M⊙. This result implies that either quasars do not radiate at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity or AGN black hole and dark matter halo masses are weakly correlated. No significant evidence is found to support fainter, X-ray selected quasars at low redshift having larger halo masses as predicted by the `hot halo' mode AGN model of Fanidakis et al. (2013). Finally, although the combined quasar sample reaches an effective volume as large as that of the original SDSS LRG sample, we do not detect the BAO feature in these data.

  7. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  8. Time Variability of Quasars: the Structure Function Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C.; Ivezić, Ž.; de Vries, W.; Sesar, B.; Becker, A.

    2008-12-01

    Significant progress in the description of quasar variability has been recently made by employing SDSS and POSS data. Common to most studies is a fundamental assumption that photometric observations at two epochs for a large number of quasars will reveal the same statistical properties as well-sampled light curves for individual objects. We critically test this assumption using light curves for a sample of ~2,600 spectroscopically confirmed quasars observed about 50 times on average over 8 years by the SDSS stripe 82 survey. We find that the dependence of the mean structure function computed for individual quasars on luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the behavior of the structure function derived from two-epoch observations of a much larger sample. We also reproduce the result that the variability properties of radio and X-ray selected subsamples are different. However, the scatter of the variability structure function for fixed values of luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is similar to the scatter induced by the variance of these quantities in the analyzed sample. Hence, our results suggest that, although the statistical properties of quasar variability inferred using two-epoch data capture some underlying physics, there is significant additional information that can be extracted from well-sampled light curves for individual objects.

  9. The Luminosity Dependence of Quasar UV Continuum Slope: Dust Extinction Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Liu, Hui; Li, Linlin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the UV continuum slope α of a large quasar sample from SDSS DR7. By using specific continuum windows, we build two samples at lower (0.71\\lt z\\lt 1.19) and higher (1.90\\lt z\\lt 3.15) redshifts, which correspond to the continuum slopes at longer (near-UV) and shorter (far-UV) rest wavelength ranges, respectively. Overall, the average continuum slopes are ‑0.36 and ‑0.51 for {α }{{NUV}} and {α }{{FUV}} with similar dispersions {σ }α ∼ 0.5. For both samples, we confirm the luminosity dependence of the continuum slope, i.e., fainter quasars have redder spectra. We further find that both {α }{{NUV}} and {α }{{FUV}} have a common upper limit (∼ 1/3), which is almost independent of the quasar luminosity {L}{{bol}}. This finding implies that the intrinsic quasar continuum (or the bluest quasar), at any luminosity, obeys the standard thin-disk model. We propose that the other quasars with redder α are caused by the reddening from the dust locally. With this assumption, we employ the dust extinction scenario to model the observed {L}{{bol}}{--}α relation. We find that a typical value of E(B-V)∼ 0.1{--}0.3 {mag} (depending on the types of extinction curve) of the quasar local dust is enough to explain the discrepancy of α between the observation (∼ -0.5) and the standard accretion disk model prediction (∼ 1/3).

  10. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  11. Luminosity Functions for Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Fabio; Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Italo

    1998-12-01

    We present theoretical mass-luminosity relations and luminosity functions (LFs) for globular cluster stars, from luminosities above the horizontal branch down to the minimum luminosity of hydrogen-burning stars. The LFs are available for metal mass fraction Z from Z = 10-4 to Z = 4 × 10-3, in the Johnson V band and in the Bessell-Cousins I band, and are based on tracks especially computed for this program, with the input physics of the models developed recently by D'Antona et al., Mazzitelli et al., and D'Antona & Mazzitelli. Two typical comparisons with observations are presented and discussed: (1) comparisons and statistical analysis with the LFs of the lower giant branch, turnoff region, and upper main sequence of several globular clusters from low to high metallicity, (2) derivation of the initial mass function (IMF) for the stars below the turnoff for several globular clusters for which Hubble Space Telescope data are available. In the first analysis we find that, for relatively large metallicities (Z >= 10-3) a good fit between theoretical and observed LFs can be found, although a simple χ2 statistical analysis shows that it is not possible to derive a strongly preferred age (or, equivalently, distance modulus) from the LF comparison. The fit with lower metallicity [Z ~ (1-2) × 10-4] LFs is less good but statistically acceptable. The main result is that the difference between observed and theoretical LFs of low-metallicity clusters reported by VandenBerg, Bolte, & Stetson appears to be much reduced in present models, and we give the possible reason why this happens and its consequences for the important parameter of the helium core mass at the flash. In the second application, we explore the effect of varying age and distance modulus on the mass function derived for a globular cluster. Distance moduli corresponding to the ``long'' distance scale (and relatively low ages) seem to be preferred based on these comparisons. The resulting index of the IMF is

  12. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  13. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. I. TESTING FWHM-BASED VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Kelly, Brandon C.

    2012-02-20

    We jointly constrain the luminosity function (LF) and black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad-line quasars with forward Bayesian modeling in the quasar mass-luminosity plane, based on a homogeneous sample of {approx}58, 000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 quasars at z {approx} 0.3-5. We take into account the selection effect of the sample flux limit; more importantly, we deal with the statistical scatter between true BH masses and FWHM-based single-epoch virial mass estimates, as well as potential luminosity-dependent biases of these mass estimates. The LF is tightly constrained in the regime sampled by SDSS and makes reasonable predictions when extrapolated to {approx}3 mag fainter. Downsizing is seen in the model LF. On the other hand, we find it difficult to constrain the BHMF to within a factor of a few at z {approx}> 0.7 (with Mg II and C IV-based virial BH masses). This is mainly driven by the unknown luminosity-dependent bias of these mass estimators and its degeneracy with other model parameters, and secondly driven by the fact that SDSS quasars only sample the tip of the active BH population at high redshift. Nevertheless, the most likely models favor a positive luminosity-dependent bias for Mg II and possibly for C IV, such that at fixed true BH mass, objects with higher-than-average luminosities have overestimated FWHM-based virial masses. There is tentative evidence that downsizing also manifests itself in the active BHMF, and the BH mass density in broad-line quasars contributes an insignificant amount to the total BH mass density at all times. Within our model uncertainties, we do not find a strong BH mass dependence of the mean Eddington ratio, but there is evidence that the mean Eddington ratio (at fixed BH mass) increases with redshift.

  14. Ultraviolet Fe II Emission in Fainter Quasars: Luminosity Dependences, and the Influence of Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, Roger G.; Haberzettl, Lutz; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Williger, Gerard M.; Mitchell, Sophia M.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Campusano, Luis E.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the strength of ultraviolet Fe II emission in fainter quasars compared with brighter quasars for 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.8, using the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) DR7QSO catalogue and spectra of Schneider et al., and the SFQS (SDSS Faint Quasar Survey) catalogue and spectra of Jiang et al. We quantify the strength of the UV Fe II emission using the W2400 equivalent width of Weymann et al., which is defined between two rest-frame continuum windows at 2240-2255 and 2665-2695 Å. The main results are the following. (1) We find that for W2400 ≳ 25 Å there is a universal (i.e. for quasars in general) strengthening of W2400 with decreasing intrinsic luminosity, L3000. (2) In conjunction with previous work by Clowes et al., we find that there is a further, differential, strengthening of W2400 with decreasing L3000 for those quasars that are members of Large Quasar Groups (LQGs). (3) We find that increasingly strong W2400 tends to be associated with decreasing FWHM of the neighbouring Mg II λ2798 broad emission line. (4) We suggest that the dependence of W2400 on L3000 arises from Lyα fluorescence. (5) We find that stronger W2400 tends to be associated with smaller virial estimates from Shen et al. of the mass of the central black hole, by a factor ˜2 between the ultrastrong emitters and the weak. Stronger W2400 emission would correspond to smaller black holes that are still growing. The differential effect for LQG members might then arise from preferentially younger quasars in the LQG environments.

  15. Ultraviolet Fe II emission in fainter quasars: luminosity dependences, and the influence of environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, Roger G.; Haberzettl, Lutz; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Williger, Gerard M.; Mitchell, Sophia M.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Campusano, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the strength of ultraviolet Fe II emission in fainter quasars compared with brighter quasars for 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.8, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7QSO catalogue and spectra of Schneider et al., and the SDSS Faint Quasar Survey (SFQS) catalogue and spectra of Jiang et al. We quantify the strength of the UV Fe II emission using the W2400 equivalent width of Weymann et al., which is defined between two rest-frame continuum windows at 2240-2255 and 2665-2695 Å. The main results are the following. (1) We find that for W2400 ≳ 25 Å there is a universal (i.e. for quasars in general) strengthening of W2400 with decreasing intrinsic luminosity, L3000. (2) In conjunction with previous work by Clowes et al., we find that there is a further, differential, strengthening of W2400 with decreasing L3000 for those quasars that are members of Large Quasar Groups (LQGs). (3) We find that increasingly strong W2400 tends to be associated with decreasing full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the neighbouring Mg II λ2798 broad emission line. (4) We suggest that the dependence of W2400 on L3000 arises from Lyα fluorescence. (5) We find that stronger W2400 tends to be associated with smaller virial estimates from Shen et al. of the mass of the central black hole, by a factor of ˜2 between the ultrastrong emitters and the weak. Stronger W2400 emission would correspond to smaller black holes that are still growing. The differential effect for LQG members might then arise from preferentially younger quasars in the LQG environments.

  16. Casadio-Fabbri-Mazzacurati black strings and braneworld-induced quasars luminosity corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, Roldão; Piloyan, A.; Kuerten, A. M.; Coimbra-Araújo, C. H.

    2013-02-01

    This paper aims to evince the corrections on the black string warped horizon in the braneworld paradigm, and their drastic physical consequences, as well as to provide subsequent applications in astrophysics. Our analysis concerning black holes on the brane departs from the Schwarzschild case, where the black string is unstable to large-scale perturbation. The cognizable measurability of the black string horizon corrections due to braneworld effects is investigated, as well as their applications in the variation of quasars luminosity. We delve into the case wherein two solutions of Einstein’s equations proposed by Casadio, Fabbri and Mazzacurati, regarding black hole metrics presented a post-Newtonian parameter measured on the brane. In this scenario, it is possible to analyze purely the braneworld corrected variation in quasars luminosity, by an appropriate choice of the post-Newtonian parameter that precludes Hawking radiation on the brane: the variation in quasars luminosity is uniquely provided by pure braneworld effects, as the Hawking radiation on the brane is suppressed.

  17. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Salviander, S.; Shields, G. A.; Bonning, E. W. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M {sub BH}, and the host galaxy luminosity, L {sub gal}, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship by examining the redshift dependence of Δ log M {sub BH}, the offset in M {sub BH} from the local M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship. There is little systematic trend in Δ log M {sub BH} out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, σ{sub *}, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for σ{sub *} in statistical studies.

  18. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  19. MAD Adaptive Optics Imaging of High-luminosity Quasars: A Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Paiano, S.; Treves, A.; Uslenghi, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Baruffolo, A.; Diolaiti, E.; Farinato, J.; Lombini, M.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z ∼ 2 and one at z ∼ 4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these nonoptimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ∼ 0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for two sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with AO systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2–3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for quasi-stellar objects at z = 2 with nucleus K-magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude ‑31 to ‑26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.

  20. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - Hidden quasar or protogalaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Oliver, S. J.; Taylor, A. N.; Lawrence, A.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P. B.; Conrow, T.

    1991-01-01

    An emission line galaxy with the enormous far-IR luminosity of 3 x 10 to the 14th solar has been found at z = 2.286. The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-alpha emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the IR energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the IR emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 billion solar masses of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. The presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch.

  1. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  2. Gamma-ray luminosity function of BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) of BL Lac objects is constructed by using a sample of BL Lac objects with redshifts selected from the Second LAT AGN catalog. The GLFs of BL Lacs in the frame of the pure density evolution (PDE), the pure luminosity evolution (PLE), and the luminosity-dependent density (LDDE) models are determined by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, respectively. Our results suggest that the PDE model can give best description for BL Lac GLF based on the combination of constraints of model parameters and good fits to the observed data of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) BL Lacs, but other two models (PLE and LDDE) cannot be excluded. Based on our constructed GLFs, the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) from BL Lacs is estimated, and ˜1-5 per cent of the EGRB in the 0.1-100 GeV band is found to come from unresolved BL Lacs (including the cascade emission). In addition, it is found that the BL Lac GLF is very different from flat spectrum radio quasar GLF and then the contribution of blazars to the EGRB should be estimated separately.

  3. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  4. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  5. A Compton-thick Wind in the High Luminosity Quasar, PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Behar, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaspi, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L(sub bol) approximately equal to 10(exp 47) ergs(exp -1) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest-frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (0.26-0.31c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (N(sub H) greater than 10(exp 24)cm(exp -2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of 4(pi) steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.

  6. A direct measurement of the mean occupation function of quasars: Breaking degeneracies between halo occupation distribution models

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Nguyen, My L.; Myers, Adam D.; Zheng, Zheng

    2013-12-20

    Recent work on quasar clustering suggests a degeneracy in the halo occupation distribution constrained from two-point correlation functions. To break this degeneracy, we make the first empirical measurement of the mean occupation function (MOF) of quasars at z ∼ 0.2 by matching quasar positions with groups and clusters identified in the MaxBCG sample. We fit two models to the MOF, a power law and a four-parameter model. The number distribution of quasars in host halos is close to Poisson, and the slopes of the MOF obtained from our best-fit models (for the power-law case) favor an MOF that monotonically increases with halo mass. The best-fit slopes are 0.53 ± 0.04 and 1.03 ± 1.12 for the power-law model and the four-parameter model, respectively. We measure the radial distribution of quasars within dark matter halos and find it to be adequately described by a power law with a slope –2.3 ± 0.4. We measure the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of quasars and show that there is no evidence that quasar luminosity depends on host halo mass, similar to the inferences drawn from clustering measurements. We also measure the conditional black hole mass function (CMF) of our quasars. Although the results are consistent with no dependence on halo mass, we observe a slight indication of downsizing of the black hole mass function. The lack of halo mass dependence in the CLF and CMF shows that quasars residing in galaxy clusters have characteristic luminosity and black hole mass scales.

  7. A deep luminosity function for 47 Tucanae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.

    CCD photometry in B and V reaching B(lim) ≅ 25 has been employed to obtain the luminosity function and color-magnitude diagram for the main sequence of 47 Tuc. For 5 < Mv < 10 the authors find that its LF is essentially flat (Δlog n/Δm ≡ 0). The CMD is successfully matched by isochrones with [Fe/H] = -0.5 and t ≅ 15×109y.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE Halpha LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, Eduard; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a window on the star formation history over the last 4 Gyr. SHELS is a spectroscopically complete survey for R{sub tot} < 20.3 over 4 square{sup 0}. We use the 10k spectra to select a sample of pure star-forming galaxies based on their Halpha emission line. We use the spectroscopy to determine extinction corrections for individual galaxies and to remove active galaxies in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. We use the large volume of SHELS with the depth of a narrowband survey for Halpha galaxies at z approx 0.24 to make a combined determination of the Halpha luminosity function at z approx 0.24. The large area covered by SHELS yields a survey volume big enough to determine the bright end of the Halpha luminosity function from redshift 0.100 to 0.377 for an assumed fixed faint-end slope alpha = -1.20. The bright end evolves: the characteristic luminosity L* increases by 0.84 dex over this redshift range. Similarly, the star formation density increases by 0.11 dex. The fraction of galaxies with a close neighbor increases by a factor of 2-5 for L{sub Ha}lpha approx> L* in each of the redshift bins. We conclude that triggered star formation is an important influence for star-forming galaxies with Halpha emission.

  9. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y.; Watson, L. C.; Bentz, M. C.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dietrich, M.; Ferrarese, L.

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  10. Luminosity Function Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Kao, K. C.; Hu, J. Y.

    The luminosity function of a star cluster evolves markedly during the pre-main sequence phase. With an assumed initial mass function (Miller & Scalo, 1979) and pre-main sequence tracks (D'Antona & Mazzitelli, 1994), we calculate a set of monochromatic luminosity functions which, when compared with observations, can be used to infer the age and star formation history (coeval versus intermittent) of a star cluster. Applied to the Trapezium cluster (2.2 micron imaging data by Zinncker et al 1993), our model suggests an age close to 10^6 years, whereas in IC 348 (2 micron data from Lada & Lada, 1995) the age estimate yields 4--6 times 10^6 years and continual bursts of star formation seem to have occurred in this cluster. CCD imaging observations at optical-infrared I band are presented for NGC 663, for which an age of 1--3 times 10^7 years is inferred. The initial mass function for NGC 663 in the range 2--7.1 {Modot} has a slope of -0.77 plus or minus 0.20, much shallower than that for the solar neighborhood field stars. We interpret this being due to the mass segregation in the cluster.

  11. The X-ray luminosity function of very rich clusters and the luminosity-richness relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltan, A.; Henry, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    For a sample of galactic clusters that includes richness class three, four, and five clusters, the significance of the luminosity-richness relation is estimated using nonparametric methods which are valid for any luminosity function. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to determine the significance at which the X-ray luminosities of clusters in one richness class are statistically equal to those in another. The a priori expectation that the high richness clusters are more luminous on average than lower richness objects is confirmed, but it is found that the luminosity function for clusters of richness class three or higher turns over for luminosities less than about 3 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s, while that for lower richness classes extends to at least an order of magnitude lower luminosity.

  12. Near-infrared spectra and intrinsic luminosities of candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Lang, Dustin; Hamann, Frederick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald

    2014-06-10

    We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at the Magellan/Baade 6.5 m telescope, and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of C IV and Ly α, with FWHM < 2000 km s{sup –1} from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [O III] λ5007 line shape as a model for the narrow-line region emission and find that Hα consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the C IV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000-4500 km s{sup –1}. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [O III] line, we find typical A{sub V} values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explains the attenuated C IV lines relative to Hα. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [O III] spectrum.

  13. Luminosity enhancement in relativistic jets and altered luminosity functions for beamed objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Due to relativistic effects, the observed emission from relativistic jets is quite different from the rest frame emission. Systematic differences between the observed and intrinsic intensities of sources in which jet phenomena are occurring are discussed. Assuming that jets have a power law luminosity function of a slope B, the observed luminosity distribution as a function of the velocity of the jet, the spectral index of the rest frame emission, and the range of angles of the jets relative to our line of sight are calculated. The results is well-approximated by two power laws, the higher luminosity end having the original power law index X and the lower luminosity end having a flattened exponent independent of B and only slightly greater than 1. A model consisting of beamed emission from a jet and unbeamed emission from a stationary central component is investigated. The luminosity functions for these two-component sources are calculated for two ranges of angles. For sources in which beaming is important, the luminosity function is much flatter. Because of this, the relative numbers of ""beamed'' and ""unbeamed'' sources detected on the sky depend strongly on the luminosity at which the comparison is made.

  14. SIX MORE QUASARS AT REDSHIFT 6 DISCOVERED BY THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; McLure, Ross J.

    2009-03-15

    We present imaging and spectroscopic observations for six quasars at z {>=} 5.9 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS). The CFHQS contains subsurveys with a range of flux and area combinations to sample a wide range of quasar luminosities at z {approx} 6. The new quasars have luminosities 10-75 times lower than the most luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at this redshift. The least luminous quasar, CFHQS J0216-0455 at z = 6.01, has absolute magnitude M {sub 1450} = -22.21, well below the likely break in the luminosity function. This quasar is not detected in a deep XMM-Newton survey showing that optical selection is still a very efficient tool for finding high-redshift quasars.

  15. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  16. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  17. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  18. Observations of the Ca ii IR Triplet in High Luminosity Quasars: Exploring the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new spectroscopic sample of 11 quasars at intermediate redshift observed with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC) on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), covering O i λ8446 and the Ca ii triplet 8498, 8542, 8662. The new observations - that supplement the sample presented by Martínez-Aldama et al. (2015) - allow us to confirm the constraints on physical conditions and location of the region emitting the low ionization lines, as well as the relation between Ca ii and Fe ii.

  19. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z = 4 (a few 1011 M⊙) to z = 1 (a few 1012 M⊙), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increases with redshift, which is in qualitative agreement with observations. Our bias value is lower than the observed values at high redshifts, implying that we need some mechanisms that make quasars inactive in low-mass haloes and/or that make them more active in high-mass haloes.

  20. Deriving an X-ray luminosity function of dwarf novae

    SciTech Connect

    Byckling, Kristiina; Osborne, Julian; Mukai, Koji

    2010-07-15

    Current measurements of X-ray luminosity functions of dwarf novae contain biases due to high X-ray flux sources. We have obtained Suzaku, XMM-Newton and ASCA observations of nearby DNe which have parallax-based distance measurements, and carried out X-ray spectral analysis for these sources. Our primary goal is to derive a reliable X-ray luminosity function for this sample, and to compare it with existing X-ray luminosity functions. We briefly introduce the source sample and preliminary results.

  1. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR QUASAR DEMOGRAPHICS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; White, Martin

    2013-01-10

    We present a simple model for the relationship between quasars, galaxies, and dark matter halos from 0.5 < z < 6. In the model, black hole (BH) mass is linearly related to galaxy mass, and galaxies are connected to dark matter halos via empirically constrained relations. A simple 'scattered' light bulb model for quasars is adopted, wherein BHs shine at a fixed fraction of the Eddington luminosity during accretion episodes, and Eddington ratios are drawn from a lognormal distribution that is redshift independent. This model has two free, physically meaningful parameters at each redshift: the normalization of the M {sub BH}-M {sub gal} relation and the quasar duty cycle; these parameters are fit to the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) over the interval 0.5 < z < 6. This simple model provides an excellent fit to the LF at all epochs and also successfully predicts the observed projected two-point correlation of quasars from 0.5 < z < 2.5. It is significant that a single quasar duty cycle at each redshift is capable of reproducing the extant observations. The data are therefore consistent with a scenario wherein quasars are equally likely to exist in galaxies, and therefore dark matter halos, over a wide range in masses. The knee in the quasar LF is a reflection of the knee in the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. Future constraints on the quasar LF and quasar clustering at high redshift will provide strong constraints on the model. In the model, the autocorrelation function of quasars becomes a strong function of luminosity only at the very highest luminosities and will be difficult to observe because such quasars are so rare. Cross-correlation techniques may provide useful constraints on the bias of such rare objects. The simplicity of the model allows for rapid generation of quasar mock catalogs from N-body simulations that match the observed LF and clustering to high redshift.

  2. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  3. The luminosity function of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Madore, B. F.; Neugebauer, G.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Rice, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a study of the far infrared properties of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey are described. There is a correlation between the infrared luminosity and the infrared to optical luminosity ratio and between the infrared luminosity and the far infrared color temperature in these galaxies. The infrared bright galaxies represent a significant component of extragalactic objects in the local universe, being comparable in space density to the Seyferts, optically identified starburst galaxies, and more numerous than quasars at the same bolometric luminosity. The far infrared luminosity in the local universe is approximately 25% of the starlight output in the same volume.

  4. A bimodal model for the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The galaxy luminosity function in the Virgo cluster has been recently found to show a clear separation between bright galaxies and dwarf galaxies. Here, consideration is given to the effect on the luminosity function of galaxy binding energy which allows gas to be retained and star formation to proceed over about 1 Gyr in massive galaxies, but implies wind-driven mass loss and inefficient star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  5. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  6. SDSS J013127.34-032100.1: A Newly Discovered Radio-loud Quasar at z = 5.18 with Extremely High Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Xin, Yu-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34-032100.1 (J0131-0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131-0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ~100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L bol ~ 1.1 × 1048 erg s-1, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131-0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 109 M ⊙, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  7. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  8. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  9. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  10. MAGNITUDE GAP STATISTICS AND THE CONDITIONAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2012-12-20

    In a recent preprint, Hearin et al. (H12) suggest that the halo mass-richness calibration of clusters can be improved by using the difference in the magnitude of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy (magnitude gap) as an additional observable. They claim that their results are at odds with the results from Paranjape and Sheth (PS12) who show that the magnitude distribution of the brightest and second brightest galaxies can be explained based on order statistics of luminosities randomly sampled from the total galaxy luminosity function. We find that a conditional luminosity function (CLF) for galaxies which varies with halo mass, in a manner which is consistent with existing observations, naturally leads to a magnitude gap distribution which changes as a function of halo mass at fixed richness, in qualitative agreement with H12. We show that, in general, the luminosity distribution of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy depends upon whether the luminosities of galaxies are drawn from the CLF or the global luminosity function. However, we also show that the difference between the two cases is small enough to evade detection in the small sample investigated by PS12. This shows that the luminosity distribution is not the appropriate statistic to distinguish between the two cases, given the small sample size. We argue in favor of the CLF (and therefore H12) based upon its consistency with other independent observations, such as the kinematics of satellite galaxies, the abundance and clustering of galaxies, and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  11. The faintest stars - From Schmidt plates to luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Reid, I. N.; Mould, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the construction of a photometric catalog from scans of IIIaF and IVN plate material in 11 fields of the UKSRC and POSSII surveys. The procedures used and quality checks applied are described in detail, and should be considered as illustrative for those planning scientific programs with the forthcoming scans of these surveys. We find our plate material is complete to I of about 18 and R of about 20.5 with photometric uncertainties of +/- 0.20 and +/- 0.25 magnitudes (respectively) at those limits. These data are used to construct luminosity functions for stars within 150 pc of the sun in four distinct directions. We find no significant evidence for variations in the form of the luminosity function in different locations within the Galactic disk. Approximately 10-20 percent variations are seen in the normalization of the luminosity function.

  12. The luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; De Carvalho, R. R.; Zepf, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We use counts of faint galaxies in the regions of compact groups to extend the study of the luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups to absolute magnitudes as faint as M(sub B) = -14.5 + 5 log h. We find a slope of the faint end of the luminosity function of approximately alpha = -0.8, with a formal uncertainty of 0.15. This slope is not significantly different from that found for galaxies in other environments. Our results do not support previous suggestions of a dramatic underabundance of intrinsically faint galaxies in compact groups, which were based on extrapolations from fits at brighter magnitudes. The normal faint-end slope of the luminosity function in compact groups is in agreement with previous evidence that most galaxies in compact groups have not been dramatically affected by recent merging.

  13. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  14. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  15. The Subaru High-z Quasar Survey: Discovery of Faint z ~ 6 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Willott, Chris J.; Onoue, Masafusa; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Niino, Yuu; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ~ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg2 utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-zB ) and (zB -zR ) colors, where zB and zR are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ~ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to zR < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M 1450 = -23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M 1450 = -22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s-1, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ~ 6.

  16. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  17. Quasars Outflows As A Function of SED - An Empirical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph M.; Ganguly, Rajib

    2015-08-01

    Feedback from quasars (jets, outflows, and luminosity) is now recognized as a vital phase in describing galaxy evolution, growth, and star formation efficiency. Regarding outflows, roughly 60% are observed to have outflowing gas appearing at large velocities and with a variety of velocity dispersions. The most extreme observed form of these outflows appears in the ultraviolet spectrum of 15-20% of objects. Understanding the physics of these outflows is important for both astrophysical and cosmological reasons. Establishing empirical relationships to test the theoretical models of how these outflows are driven (and hence, how they impact their surroundings) is currently plagued by having too few objects, where other parameters like the black hole mass or accretion rate, may add to the scatter. We aim to fix this by using a systematic study of a large sample of objects. As a follow up to a previous study, we have identified a sample of nearly 11000 z=1.7-2 quasars using archived data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7), of which roughly 4400 appear to show outflows according to the visual inspection. The specific redshift range is chosen to feature both the Mg II 2800 emission line as well as wavelengths extending to nearly 20,000 km/s blueward of the C IV 1549 emission line. Our goals for this study are: (1) To temper our visual inspection schemes with a more automated, computer-driven scheme; (2) To measure the properties of the outflows (velocity, velocity dispersion, equivalent width, ionization); (3) To supplement the SDSS spectra with photometric measurements from GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE to further characterize the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and dust content; (4) To form spectral composites to investigate possible SED changes with outflow properties; and (5) To use published estimates of the quasar physical properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, etc.) to fully establish in an empirical way the complex dependencies between the

  18. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DURING THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, M.; Shull, J. M.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2010-05-10

    The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z = 6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function (LF) measured at z = 5 and z = 4. We then predict the LF at z {>=} 7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z {approx_gt} 7 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the LF: {alpha}(z {approx_gt} 8) {approx_lt} -1.9 compared to {alpha} = -1.74 at z = 6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L {sub *} {approx_gt} 10{sup -4}) might provide {approx_gt}75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f {sub esc} {approx} 0.2, clumping factor C {approx} 5, top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z {approx_gt} 8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z {approx_gt} 6, but a smaller C/f {sub esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L {sub *} galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z {>=} 6 than today.

  19. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Marshall, P. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Busha, Michael T.

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  20. On Schmidt's Vm estimator and other estimators of luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Schmidt's (1968) estimator, sometimes used to calculate the luminosity function from a complete sample of observed objects, can be generalized naively to the case in which the maximum distance for detection is a function of the direction. Though unbiased, this estimator then does not have minimum variance and, in some cases, is inferior to the classical estimator. The classical estimator, however, is biased when the magnitude boxes are not infinitesimal. A generalization of Schmidt's estimator is proposed which is unbiased and usually superior to both Schmidt's and the classical estimator. Variance formulas and numerical examples are given. The results can be used in combining several catalogs.

  1. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  2. Generalized Continuity Equation Solutions for the QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caditz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized continuity equation that describes the relationship between the statistical and physical evolution of populations of astronomical objects. This equation allows us to parameterize the luminosity function (LF) in terms of physically meaningful quantities, such as creation timescale, τs, object evolutionary timescale, τg, and lifetime, am. The shape and evolution of the LF are shown to be sensitive to these physical parameters, with large regions of the parameter space producing relatively simple evolutionary scenarios such as density evolution (DE) or luminosity evolution (LE). Regions of parameter space where τs ≲ 0.3tH and τg ≲ 0.5tH, where tH is the Hubble time, may be characterized by more complex evolution including the natural formation of a double power-law shape and mixed density and luminosity evolution (ME). This result has important consequences for the interpretation of the quasi-stellar object (QSO) LF, implying that the timescales for creation and physical evolution may fall near the above range. A fit to QSO survey data for redshifts 0.68 < z < 4 implies that τs ∼ 0.2tH and τg ∼ 0.05tH with QSOs having a maximum lifetime of am ∼ 0.25tH.

  3. z ~ 1 Lyα Emitters. I. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ~ 1 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Lyα luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ~ 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ~1.5 from z ~ 0.3 to z ~ 1 and ~20 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 2. We find a z ~ 1 volumetric Lyα escape fraction of 0.7% ± 0.4%. Based in part on data obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX09AF08G and by other grants and contracts. Based in part on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839.

  4. Revisiting the luminosity function of single halo white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Ruxandra; Torres, Santiago; Althaus, Leandro G.; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Context. White dwarfs are the fossils left by the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, and have very long evolutionary timescales. This allows us to use them to explore the properties of old populations, like the Galactic halo. Aims: We present a population synthesis study of the luminosity function of halo white dwarfs, aimed at investigating which information can be derived from the currently available observed data. Methods: We employ an up-to-date population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences for metal-poor progenitors as well as an accurate modeling of the observational biases. Results: We find that because the observed sample of halo white dwarfs is restricted to the brightest stars, only the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function can be used for these purposes, and that its shape function is almost insensitive to the most relevant inputs, such as the adopted cooling sequences, the initial mass function, the density profile of the stellar spheroid, or the adopted fraction of unresolved binaries. Moreover, since the cutoff of the observed luminosity has not yet been determined only the lower limits to the age of the halo population can be placed. Conclusions: We conclude that the current observed sample of the halo white dwarf population is still too small to obtain definite conclusions about the properties of the stellar halo, and the recently computed white dwarf cooling sequences, which incorporate residual hydrogen burning, should be assessed using metal-poor globular clusters.

  5. The luminosity function of the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, R. O.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We use the CfA Reshift Survey of galaxies with m(sub z) less than or equal to 15.5 to calculate the galaxy luminosity function over the range -13 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -22. The sample includes 9063 galaxies distributed over 2.1 sr. For galaxies with velocities cz greater or equal to 2500 km per sec, where the effects of peculiar velocities are small, the luminosity function is well represented by a Schechter function with parameters phi(sub star) = 0.04 +/- 0.01 per cu Mpc, M(sub star) = -18.8 +/- 0.3, and alpha = -1.0 +/- 0.2. When we include all galaxies with cz greater or equal to 500 km per sec, the number of galaxies in the range -16 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -13 exceeds the extrapolation of the Schechter function by a factor of 3.1 +/- 0.5. This faint-end excess is not caused by the local peculiar velocity field but may be partially explained by small scale errors in the Zwicky magnitudes. Even with a scale error as large as 0.2 mag per mag, which is unlikely, the excess is still a factor of 1.8 +/- 0.3. If real, this excess affects the interpretation of deep counts of field galaxies.

  6. QUASAR-GALAXY CLUSTERING THROUGH PROJECTED GALAXY COUNTS AT z = 0.6-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shaohua; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Tinggui; Wang Huiyuan E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies around quasars at z = 0.6-1.2 using photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. The quasar and galaxy cross-correlation functions are measured through the projected galaxy number density n(r{sub p} ) on scales of 0.05 < r{sub p} < 20 h {sup -1} Mpc around quasars for a sample of 2300 quasars from Schneider et al. We detect strong clustering signals at all redshifts and find that the clustering amplitude increases significantly with redshift. We examine the dependence of quasar-galaxy clustering on quasar and galaxy properties and find that the clustering amplitude is significantly larger for quasars with more massive black holes or with bluer colors, while there is no dependence on quasar luminosity. We also show that quasars have a stronger correlation amplitude with blue galaxies than with red galaxies. We finally discuss the implications of our findings.

  7. Leveraging Spitzer's Legacy: Quasars and Feedback at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon; Anderson, Scott; Bauer, Franz; Deo, Rajesh; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallagher, Sarah; Myers, Adam; Strauss, Michael; Zakamska, Nadia

    2009-04-01

    Recent research efforts to understand the evolution of galaxies and quasars are beginning to form a consistent picture. Galaxies and their supermassive black holes grow through mergers, but with decreasing characteristic mass scales over time. Much less, however, is known about the evolution of galaxies at high redshifts and the role played by energy injection from the onset of active black hole growth. Understanding these events requires investigating a statistically significant number of high-redshift quasars and crossing the L* boundary in luminosity. To construct an appropriate data set requires both relatively wide-areas (to find these rare objects) and moderate-depth imaging (to probe below L* in luminosity). Unfortunately, existing optical and MIR surveys fail to meet both of these requirements. Furthermore, both optical and MIR quasar selection are blindest at the most crucial redshifts. Here we propose to address these gaps with targeted IRAC observations of a few hundred high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Such a sample will enable the construction of a proper training set for the discovery of 2.5quasars through combined optical+MIR (from IRAC channels 1 and 2) selection methods that overcome the limitations inherent to optical and MIR selection alone. By concentrating on SDSS Stripe 82, with sensitivity of i~23, we will learn how to identify high-redshift quasars in other fields over a large range in luminosity. With this knowledge, we will crack open the high-z quasar discovery space within existing IRAC legacy surveys (SWIRE, XFLS, Bootes, COSMOS). With a large sample of high-redshift quasars spanning a large range in luminosity, we can turn the quasar luminosity function and quasar clustering analysis into tools for distinguishing between different evolutionary models and feedback prescriptions. In all, we will observe 330 SDSS quasars using 307 pointings/AORs, totaling 48.5 hours of IRAC time.

  8. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  9. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Maccacaro, T.; Henry, J. P.; Tananbaum, H.; Soltan, A.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Smith, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray observations of 107 quasars have been carried out with the Einstein Observatory, and 79 have been detected. A correlation between optical emission and X-ray emission is found; and for radio-loud quasars, the data show a correlation between radio emission and X-ray emission. For a given optical luminosity, the average X-ray emission of radio-loud quasars is about three times higher than that of radio-quiet quasars. The data also suggest that the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is decreasing with increasing redshift and/or optical luminosity. The data support the picture in which luminosity evolution, rather than pure density evolution, describes the quasar behavior as a function of redshift.

  10. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  11. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  12. What BOSS has taught us about Quasars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents science highlights from the SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Survey, which has obtained spectra for over 300,000 quasars, 200,000 of which are at redshift z>2. Using this dataset, new measurements of the luminosity function have been made, with the faint end of the luminosity function now measured to z~5. New clustering results from DR12 are presented, and the weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at z~0.5 is also discussed.New studies of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar population have also been performed, with a sample of BAL quasars from the original SDSS being re-observed. These new data have shown the disappearance of CIV BAL troughs and indeed the transformation of BAL QSOs to non-BAL QSOs. BAL disappearance, and emergence, events appear to be extremes of general BAL variability, and have shed light on accretion-disk wind models.We highlight the discovery of new classes of quasars including: a population of broad-line Mg II emitters found in a passive galaxy sample; objects with extremely red optical-to-mid infrared colors; objects with very curious UV line (LyA:NV) ratios and potentially the long-sought after high-redshift Type 2 Quasar population.Finally, we describe two new dedicated programs, one focusing on reverberation mapping, the other on X-ray selected quasars.A full list of papers connected to the BOSS Quasar Survey is given at: http://www.sdss3.org/science/publications.php

  13. A two-mode planetary nebula luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Stasińska, G.; Peña, M.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. We propose a new planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) that includes two populations in the distribution. Our PNLF is a direct extension of the canonical function proposed by Jacoby et al. (1987), in order to avoid problems related with the histogram construction, it is cast in terms of cumulative functions. Aims: We are interested in recovering the shape of the faint part of the PNLF in a consistent manner, for galaxies with and without a dip in their PNLFs. Methods: The parameters for the two-mode PNLF are obtained with a genetic algorithm, which obtains a best fit to the PNLF varying all of the parameters simultaneously in a broad parameter space. Results: We explore a sample of nine galaxies with various Hubble types and construct their PNLF. All of the irregular galaxies, except one, are found to be consistent with a two-mode population, while the situation is less clear for ellipticals and spirals.For the case of NGC 6822, we show that the two-mode PNLF is consistent with previous studies of the star formation history within that galaxy. Our results support two episodes of star formation, in which the second episode is significantly stronger.

  14. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-22

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6{+-}0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  15. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  16. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  17. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of \

  18. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    pointing to a rapid drop of the ionization degree above z ≅ 6, such as indications of a decrease of the comoving emission rate of ionizing photons at z ≅ 6, a decrease of sizes of quasar near zones, and a possible decline of the Lyα transmission through the intergalactic medium at z > 6. On the other hand, the electron scattering optical depth, τ{sub es}, inferred from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments favor an ionization degree close to unity up to z ≅ 9-10. Consistency with CMB data can be achieved if M {sub crit} ≅ 10{sup 8.5} M {sub ☉}, implying that the UV luminosity functions extend to M {sub UV} ≅ –13, although the corresponding τ{sub es} is still on the low side of CMB-based estimates.

  19. The luminosity function for the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for two complete slices of the extension of the CfA redshift survey is calculated. The nonparametric technique of Lynden-Bell (1971) and Turner (1979) is used to determine the shape for the luminosity function of the 12 deg slice of the redshift survey. The amplitude of the luminosity function is determined, taking large-scale inhomogeneities into account. The effects of the Malmquist bias on a magnitude-limited redshift survey are examined, showing that the random errors in the magnitudes for the 12 deg slice affect both the determination of the luminosity function and the spatial density constrast of large scale structures.

  20. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature–density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h∼ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h∼ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5–2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  1. THE MID-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z < 0.3 FROM 5MUSES: UNDERSTANDING THE STAR FORMATION/ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS BALANCE FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC VIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanling; Shi Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A.; Papovich, Casey; Rahman, Nurur; Dasyra, Kalliopi E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present rest-frame 15 and 24 {mu}m luminosity functions (LFs) and the corresponding star-forming LFs at z < 0.3 derived from the 5MUSES sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for {approx}98% of the objects and the median redshift is {approx}0.12. The 5-35 {mu}m Infrared Spectrograph spectra allow us to estimate accurately the luminosities and build the LFs. Using a combination of starburst and quasar templates, we quantify the star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributions in the mid-IR spectral energy distribution. We then compute the SF LFs at 15 and 24 {mu}m, and compare with the total 15 and 24 {mu}m LFs. When we remove the contribution of AGNs, the bright end of the LF exhibits a strong decline, consistent with the exponential cutoff of a Schechter function. Integrating the differential LF, we find that the fractional contribution by SF to the energy density is 58% at 15 {mu}m and 78% at 24 {mu}m, while it goes up to {approx}86% when we extrapolate our mid-IR results to the total IR luminosity density. We confirm that the AGNs play more important roles energetically at high luminosities. Finally, we compare our results with work at z {approx} 0.7 and confirm that evolution on both luminosity and density is required to explain the difference in the LFs at different redshifts.

  2. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Willott, Chris J.; Im, Myungshin; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  3. Optical and Radio Properties of QSOS as a Function of Absolute Luminosity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Andrew Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Photometric data for nearly 250 quasars, BL Lacertids, and active galaxies have been obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory during a continuous 13-year monitoring program. Long-term optical records for 130 of these sources are employed in an effort to assess the physical and cosmological properties of quasi-stellar objects. Photographic P and B magnitudes were obtained with the 76- and 46-cm telescopes at Rosemary Hill. Corrections for galactic absorption, emission lines, and the K-term are applied to the raw data yielding monochromatic flux densities at a standard emitted wavelength of 2500 (ANGSTROM). Long -term light curves are compiled for all objects and 3 levels of activity are determined for each individual source. The MEAN, BASE, and MAX brightness levels are then used to study QSOs in their average, quiescent, and active phases, respectively. Absolute intrinsic luminosities of all sources in the sample are computed from the monochromatic flux densities based on relativistic cosmological models. Radio -emitting quasars, radio-quiet QSOs, and active galaxies fall into 3 distinct groups and are examined separately. The cosmological properties of QSOs are studied by plotting apparent magnitude vs. redshift, the so-called Hubble diagram. Scatter in the diagram due to variability is substantially reduced by plotting log z vs. the MEAN, BASE, and MAX flux densities. The brightest QSOs at each redshift are then chosen as "standard candles" in an effort to determine if quasars obey Hubble's law for expanding universe. It is found that they fit the Hubble relation quite well if certain selection effects are accounted for. Other evidence for the cosmological origin of QSOs is briefly discussed. Variability provides a test as to whether individual quasars are essentially multiple in nature (the "Christmas Tree" model), or are single coherent sources (such as a massive black hole). The amplitude of variability vs. absolute luminosity relation is used to discriminate

  4. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  5. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  6. The Luminosity Function of OB Associations in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    1997-02-01

    OB associations ionize the interstellar medium, producing both localized H II regions and diffuse ionized gas. The supernovae resulting from these associations pressurize and stir the interstellar medium. Using Smith, Biermann, & Mezger's compilation of radio H II regions in the Galaxy, and Kennicutt, Edgar, & Hodge's optical study of H II regions in nearby galaxies, we show that the luminosity distribution of giant OB associations in the Galaxy can be fit by a truncated power law of the form \\Nscra(>S)=\\Nscrau[(Su/S)-1], where S is the ionizing photon luminosity, \\Nscra(>S) is the number of associations with a luminosity of at least S, and Su is the upper limit to the distribution. The coefficient \\Nscrau is the number of the most luminous associations, with a luminosity between 0.5Su and Su. For the Galaxy, \\Nscrau=6.1 the fact that the number of the most luminous associations is significantly larger than unity indicates that there is a physical limit to the maximum size of H II regions in the Galaxy. To extend the luminosity distribution to small H II regions, we assume that the birthrate of associations, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*), is also a truncated power law, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*)~[(\\Nscr*u/\\Nscr*)-1], where \\Nscr* is the number of stars in the association. For large associations, the ionizing luminosity is proportional to the number of stars, S~\\Nscr* for smaller associations, we use both an analytic and a Monte Carlo approach to find the resulting luminosity distribution \\Nscra(>S). H II regions are generally centrally concentrated, with only the dense central regions being bright enough to appear in radio catalogs. Anantharamaiah postulated that radio H II regions have extended envelopes in order to account for diffuse radio recombination line emission in the Galaxy. Some of these envelopes are visible as the ionized ``worms'' discussed by Heiles and coworkers. We estimate that on the average the envelopes of radio H II regions absorb about twice

  7. X-ray spectral evolution of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Jill; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Olga; Cutri, Roc M.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Rieke, Marcia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    At z approx. equals 3, the x-ray spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. High-redshift radio-quiet quasars either have large absorbing columns, N(sub H), and steeper power law spectral indices, alpha(sub epsilon), than low redshift quasars, or no absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s. In contrast, the radio-loud quasars at high redshift have substantial absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s to low redshift quasars. Implications for the interpretation of the evolution of the luminosity function of quasars are discussed. If the absorption arises outside the central engine for both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, then radio-quiet quasars differ from the radio-loud quasars in that their emitted power law spectrum has evolved with redshift. We argue that this favors models where quasars are numerous and short-lived, rather than rare and long-lived.

  8. A revisit of gamma-ray luminosity function and contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background for Fermi FSRQs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2013-05-01

    A clean sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) has been provided by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in two years of operation. Based on this sample, we reconstruct the gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) in the framework of the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model, and obtain the best-fitting GLF by comparing the distributions of observed redshifts, luminosities, indexes and source counts with the predicted distribution of the GLF through the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method which constrains the model parameters in an efficient way. Using the best-fitting GLF, we estimate the contribution of Fermi-undetected FSRQs to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB), and find that the contribution of unresolved FSRQs to the EGRB is 10.1 ± 4.7 per cent in the 0.1-100 GeV band. We also study the influence of different bins of redshifts, luminosities and spectral indices on the contribution to EGRB from the unresolved FSRQs, and find that the contributions of unresolved FSRQs in the redshift range of z = 0.0-2.0 and in the gamma-ray luminosity range of 1044-1048 erg s-1 are ˜90 per cent, respectively.

  9. The Quasar Fraction in Low-Frequency Selected Complete Samples and Implications for Unified Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Low-frequency radio surveys are ideal for selecting orientation-independent samples of extragalactic sources because the sample members are selected by virtue of their isotropic steep-spectrum extended emission. We use the new 7C Redshift Survey along with the brighter 3CRR and 6C samples to investigate the fraction of objects with observed broad emission lines - the 'quasar fraction' - as a function of redshift and of radio and narrow emission line luminosity. We find that the quasar fraction is more strongly dependent upon luminosity (both narrow line and radio) than it is on redshift. Above a narrow [OII] emission line luminosity of log(base 10) (L(sub [OII])/W) approximately > 35 [or radio luminosity log(base 10) (L(sub 151)/ W/Hz.sr) approximately > 26.5], the quasar fraction is virtually independent of redshift and luminosity; this is consistent with a simple unified scheme with an obscuring torus with a half-opening angle theta(sub trans) approximately equal 53 deg. For objects with less luminous narrow lines, the quasar fraction is lower. We show that this is not due to the difficulty of detecting lower-luminosity broad emission lines in a less luminous, but otherwise similar, quasar population. We discuss evidence which supports at least two probable physical causes for the drop in quasar fraction at low luminosity: (i) a gradual decrease in theta(sub trans) and/or a gradual increase in the fraction of lightly-reddened (0 approximately < A(sub V) approximately < 5) lines-of-sight with decreasing quasar luminosity; and (ii) the emergence of a distinct second population of low luminosity radio sources which, like M8T, lack a well-fed quasar nucleus and may well lack a thick obscuring torus.

  10. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artifact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  11. Galaxy luminosity function and Tully-Fisher relation: reconciled through rotation-curve studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Salucci, Paolo; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2014-03-10

    The relation between galaxy luminosity L and halo virial velocity v {sub vir} required to fit the galaxy luminosity function differs from the observed Tully-Fisher relation between L and disk speed v {sub rot}. Because of this, the problem of reproducing the galaxy luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation simultaneously has plagued semianalytic models since their inception. Here we study the relation between v {sub rot} and v {sub vir} by fitting observational average rotation curves of disk galaxies binned in luminosity. We show that the v {sub rot}-v {sub vir} relation that we obtain in this way can fully account for this seeming inconsistency. Therefore, the reconciliation of the luminosity function with the Tully-Fisher relation rests on the complex dependence of v {sub rot} on v {sub vir}, which arises because the ratio of stellar mass to dark matter mass is a strong function of halo mass.

  12. Anchoring the AGN X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, John

    2003-09-01

    Knowledge of the AGN LF over a range of luminosities and redshifts is crucial to understanding the accretion history of supermassive blackholes. Much of the CXRB has been resolved and spectroscopic follow-up has revealed a mixed bag of object types at moderate to high redshifts. For the deep Chandra survey results to be useful in studying the evolution of the XLF, a representative sample of local AGNs of various types with known X-ray luminosities is needed. The new KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) provides the best available sample of H-alpha selected Type 1 and 2 AGNs to serve as the baseline for XLF evolution studies. We propose to observe a volume-limited sample of 28 KISS AGNs to assess their X-ray emission characteristics and establish the local AGN XLF.

  13. Determining Orientation in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, Michael S.; Singh, Vikram; Runnoe, Jessie C.

    2016-01-01

    We present further steps developing an orientation indicator based on optical parameters that can be used for radio-quiet quasars. We recently demonstrated that the ratio of orientation-biased black hole mass calculated using the velocity width of Hbeta to the orientation-unbiased black hole mass calculated using the stellar velocity dispersion correlates with radio-loud orientation indicators, albeit with significant scatter. Our new work eliminates or reduces some sources of scatter to improve the significance of the correlation and to produce a better predictive prescription. Beyond biasing some mass measurements, orientation also affects luminosity determinations, and in turn estimates of the Eddington fraction, as well as luminosity functions, and other quasar properties. A practical radio-quiet orientation indicator for quasars is overdue.

  14. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  15. The galaxy luminosity function and the redshift-distance controversy (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, E. E.; Hoffman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The mean relation between distance and redshift for galaxies is reviewed as an observational question. The luminosity function for galaxies is an important ingredient and is given explicitly. We discuss various observational selection effects that are important for comparison of the linear and quadratic distance-redshift laws. Several lines of evidence are reviewed, including the distribution of galaxy luminosities in various redshift ranges, the luminosities of brightest galaxies in groups and clusters at various redshifts, and the Tully-Fisher correlation between neutral hydrogen velocity widths and luminosity. All of these strongly favor the linear law over the quadratic. PMID:16593693

  16. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Luminosity Function in the ECO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Hayley; Andreas A. Berlind, Victor Calderon, Kathleen D. Eckert, Sheila J. Kannappan, Amanda J. Moffett, David V. Stark

    2016-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy luminosity function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy luminosity distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that luminous galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low luminosity galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the correlation of galaxy luminosity and dark matter halo mass combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the luminosity of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo's larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign luminosities to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect luminosity to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO luminosity function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. Though our mock catalog luminosity functions display similar qualitative trends as those from the ECO data, the trends are not in agreement quantitatively. Our results thus suggest that the simple models used to build the mocks are incomplete and that galaxy luminosity is possibly correlated with the larger scale density field.

  17. Population Studies of Quasars in Infrared and X-Ray Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Joseph; Singal, Jack

    2016-01-01

    We present newly assembled multiwavelength datasets for studying the luminosity evolution, density evolution, and luminosity functions of quasars in infrared and X-ray light, as well as preliminary results for these parameters in infrared. We use infrared and X-ray data from NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Chandra X-ray satellites respectively, in combination with optically identified quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present results for the infrared population parameters, including luminosity evolution which suggests that quasars have evolved more slowly in infrared than in other bands. We also demonstrate new techniques for recovering the intrinsic luminosity-luminosity correlations in datasets with different wavebands in the presence of artificial correlations introduced by survey limits and similar redshift evolutions.

  18. The luminosity functions of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers are presented and used to derive luminosity functions for the 288 Perseids and 56 Orionids detected. Visual counts were performed under very good to excellent seeing conditions at the times of peak activities, and the brightnesses of the meteors were estimated to the nearest magnitude by comparison with the magnitudes of known objects. Maximum likelihood estimates of the power law index of the luminosity function of 1.56 + or - 0.06 for the Perseids and of 1.85 + or - 0.1 for the Orionids are obtained which are lower than the values found by other investigators. Under the assumption that the luminosity of visual meteors is proportional to their mass, the luminosity function power law may also be used to characterize the mass function.

  19. Evolution of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Kennefick, J.; Mahmood, A.

    2012-05-01

    A common practice when formulating quasar luminosity functions (QLF) has been to adopt an average spectral index, $\\alpha$, for the sample even though it is well known that quasars exhibit a broad range of spectral energy distributions (SED.) We have investigated the possible evolution of $\\alpha$ as a function of redshift, as any evolution in this parameter would introduce or mask evolution in the QLF. We imaged 103 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars in the optical and near-infrared bands, near in time to mitigate the effects of variability, in three redshift bins centered at $z\\approx 1.9$, $2.7$, and $4.0$, corresponding to look-back times of 10-12 billion years. We present restframe UV-optical SED’s and spectral indices and discuss possible evolution in our sample. We also use single epoch spectra of the quasars to estimate the mass of the central black hole and discuss possible correlations of quasar properties such as mass, luminosity, and spectral shape.

  20. A Constraint on Quasar Clustering at z = 5 from a Binary Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ˜135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5 the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r0)-2, this discovery implies a correlation length of r0 ≳ 20h-1 Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  1. The Environments of Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kristen M.; Lacy, Mark; Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) feedback is prescribed for driving the high-end shape of the galaxy luminosity function, clearing the circumnuclear environment during the end stages of mergers, and eventually turning off its own accretion. Yet the dominant processes and characteristics of active galactic nuclei are indistinct. Chief among this confusion is how significant the role of dust is in each galaxy. Orientation of the dusty torus is attributed to causing the differences between Sy1 and Sy2, but whether obscured quasars are found in particularly dusty host galaxies, if they exist at a different stage in the merger process (early on, before the dust is blown out), or if they are merely oriented differently than optical quasars is not yet so well distinguished. With obscured quasars now observed to make up 50% or greater of the population of quasars, the question of what causes obscuration becomes vital to address. With this in mind, I study matched samples of obscured and unobscured quasars to characterize their environments, with the intent of addressing what contribution environment has to obscuration levels. I investigate the megaparsec-scale environments of SIRTF Wide-field Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) quasars at z ˜ 1-3 by cross-correlating the sample with 3.8 million galaxies from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). Optically obscured quasars are compared to a control sample of optically-bright quasars via selection in the mid-infrared. Environments were observed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm to a depth of ≈ 2 μJy (AB = 23.1). Recent work has found diverse results in such studies, with dependence of environmental richness on both redshift and level of obscuration. I find that, within reasonable error, on average there is no distinct difference between the level of clustering for obscured and normal quasars, and that there is no dependence on redshift of this result within the range of 1.3 < z < 2.5. I compare our results

  2. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James; Williams, Kurtis A.; von Hippel, Ted; Levine, Stephen E.; Monet, David G.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Nitta, Atsuko; Winget, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka; Knapp, G. R.; Lupton, Robert H.; Smith, J. Allyn; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of white dwarfs is selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 using their reduced proper motions, based on improved proper motions from combined SDSS and USNO-B data. Numerous SDSS and follow-up spectra (Kilic and coworkers) are used to quantify completeness and contamination of the sample; kinematics models are used to understand and correct for velocity-dependent selection biases. A luminosity function is constructed covering the range 7luminosity function based on 6000 stars is remarkably smooth and rises nearly monotonically to Mbol=15.3. It then drops abruptly, although the small number of low-luminosity stars in the sample and their unknown atmospheric composition prevent quantitative conclusions about this decline. Stars are identified that may have high tangential velocities, and a preliminary luminosity function is constructed for them.

  3. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  4. The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Vio, R.; Cappellaro, E; Turatto, M Padova Osservatorio Astronomico, Padua )

    1990-08-01

    The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446 is investigated using power spectrum and structure function analysis along with a new set of observations that extend the available data till 1989. No contradiction is found between the PS and SF analyses. The presence of the 1540-day periodicity is strengthened by the occurrence of the 1988 luminosity peak, suggesting that the next burst will occur in the northern spring of 1992. The time series of the quasar is nonstationary. The light variations are determined by a sequence of luminosity bursts, mostly regularly spaced in time and lasting up to 2 yr. 25 refs.

  5. Sub-mm Emission Line Deep Fields: CO and [CII] Luminosity Functions out to z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-06-01

    Now that ALMA is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J=1-0 out to CO J=6-5 and [CII] at redshifts z=0-6. We find that: 1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [CII] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z ≤ 2.75; 2) we find that the CO and [CII] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [CII] are found at z ˜ 2; 3) the CO J=3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; 4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; 5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [CII] luminosity function of galaxies at z ≥ 1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  6. The faintest stars - The luminosity and mass functions at the bottom of the main sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    We present IR K-band photometry of complete samples of VLM candidates constructed from IIIaF and IVN plates in 10 fields taken as part of the POSSII and UKSRC surveys. Using the I-K colors constructed for these stars we estimate a bolometric luminosity function which extends to M(Bol) = 13.75. We find significant evidence for a luminosity function decreasing toward these luminosities. We also find that our results are consistent with those of studies based on the Nearby Star sample, when those data are presented as a bolometric luminosity function. We convert our observed luminosity function into a mass function, which extends with reasonable statistics to 0.08 solar masses - the H-burning minimum mass. We find significant evidence for features in the mass function at these masses. Specifically, the mass function 'turns over' at 0.25 solar mass, goes through a local minimum at about 0.15 solar mass, and may increase again below 0.1 solar mass - none of these features are predicted by any of the current theories of star formation. Lastly, the mass density we observe just above the H-burning minimum mass makes it difficult to envisage brown dwarfs contributing significant quantities of missing mass without invoking either a mass function in this region significantly steeper than that seen for main-sequence stars, or an extremely low cutoff mass to the mass function.

  7. Do quasars evolve over cosmological time scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, E. J.; Ponz, D.

    Systematic biases that are redshift dependent can influence the optical discovery of quasars and the evolution laws derived from counts of quasars. New data and their interpretation for quasars brighter than MB = -24 in the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) (Schmidt and Green, 1983) are consistent with no evolution. A comparison of BQS quasars with the brightest quasars from the CTIO Schmidt Telescope Survey (Osmer and Smith, 1980) shows that if q(0) is near zero, the comoving density of bright quasars in a Friedmann cosmology is about 15 times higher for the CTIO survey quasars (mean z of about 2.8) than for the BQS quasars (mean z of about 1.8). In this case spectral evolution is also required since the CTIO quasars have stronger CIV 1548 A lines than the BQS quasars of similar luminosity. Alternatively, if q(0) is taken to be near 1, the CTIO survey quasars would then have a lower luminosity than the BQS quasars and these data would be consistent with no evolution. Strong CIV 1548 A lines for the CTIO quasars would then fit the general correlation between absolute quasar luminosity and emission line strength (Wampler, Gaskell, Burke and Baldwin, 1984).

  8. Testing Fundamental Particle Physics with the Galactic White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Melendez, B. E.; Althaus, L. G.; Isern, J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent determinations of the white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) from very large surveys have extended our knowledge of the WDLF to very high luminosities. It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to test the possible properties and existence of fundamental weakly interacting subelectronvolt particles. This, together with the availability of new full evolutionary white dwarf models that are reliable at high luminosities, have opened the possibility of testing particle emission in the core of very hot white dwarfs. We use the available WDLFs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey to constrain the values of the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μν) and the axion-electron coupling constant (gae) of DFSZ-axions.

  9. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  10. Luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioia-Eastwood, K.; Meyers, R. P.; Jones, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    Using the point spread function photometry program DAOPHOT, we have used UBV CCD photometry to construct color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The region LH 76 appears to be completely coeval; the region LH 13 shows some evidence for noncoevality which will need to be checked with spectra of the stars in question. The region LH 105, which lies on the southern edge of 30 Doradus, shows significant contamination by an underlying older population, possibly from previous star forming events. The luminosity functions, which serve as the first step toward determining the initial mass function in these regions, are calculated.

  11. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions atmore » $$z\\gtrsim 6$$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.« less

  12. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: The Faint End of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at z≳ 6. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at {M}{{cut}}˜ -13 provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut {M}{{cut}} is found to vary between ‑12 and ‑14 with a mild redshift dependence. An analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  13. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  14. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  15. Radio-Selected Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.

    2009-12-01

    We have conducted a pilot survey for z > 3.5 quasars by combining the FIRST radio survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). While SDSS already targets FIRST sources for spectroscopy as quasar candidates, our survey includes fainter quasars and greatly improves the discovery rate by using strict astrometric criteria for matching the radio and optical positions. Our method allows for selection of high-redshift quasars with less color bias than with optical selection, as using radio selection essentially eliminates stellar contamination. We report the results of spectroscopy for 45 candidates, including 29 quasars in the range 0.37 < z < 5.2, with 7 having redshifts z > 3.5. We compare quasars selected using radio and optical criteria, and find that radio-selected quasars have a much higher fraction of moderately reddened objects. We derive a radio-loud quasar luminosity function at 3.5 < z < 4.0, and find that it is in good agreement with expectations from prior SDSS results.

  16. Cosmic evolution of Quasar radio structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the results of a survey of Quasar radio structures over redshifts from 0.6 to 3.7. There are clear evolutionary trends in size and luminosity, which suggest that the duty cycle of individual Quasars has increased over cosmic time. This affects source count statistics and gives clues on the evolution of Quasar environments.

  17. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-03-20

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z){sup (0.54{+-}0.64)} for red galaxies and (1 + z){sup (1.64{+-}0.39)} for blue galaxies.

  18. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  19. The white dwarf luminosity function - A possible probe of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamanaha, Christopher M.; Silk, Joseph; Wood, M. A.; Winget, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamically inferred dark halo mass density, amounting to above 0.01 solar masses/cu pc at the sun's Galactocentric radius, can be composed of faint white dwarfs provided that the halo formed in a sufficiently early burst of star formation. The model is constrained by the observed disk white dwarf luminosity function which falls off below log (L/solar L) = -4.4, due to the onset of star formation in the disk. By using a narrow range for the initial mass function and an exponentially decaying halo star formation rate with an e-folding time equal to the free-fall time, all the halo dark matter is allowed to be in cool white dwarfs which lie beyond the falloff in the disk luminosity function. Although it is unlikely that all the dark matter is in these dim white dwarfs, a definite signature in the low-luminosity end of the white dwarf luminosity function is predicted even if they comprise only 1 percent of the dark matter. Current CCD surveys should answer the question of the existence of this population within the next few years.

  20. A New Model for Dark Matter Halos Hosting Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue; Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher

    2015-01-01

    A new model for quasar-hosting dark matter halos, meeting two physical conditions, is put forth. First, significant interactions are taken into consideration to trigger quasar activities. Second, satellites in very massive halos at low redshift are removed from consideration due to their deficiency in cold gas. We analyze the Millennium Simulation to find halos that meet these two conditions and simultaneously match two-point auto-correlation functions of quasars and cross-correlation functions between quasars and galaxies at z = 0.5-3.2. The masses of the quasar hosts found decrease with decreasing redshift, with the mass thresholds being [(2-5) × 1012, (2-5) × 1011, (1-3) × 1011] M ⊙ for median luminosities of ~[1046, 1046, 1045] erg s-1 at z = (3.2, 1.4, 0.53), respectively, an order of magnitude lower than those inferred based on halo occupation distribution modeling. In this model, quasar hosts are primarily massive central halos at z >= 2-3 but increasingly dominated by lower mass satellite halos experiencing major interactions toward lower redshift. However, below z = 1, satellite halos in groups more massive than ~2 × 1013 M ⊙ do not host quasars. Whether for central or satellite halos, imposing the condition of significant interactions substantially boosts the clustering strength compared to the total population with the same mass cut. The inferred lifetimes of quasars at z = 0.5-3.2 of 3-30 Myr are in agreement with observations. Quasars at z ~ 2 would be hosted by halos of mass ~5 × 1011 M ⊙ in this model, compared to ~3 × 1012 M ⊙ previously thought, which would help reconcile with the observed, otherwise puzzling high covering fractions for Lyman limit systems around quasars.

  1. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  2. Evolution of the Blue and Far-Infrared Galaxy Luminosity Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Chokshi, Arati

    1993-01-01

    The space density of blue-selected galaxies at moderate redshifts is determined here directly by deriving the luminosity function. Evidence is found for density evolution for moderate luminosity galaxies at a rate of (1+z) exp delta, with a best fit of delta + 4 +/- 2, between the current epoch and Z greater than about 0.1. At M(b) less than -22 evidence is found for about 0.5-1.5 mag of luminosity evolution in addition to the density evolution, corresponding to an evolutionary rate of about (1+z) exp gamma, with gamma = 0.5-2.5, but a redshift of about 0.4. Assuming a steeper faint end slope of alpha = -1.3 similar to that observed in the Virgo cluster, could explain the data with a luminosity evolution rate of gamma = 1-2, without need for any density evolution. Acceptable fits are found by comparing composite density and luminosity evolution models to faint IRAS 60 micron source counts, implying that the blue and far-IR evolutionary rates may be similar.

  3. The most powerful quasar outflows as revealed by the Civ λ1549 resonance line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; Martínez Carballo, M. A.; Sulentic, J. W.; Del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Dultzin, D.

    2016-01-01

    Outflows from quasars may be almost ubiquitous, but there are significant differences on a source- by-source basis. These differences can be organized along the 4D Eigenvector 1 sequence: at low z, only the Population A sources radiating at relatively high Eddington ratio show evidences of prominent high- velocity outflows from the Civλ1549 line profiles. Here we discuss, starting from recent observations of high-luminosity sample of Hamburg-ESO quasars, the Civλ1549 emission line profiles and how they are affected by outflow motion as a function of the quasar luminosity. Our high-luminosity sample has the notable advantage that the rest frame has been set by previous Hβ observations in the J, H, and K band, therefore making measurements of inter-line shift accurate and free of systemic biases. As the redshift increases and the luminosity of the brightest quasars grows, powerful, high-velocity outflows may become more frequent. We then discuss the outflow contextualisation following the 4DE1 approach as a tool for unveiling the nature of the so-called Weak Lined Quasars (WLQs) that have emerged in recent years as a new, poorly understood class of quasars. We estimate the kinetic power associated with the Civλ1549 emitting gas in outflow, and we suggest that the host galaxies of the most luminous sources may experience a significant feedback effect.

  4. ACCESS: NIR luminosity function and stellar mass function of galaxies in the Shapley supercluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merluzzi, P.; Mercurio, A.; Haines, C. P.; Smith, R. J.; Busarello, G.; Lucey, J. R.

    2010-02-01

    We present the near-infrared luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) of galaxies in the core of the Shapley supercluster at z = 0.048, based on new K-band observations carried out at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope with the Wide Field Infrared Camera in conjunction with B- and R-band photometry from the Shapley Optical Survey, and including a subsample (~650 galaxies) of spectroscopically confirmed supercluster members. These data sets allow us to investigate the supercluster galaxy population down to M*K + 6 and . For the overall 3deg2 field, the K-band luminosity function (LF) is described by a Schechter function with M*K = -24.96 +/- 0.10 and α = -1.42 +/- 0.03, a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that observed in field regions. We investigate the effect of environment by deriving the LF in three regions selected according to the local galaxy density and observe a significant (2σ) increase in the faint-end slope going from high-density (α = -1.33) to low-density (α = -1.49) environments, while a faint-end upturn at MK > -21 becomes increasingly apparent in the lower density regions. The galaxy SMF is fitted well by a Schechter function with and α = -1.20 +/- 0.02. The SMF of supercluster galaxies is also characterized by an excess of massive galaxies that are associated with the brightest cluster galaxies. While the value of depends on the environment, increasing by 0.2dex from low- to high-density regions, the slope of the galaxy SMF does not vary with the environment. By comparing our findings with cosmological simulations, we conclude that the environmental dependences of the LF are not primarily due to variations in the merging histories, but to processes which are not treated in the semi-analytical models, such as tidal stripping or harassment. In field regions, the SMF shows a sharp upturn below , close to our mass limit, suggesting that the upturns seen in our K-band LFs, but not in the SMF, are due to this dwarf population. The

  5. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  6. Constraining the rate and luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Coward, D. M.; Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Zhou, H.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the intrinsic isotropic peak luminosity function (LF) and formation rate of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a novel approach. We complement a standard log N-log P brightness distribution and Vmax estimations with two observation-time relations: a redshift-observation-time relation (log z-log T) and a new luminosity-observation-time relation (log L-log T). We show that this approach reduces degeneracies that exist between the rate and LF of a brightness distribution. To account for the complex triggering algorithm employed by Swift, we use recent results of Lien et al. (2014) to produce a suite of efficiency functions. Using these functions with the above methods, we show that a log L-log T method can provide good constraints on the form of the LF, particularly the high end. Using a sample of 175 peak luminosities determined from redshifts with well-defined selection criteria, our results suggest that LGRBs occur at a local rate (without beaming corrections) of [0.7 < ρ0 < 0.8] Gpc-3 yr-1. Within this range, assuming a broken power-law LF, we find best estimates for the low- and high-energy indices of -0.95 ± 0.09 and -2.59 ± 0.93, respectively, separated by a break luminosity 0.80 ± 0.43 × 1052 erg s-1.

  7. Heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z ∼ 2 are discs, not major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Glikman, Eilat

    2012-09-01

    We explore the nature of heavily obscured quasar host galaxies at z˜ 2 using deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3/infrared imaging of 28 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) to investigate the role of major mergers in driving black hole growth. The high levels of obscuration of the quasars selected for this study act as a natural coronagraph, blocking the quasar light and allowing a clear view of the underlying host galaxy. The sample of heavily obscured quasars represents a significant fraction of the cosmic mass accretion on supermassive black holes as the quasars have inferred bolometric luminosities around the break of the quasar luminosity function. We find that only a small fraction (4 per cent, at most 11-25 per cent) of the quasar host galaxies are major mergers. Fits to their surface brightness profiles indicate that 90 per cent of the host galaxies are either disc dominated, or have a significant disc. This disc-like host morphology, and the corresponding weakness of bulges, is evidence against major mergers and suggests that secular processes are the predominant driver of massive black hole growth. Finally, we suggest that the coincidence of mergers and active galactic nucleus activity is luminosity dependent, with only the most luminous quasars being triggered mostly by major mergers. a MUSYC catalogue ID, see Cardamone et al. (2010). Objects with X-ray detections are marked with *. b See images shown in Fig. 1. c The ratio of the host luminosity to the point source luminosity, reported only when GALFIT requires an unresolved object to yield a physical fit. This may be due to an AGN point source (in the case of the X-ray-detected DOGs) or an unresolved bulge or central concentration, i.e. a central bulge. d See Fig. 2.

  8. QUASAR OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN THE PALOMAR-QUEST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne; Baltay, Charles; Coppi, Paolo; Ellman, Nancy; Jerke, Jonathan; Rabinowitz, David; Scalzo, Richard

    2009-05-10

    The ensemble variability properties of nearly 23,000 quasars are studied using the Palomar-QUEST Survey. The survey has covered 15,000 deg{sup 2} multiple times over 3.5 years using seven optical filters, and has been calibrated specifically for variability work. Palomar-QUEST allows for the study of rare objects using multiple epochs of consistently calibrated, homogeneous data, obviating the common problem of generating comparable measurements from disparate data sets. A power-law fit to the quasar structure function versus time yields an index of 0.432 {+-} 0.024 for our best measured sample. We see the commonly reported anticorrelation between average optical variability amplitude and optical luminosity, and measure the logarithmic decrease in variability amplitude to scale as the logarithm of the luminosity times 0.205 {+-} 0.002. Black hole mass is positively correlated with variability amplitude over three orders of magnitude in mass. Quasar variability amplitude is seen to decrease with Eddington ratio as a step function with a transition around Eddington ratio of 0.5. The higher variability at low Eddington ratios is due to excess power at timescales shorter than roughly 300 days. X-ray and radio measurements exist for subsets of the quasar sample. We observe an anticorrelation between optical variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity. No significant correlation is seen between average optical variability properties and radio luminosity. The timescales of quasar fluctuations are suggestive of accretion disk instabilities. The relationships seen between variability, Eddington ratio, and radio and X-ray emission are discussed in terms of a possible link between the behavior of quasars and black hole X-ray binaries.

  9. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-10-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~5x10^4^h^-3^Mpc^3^ at the sensitivity peak (z~0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function (with α=-1.22, M^*^_bJ_=-19.61+5logh and φ^*^=0.020h^3^/Mpc^3^) is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh), our data suggest the presence of a steepening of the luminosity function for M_bJ_>=-17+5logh. Such a steepening at the faint end of the luminosity function, well fitted by a power law with slope β~-1.6, is almost completely due to galaxies with emission lines: in fact, dividing our galaxies into two samples, i.e. galaxies with and without emission lines, we find significant differences in their luminosity functions. In particular, galaxies with emission lines show a significantly steeper slope and a fainter M^*^. The amplitude and the α and M^*^ parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Vice-versa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~1.6 at M~M^*^, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. The galaxy number density for M_bJ_<=-16+5logh is well determined (n{bar}=0.08+/-0.015h^3^/Mpc^3^). Its estimate for M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh is more uncertain, ranging from n{bar}=0.28h

  10. Constructing a bivariate distribution function with given marginals and correlation: application to the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2010-08-01

    We provide an analytic method to construct a bivariate distribution function (DF) with given marginal distributions and correlation coefficient. We introduce a convenient mathematical tool, called a copula, to connect two DFs with any prescribed dependence structure. If the correlation of two variables is weak (Pearson's correlation coefficient |ρ| < 1/3), the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) copula provides an intuitive and natural way to construct such a bivariate DF. When the linear correlation is stronger, the FGM copula cannot work anymore. In this case, we propose using a Gaussian copula, which connects two given marginals and is directly related to the linear correlation coefficient between two variables. Using the copulas, we construct the bivariate luminosity function (BLF) and discuss its statistical properties. We focus especially on the far-infrared-far-ulatraviolet (FUV-FIR) BLF, since these two wavelength regions are related to star-formation (SF) activity. Though both the FUV and FIR are related to SF activity, the univariate LFs have a very different functional form: the former is well described by the Schechter function whilst the latter has a much more extended power-law-like luminous end. We construct the FUV-FIR BLFs using the FGM and Gaussian copulas with different strengths of correlation, and examine their statistical properties. We then discuss some further possible applications of the BLF: the problem of a multiband flux-limited sample selection, the construction of the star-formation rate (SFR) function, and the construction of the stellar mass of galaxies (M*)-specific SFR (SFR/M*) relation. The copulas turn out to be a very useful tool to investigate all these issues, especially for including complicated selection effects.

  11. The Hubble relation for nonstandard candles and the origin of the redshift of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the magnitude-log (redshift) relation for brightest quasars can have a slope different from the value expected for standard candles. The value of this slope depends on the luminosity function and its evolution. Therefore the difference of this slope from the expected value cannot be used as evidence against the cosmological origin of the redshift of the quasars. It is shown that the observed variation of the luminosity of the brightest objects with redshift is consistent with the cosmological hypothesis and that it agrees with (and perhaps could be used to complement) the luminosity function obtained from V/Vm analysis. It is also shown that the nonzero slope of the magnitude-log (redshift) relation rules out the local quasar hypothesis, where it is assumed that the sources are nearby (less than 500 Mpc), that the bulk of their redshift is intrinsic, and that there is no dependence on distance of the intrinsic properties of the sources.

  12. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  13. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc‑3 yr‑1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s‑1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s‑1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s‑1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s‑1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s‑1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s‑1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of ‑1.6.

  14. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  15. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William E.; O'Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  16. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies: A Near-universal Luminosity Function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Morningstar, Warren; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; O'Halloran, Heather; Blakeslee, John P.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Côté, Patrick; Geisler, Douglas; Peng, Eric W.; Bailin, Jeremy; Rothberg, Barry; Cockcroft, Robert; Barber DeGraaff, Regina

    2014-12-01

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L >~ 107 L ⊙), we find small numbers of "superluminous" objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R >~ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L 0 ~ R -0.2, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  17. Weak bump quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B. J.; Mcdowell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the optical, ultraviolet and infrared continuum emission from quasars and their host galaxies was carried out. The main results were the discovery of quasars with unusually weak infrared emission and the construction of a quantitative estimate of the dispersion in quasar continuum properties. One of the major uncertainties in the measurement of quasar continuum strength is the contribution to the continuum of the quasar host galaxy as a function of wavelength. Continuum templates were constructed for different types of host galaxy and individual estimates made of the decomposed quasar and host continua based on existing observations of the target quasars. The results are that host galaxy contamination is worse than previously suspected, and some apparent weak bump quasars are really normal quasars with strong host galaxies. However, the existence of true weak bump quasars such as PHL 909 was confirmed. The study of the link between the bump strength and other wavebands was continued by comparing with IRAS data. There is evidence that excess far infrared radiation is correlated with weaker ultraviolet bumps. This argues against an orientation effect and implies a probable link with the host galaxy environment, for instance the presence of a luminous starburst. However, the evidence still favors the idea that reddening is not important in those objects with ultraviolet weak bumps. The same work has led to the discovery of a class of infrared weak quasars. Pushing another part of the envelope of quasar continuum parameter space, the IR-weak quasars have implications for understanding the effects of reddening internal to the quasars, the reality of ultraviolet turnovers, and may allow further tests of the Phinney dust model for the IR continuum. They will also be important objects for studying the claimed IR to x-ray continuum correlation.

  18. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  19. Predicting the Redshift 2 H-Alpha Luminosity Function Using [OIII] Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James W.; Dai, Y. S.; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Rafelski, Marc; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; Bagley, Micaela; Beck, Melanie; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Rutkowski, Michael; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Upcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA plan to measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) in order to study dark energy. These surveys will use IR slitless grism spectroscopy to measure redshifts of a large number of galaxies over a significant redshift range. In this paper, we use the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) to estimate the expected number of H-alpha emitters observable by these future surveys. WISP is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope slitless spectroscopic survey, covering the 0.8 - 1.65 micrometers wavelength range and allowing the detection of H-alpha emitters up to z approximately equal to 1.5 and [OIII] emitters to z approximately equal to 2.3. We derive the H-alpha-[OIII] bivariate line luminosity function for WISP galaxies at z approximately equal to 1 using a maximum likelihood estimator that properly accounts for uncertainties in line luminosity measurement, and demonstrate how it can be used to derive the H-alpha luminosity function from exclusively fitting [OIII] data. Using the z approximately equal to 2 [OIII] line luminosity function, and assuming that the relation between H-alpha and [OIII] luminosity does not change significantly over the redshift range, we predict the H-alpha number counts at z approximately equal to 2 - the upper end of the redshift range of interest for the future surveys. For the redshift range 0.7 less than z less than 2, we expect approximately 3000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of 3 x 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the proposed depth of Euclid galaxy redshift survey) and approximately 20,000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of approximately 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the baseline depth of WFIRST galaxy redshift survey).

  20. The luminosity function for different morphological types in the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, Ronald O.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the luminosity function for different morphological types in the original CfA Redshift Survey (CfA1) and in the first two slices of the CfA Redshift Survey Extension (CfA2). CfA1 is a complete sample containing 2397 galaxies distributed over 2.7 steradians with m(sub z) less than or equal 14.5. The first two complete slices of CfA2 contain 1862 galaxies distributed over 0.42 steradians with m(sub z)=15.5. The shapes of the E-S0 and spiral luminosity functions (LF) are indistinguishable. We do not confirm the steeply decreasing faint end in the E-S0 luminosity function found by Loveday et al. for an independent sample in the southern hemisphere. We demonstrate that incomplete classification in deep redshift surveys can lead to underestimates of the faint end of the elliptical luminosity function and could be partially responsible for the difference between the CfA survey and other local field surveys. The faint end of the LF for the Magellanic spirals and irregulars is very steep. The Sm-Im luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function with M*=-18.79, alpha=-1.87, and phi*=0.6x10(exp -3) for M(sub z) less than or equal to -13. These galaxies are largely responsible for the excess at the faint end of the general CfA luminosity function. The abundance of intrinsically faint, blue galaxies nearby affects the interpretation of deep number counts. The dwarf population increases the expected counts at B=25 in a no-evolution, q(sub 0)=0.05 model by a factor of two over standard no-evolution estimates. These dwarfs change the expected median redshift in deep redshift surveys by less than 10 percent . Thus the steep Sm-Im LF may contribute to the reconciliation of deep number counts with deep redshift surveys.

  1. Causes and effects of the first quasars.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, M J

    1993-01-01

    The light we observe from the most distant known quasars set out when the Universe was about 200 times denser than it is now and less than one-tenth of its present age. The existence of these objects implies that galaxy formation had already, at that early epoch, proceeded to the stage when massive (>10(8)M[symbol, see text]) objects had accumulated in the centers of at least some young galaxies. A specific model is presented to show that the evolution and luminosity function of quasars are compatible with the cold dark matter cosmogony. Most big galaxies probably passed through a quasar phase; the remnant black holes in nearby galaxies may reveal themselves via the flares that occur whenever a star passes too close to them and gets tidally disrupted. The rich absorption spectra of quasars serve as a probe of the intervening medium. The gas responsible for the Lyman alpha absorption lines may be due to primordial gas gravitationally confined in minihalos of dark matter--shallow potential wells whose evolution and relation to dwarf galaxies are briefly discussed. The patchy heat input into the intergalactic medium from early quasars could modulate the environment in which galaxies form, leading to large-scale spatial correlations in the galaxy distribution. This review concludes with general comments on the prospects for a fully quantitative understanding of galaxy formation. PMID:11607397

  2. Pleiades luminosity function: fine structure and new Pre-MS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. N.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.

    In order to study a model-dependence of the results achieved in the previous investigations of the Pleiades luminosity function using D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1994) evolutionary tracks, we repeated the computations with the new track system by D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997). T h e following main conclusions can be drawn: the new models agree better with observations; the helium abundance needed to fit the Hipparcos distance modulus is reduced to a more reasonable value of Y=0.31; the cluster age becomes slightly higher and the slope of the initial mass function somewhat lower. The conclusions on the fine structure of the luminosity function do not change significantly due to the application of the new models.

  3. The bright end of the luminosity function of red sequence galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yeong-Shang; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-02-01

    We study the bright end of the luminosity distribution of galaxies in fields with luminous red galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099deg2 of SDSS imaging data, we search for luminous (>~L*) early-type galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc of a volume-limited sample of 12608 spectroscopic LRG in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. Most of these objects lie in rich environments, with the LRG being the brightest object within 1.0h-1Mpc. The luminosity gap, M12, between the first- and second-ranked galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc is large (~0.8 mag), substantially larger than can be explained with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of galaxies. The brightest member is less luminous (by 0.1-0.2 mag) and shows a larger gap in LRG selected groups than in cluster-like environments. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshift to z= 0.4, ruling out the scenario that these LRG selected brightest cluster or group galaxies grow by recent cannibalism of cluster members.

  4. DETERMINING THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH PSEUDO-REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weiwei; Yu Yunwei; Cao Xiaofeng

    2013-07-20

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is an important role for the cosmological applications of the GRBs, which, however, is seriously hindered by some selection effects due to redshift measurements. In order to avoid these selection effects, we suggest calculating pseudo-redshifts for Swift GRBs according to the empirical L-E{sub p} relationship. Here, such a L-E{sub p} relationship is determined by reconciling the distributions of pseudo- and real redshifts of redshift-known GRBs. The values of E{sub p} taken from Butler's GRB catalog are estimated with Bayesian statistics rather than observed. Using the GRB sample with pseudo-redshifts of a relatively large number, we fit the redshift-resolved luminosity distributions of the GRBs with a broken-power-law LF. The fitting results suggest that the LF could evolve with redshift by a redshift-dependent break luminosity, e.g., L{sub b} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51}(1 + z){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The low- and high-luminosity indices are constrained to 0.8 and 2.0, respectively. It is found that the proportional coefficient between the GRB event rate and the star formation rate should correspondingly decrease with increasing redshifts.

  5. Quasars Candidates in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, A.; Kennefick, J. D.; Martini, P. L.; Omser, P. S.

    1996-12-01

    The Hubble Deep Field gives us an unprecedented view of our universe and an opportunity to study a wide range of questions in galaxy evolution and cosmology. Here, we will focus on the search for faint quasars and AGN in the crude combined images using a multicolor imaging analysis that has proven very successful in recent years. To produce a catalog of objects in the field, we used the FOCAS package for object detection with particular care to the set of input parameters used to minimize spurious detections. For each detected source we measured aperture magnitudes in several different apertures using the IRAF PHOT routine. For object classification we have chosen not to use the built in FOCAS routines, instead we have developed classification schemes that closely resemble those of Flynn at al. (1996) to distinguish resolved from unresolved objects in the Hubble Deep Field. We generated synthetic quasar spectra in the range 2.0quasar colors.These colors are used to identify areas of the multicolor space where quasars might be expected. A quasar candidate list is being formed. Routines were developed to determine the completeness of our data to point sources in the observed bands. The data are 50 % complete at 27.0(m) , 28.9(m) ,29.1(m) , 28.2(m) in the F300W (U), F450W (B), F606W (V) and F814W (I) filter respectively. These completeness limits closely approximate the 3sigma detection limit. We will present a list of quasars candidates and compare the results to expectations from previous surveys and extrapolations from current models. Our initial extrapolations, based on the luminosity function of Boyle (1991) and Warren at al. (1994), suggest the Hubble Deep Field may contain of order 10 quasars.

  6. Binary Aggregations in Hierarchical Galaxy Formation: The Evolution of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Cavaliere, A.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Poli, F.

    2002-08-01

    We develop a semianalytic model of hierarchical galaxy formation with an improved treatment of the evolution of galaxies inside dark matter halos. We take into account not only dynamical friction processes building up the central dominant galaxy but also binary aggregations of satellite galaxies inside a common halo. These deplete small to intermediate mass objects, affecting the slope of the luminosity function at its faint end, with significant observable consequences. We model the effect of two-body aggregations using the kinetic Smoluchowski equation. This flattens the mass function by an amount that depends on the histories of the host halos as they grow by hierarchical clustering. The description of gas cooling, star formation and evolution, and supernova feedback follows the standard prescriptions widely used in semianalytic modeling. We find that binary aggregations are effective in depleting the number of small/intermediate mass galaxies over the redshift range 1luminosity function at the faint end. At z~0 the flattening occurs for -20-16. We compare our predicted luminosity functions with those obtained from deep multicolor surveys in the Hubble Deep Field-North, Hubble Deep Field-South, and New Technology Telescope Deep Field in the rest-frame B and UV bands for the redshift ranges 01 and even more at z~3 by the effect of the binary aggregations. The predictions from our dynamical model are discussed and compared with the effects of complementary processes (additional starburst recipes, alternative sources of feedback, different mass distribution of the dark matter halos) that may conspire in affecting the shape of the luminosity function.

  7. The X-ray Luminosity Function for Poor Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Ledlow, M.; Loken, C.; Klypin, A.; Voges, W.; White, R. A.; Bryan, G.; Norman, M.

    1995-12-01

    We will present the first X-ray Luminosity Function for poor clusters of galaxies. Using a percolation algorithm, White et al. (1996) has compiled a catalog of 600 optically selected groups composed of Zwicky galaxies. This catalog includes MKW and AWM groups (with cD galaxies), many Hickson compact groups, as well as many more loose condensations. We selected a complete,volume-limited subsample of these poor clusters which have at least 4 Zwicky galaxies, b>30deg , a surface density enhancement of ~50, and z <= 0.03. We then cross-correlated this sample with the ROSAT all-sky X-ray survey. About 50% of this sample of 50 clusters was detected with 0.5-2.0 keV X-ray luminosities >4 x 10(41) h75(-2) ergs/sec. These are the X-ray brightest groups in the northern sky. From this sample, we constructed an X-ray Luminosity Function. We find that this poor cluster luminosity function matches well with that derived for Abell clusters by Briel & Henry (1993). It appears that these groups are low mass extensions of rich clusters. We have also derived a mass function for these groups assuming that the X-ray emission is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the clusters. We will compare this mass function with those expected from different cosmological models with different values of Omega . This research was funded by NSF grant AST93-17596 and NASA grant NAGW-3152.

  8. Neural network method for galaxy classification: the luminosity function of E/S0 in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Smareglia, Riccardo

    1998-02-01

    We present a method based on the non-linear behaviour of neural network for the identification of the early-type population in the cores of galaxy clusters. A Kohonen Self Organising Map applied on a three-colour photometric catalogue of objects enabled us to select in each passband the elliptical galaxies. We measured in this way the luminosity function of the E/S0 galaxies selected in this way. Such luminosity functions show peculiarities which disfavour the hypothesis of its universality often claimed for rich clusters and that can be related to the past dynamical history of the cluster as a whole. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, Chile

  9. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF SDSS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Nagai, Daisuke; Zheng Zheng; Shen Yue

    2012-08-10

    We present an estimate of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) over the full range of one- and two-halo scales, 0.02 h{sup -1} Mpc < r{sub p} < 120 h{sup -1} Mpc. This was achieved by combining data from SDSS DR7 on large scales and Hennawi et al. (with appropriate statistical corrections) on small scales. Our combined clustering sample is the largest spectroscopic quasar clustering sample to date, containing {approx}48, 000 quasars in the redshift range 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5 with median redshift 1.4. We interpret these precise 2PCF measurements within the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework and constrain the occupation functions of central and satellite quasars in dark matter halos. In order to explain the small-scale clustering, the HOD modeling requires that a small fraction of z {approx} 1.4 quasars, f{sub sat} = (7.4 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, be satellites in dark matter halos. At z {approx} 1.4, the median masses of the host halos of central and satellite quasars are constrained to be M{sub cen} = 4.1{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and M{sub sat} = 3.6{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }, respectively. To investigate the redshift evolution of the quasar-halo relationship, we also perform HOD modeling of the projected 2PCF measured by Shen et al. for SDSS quasars with median redshift 3.2. We find tentative evidence for an increase in the mass scale of quasar host halos-the inferred median mass of halos hosting central quasars at z {approx} 3.2 is M{sub cen} = 14.1{sup +5.8}{sub -6.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }. The cutoff profiles of the mean occupation functions of central quasars reveal that quasar luminosity is more tightly correlated with halo mass at higher redshifts. The average quasar duty cycle around the median host halo mass is inferred to be f{sub q

  10. SurveySim: a new MCMC code to explore the evolution of the IR luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo; Kurinsky, Noah; Sajina, Anna; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Silva, Andrea; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel and Spitzer space telescopes have been crucial in furthering our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. However key questions, such as the role of SF and AGN in powering the IR output of galaxies remain unanswered. The large numbers of high redshift galaxies detected by recent IR surveys make individual spectroscopic follow-up impractical. However statistical trends in SED and luminosity function evolution in an entire population can be realized. We present a new open source Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code, SurveySim. It is built to constrain the spectral energy distribution and luminosity function evolution required to produce a given multi-wavelength survey. Its very general design allow us to use a wide range of different dusty galaxy populations (including SFGs, AGNs and Composites), luminosity function forms and SED templates. The code employs a multidimensional color-color diagnostic to determine goodness of fit. It simulates observational errors and takes into account incompleteness. Here, dusty high-z galaxies at different parts of the IR SED have been considered to analyze the relative selection biases.

  11. The Seven Sisters DANCe. I. Empirical isochrones, luminosity, and mass functions of the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Sarro, L. M.; Barrado, D.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Berihuete, A.; Olivares, J.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The DANCe survey provides photometric and astrometric (position and proper motion) measurements for approximately 2 million unique sources in a region encompassing ~80 deg2 centered on the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at deriving a complete census of the Pleiades and measure the mass and luminosity functions of the cluster. Methods: Using the probabilistic selection method previously described, we identified high probability members in the DANCe (i ≥ 14 mag) and Tycho-2 (V ≲ 12 mag) catalogues and studied the properties of the cluster over the corresponding luminosity range. Results: We find a total of 2109 high-probability members, of which 812 are new, making it the most extensive and complete census of the cluster to date. The luminosity and mass functions of the cluster are computed from the most massive members down to ~0.025 M⊙. The size, sensitivity, and quality of the sample result in the most precise luminosity and mass functions observed to date for a cluster. Conclusions: Our census supersedes previous studies of the Pleiades cluster populations, in terms of both sensitivity and accuracy. Based on service observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Table 1 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgDANCe catalogs (Tables 6 and 7) and full Tables 2-5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A148

  12. The K20 survey. V. The evolution of the near-IR Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Daddi, E.; Menci, N.; Fontana, A.; Renzini, A.; Mignoli, M.; Poli, F.; Saracco, P.; Broadhurst, T.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Giallongo, E.; Gilmozzi, R.

    2003-05-01

    We present the galaxy rest-frame near-IR Luminosity Function (LF) and its cosmic evolution to z ~ 1.5 based on a spectroscopic survey of a magnitude limited sample of galaxies with Ks<20 (the K20 survey, Cimatti et al. \\cite{Cimatti2002b}). The LFs have been derived in the rest-frame J and Ks bands. Their evolution is traced using three different redshift bins (zmean =~ 0.5, 1, 1.5) and comparing them to the Local near-IR Luminosity Function. The luminosity functions at different redshifts are fairly well fitted by Schechter functions at z<1.3. The faint-end of the LFs (Lluminosity function is not well sampled by our data. Viceversa, the density of luminous galaxies (MK_s-5 log h70<-25.5) is higher than locally at all redshifts and relatively constant or mildly increasing with redshift within our sample. The data are consistent with a mild luminosity evolution both in the J- and Ks-band up to z =~ 1.5, with an amplitude of about Delta MJ =~ -0.69+/-0.12 and Delta MK =~ -0.54+/-0.12 at z ~ 1. Pure density evolution is not consistent with the observed LF at zle1 . Moreover, we find that red and early-type galaxies dominate the bright-end of the LF, and that their number density shows at most a small decrease (<30%) up to z =~ 1, thus suggesting that massive elliptical galaxies were already in place at z =~ 1 and they should have formed their stars and assembled their mass at higher redshift. There appears to be a correlation of the optical/near-IR colors with near-IR luminosities, the most luminous/massive galaxies being red/old, the low-luminous galaxies being instead dominated by blue young stellar populations. We also investigate the evolution of the near-IR comoving luminosity density to z =~ 1.5, finding a slow evolution with redshift (rholambda (z)= rholambda (z=0) (1+z)beta (lambda ) with beta (J

  13. The Bivariate Luminosity--HI Mass Distribution Function of Galaxies based on the NIBLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Zhon; Schneider, Stephen E.; van Driel, Wim; Lehnert, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We use 21cm HI line observations for 2610 galaxies from the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) to derive a bivariate luminosity--HI mass distribution function. Our HI survey was selected to randomly probe the local (900 < cz < 12,000 km/s) galaxy population in each 0.5 mag wide bin for the absolute z-band magnitude range of -13.5 < Mz < -24 without regard to morphology or color. This targeted survey allowed more on-source integration time for weak and non-detected sources, enabling us to probe lower HI mass fractions and apply lower upper limits for non-detections than would be possible with the larger blind HI surveys. Additionally, we obtained a factor of four higher sensitivity follow-up observations at Arecibo of 90 galaxies from our non-detected and marginally detected categories to quantify the underlying HI distribution of sources not detected at Nançay. Using the optical luminosity function and our higher sensitivity follow up observations as priors, we use a 2D stepwise maximum likelihood technique to derive the two dimensional volume density distribution of luminosity and HI mass in each SDSS band.

  14. The Near-ultraviolet Luminosity Function of Young, Early M-type Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lépine & Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 Å) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5σ) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these "false positives" (FPs) as ~16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  15. THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF YOUNG, EARLY M-TYPE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ansdell, Megan; Baranec, Christoph; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lépine and Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 Å) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5σ) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these ''false positives'' (FPs) as ∼16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  16. CO luminosity function from Herschel-selected galaxies and the contribution of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions [i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)] starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate LCO-LIR conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at z ≈ 0 and 2. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at z ≈ 0, at z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 2, the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous active galactic nucleus (LX > 1044 erg s- 1) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO LF at z ≈ 2.

  17. Quasar X-Ray Spectra At z=1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2001-01-01

    The predicted counts for ASCA observation was much higher than actually observed counts in the quasar. However, there are three weak hard x-ray sources in the GIS field. We are adding them to the source counts in modeling of hard x-ray background. The work is in progress. We have published a paper in Ap.J. on the luminosity function and the quasar evolution. Based on the theory described in this paper we are predicting a number of sources and their contribution to the x-ray background at different redshifts. These model predictions will be compared to the observed data in the final paper.

  18. Local Luminosity Function at 15 micro m and Galaxy Evolution Seen by ISOCAM 15 micro m Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.

    2000-01-01

    A local luminosity function at 15 micro m is derived using the bivariate (15 micro m vs. 60 micro m luminosities) method, based on the newly published ISOCAM LW3-band (15 micro m) survey of the very deep IRAS 60 micro m sample in the north ecliptic pole region (NEPR).

  19. PRIMUS: Galaxy Clustering as a Function of Luminosity and Color at 0.2 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(rp , π) and wp (rp ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ~130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg2 of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h -1 < rp < 1 Mpc h -1) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b gal ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ~ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that "cosmic variance" can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  20. Modeling the Redshift Evolution of the Normal Galaxy X-Ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Farr, W. M.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales (approximately 10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to approximately 20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris & Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 41)) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10(exp 40) and 10(exp 41) erg s(exp -1).

  1. The luminosity function at z ∼ 8 from 97 Y-band dropouts: Inferences about reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Treu, Tommaso; Kelly, Brandon C.; Trenti, Michele; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Oesch, Pascal A.; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the largest search to date for Y-band dropout galaxies (z ∼ 8 Lyman break galaxies, LBGs) based on 350 arcmin{sup 2} of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the V, Y, J, and H bands from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. In addition to previously published data, the BoRG13 data set presented here includes approximately 50 arcmin{sup 2} of new data and deeper observations of two previous BoRG pointings, from which we present 9 new z ∼ 8 LBG candidates, bringing the total number of BoRG Y-band dropouts to 38 with 25.5 ≤ m{sub J} ≤ 27.6 (AB system). We introduce a new Bayesian formalism for estimating the galaxy luminosity function, which does not require binning (and thus smearing) of the data and includes a likelihood based on the formally correct binomial distribution as opposed to the often-used approximate Poisson distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the new method on a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts that combines the bright BoRG galaxies with the fainter sources published in Bouwens et al. from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Early Release Science programs. We show that the z ∼ 8 luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function over its full dynamic range with a characteristic magnitude M{sup ⋆}=−20.15{sub −0.38}{sup +0.29}, a faint-end slope of α=−1.87{sub −0.26}{sup +0.26}, and a number density of log{sub 10} ϕ{sup ⋆}[Mpc{sup −3}]=−3.24{sub −0.24}{sup +0.25}. Integrated down to M = –17.7, this luminosity function yields a luminosity density log{sub 10} ϵ[erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3}]=25.52{sub −0.05}{sup +0.05}. Our luminosity function analysis is consistent with previously published determinations within 1σ. The error analysis suggests that uncertainties on the faint-end slope are still too large to draw a firm conclusion about its evolution with redshift. We use our statistical framework to discuss the implication of our study for the physics of

  2. Disclosing the Radio Loudness Distribution Dichotomy in Quasars: An Unbiased Monte Carlo Approach Applied to the SDSS-FIRST Quasar Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloković, M.; Smolčić, V.; Ivezić, Ž.; Zamorani, G.; Schinnerer, E.; Kelly, B. C.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 ± 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  3. DISCLOSING THE RADIO LOUDNESS DISTRIBUTION DICHOTOMY IN QUASARS: AN UNBIASED MONTE CARLO APPROACH APPLIED TO THE SDSS-FIRST QUASAR SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Balokovic, M.; Smolcic, V.; Ivezic, Z.; Zamorani, G.; Schinnerer, E.; Kelly, B. C.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 {+-} 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  4. A study of the luminosity function for field galaxies. [non-rich-cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nine determinations of the luminosity function (LF) for field galaxies are analyzed and compared. Corrections for differences in Hubble constants, magnitude systems, galactic absorption functions, and definitions of the LF are necessary prior to comparison. Errors in previous comparisons are pointed out. After these corrections, eight of the nine determinations are in fairly good agreement. The discrepancy in the ninth appears to be mainly an incompleteness effect. The LF data suggest that there is little if any distinction between field galaxies and those in small groups.

  5. Bayesian High-redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Riegel, Ryan N.

    2015-08-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i≲ 22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III/BOSS), while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) “AllWISE” data release and several large-area Spitzer Space Telescope fields. Selection is based on a Bayesian kernel density algorithm with a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of the quasar candidates, 733,713 lack spectroscopic confirmation (and 305,623 are objects that we have not previously classified as photometric quasar candidates). These candidates include 7874 objects targeted as high-probability potential quasars with 3.5\\lt z\\lt 5 (of which 6779 are new photometric candidates). Our algorithm is more complete to z\\gt 3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection “wedges” and to 2.2\\lt z\\lt 3.5 quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. Number counts and luminosity function analysis suggest that the resulting catalog is relatively complete to known quasars and is identifying new high-z quasars at z\\gt 3. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine-learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  6. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  7. The Fall of the Quasar Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, A.; Vittorini, V.

    2000-11-01

    We derive quantitative predictions of the optical and X-ray luminosity functions for quasars in the redshift range z<~3. Based on accreting black holes as primary sources for the quasar outputs, we investigate how the accretion is controlled by the surrounding structures, as these grow hierarchically from the formation of the host galaxies to their assemblage into poor and eventually into rich groups. We argue that for z<3 efficient black hole fueling is triggered by the encounters of a gas-rich host with its companions in a group; these destabilize the gas and induce accretion, giving rise to the following features. The dispersion of the dynamical parameters in the encounters produces luminosity functions with the shape of a double power law. Strong luminosity evolution is produced as these encounters deplete the gas supply in the host; an additional, milder density evolution obtains, since the interactions become progressively rarer as the groups grow richer but less dense. We carry out these arguments to derive a specific model for the evolving luminosity functions. From the agreement with the optical and the X-ray data, we conclude that the evolution of the bright quasars is driven by the development of cosmic structures in two ways. Earlier than z~3 the gas-rich protogalaxies grow by merging, which also induces parallel growth of central holes accreting at their full Eddington rates. In the later era of group assemblage the host encounters with companions drive onto already existing holes further but meager accretion; these events consume the gas reservoirs in the hosts, while they cause supply-limited emissions that are intermittent, go progressively sub-Eddington, and peter out. Then other fueling processes occurring in the field come to the foreground; we specifically discuss the faint emissions, especially noticeable in X-rays, which are expected when hosts in the field cannibalize satellite galaxies with their scant gaseous contents.

  8. Differential Density Statistics of the Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, V. V. L.; Iribarrem, A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number density statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro, namely, the differential density γ and the integral differential density γ*. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro & Stoeger, which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts dN/dz are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both γ and γ* with various cosmological distance definitions, namely, area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance, and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey, and γ and γ* are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an Ωm0=0.3, ΩΛ0=0.7 standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in Ribeiro, as well as showing that plots of γ and γ* against the luminosity and redshift distances indicate that the CNOC2 galaxy distribution follows a power-law pattern for redshifts higher than 0.1. These findings support Ribeiro's theoretical proposition that using different cosmological distance measures in statistical analyses of galaxy surveys can lead to significant ambiguity in drawing conclusions about the behavior of the observed large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  9. The Galaxy Luminosity Function at Redshifts 7 < z < 9 from the Hubble Ultradeep Field 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Matthew; McLure, R.; Ono, Y.; Ellis, R. S.; Dunlop, J.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Robertson, B. E.; UDF12 Team

    2013-01-01

    The UV-selected galaxy luminosity function at z > 6 provides a crucial observational constraint on the earliest phases of galaxy evolution and the likely role galaxies play in cosmic reionization. Within this context, we present new results on the galaxy luminosity function at redshifts 7 < z < 9 arising from the unprecedented deep near-IR imaging data provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12) program undertaken with the near-infrared arm of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR). Compared to previous data in the UDF, the new UDF12 program quadruples the integration time in the vital Y-band filter (F105W), reaching a 5-sigma detection limit of 30.0 AB, and provides the first ultra-deep imaging (5-sigma limit=29.8 AB) in the previously unused J-band/F140W filter. Using a combination of traditional drop-out selection and photometric redshift techniques we have assembled a well defined sample of over 200 galaxies at z>6.5, drawn from UDF12 and wider field HST imaging sampling a total area of 300 square arcmin. Our combined analyses provide the most accurate measures to data of the faint end of the luminosity function at z=7 and z=8, and the first census of the population at z=9. High redshift galaxy samples derived from the UDF12 program will provide a premier resource for studying high-redshift galaxy evolution in the era prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  10. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  11. Differential evolution of the UV luminosity function of Lyman break galaxies from z ~ 5 to 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Akiyama, M.; Aoki, K.; Ando, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    We report the ultraviolet luminosity function (UVLF) of Lyman break galaxies at z ~ 5 derived from a deep and wide survey using the prime focus camera of the 8.2 m Subaru telescope (Suprime-Cam). Target fields consist of two blank regions of the sky, namely, the region including the Hubble Deep Field-North and the J0053+1234 region, and the total effective surveyed area is 1290 arcmin2. Applications of carefully determined colour selection criteria in V - Ic and Ic - z' yield a detection of 853 z ~ 5 candidates with z'AB < 26.5 mag. The UVLF at z ~ 5 based on this sample shows no significant change in the number density of bright (L >~ L*z=3) LBGs from that at z ~ 3, while there is a significant decline in the LF's faint end with increasing look-back time. This result means that the evolution of the number densities is differential with UV luminosity: the number density of UV luminous objects remains almost constant from z ~ 5 to 3 (the cosmic age is about 1.2 to 2.1 Gyr) while the number density of fainter objects gradually increases with cosmic time. This trend becomes apparent thanks to the small uncertainties in number densities both in the bright and faint parts of LFs at different epochs that are made possible by the deep and wide surveys we use. We discuss the origins of this differential evolution of the UVLF along the cosmic time and suggest that our observational findings are consistent with the biased galaxy evolution scenario: a galaxy population hosted by massive dark haloes starts active star formation preferentially at early cosmic time, while less massive galaxies increase their number density later. We also calculated the UV luminosity density by integrating the UVLF and at z ~ 5 found it to be 38.8+6.7-4.1 per cent of that at z ~ 3 for the luminosity range L > 0.1L*z=3. By combining our results with those from the literature, we find that the cosmic UV luminosity density marks its peak at and then slowly declines towards higher redshift. Based on

  12. The Rest-Frame Optical Luminosity Functions of Galaxies at 2<=z<=3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, D.; van Dokkum, P.; Quadri, R.; Rudnick, G.; Franx, M.; Lira, P.; Wuyts, S.; Gawiser, E.; Christlein, D.; Toft, S.

    2007-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical (B, V, and R band) luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 2<=z<=3.5, measured from a K-selected sample constructed from the deep NIR MUSYC, the ultradeep FIRES, and the GOODS-CDFS. This sample is unique for its combination of area and range of luminosities. The faint-end slopes of the LFs at z>2 are consistent with those at z~0. The characteristic magnitudes are significantly brighter than the local values (e.g., ~1.2 mag in the R band), while the measured values for Φ* are typically ~5 times smaller. The B-band luminosity density at z~2.3 is similar to the local value, and in the R band it is ~2 times smaller than the local value. We present the LF of distant red galaxies (DRGs), which we compare to that of non-DRGs. While DRGs and non-DRGs are characterized by similar LFs at the bright end, the faint-end slope of the non-DRG LF is much steeper than that of DRGs. The contribution of DRGs to the global densities down to the faintest probed luminosities is 14%-25% in number and 22%-33% in luminosity. From the derived rest-frame U-V colors and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate the mass-to-light ratios (M/L) of the different subsamples. The M/L ratios of DRGs are ~5 times higher (in the R and V bands) than those of non-DRGs. The global stellar mass density at 2<=z<=3.5 appears to be dominated by DRGs, whose contribution is of order ~60%-80% of the global value. Qualitatively similar results are obtained when the population is split by rest-frame U-V color instead of observed J-K color. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatories on Paranal, Chile as part of the ESO program 164.O-0612.

  13. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  14. The mass function of primordial rogue planet MACHOs in quasar nano-lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Rudolph E.; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-11-01

    The recent Sumi et al (2010 Astrophys. J. 710 1641; 2011 Nature 473 349) detection of free roaming planet mass MACHOs in cosmologically significant numbers recalls their original detection in quasar microlening studies (Colley and Schild 2003 Astrophys. J. 594 97; Schild R E 1996 Astrophys. J. 464 125). We consider the microlensing signature of such a population, and find that the nano-lensing (microlensing) would be well characterized by a statistical microlensing theory published previously by Refsdal and Stabell (1991 Astron. Astrophys. 250 62) Comparison of the observed First Lens microlensing amplitudes with the theoretical prediction gives close agreement and a methodology for determining the slope of the mass function describing the population. Our provisional estimate of the power law exponent in an exponential approximation to this distribution is 2.98+1.0-0.5, where a Salpeter slope is 2.35.

  15. Tidally triggered galaxy formation. I - Evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Cedric; Silk, Joseph

    1991-11-01

    Motivated by accumulating evidence that large-scale galactic star formation is initiated and sustained by tidal interactions, a phenomenological model is developed for the galaxy luminosity function, commencing from a galaxy mass function that is predicted by a hierarchical model of structure formation such as the cold dark matter dominated cosmology. The epoch of luminous galaxy formation and the galactic star-formation rate are determined by the environment. Gas cooling and star-formation feedback are incorporated; the present epoch luminosity function of bright galaxies and the distribution of galaxy colors are well reproduced. Biasing, via the preferential formation of luminous galaxies in denser regions associated with groups of clusters, is a natural outcome of this tidally triggered star-formation model. A large frequency is inferred of 'failed' galaxies, prematurely stripped by supernova-driven winds, that populate groups and clusters in the form of low surface brightness gas-poor dwarfs, and of 'retarded' galaxies, below the threshold for effective star formation, in the field, detectable as gas-rich, extremely low surface brightness objects. Predictions are presented for the evolution with redshift of the distribution of characteristic star formation timescales, galaxy ages, and colors. Estimates are also made of galaxy number counts, and it is suggested that dwarf galaxies undergoing bursts of star formation at z of about 1 may dominate the counts at the faintest magnitudes.

  16. GALACTIC-SCALE ABSORPTION OUTFLOW IN THE LOW-LUMINOSITY QUASAR IRAS F04250-5718: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, Doug; Borguet, Benoit; Arav, Nahum; Dunn, Jay P.; Penton, Steve; Kriss, Gerard A.; Korista, Kirk; Bautista, Manuel; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle; Steenbrugge, Katrien; Ignacio Gonzalez-Serrano, J.; Benn, Chris; Aoki, Kentaro; Behar, Ehud; Micheal Crenshaw, D.; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Moe, Maxwell; Scott, Jennifer

    2011-09-20

    We present absorption line analysis of the outflow in the quasar IRAS F04250-5718. Far-ultraviolet data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal intrinsic narrow absorption lines from high ionization ions (e.g., C IV, N V, and O VI) as well as low ionization ions (e.g., C II and Si III). We identify three kinematic components with central velocities ranging from {approx}-50 to {approx}-230 km s{sup -1}. Velocity-dependent, non-black saturation is evident from the line profiles of the high ionization ions. From the non-detection of absorption from a metastable level of C II, we are able to determine that the electron number density in the main component of the outflow is {approx}<30 cm{sup -3}. Photoionization analysis yields an ionization parameter log U{sub H} {approx} -1.6 {+-} 0.2, which accounts for changes in the metallicity of the outflow and the shape of the incident spectrum. We also consider solutions with two ionization parameters. If the ionization structure of the outflow is due to photoionization by the active galactic nucleus, we determine that the distance to this component from the central source is {approx}>3 kpc. Due to the large distance determined for the main kinematic component, we discuss the possibility that this outflow is part of a galactic wind.

  17. Discovery of a narrow line quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J.; Liebert, J.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Steiner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A stellar object is reported which, while having X-ray and optical luminosities typical of quasars, has narrow permitted and forbidden emission lines over the observed spectral range. The narrow-line spectrum is high-excitation, the Balmer lines seem to be recombinational, and a redder optical spectrum than that of most quasars is exhibited, despite detection as a weak radio source. The object does not conform to the relationships between H-beta parameters and X-ray flux previously claimed for a large sample of the active galactic nuclei. Because reddish quasars with narrow lines, such as the object identified, may not be found by the standard techniques for the discovery of quasars, the object may be a prototype of a new class of quasars analogous to high-luminosity Seyfert type 2 galaxies. It is suggested that these objects cannot comprise more than 10% of all quasars.

  18. COSMOLOGICAL DEPENDENCE OF THE MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, PROJECTED CLUSTERING AND GALAXY-GALAXY LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2013-11-10

    Observables such as the galaxy luminosity function, Φ(M), projected galaxy clustering, w {sub p}(r {sub p}), and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal, ΔΣ(r {sub p}), are often measured from galaxy redshift surveys assuming a fiducial cosmological model for calculating distances to, and between galaxies. There are a growing number of studies that perform joint analyses of these measurements and constrain cosmological parameters. We quantify the amount by which such measurements systematically vary as the fiducial cosmology used for the measurements is changed, and show that these effects can be significant at high redshifts (z ∼ 0.5). Cosmological analyses (or halo occupation distribution analyses) that use the luminosity function, clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal but ignore such systematic effects may bias the inference of the parameters. We present a simple way to account for the differences in the cosmological model used for the measurements and those used for the prediction of observables, thus allowing a fair comparison between models and data.

  19. Constraints on the CO Luminosity Function at z˜1 Using ALMA Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kohno, K.; Tamura, Y.; Matsuda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We report the constraints on the CO luminosity function using ALMA Cycle 0 archival data. We use band 6 data taken toward a z=0.1832 lensing cluster, Abell 1689 (4.7 arcmin2), to produce a 3-dimensional cube with a 30-km s-1 resolution and to search for millimeter emission line galaxies using CLUMPFIND. We do not detect any emitters above 5σ (σ = 2.5 mJy beam-1). However, this result provides upper limits to the CO luminosity function down to φ<3.3×10-2 Mpc-3 dex-1 at LVCO˜ 1.0×108 Jy kms-1 Mpc2. We also detect a 4σ candidate line emitter with SΔ V=0.894 Jy km s-1 and FWHM = 138 km s-1 at 241.03 GHz. The photometric redshift is z=0.853, which is estimated from optical/near-infrared data, suggesting the line may be 12CO(4-3) at z=0.913. The estimated molecular gas mass of this candidate indicates this candidate is extremely gas rich.

  20. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  1. PRIMUS: Galaxy clustering as a function of luminosity and color at 0.2 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Cool, Richard J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(r{sub p} , π) and w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ∼130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg{sup 2} of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h {sup –1} < r{sub p} < 1 Mpc h {sup –1}) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b {sub gal} ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ∼ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  2. Sub-mm emission line deep fields: CO and [C II] luminosity functions out to z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-09-01

    Now that Atacama Large (Sub)Millimeter Array is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J =1-0 out to CO J = 6-5 and [C II] at redshifts z= 0-6. We find that (1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [C II] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z ≤ 2.75; (2) we find that the CO and [C II] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [C II] are found at z ˜ 2; (3) the CO J = 3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; (4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; (5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [C II] luminosity function of galaxies at z ≥ 1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  3. AN EXPONENTIAL DECLINE AT THE BRIGHT END OF THE z = 6 GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; McLure, Ross J.; Bruce, Victoria A.; Hibon, Pascale; McCracken, Henry J.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier; Bonfield, David G.; Jarvis, Matt J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for the most luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 6 based on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data. We identify a sample of 40 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) brighter than magnitude z' = 25.3 across an area of almost 4 deg{sup 2}. Sensitive spectroscopic observations of seven galaxies provide redshifts for four, of which only two have moderate to strong Ly{alpha} emission lines. All four have clear continuum breaks in their spectra. Approximately half of the LBGs are spatially resolved in 0.7 arcsec seeing images, indicating larger sizes than lower luminosity galaxies discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope, possibly due to ongoing mergers. The stacked optical and infrared photometry is consistent with a galaxy model with stellar mass {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. There is strong evidence for substantial dust reddening with a best-fit A{sub V} = 0.75 and A{sub V} > 0.48 at 2{sigma} confidence, in contrast to the typical dust-free galaxies of lower luminosity at this epoch. The spatial extent and spectral energy distribution suggest that the most luminous z Almost-Equal-To 6 galaxies are undergoing merger-induced starbursts. The luminosity function of z = 5.9 star-forming galaxies is derived. This agrees well with previous work and shows strong evidence for an exponential decline at the bright end, indicating that the feedback processes that govern the shape of the bright end are occurring effectively at this epoch.

  4. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF X-RAY SOURCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, A. H.; Primini, F.; McDowell, J. C.; Zezas, A.; Kilgard, R. E.

    2009-11-10

    X-ray sources in spiral galaxies can be approximately classified into bulge and disk populations. The bulge (or hard) sources have X-ray colors which are consistent with low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) but the disk sources have softer colors suggesting a different type of source. In this paper, we further study the properties of hard and soft sources by constructing color-segregated X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for these two populations. Since the number of sources in any given galaxy is small, we co-added sources from a sample of nearby, face-on spiral galaxies observed by Chandra as a Large Project in Cycle 2. We use simulations to carefully correct the XLF for completeness. The composite hard source XLF is not consistent with a single-power-law fit. At luminosities L{sub x} > 3 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, it is well fitted by a power law with a slope that is consistent with that found for sources in elliptical galaxies by Kim and Fabbiano. This supports the suggestion that the hard sources are dominated by LMXBs. In contrast, the high-luminosity XLF of soft sources has a slope similar to the 'universal' high-mass X-ray binary XLF. Some of these sources are stellar-mass black hole binaries accreting at high rates in a thermal/steep power-law state. The softest sources have inferred disk temperatures that are considerably lower than found in galactic black holes binaries. These sources are not well understood, but some may be super-soft ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a quiescent state as suggested by Soria and Ghosh.

  5. A Hubble Diagram for Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, Guido; Lusso, Elisabeta

    2015-09-01

    We present a new method to test the cosmological model at high z, and measure the cosmological parameters, based on the non-linear correlation between UV and X-ray luminosity in quasars. While the method can be successfully tested with the data available today, a deep X-ray survey matching the future LSST and Euclid quasar catalogs is needed to achieve a high precision. Athena could provide a Hubble diagram for quasar analogous to that available today for supernovae, but extending up to z>6.

  6. Probability distributions for the magnification of quasars due to microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing can magnify the flux of a lensed quasar considerably and therefore possibly influence quasar source counts or the observed quasar luminosity function. A large number of distributions of magnification probabilities due to gravitational microlensing for finite sources are presented, with a reasonable coverage of microlensing parameter space (i.e., surface mass density, external shear, mass spectrum of lensing objects). These probability distributions were obtained from smoothing two-dimensional magnification patterns with Gaussian source profiles. Different source sizes ranging from 10 exp 14 cm to 5 x 10 exp 16 cm were explored. The probability distributions show a large variety of shapes. Coefficients of fitted slopes for large magnifications are presented.

  7. The luminosity function of cluster galaxies: relations among M_1_, M^*^ and the morphological type.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Cirimele, G.; Appodia, B.

    1996-11-01

    A study of the luminosity function of 36 Abell clusters of galaxies has been carried out using photographic plates obtained with the Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt telescope. The relation between the magnitude M_1_ of the brightest cluster member and the Schechter function parameter M^*^ has been analyzed. A positive correlation between M^*^ and M_1_ is found. However clusters appear segregated in the M_1_-M^*^ plane according to their Rood & Sastry class in such a way that on average M_1_ becomes brighter while M^*^ becomes fainter going from late to early Rood & Sastry and also Bautz & Morgan classes. Also a partial correlation analysis involving the magnitude M_10_ of the 10th brightest galaxy, shows a negative intrinsic correlation between M_1_ and M^*^. These results agree with the cannibalism model for the formation of brightest cluster members, and provide new constraints for theories of cluster formation and evolution.

  8. Constraints on the age and evolution of the Galaxy from the white dwarf luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The white dwarf disk luminosity function is explored using observational results of Liebert et al. (1988, 1989) as a template for comparison, and the cooling curves of Wood (1990, 1991) as the input basis functions for the integration. The star formation rate over the history of the Galaxy is found to be constant to within an order of magnitude, and the disk age lies in the range 6-13.5 Gyr, where roughly 40 percent of the uncertainty is due to the observational uncertainties. Using the best current estimates as inputs to the integration, the disk ages range from 7.5 to 11 Gyr, i.e., they are substantially younger than most estimates for the halo globular clusters but in reasonable agreement with those for the disk globular clusters and open clusters. The ages of these differing populations, taken together, are consistent with the pressure-supported collapse models of early spiral Galactic evolution.

  9. High-redshift quasars and the supermassive black hole mass budget: constraints on quasar formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, J. M.; Somerville, R. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the constraints on models of supermassive black hole (SMBH) and quasar formation obtainable from two recent observational developments: the discovery of luminous quasars at z~ 6, and estimates of the local mass density of SMBHs. If ~90 per cent of this mass was accreted at redshifts z<~ 3, as suggested by the observed quasar luminosity functions, these joint constraints pose a challenge for models, which must account for the observed luminous quasar population at z~ 6 within a very limited `mass budget'. We investigate a class of models based within the hierarchical structure formation scenario, in which major mergers lead to black hole formation and fuelling, and the resulting quasars shine at their Eddington-limited rate until their fuel is exhausted. We show that the simplest such model, in which a constant fraction of the gas within the halo is accreted in each major merger, cannot satisfy both constraints simultaneously. When this model is normalized to reproduce the number density of luminous quasars at z~ 6, the mass budget is grossly exceeded owing to an overabundance of lower-mass SMBHs. We explore a range of modifications to the simple model designed to overcome this problem. We show that both constraints can be satisfied if the gas accretion fraction scales as a function of the halo virial velocity. Similar scalings have been proposed in order to reproduce the local M•-σ relation. Successful models can also be constructed by restricting the formation of seed black holes to redshifts above zcrit~ 11.5 or to haloes above a velocity threshold vcrit~ 55 km s-1, or assuming that only a fraction of major mergers result in formation of a seed SMBH. We also briefly discuss the issue of trying to assume a `universal M•-σ relation' within the framework of simple Press-Schechter models, and further show that a fixed universal relation between SMBH mass and host halo mass is unlikely.

  10. Looking below the floor: constraints on the AGN radio luminosity functions at low power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capetti, Alessandro; Raiteri, Claudia M.

    2015-04-01

    We constrain the behaviour of the radio luminosity function (RLF) of two classes of active galactic nuclei (AGN) namely AGN of low radio power (LRP) and BL Lac objects. The extrapolation of the observed steep RLFs to low power predicts a space density of such objects that exceeds that of the sources that can harbour them and this requires a break to a shallower slope. For LRP AGN, we obtain Pbr, LRP ≳ 1020.5 W Hz- 1 at 1.4 GHz to limit their density to be smaller than that of elliptical galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107.5 M⊙. By combining this value with the limit derived by the observations the break must occur at Pbr, LRP ˜ 1020.5-1021.5 W Hz- 1. For BL Lacs, we find Pbr, BLLAC ≳ 1023.3 W Hz- 1 otherwise they would outnumber the density of weak-lined and compact radio sources, while the observations indicate Pbr, BLLAC ≲ 1024.5 W Hz- 1. In the framework of the AGN unified model, a low luminosity break in the RLF of LRP AGN must correspond to a break in the RLF of BL Lacs. The ratio between Pbr, LRP and Pbr, BLLAC is ˜103, as expected for a jet Doppler factor of ˜10.

  11. Effects of variability of X-ray binaries on the X-ray luminosity functions of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray luminosity functions of galaxies have become a useful tool for population studies of X-ray binaries in them. The availability of long term light-curves of X-ray binaries with the All Sky X-ray Monitors opens up the possibility of constructing X-ray luminosity functions, by also including the intensity variation effects of the galactic X-ray binaries. We have constructed multiple realizations of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of Milky Way, using the long term light-curves of sources obtained in the 2-10 keV energy band with the RXTE-ASM. The observed spread seen in the value of slope of both HMXB and LMXB XLFs are due to inclusion of variable luminosities of X-ray binaries in construction of these XLFs as well as finite sample effects. XLFs constructed for galactic HMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec is described by a power-law model with a mean power-law index of -0.48 and a spread due to variability of HMXBs as 0.19. XLFs constructed for galactic LMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec has a shape of cut-off power-law with mean power-law index of -0.31 and a spread due to variability of LMXBs as 0.07.

  12. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. V. Integrated JHKS magnitudes and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we determine absolute integrated magnitudes in the J,H,KS passbands for Galactic star clusters from the Milky Way Star Clusters survey. In the wide solar neighbourhood, we derive the open cluster luminosity function (CLF) for different cluster ages. Methods: The integrated magnitudes are based on uniform cluster membership derived from the 2MAst catalogue (a merger of the PPMXL and 2MASS) and are computed by summing up the individual luminosities of the most reliable cluster members. We discuss two different techniques of constructing the CLF, a magnitude-limited and a distance-limited approach. Results: Absolute J,H,KS integrated magnitudes are obtained for 3061 open clusters, and 147 globular clusters. The integrated magnitudes and colours are accurate to about 0.8 and 0.2 mag, respectively. Based on the sample of open clusters we construct the general cluster luminosity function in the solar neighbourhood in the three passbands. In each passband the CLF shows a linear part covering a range of 6 to 7 mag at the bright end. The CLFs reach their maxima at an absolute magnitude of -2 mag, then drop by one order of magnitude. During cluster evolution, the CLF changes its slope within tight, but well-defined limits. The CLF of the youngest clusters has a steep slope of about 0.4 at bright magnitudes and a quasi-flat portion for faint clusters. For the oldest population, we find a flatter function with a slope of about 0.2. The CLFs at Galactocentric radii smaller than that of the solar circle differ from those in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. The CLF in the inner area is flatter and the cluster surface density higher than the local one. In contrast, the CLF is somewhat steeper than the local one in the outer disk, and the surface density is lower. The corresponding catalogue of integrated magnitudes is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. The Luminosity Function and Radial Profile of the Stellar Population in the Core of 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paresce, F.; de Marchi, G.; Jedrzejewski, R.; Gilliland, R.; Stratta, M. G.

    1994-12-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae was observed by the Faint Object Camera on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope for the first time through narrow band F253M and F346M filters centered at 253 nm and 346 nm. A total of 511 stars down to the detection limit at m346 =~ 24 in the 7('') times 7('') field were accurately placed on a m346 vs m253-m346 color magnitude diagram to characterize the stellar populations in the core. Approximately 100 objects above and to the right of the main sequence turn-off are the same as those classified earlier with the aberrated HST but the rest below it are new objects seen now for the first time thanks to the substantial improvement in sensitivity. The new objects form a well defined main sequence whose luminosity function turns over dramatically at m346 =~ 20 well before the completeness limit and well before the end of the slowly increasing luminosity function for the outer fields measured from the ground by Hesser et al. (1987). We interpret this premature drop in the number of stars below ~ 0.7 M_sun in the core as the effect of mass segregation due to two body relaxation. The position of 9 objects in the range 20< m346<24 and -1.5luminosity function. We have also analyzed very deep frames of the core of 47 Tuc obtained with the WFPC1 before refurbishment in the U band to study with the highest possible accuracy the radial profile of stellar density around the geometrical center of the cluster. This data set fully confirms and extends further the results published by Calzetti et al. (1993) that showed that the radial density profile of 47 Tuc is not consistent with a King model of core radius 25('') extending all the way to the center but requires a central density enhancement of radius ~ 8('') = 0.02 parsec superimposed on the former. This result provides fresh evidence that this cluster may have suffered

  14. The WARPS Survey - VIII. Evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, L. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Jones, L. R.; Ebeling, H.; Horner, D. J.; Perlman, E. S.; Phillipps, S.; Scharf, C. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) from the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS) and quantify its evolution. WARPS is a serendipitous survey of the central region of ROSAT pointed observations and was carried out in two phases (WARPS-I and WARPS-II). The results here are based on a final sample of 124 clusters, complete above a flux limit of 6.5 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, with members out to redshift z ˜ 1.05, and a sky coverage of 70.9 deg2. We find significant evidence for negative evolution of the XLF, which complements the majority of X-ray cluster surveys. To quantify the suggested evolution, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis and conclude that the evolution is driven by a decreasing number density of high-luminosity clusters with redshift, while the bulk of the cluster population remains nearly unchanged out to redshift z ≈ 1.1, as expected in a low-density universe. The results are found to be insensitive to a variety of sources of systematic uncertainty that affect the measurement of the XLF and determination of the survey selection function. We perform a Bayesian analysis of the XLF to fully account for uncertainties in the local XLF on the measured evolution, and find that the detected evolution remains significant at the 95 per cent level. We observe a significant excess of clusters in the WARPS at 0.1 < z < 0.3 and LX ≈ 2 × 1043 erg s-1 compared with the reference low-redshift XLF, or our Bayesian fit to the WARPS data. We find that the excess cannot be explained by sample variance, or Eddington bias, and is unlikely to be due to problems with the survey selection function.

  15. The galaxy UV luminosity function at z ≃ 2-4; new results on faint-end slope and the evolution of luminosity density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Mortlock, Alice

    2016-03-01

    We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilize the unparalleled multifrequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ≃ 2, 3, 4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes (M1500) from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M1500 ≃ -22 (AB mag) down to M1500 = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ≃ 2, 3 and 4, respectively (thus, reaching ≃ 3-4 mag fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ≃ 2,3). At z ≃ 2, 3, we find a much shallower faint-end slope (α = -1.32 ± 0.03) than reported in some previous studies (α ≃ -1.7), and demonstrate that this new measurement is robust. By z ≃ 4, the faint-end slope has steepened slightly, to α = -1.43 ± 0.04, and we show that these measurements are consistent with the overall evolutionary trend from z = 0 to 8. Finally, we find that while characteristic number density (φ*) drops from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4, characteristic luminosity (M*) brightens by ≃ 1 mag. This, combined with the new flatter faint-end slopes, has the consequence that UV luminosity density (and hence unobscured star formation density) peaks at z ≃ 2.5-3, when the Universe was ≃ 2.5 Gyr old.

  16. THE PROPERTIES OF QUASAR HOSTS AT THE PEAK OF THE QUASAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kotilainen, Jari K.; Falomo, Renato; Decarli, Roberto; Treves, Aldo; Uslenghi, Michela; Scarpa, Riccardo E-mail: renato.falomo@oapd.inaf.i E-mail: aldo.treves@uninsubria.i E-mail: riccardo.scarpa@gtc.iac.e

    2009-10-01

    We present near-infrared imaging obtained with ESO VLT/ISAAC of a sample of 16 low luminosity radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) at the epoch around the peak of the quasar activity (2 < z < 3), aimed at investigating their host galaxies. For 11 quasars, we are able to detect the host galaxies and derive their properties, while for the other 5 quasars, upper limits to the host luminosity are estimated. The luminosities of the host galaxies of RQQs at high redshift are in the range of those of massive inactive elliptical galaxies. This work complements our previous systematic study of quasar hosts aimed to trace the cosmological luminosity evolution of the host galaxies up to z approx 2 and extends our pilot study of a few luminous quasars at z > 2. The luminosity trend with a cosmic epoch resembles that observed for massive inactive galaxies, suggesting a similar star formation history. In particular, both quasar host galaxies and massive inactive galaxies appear mostly assembled already at the peak age of the quasar activity. This result is of key importance for testing the models of joint formation and evolution of galaxies and their active nuclei.

  17. The HerMES submillimetre local and low-redshift luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, L.; Vaccari, M.; Franceschini, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Feltre, A.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-02-01

    We used wide-area surveys over 39 deg2 by the HerMES (Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey) collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multiwavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, 0.02 < z < 0.5, monochromatic luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500 μm. Within this redshift interval, we detected 7087 sources in five independent sky areas, ˜40 per cent of which have spectroscopic redshifts, while for the remaining objects photometric redshifts were used. The SPIRE LFs in different fields did not show any field-to-field variations beyond the small differences to be expected from cosmic variance. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multiwavelength archival data to perform a complete spectral energy distribution fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (IR; 8-1000 μm) LFs and their low-z evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The LFs show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, 0.02 < z < 0.2, with L_{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{6.0± 0.4} and Φ _{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-2.1± 0.4}, L_{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{5.3± 0.2} and Φ _{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-0.6± 0.4} estimated using the IR bolometric and the 250 μm LFs, respectively. Converting our IR LD estimate into an SFRD assuming a standard Salpeter initial mass function and including the unobscured contribution based on the UV dust-uncorrected emission from local galaxies, we estimate an SFRD scaling of SFRD0 + 0.08z, where SFRD0 ≃ (1.9 ± 0.03) × 10-2 [M⊙ Mpc-3] is our total SFRD estimate at z ˜ 0.02.

  18. Characterizing the Properties of Clusters of Galaxies As a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, K.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.; Goobar, A.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC

    2009-02-24

    We report the application of the new Monte Carlo method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI, described in a pair of companion papers), towards analysis and interpretation of X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our sample consists of publicly available well-exposed observations of clusters at redshifts z > 0.069, totaling 101 objects. We determine the luminosity and temperature structure of the X-ray emitting gas, with the goal to quantify the scatter and the evolution of the L{sub X} - T relation, as well as to investigate the dependence on cluster substructure with redshift. This work is important for the establishment of the potential robustness of mass estimates from X-ray data which in turn is essential towards the use of clusters for measurements of cosmological parameters. We use the luminosity and temperature maps derived via the SPI technique to determine the presence of cooling cores, via measurements of luminosity and temperature contrast. The L{sub X}-T relation is investigated, and we confirm that L{sub X} {proportional_to} T{sup 3}. We find a weak redshift dependence ({proportional_to} (1 + z){sup {beta}{sub LT}}, {beta}{sub LT} = 0.50 {+-} 0.34), in contrast to some Chandra results. The level of dynamical activity is established using the 'power ratios' method, and we compare our results to previous application of this method to Chandra data for clusters. We find signs of evolution in the P{sub 3}/P{sub 0} power ratio. A new method, the 'temperature two-point correlation function', is proposed. This method is used to determine the 'power spectrum' of temperature fluctuations in the X-ray emitting gas as a function of spatial scale. We show how this method can be fruitfully used to identify cooling core clusters as well as those with disturbed structures, presumably due to on-going or recent merger activity.

  19. High-Redshift QSOs in the SWIRE Survey and the z~3 QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siana, Brian; Polletta, Maria del Carmen; Smith, Harding E.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Farrah, Duncan; Babbedge, Tom S. R.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David; Fang, Fan; Franceschini, Alberto; Oliver, Seb

    2008-03-01

    We use a simple optical/infrared (IR) photometric selection of high-redshift QSOs that identifies a Lyman break in the optical photometry and requires a red IR color to distinguish QSOs from common interlopers. The search yields 100 z ~ 3 (U-dropout) QSO candidates with 19 < r' < 22 over 11.7 deg2 in the ELAIS-N1 (EN1) and ELAIS-N2 (EN2) fields of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Legacy Survey. The z ~ 3 selection is reliable, with spectroscopic follow-up of 10 candidates confirming that they are all QSOs at 2.83 < z < 3.44. We find that our z ~ 4 (g'-dropout) sample suffers from both unreliability and incompleteness but present seven previously unidentified QSOs at 3.50 < z < 3.89. Detailed simulations show our z ~ 3 completeness to be ~80%-90% from 3.0 < z < 3.5, significantly better than the ~30%-80% completeness of the SDSS at these redshifts. The resulting luminosity function extends 2 mag fainter than SDSS and has a faint-end slope of β = - 1.42 +/- 0.15, consistent with values measured at lower redshift. Therefore, we see no evidence for evolution of the faint-end slope of the QSO luminosity function. Including the SDSS QSO sample, we have now directly measured the space density of QSOs responsible for ~70% of the QSO UV luminosity density at z ~ 3. We derive a maximum rate of H I photoionization from QSOs at z ~ 3.2, Γ = 4.8 × 10-13 s-1, about half of the total rate inferred through studies of the Lyα forest. Therefore, star-forming galaxies and QSOs must contribute comparably to the photoionization of H I in the intergalactic medium at z ~ 3. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrained by PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Stellar population models are the tool to derive the properties of real galaxies, or predict them via galaxy formation models. A constructive approach is to use nearby stellar systems to calibrate uncertain quantities in stellar evolution. These checks and comparisons are particulary needed for evolved and short stellar phases such as the Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic giant branch, after whcih intermediate-mass stars evolve through the planetary nebula stage. Given the stellar mass range for which the fuel consumption along the TP-AGB is larger, high-redshift galaxies are the best probes of our modelling. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescription for the treatment of this stellar phase affects the integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function and stellar remnants stemming from the various assumptions.

  1. Luminosity function of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-11-01

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [O II] emission line luminosity L([O II]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [O II] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([O II]) = 1043.0 erg s-1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [O II] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([O II]) = 1041.6 erg s-1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [O II] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [O II] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)-1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ˜3(z + 1)-1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [O III] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [O II] and [O III] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  2. Luminosity function of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, KwangHo; Khandai, Nishikanta; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu

    2015-09-18

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII]) = 1043.0 erg s–1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excessmore » in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII]) = 1041.6 erg s–1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from –3 to –2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)–1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ~3(z + 1)–1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. As a result, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.« less

  3. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  4. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshift Quasars with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    High-redshift quasars are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. Through pioneering optical and near-infrared wide-area surveys such as the SDSS and the VIKING Survey, about one hundred quasars have been found at z > 6 (e.g., Fan et al. (2006b), Venemans et al. (2013)). However, its current small sample size and the fact that most of them are the most luminous (M 1450 <~ -24) population in this epoch prevents one from constraining statistics on high-redshift quasars, namely quasar luminosity function (QLF), and redshift evolution of IGM neutral fraction. Thus, discovery of large number of z > 6 quasars, especially low-luminous or z > 7 quasars, is highly desired for further understanding of the early universe. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redshift (z > 6) quasars using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. Thanks to its extremely wide coverage and its high sensitivity thorough five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r ~ 26 in HSC-Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for us to increase the number of z > 6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z ~ 6 and 50 at z ~ 7, based on the current estimate of the QLF at z > 6 by Willott et al. (2010b). One of the biggest challenges in z > 6 quasar candidate selection is contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to the quasars. To overcome this issue and maximize the selection efficiency, we apply a double-layered approach to the HSC survey products, namely combination of two probabilistic selections: SED-fitting and Bayesian selection. In particular, we have developed a template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars

  5. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project. II. Global Properties and the Luminosity Function of Field Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2005-09-01

    We discuss a 175 deg2 spectroscopic survey for blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the Galactic halo. We use the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to select BHB candidates, and we find that the 2MASS and SDSS color selection is 38% and 50% efficient, respectively, for BHB stars. Our samples include one likely runaway B7 star 6 kpc below the Galactic plane. The global properties of the BHB samples are consistent with membership in the halo population: the median metallicity is [Fe/H]=-1.7, the velocity dispersion is 108 km s-1, and the mean Galactic rotation of the BHB stars 3 kpc<|z|<15 kpc is -4+/-30 km s-1. We discuss the theoretical basis of the Preston, Shectman, and Beers MV-color relation for BHB stars and conclude that the intrinsic shape of the BHB MV-color relation results from the physics of stars on the horizontal branch. We calculate the luminosity function for the field BHB star samples using the maximum likelihood method of Efstathiou and coworkers, which is unbiased by density variations. The field BHB luminosity function exhibits a steep rise at bright luminosities, a peak between 0.8luminosities. We compare the field BHB luminosity functions with the luminosity functions derived from 16 different globular cluster BHBs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests suggest that field BHB stars and BHB stars in globular clusters share a common distribution of luminosities, with the exception of globular clusters with extended BHBs.

  6. A Snapshot Survey for Gravitational Lenses among z>=4.0 Quasars. II. Constraints on the 4.0Quasar Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Haiman, Zoltán; Pindor, Bartosz; Strauss, Michael A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Eisenstein, Daniel; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    We report on i-band snapshot observations of 157 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at 4.0quasars appear to be strongly lensed and multiply imaged at the angular resolution (~0.1") and sensitivity of HST. The nondetection of strong lensing in these systems constrains the z=4-5 luminosity function to an intrinsic slope of β>-3.8 (3 σ), assuming a break in the quasar luminosity function at M*1450~-24.5. This constraint is considerably stronger than the limit of β>-4.63 obtained from the absence of lensing in four z>5.7 quasars. Such constraints are important to our understanding of the true space density of high-redshift quasars and the ionization state of the early universe. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9472.

  7. The local stellar luminosity function and mass-to-light ratio in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Fuchs, B.; Jahreiß, H.; Flynn, C.; Dettbarn, C.; Rybizki, J.

    2015-07-01

    A new sample of stars, representative of the solar neighbourhood luminosity function (LF), is constructed from the Hipparcos catalogue and the Fifth Catalogue of Nearby Stars. We have cross-matched to sources in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalogue so that for all stars individually determined near-infrared (NIR) photometry is available on a homogeneous system (typically Ks). The spatial completeness of the sample has been carefully determined by statistical methods, and the NIR LF of the stars has been derived by direct star counts. We find a local volume luminosity of 0.121 ± 0.004 LK⊙ pc-3, corresponding to a volumetric mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of M/L_K = 0.31 ± 0.02 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}, where giants contribute 80 per cent to the light but less than 2 per cent to the stellar mass. We derive the surface brightness of the solar cylinder with the help of a vertical disc model. We find a surface brightness of 99 LK⊙ pc-2 with an uncertainty of approximately 10 per cent. This corresponds to an M/L for the solar cylinder of M/L_K = 0.34 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}. The M/L for the solar cylinder is only 10 per cent larger than the local value despite the fact that the local population has a much larger contribution of young stars. It turns out that the effective scaleheights of the lower main sequence carrying most of the mass is similar to that of the giants, which are dominating the NIR light. The corresponding colour for the solar cylinder is V - K = 2.89 mag compared to the local value of V - K = 2.46 mag. An extrapolation of the local surface brightness to the whole Milky Way yields a total luminosity of MK = -24.2 mag. The Milky Way falls in the range of K band Tully-Fisher relations from the literature.

  8. A MULTIVARIATE FIT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND WORLD MODEL FOR LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    It is proposed that the luminosity function, the rest-frame spectral correlations, and distributions of cosmological long-duration (Type-II) gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may be very well described as a multivariate log-normal distribution. This result is based on careful selection, analysis, and modeling of LGRBs' temporal and spectral variables in the largest catalog of GRBs available to date: 2130 BATSE GRBs, while taking into account the detection threshold and possible selection effects. Constraints on the joint rest-frame distribution of the isotropic peak luminosity (L{sub iso}), total isotropic emission (E{sub iso}), the time-integrated spectral peak energy (E{sub p,z}), and duration (T{sub 90,z}) of LGRBs are derived. The presented analysis provides evidence for a relatively large fraction of LGRBs that have been missed by the BATSE detector with E{sub iso} extending down to {approx}10{sup 49} erg and observed spectral peak energies (E{sub p} ) as low as {approx}5 keV. LGRBs with rest-frame duration T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 1 s or observer-frame duration T{sub 90} {approx}< 2 s appear to be rare events ({approx}< 0.1% chance of occurrence). The model predicts a fairly strong but highly significant correlation ({rho} = 0.58 {+-} 0.04) between E{sub iso} and E{sub p,z} of LGRBs. Also predicted are strong correlations of L{sub iso} and E{sub iso} with T{sub 90,z} and moderate correlation between L{sub iso} and E{sub p,z}. The strength and significance of the correlations found encourage the search for underlying mechanisms, though undermine their capabilities as probes of dark energy's equation of state at high redshifts. The presented analysis favors-but does not necessitate-a cosmic rate for BATSE LGRBs tracing metallicity evolution consistent with a cutoff Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.2-0.5, assuming no luminosity-redshift evolution.

  9. The SDSS u-band Galaxy Survey: Luminosity functions and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baldry, Ivan K.; Glazebrook, K.; Budavari, T.; Eisenstein, D.J.; Annis, J.; Bahcall, N.A.; Blanton, M.R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, I.; Heckman, T.M.; Lin, H.; Loveday, J.; Nichol, R.C.; Schneider, D.P.; /Johns Hopkins U. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Princeton U. /CCPP, New York /Apache Point Observ. /Eotvos U. /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Portsmouth U., ICG /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2005-01-01

    We construct and analyze a u-band selected galaxy sample from the SDSS Southern Survey, which covers 275 deg{sup 2}. The sample includes 43223 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.005 < z < 0.3 and with 14.5 < u < 20.5. The S/N in the u-band Petrosian aperture is improved by coadding multiple epochs of imaging data and by including sky-subtraction corrections. Luminosity functions for the near-UV {sup 0.1}u band ({lambda} {approx} 322 {+-} 26 nm) are determined in redshift slices of width 0.02, which show a highly significant evolution in M* of -0.8 {+-} 0.1 mag between z = 0 and 0.3; with M* - 5 log h{sub 70} = -18.84 {+-} 0.05 (AB mag), log {phi}* = -2.06 {+-} 0.03 (h{sub 70}{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}) and log {rho}{sub L} = 19.11 {+-} 0.02 (h{sub 70} W Hz{sup -1}Mpc{sup -3}) at z = 0.1. The faint-end slope determined for z < 0.06 is given by {alpha} = -1.05 {+-} 0.08. This is in agreement with recent determinations from GALEX at shorter wavelengths. Comparing our z < 0.3 luminosity density measurements with 0.2 < z < 1.2 from COMBO-17, we find that the 280-nm density evolves as {rho}{sub L} {proportional_to} (1+z){sup {beta}} with {beta} = 2.1 {+-} 0.2; and find no evidence for any change in slope over this redshift range. By comparing with other measurements of cosmic star formation history, we estimate that the effective dust attenuation at 280 nm has increased by 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mag between z = 0 and 1.

  10. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF NEARBY MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. Q.; Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Mao, S.; Li, Cheng

    2013-08-10

    We perform photometric analyses of a bright early-type galaxy sample with 2949 galaxies (M{sub r} < -22.5 mag) in the redshift range of 0.05-0.15, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with morphological classification from Galaxy Zoo 1. We measure the Petrosian and isophotal magnitudes, as well as the corresponding half-light radius for each galaxy. We find that for the brightest galaxies (M{sub r} < -23 mag), our Petrosian magnitudes and isophotal magnitudes to 25 mag arcsec{sup -2} and 1% of the sky brightness are on average 0.16 mag, 0.20 mag, and 0.26 mag brighter than the SDSS Petrosian values, respectively. In the first case, the underestimations are caused by overestimations in the sky background by the SDSS PHOTO algorithm, while the latter two are also due to deeper photometry. Similarly, the typical half-light radii (r{sub 50}) measured by the SDSS algorithm are smaller than our measurements. As a result, the bright end of the r-band luminosity function is found to decline more slowly than previous works. Our measured luminosity densities at the bright end are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of Blanton et al., and the stellar mass densities at M{sub *} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} and M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are a few tenths and a factor of a few higher than those of Bernardi et al. These results may significantly alleviate the tension in the assembly of massive galaxies between observations and predictions of the hierarchical structure formation model.