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Sample records for quasi-elastic barrier distributions

  1. Sensitivity of fusion and quasi-elastic barrier distributions of {sub 16}O+{sub 144}Sm reaction on the coupling radius parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Zamrun, Muhammad; Usman, Ida; Variani, Viska Inda; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2014-03-05

    We study the heavy-ion collision at sub-barrier energies of {sub 16}O+{sub 144}Sm system using full order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the sensitivity of fusion and quasi-elastic barrier distributions for this system on the coupling radius parameter. We found that the coupled-channels calculations of the fusion and the quasi-elastic barrier distributions are sensitive to the coupling radius for this reaction in contrast to the fusion and quasi-elastic cross section. Our study indicates that the larger coupling radius, i.e., r{sub coup}=1.20, is required by the experimental quasi-elastic barrier distribution. However, the experimental fusion barrier distribution compulsory the small value, i.e., r{sub coup}=1.06.

  2. Quasi-Elastic Barrier Distribution for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 144}Sm Weakly Bound System

    SciTech Connect

    Otomar, D. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.

    2009-06-03

    We have measured the excitation function of quasielastic and elastic scattering, at backward angles, for a range of energies from below to above the Coulomb barrier, for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 144}Sm system. Barrier distributions were exctracted from these excitation functions by a numerical method. From the theoretical analysis one concluded that the quadrupole and octupole excitations of {sup 144}Sm and the one-neutron transfer (stripping) channel are important reaction processes. Nevertheless, the agreement with the experimental results is poor. The discrepancy is attributed to the {sup 7}Li break-up channel that was not taken into account in the coupling scheme.

  3. Breakup coupling effects on near-barrier quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 6,7}Li on {sup 144}Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Otomar, D. R.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Monteiro, D. S.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Guimaraes, V.; Chamon, L. C.

    2009-09-15

    Excitation functions of quasi-elastic scattering at backward angles have been measured for the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems at near-barrier energies, and fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the first derivatives of the experimental cross sections with respect to the bombarding energies. The data have been analyzed in the framework of continuum discretized coupled-channel calculations, and the results have been obtained in terms of the influence exerted by the inclusion of different reaction channels, with emphasis on the role played by the projectile breakup.

  4. How well do we understand quasi-elastic reactions at energies close to the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    In collisions between too heavy nuclei a wide spectrum of different reaction modes is observed covering the range from simple processes like elastic scattering to complicated multistep transfers and fusion. On the theoretical side heavy ion reactions are usually analyzed using models that were developed first for light ion induced reactions: the optical model for elastic scattering and the DWBA for more inelastic processes like transfer and inelastic scattering. Some of the assumptions going into these approximations, however, are not valid for heavy ion induced reactions. The region between fusion and quasi-elastic reactions is not well understood theoretically. This region is associated with deep inelastic collisions, which are complex multiparticle reactions involving transfer of several protons and neutrons. In this paper, the author discusses to what extent experiments in the field of quasi-elastic scattering are understood within the framework of various theoretical models and in what areas more work is needed.

  5. Spectroscopic study of sub-barrier quasi-elastic nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, C.N.; Evans, P.M.; Smith, A.E.; Stuttge, L.; Betts, R.R.; Lilley, J.S.; Connell, K.A.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.R.; James, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The technique developed in this paper is particularly well suited to the detailed spectroscopic study of low energy quasi-elastic nuclear reactions and by overcoming the limitations of conventional procedure, the prospect of detailed studies of inclusive reaction mechanism may be realised. With only limited statistics we find evidence for strong multistep character in the transfer of a single nucleon from spherical vibrational target to spherical projectile nuclei. The suggestive measurements reported here may be made definitive through extended runs based on this technique and experiments planned for the future offer the real prospect of developing a quantified interpretation of the reaction process. 9 refs. 5 figs.

  6. Influence of breakup on fusion barrier distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Biswas, D. C.; Mirgule, E. T.; John, B. V.; Gupta, Y. K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Prajapati, G.; Danu, L. S.; Rath, P. K.; Desai, V.; Deshmukh, N.; Saxena, A.

    2013-04-01

    Fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions, measured at backward angle θlab = 160° in reactions of 6,7Li+209Bi. The present results have been compared with the barrier distributions obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements for the above mentioned systems. The fusion barrier distributions from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions have been analyzed with simplified Coupled Channels calculations using Fresco. Inclusions of resonant states for both 6,7Li projectiles improve the predictions to describe the measured quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions and barrier distributions. For both the reactions peak positions of fusion barrier distributions are shifted towards a lower energy side in comparison to that obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements. The observed discrepancy in peak positions of barrier distributions obtained from quasi-elastic scattering and fusion excitation function measurements has been discussed in terms of total reaction threshold distribution.

  7. Experimental elastic and quasi-elastic angular distributions provide transfer probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-05-01

    Following a similar approach suggested recently to derive breakup probabilities [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054620 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054620], we present a simple method to derive transfer probabilities by measuring only elastic or quasi-elastic scattering for the system under investigation with the positive transfer Q values and a similar system with closed transfer channels. Our estimations and transfer data for the two-neutron stripping in the 18O+206Pb reaction are in a reasonable agreement.

  8. Derivation of breakup probabilities of weakly bound nuclei from experimental elastic and quasi-elastic scattering angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple method to derive breakup probabilities of weakly bound nuclei by measuring only elastic (or quasi-elastic) scattering for the system under investigation and a similar tightly bound system. When transfer followed by breakup is an important process, one can derive only the sum of breakup and transfer probabilities.

  9. Role of Triple Phonon Excitations on Large Angle Quasi-elastic Scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb System

    SciTech Connect

    Zamrun, Muhammad F.; Kasim, Hasan Abu

    2011-03-30

    We study the large angle quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system in terms of the full-order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the role of single, double and triple phonon excitations on quasi-elastic scattering cross section as well as quasi-elastic barrier distribution of this system for which the experimental data have been measured. It is shown that the triple phonon excitations both in {sup 54}Cr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei seem to be needed by the present coupled-channels calculations in order to reproduce the experimental data of quasi-elastic cross section and barrier distribution for the {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system. We also show that the standard value of the surface diffuseness parameter for the nuclear potential a = 0.63 fm, is preferred by the experimental quasi-elastic scattering data for this system.

  10. Role of triple phonon excitations in large angle quasi-elastic scattering of very heavy mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamrun, Muhammad Firihu

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of multi-phonon excitations on large-angle quasi-elastic scattering of massive systems using the full order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the role of triple phonon excitations of the target and projectile nuclei on the quasi-elastic scattering cross-section as well as the barrier distribution for 54Cr, 56Fe, 64Ni and 70Zn + 208Pb systems. It is shown that the calculations taken into account, the triple octupole phonon excitations of the target and triple quadrupole phonon excitations of the projectile for these systems can explain the experimental data of the quasi-elastic cross-section and the quasi-elastic barrier distribution. These results indicate that the coupled-channels formalism is still valid even for the very heavy mass systems.

  11. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  12. Derivation of capture cross sections from quasi-elastic excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The relationship between the quasi-elastic excitation function and the capture cross section is derived. The quasi-elastic data is shown to be a useful tool to extract the capture cross sections and the angular momenta of the captured systems for the reactions 16O+144,154Sm,208Pb, 20Ne+208Pb, and 32S+90,96Zr near and above the Coulomb barrier energies.

  13. Quasi-elastic Scattering Measurements in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capurro, O. A.; Arazi, A.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Figueira, J. M.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Otomar, D. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2009-06-03

    In the present work, results of measurements of quasi-elastic scattering cross sections using a silicon-telescope detector at backward angles are reported. They allowed us to deduce fusion barrier distributions from the first derivative of the corresponding excitation function (-d(d{sigma}{sub qes}/d{sigma}{sub Rut})/dE). We report data for the systems {sup 6,7}Li on {sup 144}Sm which are characterized by loosely bound projectiles onto a closed neutron shell target. The experimental excitation functions and the associated barrier distributions are compared for both systems.

  14. Disagreement between capture probabilities extracted from capture and quasi-elastic backscattering excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, R. P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental quasi-elastic backscattering and capture (fusion) excitation functions are usually used to extract the s -wave capture probabilities for the heavy-ion reactions. We investigated the 16O + 120Sn , 144Sm , 208Pb systems at energies near and below the corresponding interaction barriers and concluded that the probabilities extracted from quasi-elastic data are much larger than the ones extracted from fusion excitation functions at sub and deep-sub barrier energies. This seems to be a reasonable explanation for the known disagreement observed in the literature for the nuclear potential diffuseness derived from both methods.

  15. Lifetime-parameters for quasi elastic and deep inelastic collisions extracted from complete angular distributions of89Y(19F, x) y reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomijärvi, T.; Lucas, R.; Mermaz, M. C.; Coffin, J.-P.; Guillaume, G.; Heusch, B.; Jundt, F.; Rami, F.

    1985-09-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of heavy fragments produced in 19F + 89Y reaction at 140 MeV incident energy have been measured. Two different domains of reaction mechanism are observed at forward and backward angles respectively; the corresponding lifetime parameters are extracted from their angular distributions.

  16. Studying neutrino oscillations using quasi-elastic events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaratunga, Sujeewa Terasita; /Minnesota U.

    2008-02-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search), is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to search for neutrino oscillations using two detectors at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, IL (Near Detector) and Soudan, MN (Far Detector). It will study {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations and make a measurement on the oscillation parameters, {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, via a {nu}{sub {mu}} beam made at Fermilab. Charge current neutrino interactions in the MINOS detectors are of three types: quasi-elastic scattering (QEL), resonance scattering (RES) and deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Of these, quasi-elastic scattering leaves the cleanest signal with just one {mu} and one proton in the final state, thus rendering the reconstruction of the neutrino energy more accurate. This thesis will outline a method to separate QEL events from the others in the two detectors and perform a calculation of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} using those events. The period under consideration was May 2005 to February 2006. The number of observed quasi-elastic events with energies below 10 GeV was 29, where the expected number was 60 {+-} 3. A fit to the energy distribution of these events gives {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 2.91{sub -0.53}{sup +0.49}(stat){sub -0.09}{sup +0.08}(sys) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 0.990{sub -0.180}(stat){sub -0.030}(sys).

  17. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  18. Deriving capture and reaction cross sections from observed quasi-elastic and elastic backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on reaction theory, we suggest a useful method for extracting total and partial reaction and capture (complete fusion) cross sections from the experimental elastic and quasi-elastic backscattering excitation functions taken at a single angle. We also propose a method to predict the differential reaction cross section from the observed elastic-scattering angular distribution.

  19. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  20. Experimental study of quasi-elastic scattering of ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyerl, A.; Yerozolimsky, B. G.; Serebrov, A. P.; Geltenbort, P.; Achiwa, N.; Pokotilovski, Yu. N.; Kwon, O.; Lasakov, M. S.; Krasnoshchokova, I. A.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2002-08-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) are lost from traps if they are quasi-elastically scattered from the wall with an energy gain sufficient to exceed the Fermi potential for the wall. Possible mechanisms of a quasi-elastic energy transfer are, for instance, scattering from hydrogen diffusing in an impurity surface layer or on surface waves at a liquid wall. Using two different experimental methods at the UCN source of the Institut Laue-Langevin we have investigated both the energy-gain and the energy-loss side of quasi-elastic UCN scattering on Fomblin grease coated walls. For Fomblin oil and similar new types of oil we report up-scattering data as a function of temperature and energy transfer. These low-temperature oils may be used in an improved measurement of the neutron lifetime, which requires extremely low wall reflection losses.

  1. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Mark Edward; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  2. Improved Optics For Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Harry Michael

    1995-01-01

    Improved optical train devised for use in light-scattering measurements of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and laser spectroscopy. Measurements performed on solutions, microemulsions, micellular solutions, and colloidal dispersions. Simultaneous measurements of total intensity and fluctuations in total intensity of light scattered from sample at various angles provides data used, in conjunction with diffusion coefficients, to compute sizes of particles in sample.

  3. Quasi-elastic nuclear scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-elastic scattering of two nuclei is considered in the high-energy optical model. Energy loss and momentum transfer spectra for projectile ions are evaluated in terms of an inelastic multiple-scattering series corresponding to multiple knockout of target nucleons. The leading-order correction to the coherent projectile approximation is evaluated. Calculations are compared with experiments.

  4. Measurement of muon neutrino quasi-elastic scattering on carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Alabama U. /Bucknell U. /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Columbia U. /Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. /Fermilab /Indiana U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Michigan U.

    2007-06-01

    Low energy (200 < E{sub v} < 2000 MeV) neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require a model of charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interactions to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of muon neutrino CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A} = 1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, used to describe the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon; and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa} = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

  5. Study of the Quasi-Elastic Scattering in the NOvA Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, Minerba

    2013-06-01

    NOvA is a 810 km long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment with two detectors (far 14 KTon and near detector 300 Ton) currently being installed in the NUMI o -axis neutrino beam produced at Fermilab. A 222 Ton prototype NOvA detector (NDOS) was built and operated in the neutrino beam for over a year to understand the response of the detector and its construction. The goal of this thesis is to study the muon neutrino interaction data collected in this test, specifically the identification of quasi-elastic charged-current interactions and measure the behavior of the quasi-elastic muon neutrino cross section.

  6. Study of quasi-elastic scattering in the NOνA near detector prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, M.

    2015-05-15

    NOvA is a 14 kTon long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment currently being installed in the NuMI off-axis neutrino beam produced at Fermilab. A 222 Ton prototype NOνA detector was built and operated in the neutrino beam for over a year to understand the response of the detector and its construction. Muon neutrino interaction data collected in this test are being analyzed to identify quasi-elastic charged-current interactions and measure the behavior of the quasi-elastic muon neutrino cross section.

  7. Quasi-elastic reactions: a survey on recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Szilner, S.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Mason, P.; Mengoni, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Silvestri, R.; Sahin, E.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Ur, C. A.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Montagnoli, G.

    2010-04-30

    Binary reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier received recently a significant boost thanks to the advent of the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA coupled to the gamma array CLARA. In the present paper different aspects of the recent results of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics will be presented, focusing more closely on the reaction mechanism.

  8. A Measurement of the Exclusive 3He(e,e'p) Reaction Below the Quasi-Elastic Peak

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A; Sarty, A J; Aniol, K A; Bartsch, P; Baumann, D; Bertozzi, W; Bohinc, K; Bahm, R; Chen, J P; Dale, D; Dennis, L; Derber, S; Ding, M; Distler, M O; Dragovitsch, P; Ewald, I; Fissum, K G; Friedrich, J; Friedrich, J M; Geiges, R; Gilad, S; Jennewein, P; Kahrau, M; Kohl, M; Krygier, K W; Liesenfeld, A; Margaziotis, D J; Merkel, H; Merle, P; Moeller, U; Neuhausen, R; Pospischil, T; Potokar, M; Riccardi, G; Rochoe, R; Rosner, G; Rowntree, D; Schmieden, H; irca, S; Templon, J A; Thompson, M N; Wagner, A; Walcher, Th; Weis, M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z -L; Golak, J; Glaeckle, W; Wita, H

    2004-09-01

    New, high-precision measurements of the 3He(e,e'p) reaction using the A1 collaboration spectrometers at the Mainz microtron MAMI are presented. These were performed in antiparallel kinematics at energy transfers below the quasi-elastic peak, and at a central momentum transfer of 685 MeV/c. Cross sections and distorted momentum distributions were extracted and compared to theoretical predictions and existing data. The longitudinal and transverse behavior of the cross section was also studied. Sizable differences in the cross-section behavior from theoretical predictions based on Plane Wave Impulse Approximation were observed in both the two- and three-body breakup channels. Full Faddeev-type calculations account for some of the observed excess cross section, but significant differences remain.

  9. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics. Progress report, November 1, 1992--May 25, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  10. Two Photon Exchange in Quasi-elastic and Deep-inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, Todd D.; Katich, Joseph; Zhao Bo

    2011-10-24

    In this paper, I present an overview and preliminary results from three experiments at Jefferson Lab that were recently completed using a {sup 3}He gas target with polarization oriented normal to the scattering plane of unpolarized incident electrons. A target single spin asymmetry was formed by periodically flipping the direction of the target spin. In the reaction {up_arrow}{sup 3}He(e,e'), the Born contribution is expected to be zero, giving direct sensitivity to two photon exchange. This asymmetry was measured in the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic regimes with 0.1 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry is predicted to decrease by two-orders of magnitude for deep-inelastic versus quasi-elastic scattering. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented.

  11. Charged current quasi-elastic neutrino analysis at MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, G. A.

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA (Main INjector Experiment for ν-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of low energy neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of different materials (plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and H2O). We present the current status of the charged current quasi-elastic scattering in plastic scintillator.

  12. Measurement of quasi-elastic back-scattering of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 118}Sn and {sup 58}Ni+{sup 124}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y. X.; Jeong, S. C.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishio, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Ikezoe, H.

    2009-05-04

    Two systems of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 118}Sn and {sup 58}Ni+{sup 124}Sn produce the same compound nucleus {sup 182}Pt in the fusion reaction and they show the similar fusion cross sections below and near the Coulomb barriers, although only the system of {sup 58}Ni+{sup 124}Sn has positive Q-value multi-neutron transfer channels of 1-11 neutron(s). In order to investigate the possible effect of positive Q-value multi-neutron transfer channels on the capture cross sections, the quasi-elastic back-scattering for the two systems were measured below and near the Coulomb barriers at the backward angles of 162 deg. and 172 deg. The beam energies were altered in the energy range and the quasi-elastic back-scattering excitation functions were obtained. They were compared with the coupled-channel calculations of collective excitations and a two-neutron transfer channel, indicating no evidence of a significant effect of the positive Q-value multi-neutron transfer channels on the capture cross sections for the system of {sup 58}Ni+{sup 124}Sn.

  13. Fusion barrier distribution described by above-barrier resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Shastry, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed an analytically solvable, smooth, short-ranged, realistic and composite barrier potential with parameters controlling the flatness at the top, the range and the asymmetry of the barrier. When certain condition on flatness is obeyed, the transmission coefficient (T) across this barrier is found to be oscillatory in the above-barrier region of energy representing above-barrier resonances (ABR). Using this T with proper dependence on angular momentum, we estimate the results of fusion cross section σ f and the distribution function {d2(Eσ f) }/{dE 2} in the cases of two best studied examples namely 16O +144Sm and 16O +208Pb systems. On comparison with the corresponding experimental data we find good explanations of these fusion data. The asymmetry in the composite barrier addresses the problem of sub-barrier enhancement of σ f data. On the other hand, for the first time, the oscillatory structure in the results of {d2(Eσ f) }/{dE 2} is proved to be the manifestation of ABR sustained by the composite barrier by virtue of its flatness at the top.

  14. Short Range Correlations in Nuclei at Large xbj through Inclusive Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhihong

    2013-12-01

    The experiment, E08-014, in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab aims to study the short-range correlations (SRC) which are necessary to explain the nuclear strength absent in the mean field theory. The cross sections for 2H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 40Ca and 48Ca, were measured via inclusive quasi-elastic electron scattering from these nuclei in a Q2 range between 0.8 and 2.8 (GeV/c)2 for x>1. The cross section ratios of heavy nuclei to 2H were extracted to study two-nucleon SRC for 1

  15. Longitudinal and Transverse Quasi-Elastic Response Functions of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlson; J. Jourdan; R. Schiavilla; I. Sick

    2001-06-01

    The {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He longitudinal and transverse response functions are determined from an analysis of the world data on quasi-elastic inclusive electron scattering. The corresponding Euclidean response functions are derived and compared to those calculated with Green's function Monte Carlo methods, using realistic interactions and currents. Large contributions associated with two-body currents are found, particularly in the {sup 4}He transverse response, in agreement with data. The contributions of two-body charge and current operators in the {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, and {sup 6}Li response functions are also studied via sum-rule techniques. A semi-quantitative explanation for the observed systematics in the excess of transverse quasi-elastic strength, as function of mass number and momentum transfer, is provided. Finally, a number of model studies with simplified interactions, currents, and wave functions is carried out to elucidate the role played, in the full calculation, by tensor interactions and correlations.

  16. Characteristic features of water dynamics in restricted geometries investigated with quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osti, N. C.; Coté, A.; Mamontov, E.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Diallo, S. O.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the molecular behavior of water in spatially restricted environments is key to better understanding its role in many biological, chemical and geological processes. Here we examine the translational diffusion of water confined to a variety of substrates, from flat surfaces to nanoporous media, in the context of a recently proposed universal scaling law (Chiavazzo 2014) [1]. Using over a dozen previous neutron scattering results, we test the validity of this law, evaluating separately the influence of the hydration amount, and the effects of the size and morphology of the confining medium. Additionally, we investigate the effects of changing instrument resolutions and fitting models on the applicability of this law. Finally, we perform quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements on water confined inside nanoporous silica to further evaluate this predictive law, in the temperature range 250 ⩽ T ⩽ 290 K.

  17. Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, I.; Lal, J.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Huppert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments, in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  18. Fast Proton Hopping Detection in Ice Ih by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, Itay; Lal, Jyotsana; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Huppert, Dan I

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments,(1) in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  19. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Tyagi, Madhu; Brown, Craig; Udovic, Terrence J.; Jenkins, T. J.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-03-05

    Hydrogen is known to damage or degrade piezoelectric materials, at low pressure for ferroelectric random access memory applications, and at high pressure for hydrogen powered vehicle applications. The piezoelectric degradation is in part governed by the motion of hydrogen species within the piezoelectric materials. We present here Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) measurements of the local hydrogen species motion within lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) on samples charged by gaseous exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen {approx}17 MPa. Filter Analyzed Neutron Spectroscopy (FANS) studies of the hydrogen enhanced vibrational modes are presented as well. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and compared to comparable bulk diffusion studies of hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate.

  20. Vibrational lifetimes and friction in adsorbate motion determined from quasi-elastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Barbara A J; Hedgeland, Holly; Jardine, Andrew P; Allison, William; Hinch, B J; Ellis, John

    2015-09-14

    The vibrational excitation of molecules adsorbed on a surface is typically probed by spectroscopic techniques such as infrared or Raman spectroscopy. In the present article we demonstrate an alternative method to determine vibrational lifetimes of adsorbate molecules using quasi-elastic helium atom scattering (QHAS). As a probe of diffusive motion of molecules on surfaces QHAS is well established. Here, we demonstrate that QHAS can also be used to probe the vibrational lifetime of a molecule in its adsorption well. Measurements of cyclopentadienyl, C5H5, on Cu(111) allow us to distinguish two substrate phonon modes as well as two molecular vibrational modes, perpendicular and parallel to the surface. We further find that the dephasing of the vibrational motion corresponds to the friction determined in previous diffusion measurements. PMID:26204093

  1. Characteristic Features of Water Dynamics in Restricted Geometries Investigated with Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osti, Naresh C.; Mamontov, Eugene; Ramirez-cuesta, A.; Wesolowski, David J.; Diallo, S. O.

    2015-12-10

    Understanding the molecular behavior of water in spatially restricted environments is important to better understanding its role in many biological, chemical and geological processes. Here we examine the translational diffusion of water confined to a variety of substrates, from flat surfaces to nanoporous media, in the context of a recently proposed universal scaling law (Chiavazzo 2014) [1]. Using over a dozen previous neutron scattering results, we test the validity of this law, evaluating separately the influence of the hydration amount, and the effects of the size and morphology of the confining medium. Additionally, we investigate the effects of changing instrumentmore » resolutions and fitting models on the applicability of this law. Finally, we perform quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements on water confined inside nanoporous silica to further evaluate this predictive law, in the temperature range 250≤T≤290 K.« less

  2. Characteristic Features of Water Dynamics in Restricted Geometries Investigated with Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Naresh C.; Mamontov, Eugene; Ramirez-cuesta, A.; Wesolowski, David J.; Diallo, S. O.

    2015-12-10

    Understanding the molecular behavior of water in spatially restricted environments is important to better understanding its role in many biological, chemical and geological processes. Here we examine the translational diffusion of water confined to a variety of substrates, from flat surfaces to nanoporous media, in the context of a recently proposed universal scaling law (Chiavazzo 2014) [1]. Using over a dozen previous neutron scattering results, we test the validity of this law, evaluating separately the influence of the hydration amount, and the effects of the size and morphology of the confining medium. Additionally, we investigate the effects of changing instrument resolutions and fitting models on the applicability of this law. Finally, we perform quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements on water confined inside nanoporous silica to further evaluate this predictive law, in the temperature range 250≤T≤290 K.

  3. Quasi elastic and inelastic neutron scattering study of vitamin C aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliardo, F.; Branca, C.; Magazù, S.; Migliardo, P.; Coppolino, S.; Villari, A.; Micali, N.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, new results obtained by quasi elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed on vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid)/H 2O mixtures are reported. The data analysis of the QENS measurements, by a separation of the diffusive dynamics of hydrated L-ascorbic acid from that of water, furnishes quantitative evidences of a random jump diffusion motion of vitamin C and shows that the water dynamics is strongly affected by the presence of L-ascorbic acid. Concerning the INS experiment, we are able, through the behaviour of neutron spectra across the glass transition temperature ( T g≈233 K for the vitamin C/water system), to collocate the investigated system in the Angell “strong-fragile” scheme.

  4. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Piteira, Rodolphe; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-09-01

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 23}). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  5. Analysis of a quasi-elastic laser scattering spectrum using the maximum entropy method.

    PubMed

    Tsuyumoto, Isao

    2007-12-01

    We have applied the maximum entropy method (MEM) to the analysis of quasi-elastic laser scattering (QELS) spectra and have established a technique for determining capillary wave frequencies with a higher time resolution than that of the conventional procedure. Although the QELS method has an advantage in time resolution over mechanical methods, it requires the averaging of at least 20-100 power spectra for determining capillary wave frequencies. We find that the MEM analysis markedly improves the S/N ratio of the power spectra, and that averaging the spectra is not necessary for determining the capillary wave frequency, i.e., it can be estimated from one power spectrum. The time resolution of the QELS attains the theoretical limit by using MEM analysis. PMID:18071233

  6. Counter-ions dynamics in highly plastic and conducting compounds of poly(aniline). A quasi-elastic neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Djurado, David; Bée, Marc; Sniechowski, Maciej; Howells, Spencer; Rannou, Patrice; Pron, Adam; Travers, J P; Luzny, Wojciech

    2005-03-21

    Proton dynamics in films of poly(aniline) "plastdoped" with di-esters of sulfophthalic (or sulfosuccinic) acids have been investigated by using quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques. A broad time range (10(-13)-10(-9) s) has been explored by using four different spectrometers. In this time range, the dynamics is exclusively due to protons attached to the flexible tails of the counter-ions. A model of limited diffusion in spheres whose radii are distributed in size gives a realistic view of the geometry of molecular motions. However, it is found that the characteristic times of these motions are widely distributed over several orders of magnitude. The time decay of the intermediate scattering function is well described by a time power law. This behaviour is qualitatively discussed in connection with the structure of the systems and by comparison with other so-called complex systems. PMID:19791338

  7. The effects of density-dependent form factors for (e, e'p) reaction in quasi-elastic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of a relativistic single particle model, the effects of density-dependent electromagnetic form factors on the exclusive (e,e'p) reaction are investigated in the quasi-elastic region. The density-dependent electromagnetic form factors are generated from a quark-meson coupling model and used to calculate the cross sections in two different densities, either at the normal density of ρ_0 ˜ 0.15 fm^-3 or at the lower density, 0.5ρ_0 . Then these cross sections are analyzed in the two different kinematics: One is that the momentum of the outgoing nucleon is along the momentum transfer. The other is that the angle between the momentum of the outgoing nucleon and the momentum transfer is varied at fixed magnitude of the momentum of the outgoing nucleon. Our theoretical differential reduced cross sections are compared with the NIKHEF data for the 208 Pb( e, e'p) reaction, which is related to the probability that a bound nucleon from a given orbit can be knocked-out of the nucleus. The effects of the density-dependent form factors increase the differential cross sections for both knocked-out proton and neutron by an amount of a few percent. Moreover they are shown to be almost the same within only a few percent, i.e., nearly independent of the shell location of knockout nucleons. These results are quite consistent with the characteristics of double magic nuclei which have relatively sharp smearing in the density distribution.

  8. A sub-GeV charged-current quasi-elastic $\

    SciTech Connect

    Walding, Joseph James

    2009-12-01

    Neutrino-nucleus charged-current quasi-elastic scattering is the signal interaction used by many neutrino oscillation experiments. For muon disappearance studies the signal mode is νμn → μp. Modern oscillation experiments, such as T2K, produce neutrino beams with peak beam energies of order a few-GeV. It is therefore vitally important to have accurate measurements of the charged-current quasi-elastic crosssection for future neutrino oscillation experiments. Neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the few-GeV region are not well understood, with the main uncertainties coming from understanding of the neutrino beam flux and the final state interactions within nuclei. SciBooNE is a sub-GeV neutrino-nucleus cross-section experiment based at Fermilab, Batavia, USA, with the goal to measure neutrino cross-sections with precision of order 5%. SciBooNE took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in total 0.99×1020 and 1.53×1020 protons on target were collected in neutrino and anti-neutrino mode, respectively. In this thesis a νμ charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) cross-section contained within the SciBar sub-detector is presented. A method to tag muons in SciBar was developed and three samples were isolated. An excess in backwards tracks in the one-track sample is observed. A Poisson maximum likelihood is used to extract the CCQE cross-section. The fit was applied using a basic fit parameter model, successfully used to obtain the cross-section in the SciBar-MRD matched CCQE analysis. This method was found to be insufficient in describing the data for the SciBarcontained CCQE analysis. By adding two migration parameters the cross-section was calculated to be 1.004 ± 0.031 (stat)+0.101 -0.150(sys) × 10-38 cm2/neutron, excluding backwards tracks with a χ2 = 203.8/76 d.o.f. and 1.083 ± 0.030(stat)+0.115 -0.177(sys) × 10-38 cm2

  9. Capture barrier distributions: Some insights and details

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, N.; Grar, N.; Trotta, M.

    2007-10-15

    The 'experimental barrier distribution' provides a parameter-free representation of experimental heavy-ion capture cross sections that highlights the effects of entrance-channel couplings. Its relation to the s-wave transmission is discussed, and in particular it is shown how the full capture cross section can be generated from an l=0 coupled-channels calculation. Furthermore, it is shown how this transmission can be simply exploited in calculations of quasifission and evaporation-residue cross sections. The system {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm is studied in detail. A calculation of the compound-nucleus spin distribution reveals a possible energy dependence of barrier weights due to polarization arising from target and projectile quadrupole phonon states; this effect also gives rise to an entrance-channel 'extra-push'.

  10. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  11. A quasi-elastic light scattering study of smooth muscle myosin in the presence of ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X; Blank, P S; Carlson, F D

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the hydrodynamic properties of turkey gizzard smooth muscle myosin in solution using quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). The effects of ionic strength (0.05-0.5 M KCl) and light chain phosphorylation on the conformational transition of myosin were examined in the presence of ATP at 20 degrees C. Cumulant analysis and light scattering models were used to describe the myosin system in solution. A nonlinear least squares fitting procedure was used to determine the model that best fits the data. The conformational transition of the myosin monomer from a folded form to an extended form was clearly demonstrated in a salt concentration range of 0.15-0.3 M KCl. Light chain phosphorylation regulates the transition and promotes unfolding of the myosin. These results agree with the findings obtained using sedimentation velocity and electron microscopy (Onishi and Wakabayashi, 1982; Trybus et al., 1982; Trybus and Lowey, 1984). In addition, we present evidence for polymeric myosin coexisting with the two monomeric myosin species over a salt concentration range from 0.05 to 0.5 M KCl. The size of the polymeric myosin varied with salt concentration. This observation supports the hypothesis that, in solution, a dynamic equilibrium exists between the two conformations of myosin monomer and filaments. PMID:1420864

  12. Quasi-elastic light scattering in betaine calcium chloride dihydrate (BCCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Lewen, M.; Schaack, G.

    1999-12-01

    We report measurements of the temperature (40 Kicons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/> T icons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/>200 K) and polarization (z(yy)x,z(xz)x) dependence of the integrated intensities of quasi-elastically scattered laser light (icons/Journals/Common/lambda" ALT="lambda" ALIGN="TOP"/> = 514.5 nm) in a wavenumber interval of 0+/-3 cm-1 around the Rayleigh line at the different phase transitions in single crystals of BCCD. Large anomalies (central peaks) are observed at the transitions into the ferroelectric, the various commensurate (c,c´), and the incommensurate phases. The widths of the anomalies on the temperature scale are large in the regions of quasi-harmonic modulation of the structure, but narrow and distinct in the region of square-wave modulation in the solitonic phase of BCCD, where also unusual shapes on the T-axis are observed. The scattering phenomena at low temperatures are interpreted hypothetically as due to fluctuations caused by the formation or rearrangement of domain walls (solitons) in the lattice near the transitions between commensurate phases and by the variation in soliton density. The cicons/Journals/Common/leftrightarrow" ALT="leftrightarrow" ALIGN="TOP"/>c´ transitions are of the order-disorder type.

  13. A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Dynamics of Electrically Constrained Water.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Elmar C; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Wexler, Adam D; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Freund, Friedemann T

    2015-12-31

    We have measured the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) of an electrohydrodynamic liquid bridge formed between two beakers of pure water when a high voltage is applied, a setup allowing to investigate water under high-voltage without high currents. From this experiment two proton populations were distinguished: one consisting of protons strongly bound to oxygen atoms (immobile population, elastic component) and a second one of quasi-free protons (mobile population, inelastic component) both detected by QENS. The diffusion coefficient of the quasi-free protons was found to be D = (26 ± 10) × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1) with a jump length lav ∼ 3 Å and an average residence time of τ0 = 0.55 ± 0.08 ps. The associated proton mobility in the proton channel of the bridge is ∼9.34 × 10(-7) m(2) V(-1) s(-1), twice as fast as diffusion-based proton mobility in bulk water. It also matches the so-called electrohydrodynamic or "apparent" charge mobility, an experimental quantity which so far has lacked molecular interpretation. These results further corroborate the proton channel model for liquid water under high voltage and give new insights into the molecular mechanisms behind electrohydrodynamic charge transport phenomena and delocalization of protons in liquid water. PMID:26643863

  14. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulationmore » due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.« less

  15. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulation due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.

  16. Diffusive properties of water in Artemia cysts as determined from quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectra.

    PubMed Central

    Trantham, E C; Rorschach, H E; Clegg, J S; Hazlewood, C F; Nicklow, R M; Wakabayashi, N

    1984-01-01

    Results have been obtained on the quasi-elastic spectra of neutrons scattered from pure water, a 20% agarose gel (hydration four grams H2O per gram of dry solid) and cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia for hydrations between 0.10 and 1.2 grams H2O per gram of dry solids. The spectra were interpreted using a two-component model that included contributions from the covalently bonded protons and the hydration water, and a mobile water fraction. The mobile fraction was described by a jump-diffusion correlation function for the translation motion and a simple diffusive orientational correlation function. The results for the line widths gamma (Q2) for pure water were in good agreement with previous measurements. The agarose results were consistent with NMR measurements that show a slightly reduced translational diffusion for the mobile water fraction. The Artemia results show that the translational diffusion coefficient of the mobile water fraction was greatly reduced from that of pure water. The line width was determined mainly by the rotational motion, which was also substantially reduced from the pure water value as determined from dielectric relaxation studies. The translational and rotational diffusion parameters were consistent with the NMR measurements of diffusion and relaxation. Values for the hydration fraction and the mean square thermal displacement [u2] as determined from the Q-dependence of the line areas were also obtained. PMID:6733243

  17. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  18. Measurement of the nu(mu) Charged Current pi+ Production to Quasi-elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Jaroslaw A.; /Louisiana State U.

    2009-09-01

    Using high statistics samples of charged current interactions, MiniBooNE reports a model independent measurement of the single charged pion production to quasi-elastic cross section ratio on mineral oil without corrections for pion re-interactions in the target nucleus [1]. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < E < 2.4 GeV with 11% precision in the region of highest statistics.

  19. Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering in MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Chvojka, Jesse John

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillation is becoming increasingly understood with results from accelerator-based and reactor-based experiments, but unanswered questions remain. The proper ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates that compose the neutrino avor eigenstates is not completely known. We have yet to detect CP violation in neutrino mixing, which if present could help explain the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter in the universe. We also have not resolved whether sterile neutrinos, which do not interact in any Standard Model interaction, exist. Accelerator-based experiments appear to be the most promising candidates for resolving these questions; however, the ability of present and future experiments to provide answers is likely to be limited by systematic errors. A significant source of this systematic error comes from limitations in our knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Errors on cross-sections for such interactions are large, existing data is sometimes contradictory, and knowledge of nuclear effects is incomplete. One type of neutrino interaction of particular interest is charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering, which yields a final state consisting of a charged lepton and nucleon. This process, which is the dominant interaction near energies of 1 GeV, is of great utility to neutrino oscillation experiments since the incoming neutrino energy and the square of the momentum transferred to the final state nucleon, Q2, can be reconstructed using the final state lepton kinematics. To address the uncertainty in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, many experiments have begun making dedicated measurements. In particular, the MINER A experiment is studying neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few GeV region. MINERvA is a fine-grained, high precision, high statistics neutrino scattering experiment that will greatly improve our understanding of neutrino cross-sections and nuclear effects that affect the final state particles

  20. Few-nucleon transfer in quasi-elastic collisions at 20 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Deci, E.C.; Blue, R.A.; Harwood, L.H.; Ronningen, R.M.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    We report measurements of the isotopic distributions of targetlike fragments in coincidence with nitrogen, carbon, and boron isotopes from the reaction of 20 MeV/nucleon UN with WVHo and WUDy. The binary nature of the reaction was studied by observing particle-el-ray coincidences; projectilelike fragments were identified near the classical grazing angle with a telescope consisting of silicon surface barrier detectors, and the targetlike fragments were identified by observing their discrete deexcitation el rays in either of two high purity germanium detectors. The following reactions were studied: WUDy( UN,chixn), WUDy( UN,chi xn), WVHo( UN,Cxn), WVHo( UN,C xn), where chi = nitrogen or boron isotopes. The inclusive energy spectra of the projectilelike fragments are reasonably described by either the extended Serber or the Friedman model of projectile breakup. Such interpretations of the reaction mechanism were further tested by comparing the targetlike fragment isotopic distributions to those expected from transfer of the unobserved breakup fragment to the target followed by statistical decay. The agreement of the predicted targetlike fragment isotopic distributions with the present data is remarkably good.

  1. New Results from MiniBooNE Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Anti-Neutrino Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Joseph

    2011-07-01

    MiniBooNE anti-neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) data is compared to model predictions. The main background of neutrino-induced events is examined first, where three independent techniques are employed. Results indicate the neutrino flux is consistent with a uniform reduction of {approx}20% relative to the largely uncertain prediction. After background subtraction, the Q{sup 2} shape of {bar v}{sub {mu}} CCQE events is consistent with the model parameter MA = 1.35 GeV determined from MiniBooNE v{sub {mu}} CCQE data, while the normalization is {approx} 20% high compared to the same prediction.

  2. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) Studies of Hydrogen Dynamics for Nano-Confined NaAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, Tabbetha; Narasegowda, Shathabish; Brown, Craig; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Jenkins, Timothy

    The hydrogen dynamics of nano-confined sodium alanate (NaAlH4) has been studied using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). Results indicate thermodynamic destabilization is responsible for reduced desorption temperatures of NaAlH4 upon confinement within the nanopores of a metal organic framework (MOF). Both the bulk (microscale) NaAlH4 and the nanoconfined NaAlH4 data were fitted to re-orientation models which yielded corresponding percent mobile hydrogen and jump lengths. The jump lengths calculated from the nano-NaAlH4 were ~2.5 Å, and in conformity with those jump lengths determined for bulk NaAlH4 of ~2.3 Å. As much as 18 % of the hydrogen atoms were estimated to be mobile in the nano-NaAlH4 sample even at relatively low temperatures of 350 K. In contrast, bulk NaAlH4 shows less than 7 % mobile H-atoms even at higher temperatures of ~450 K. The activation energy for the long range is 3.1meV. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) Studies of Hydrogen Dynamics for Nano-Confined NaAlH4.

  3. Barrier distributions for the 7Li+27Al reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, W. H. Z.

    2010-08-01

    Barrier distributions can be obtained from the first derivative of the elastic and quasielastic (QEL) backward angle excitation functions [1]. In this work we present a study of the barrier distribution for the 7Li+27Al reaction from a Coupled-Channels Born Approximation (CCBA) calculations using the code FRESCO [2].

  4. Meaurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in quasi-elastic region from the reaction {sup 3}He{up_arrow}(e,e')

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yawei

    2013-10-01

    A measurement of the inclusive target single-spin asymmetry has been performed using the quasi-elastic {sup 3}He{up_arrow}(e,e') reaction with a vertically polarized {sup 3}He target at Q{sup 2} values of 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV{sup 2}. This asymmetry vanishes under the one photon exchange assumption. But the interference between two-photon exchange and one-photon exchange gives rise to an imaginary amplitude, so that a non-zero A{sub y} is allowed. The experiment, conducted in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory in 2009, used two independent spectrometers to simultaneously measure the target single-spin asymmetry. Using the effective polarization approximation, the neutron single-spin asymmetries were extracted from the measured {sup 3}He asymmetries. The measurement is to establish a non-vanishing A{sub y}. Non-zero asymmetries were observed at all Q{sup 2} points, and the overall precision is an order of magnitude improved over the existing proton data. The data provide new constraints on Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) models and new information on the dynamics of the two-photon exchange process.

  5. Effects of weakly coupled channels on quasielastic barrier distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Piasecki, E.; Kisielinski, M.; Swiderski, L.; Keeley, N.; Rusek, K.; Strojek, I.; Gawlikowicz, W.; JastrzePbski, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Trzcinska, A.; Kliczewski, S.; Kowalczyk, M.; Khlebnikov, S.; Koshchiy, E.; Kozulin, E.; Loktev, T.; Smirnov, S.; Krogulski, T.; Mutterer, M.; Piasecki, K.

    2009-11-15

    Heavy-ion collisions often produce fusion barrier distributions with structures displaying a fingerprint of couplings to highly collective excitations. Similar distributions can be obtained from large-angle quasielastic scattering, although in this case, the role of the many weak direct-reaction channels is unclear. For {sup 20}Ne+{sup 90}Zr, we have observed the barrier structures expected for the highly deformed neon projectile; however, for {sup 20}Ne+{sup 92}Zr, we find significant extra absorption into a large number of noncollective inelastic channels. This leads to smearing of the barrier distribution and a consequent reduction in the ''resolving power'' of the quasielastic method.

  6. The Transverse Asymmetry A{sub T}, from Quasi-elastic {sup 3}{ovr He}({rvec e}, e{prime}) Process and the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xu; Dipangkar Dutta; Feng Xiong; Brian Anderson; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; John Calarco; Lawrence Cardman; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jian-ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; G.S. Corrado; C. Crawford; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Bradley Filippone; John Finn; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; J. Golak; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Calvin Howell; Emlyn Hughes; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Cornelis De Jager; John Jensen; Xiaodong Jiang; C.E. Jones; Mark Jones; R. Kahl; H. Kamada; A. Kievsky; Ioannis Kominis; Wolfgang Korsch; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; Enkeleida Lakuriqi; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; John Lerose; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; J.W. Martin; Kathy Mccormick; Robert Mckeown; Kevin Mcilhany; Zein-eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; G.W. Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; E. Pace; Tina Pavlin; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; D. Pripstein; David Prout; Ronald Ransome; Yves Roblin; Marat Rvachev; Arunava Saha; G. Salme; Michael Schnee; Taeksu Shin; Karl Slifer; Paul Souder; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Mark Sutter; Bryan Tipton; Luminita Todor; Michele Viviani; Branislav Vlahovic; J. Watson; Claude Williamson; H. Witala; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Jen-chuan Yeh; Piotr Zolnierczuk

    2000-10-01

    We have measured the transverse asymmetry from inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He nuclei at quasi-elastic kinematics in Hall A at Jefferson Lab with high statistical and systematic precision. The neutron magnetic form factor was extracted based on Faddeev calculations with an experimental uncertainty of less than 2%.

  7. Diffusive properties of water in Artemia cysts as determined from quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectra. [Artemia shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Trantham, E.C.; Rorschach, H.E.; Clegg, J.S.; Hazlewood, C.F.; Nicklow, R.M.; Wakabayashi, N.

    1984-05-01

    Results have been obtained on the quasi-elastic spectra of neutrons scattered from pure water, 20% agarose gel (hydration four grams H/sub 2/O per gram of dry solid) and cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia for hydrations between 0.10 and 1.2 grams H/sub 2/O per gram of dry solids. The spectra were interpreted using a two-component model that included contributions from the covalently bonded protons and the hydration water, and a mobile water fraction. The mobile fraction was described by a jump-diffusion correlation function for the translation motion and a simple diffusive orientational correlation function. The results for the line widths ..gamma..(Q/sup 2/) for pure water were in good agreement with previous measurements. The agarose results were consistent with NMR measurements that show a slightly reduced translational diffusion for the mobile water fraction. The Artemia results show that the translational diffusion coefficient of the mobile water fraction was greatly reduced from that of pure water. The line width was determined mainly by the rotational motion, which was also substantially reduced from the pure water value as determined from dielectric relaxation studies. The translational and rotational diffusion parameters were consistent with the NMR measurements of diffusion and relaxation. Values for the hydration fraction and the mean square thermal displacement as determined from the Q-dependence of line areas were also obtained.

  8. Theory of quasi-elastic secondary emission from a quantum dot in the regime of vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Baymuratov, Anvar S; Premaratne, Malin

    2011-08-01

    We develop a low-temperature theory of quasi-elastic secondary emission from a semiconductor quantum dot, the electronic subsystem of which is resonant with the confined longitudinal-optical (LO) phonon modes. Our theory employs a generalized model for renormalization of the quantum dot's energy spectrum, which is induced by the polar electron-phonon interaction. The model takes into account the degeneration of electronic states and allows for several LO-phonon modes to be involved in the vibrational resonance. We give solutions to three fundamental problems of energy-spectrum renormalization--arising if one, two, or three LO-phonon modes resonantly couple a pair of electronic states--and discuss the most general problem of this kind that admits an analytical solution. With these results, we solve the generalized master equation for the reduced density matrix, in order to derive an expression for the differential cross section of secondary emission from a single quantum dot. The obtained expression is then analyzed to establish the basics of optical spectroscopy for measuring fundamental parameters of the quantum dot's polaron-like states. PMID:21934910

  9. Structural relaxation and quasi-elastic light scattering in glass: Approach by ferroelectric and ion-conducting phases

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kensaku; Osada, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering has been utilized for examining the structure of glass and its relaxation. However, the quasi-elastic-light-scattering (QLS) phenomenon has not been addressed in much detail. In this study, we observed pronounced QLS-intensity variations in two temperature domains—supercooled liquid (SCL) state (α-relaxation regime) and below the glass-transition temperature (β-relaxation regime)—in niobium-oxide (Nb2O5)-rich glass. These variations may be interpreted on the basis of the concept of ferroelectric and ion-conducting phases. It was suggested that the observed QLS originates as a result of the polarization fluctuation of NbO6 units, which is due to the dynamics of the nanometric phase separation in the SCL phase (α-regime), and the fluctuation due to the migration/hopping of conductible ions that are localized in the vicinity of the NbO6 units (β-regime). PMID:23056906

  10. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  11. Using Quasi-Elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Masaki

    2010-05-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far Detector in the Soudan mine in Minnesota, 735 km from the target. The MINOS oscillation analysis is mainly performed with the charged current (CC) events and sensitive to constrain high- Δm2 values. However, the quasi-elastic (QEL) charged current interaction is dominant in the energy region important to access low- m2 values. For further improvement, the QEL oscillation analysis is performed in this dissertation. A data sample based on a total of 2.50 x 1020 POT is used for this analysis. In summary, 55 QEL-like events are observed at the Far detector while 87.06 ± 13.17 (syst:) events are expected with null oscillation hypothesis. These data are consistent with disappearance via oscillation with m2 = 2:10 0.37 (stat:) ± 0.24 (syst:) eV2 and the maximal mixing angle.

  12. Antifreeze glycoproteins from an Antarctic fish. Quasi-elastic light scattering studies of the hydrodynamic conformations of antifreeze glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A I; Feeney, R E; Osuga, D T; Yeh, Y

    1975-05-10

    A quasi-elastic light-scattering technique was used to study the hydrodynamic conformations of antifreeze glycoproteins from an Antarctic fish. Antifreeze glycoprotein is composed of repeating units of Ala-Ala-Thr, with each threonine O-linked to a disaccharide, and it exists as several polymers of different numbers of this repeating unit. Molecular weights of the two major active polymers are 10,500 and 17,500 by such methods as centrifugation and osmotic pressure, but smaller than 20 by freezing-point depression. Translational diffusion coefficients at 20 degrees were 8.35 times 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 6.15 times 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the M-r-10,500 and 17,500 polymers, respectively. Measurements at -0.2 degrees in the presence of ice crystals did not indicate any conformational changes that might be related to the lowering of the freezing temperature. Lowering the temperature of these glycoprotein solutions close to temperatures of freezing caused a decrease in the effective hydrodynamic radius of both active and inactive glycoprotein components. PMID:1168194

  13. Advances in quasi-elastic scattering of light with emphasis on simultaneous measurements of velocities and sizes of particles embedded in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.; Grehan, G.

    1981-06-01

    Advances in quasi-elastic scattering of light are studied, and the theoretical analysis includes: (1) a generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), describing the quasi-elastic linear scattering of light; (2) a computer program using the Lentz algorithm to compute ratios of Bessel functions; (3) a comparative analysis of the GLMT and geometrical optics; and (4) a discussion of new monotonic relationships between scattered powers and the sizes of scatter centers. The theoretical results are applied to the experimental study which attempts to measure simultaneously the diameter and velocity of individual particles embedded in laminar and turbulent two-phase flows, illuminated by a laser beam. Results show a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions, and it is concluded that simultaneous velocimetry of single particles can be achieved by superimposing on the sizing probe a classical LDV control volume.

  14. HZETRN: neutron and proton production in quasi-elastic scattering of GCR heavy-ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The development of transport models for radiation shielding design and evaluation has provided a series of deterministic computer codes that describe galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events, and experimental beams at particle accelerators. These codes continue to be modified to accommodate new theory and improvements to the particle interaction database (Cucinotta et al., 1994, NASA Technical Paper 3472, US Government Printing Office, Washington DC). The solution employed by the heavy-ion transport code HZETRN was derived with the assumption that nuclear fragments are emitted with the same velocity as the incident ion through velocity conserving nuclear interactions. This paper presents a version of the HZETRN transport code that provides a more realistic distribution of the energy of protons and neutrons emitted from GCR interactions in shields. This study shows that the expected GCR dose equivalent is lower than previously calculated for water shields that are less than 110 g cm-2 thick. Calculations of neutron energy spectra in low Earth orbit indicate substantial contributions from relativistic neutrons. c2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reseved.

  15. Sub-barrier reactions measured using a recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Few data exist in the sub-barrier region for reaction channels other than fusion. In particular, our experimental knowledge of quasi-elastic transfer reactions is sparse, despite the belief that this particular channel may be dominant in determining some features of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Transfer reactions are governed primarily by the closet approach of the colliding nuclei which, at low energies, results in a strong backward peaking of the angular distribution in the center-of-mass frame. For situations where the projectile has a significant fraction of the target mass, as is so in most cases of interest, the backscattered projectile-like fragment has such low energy that the usual techniques of measurement and identification become invalid. Here, we report on a solution to this problem which allows a systematic study of many aspects of transfer reactions in the energy regime of interest. We exploit the fact that associated with the low-energy backscattered projectile-like fragment is a complementary target-like fragment which recoils to forward angles with a large fraction of the incident beam energy. These target-like fragments were detected and identified using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator thus allowing the measurement of quasi-elastic transfer over hitherto inaccessible energy range from the vicinity of the barrier to several tens of MeV below. The experiments described here used VYNi beams of energies ranging from 180 to 260 MeV provided by the Daresbury Laboratory Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. Data on sub-barrier transfer for targets of /sup 116,118,120,122,124/Sn and /sup 144,148,150,152,154/Sm were obtained. 16 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Solvent Dynamics in Solutions of PNIPAM in Water/Methanol Mixtures-A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study.

    PubMed

    Kyriakos, Konstantinos; Philipp, Martine; Silvi, Luca; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Petry, Winfried; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Papadakis, Christine M

    2016-05-26

    The solvent dynamics of concentrated solutions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM, 25 wt %) in water/methanol mixtures (85:15 v/v) are measured with the aim of shedding light onto the cononsolvency effect. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) with contrast variation has been carried out at temperatures below and above the cloud point by using in the first set of experiments the mixture H2O:d-MeOD (d-MeOD denotes fully deuterated methanol) as a solvent and in the second set of experiments the mixture D2O:MeOH (MeOH denotes methanol). As a reference, bulk H2O, bulk MeOH and the mixtures H2O:d-MeOD and D2O:MeOH (both 85:15 v/v) have been investigated as well. In the PNIPAM solution in H2O:d-MeOD, two water populations are identified, namely strongly and less strongly arrested water. At the cloud point, the former is partially released from PNIPAM. The diffusion coefficient of the latter one is similar to the one in the water/methanol mixture, and its residence time decreases at the cloud point. The PNIPAM solution in D2O:MeOH reveals similar dynamics to the one in H2O:d-MeOD which may reflect that the dynamics of MeOH near the PNIPAM chain is similar to the one of H2O. The similarity may, however, partially be due to H/D exchange between D2O and MeOH. In both PNIPAM solutions, the mean-square displacement of the PNIPAM chain decreases gradually above the cloud point. PMID:27187897

  17. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I.; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses.

  18. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K

    2013-01-21

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses. PMID:23343292

  19. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 2–12 kJ mol{sup −1} range.

  20. The Quasi-Elastic Region of the IRON-56+IRON-56 and IRON-56+URANIUM-238 Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston-Dawkes, Andrew Peter

    Projectile-like fragments (PLF's) were detected for the 15-MeV/uFe+Fe and Fe+U reactions. The mass, charge and energy of the PLF's were recorded. For the Fe+Fe reaction light-charged particles were also recorded in coincidence with PLF's. Products with kinetic energies corresponding to the first 100 MeV of energy loss were studied in detail for a variety of questions that remain concerning the quasi -elastic region. PLF energy spectra clearly show the presence of structures. These structures can be classified as either narrow or broad in kinetic energy width. By use of evaporation calculations, it was shown that broad structures were due to normal evaporation processes. Narrow structures with widths of 8 to 10 MeV could not be duplicated by evaporation calculations and their origin is still unexplained. The evaporation peaks seen in the cobalt isotope energy spectra were used to determine the mean value of the excitation energy division (EED) since it was shown that this is the main determining factor in the value of the evaporation peak centroid. The results of the EED determinations indicate that many model assumptions of excitation energy division with nucleon exchange may be inapplicable during the first stages of interaction. The variance of the EED was determined for certain cobalt isotopes by use of an iteractive fitting program based on the evaporation process. For the 15-MeV/u systems it was found that the EED variance was smaller than what would be predicted by Morrissey's thermal variance. The optimum Q-values for cobalt isotopes were found to be effected by evaporation processes. After evaporation corrections to these values, it was found that Siemen's optimum Q-value model accurately predicted all values for the Fe+U system and most values for the Fe+Fe system. The exception was for the one proton transfer to ('57)Co in the Fe+Fe system, which has a much larger optimum Q-value than predicted. This may indicate a fundamental difference in proton

  1. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  2. A new apparatus design for high temperature (up to 950 °C) quasi-elastic neutron scattering in a controlled gaseous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Wahish, Amal; Armitage, D.; Hill, B.; Mills, R.; Santodonato, L.; Herwig, K. W.; Al-Binni, U.; Jalarvo, N.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-09-15

    A design for a sample cell system suitable for high temperature Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) experiments is presented. The apparatus was developed at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge National Lab where it is currently in use. The design provides a special sample cell environment under controlled humid or dry gas flow over a wide range of temperature up to 950 °C. Using such a cell, chemical, dynamical, and physical changes can be studied in situ under various operating conditions. While the cell combined with portable automated gas environment system is especially useful for in situ studies of microscopic dynamics under operational conditions that are similar to those of solid oxide fuel cells, it can additionally be used to study a wide variety of materials, such as high temperature proton conductors. The cell can also be used in many different neutron experiments when a suitable sample holder material is selected. The sample cell system has recently been used to reveal fast dynamic processes in quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments, which standard probes (such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) could not detect. In this work, we outline the design of the sample cell system and present results demonstrating its abilities in high temperature QENS experiments.

  3. A new apparatus design for high temperature (up to 950 °C) quasi-elastic neutron scattering in a controlled gaseous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Wahish, Amal; Armitage, D.; al-Binni, U.; Hill, B.; Mills, R.; Jalarvo, N.; Santodonato, L.; Herwig, K. W.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-09-01

    A design for a sample cell system suitable for high temperature Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) experiments is presented. The apparatus was developed at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge National Lab where it is currently in use. The design provides a special sample cell environment under controlled humid or dry gas flow over a wide range of temperature up to 950 °C. Using such a cell, chemical, dynamical, and physical changes can be studied in situ under various operating conditions. While the cell combined with portable automated gas environment system is especially useful for in situ studies of microscopic dynamics under operational conditions that are similar to those of solid oxide fuel cells, it can additionally be used to study a wide variety of materials, such as high temperature proton conductors. The cell can also be used in many different neutron experiments when a suitable sample holder material is selected. The sample cell system has recently been used to reveal fast dynamic processes in quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments, which standard probes (such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) could not detect. In this work, we outline the design of the sample cell system and present results demonstrating its abilities in high temperature QENS experiments.

  4. A new apparatus design for high temperature (up to 950°C) quasi-elastic neutron scattering in a controlled gaseous environment.

    PubMed

    al-Wahish, Amal; Armitage, D; al-Binni, U; Hill, B; Mills, R; Jalarvo, N; Santodonato, L; Herwig, K W; Mandrus, D

    2015-09-01

    A design for a sample cell system suitable for high temperature Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) experiments is presented. The apparatus was developed at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge National Lab where it is currently in use. The design provides a special sample cell environment under controlled humid or dry gas flow over a wide range of temperature up to 950 °C. Using such a cell, chemical, dynamical, and physical changes can be studied in situ under various operating conditions. While the cell combined with portable automated gas environment system is especially useful for in situ studies of microscopic dynamics under operational conditions that are similar to those of solid oxide fuel cells, it can additionally be used to study a wide variety of materials, such as high temperature proton conductors. The cell can also be used in many different neutron experiments when a suitable sample holder material is selected. The sample cell system has recently been used to reveal fast dynamic processes in quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments, which standard probes (such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) could not detect. In this work, we outline the design of the sample cell system and present results demonstrating its abilities in high temperature QENS experiments. PMID:26429475

  5. New Insights into the Molecular Dynamics of P3HT:PCBM Bulk Heterojunction: A Time-of-Flight Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Anne A Y; Zbiri, Mohamed; Jenart, Maud V C; Nielsen, Christian B; Nelson, Jenny

    2016-06-16

    The molecular dynamics of organic semiconductor blend layers are likely to affect the optoelectronic properties and the performance of devices such as solar cells. We study the dynamics (5-50 ps) of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend by time-of-flight quasi-elastic neutron scattering, at temperatures in the range 250-360 K, thus spanning the glass transition temperature region of the polymer and the operation temperature of an OPV device. The behavior of the QENS signal provides evidence for the vitrification of P3HT upon blending, especially above the glass transition temperature, and the plasticization of PCBM by P3HT, both dynamics occurring on the picosecond time scale. PMID:27192930

  6. Quasi elastic cross sections for the Bi-209(e, e-prime p) Pb-208 reaction: Jefferson Lab experiment E06007

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Cornejo, J.L. Herraiz, A. Camsonne, A. Saha, J.M. Udias, G. Urciuoli, J.R. Vignote, K.A. Aniol

    2012-09-01

    Quasi elastic cross sections were measured for the first time for both negative and positive missing momenta for the {sup 209}Bi(e,e'p){sup 208}Pb reaction leading to the ground state and hole states of (208)Pb. Experimental cross sections obtained between -0.3 GeV/c to 0.3 GeV/c agree with theoretical calculations using RDWIA techniques both in shape and magnitude for the ground state. The data for the ground state production of {sup 208}Pb are consistent with a theoretical model assuming a single proton(1.06 +- 0.10) in the 1h9/2 orbit in {sup 209}Bi.

  7. Barrier distributions for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, W. H. Z.

    2010-08-04

    Barrier distributions can be obtained from the first derivative of the elastic and quasielastic (QEL) backward angle excitation functions [1]. In this work we present a study of the barrier distribution for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al reaction from a Coupled-Channels Born Approximation (CCBA) calculations using the code FRESCO [2].

  8. Measurement of the $M_A^{QE}$ parameter using multiple quasi-elastic dominated sub-samples in the minos near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan Samuel

    2011-12-05

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a two detector, long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS near detector is an ironscintillator tracking/sampling calorimeter and has recorded the world’s largest data set of neutrino interactions in the 0-5 GeV region. This high statistics data set is used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross-sections on iron. The Q2 dependence in charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering probes the axial and vector structure (form factor) of the nucleon/nuclear target, and nuclear effects in neutrino scattering. Presented here is a study of the MINOS Data that will introduce a method that improves the existing MINOS CCQE analysis. This analysis uses an additional CCQE dominated sub-sample from a different kinematic region to reduce correlations between fit parameters in the existing MINOS CCQE analysis. The measured value of the axial-vector mass is MQE A = 1.312+0.037 -0.038(fit)+0.123 -0.265(syst.) GeV.

  9. Self and transport diffusivity of CO2 in the metal-organic framework MIL-47(V) explored by quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Salles, Fabrice; Jobic, Hervé; Devic, Thomas; Llewellyn, Philip L; Serre, Christian; Férey, Gérard; Maurin, Guillaume

    2010-01-26

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to determine the self-diffusivity, corrected diffusivity, and transport diffusivity of CO(2) in the metal-organic framework MIL-47(V) (MIL = Materials Institut Lavoisier) over a wide range of loading. The force field used for describing the host/guest interactions is first validated on the thermodynamics of the MIL-47(V)/CO(2) system, prior to being transferred to the investigations of the dynamics. A decreasing profile is then deduced for D(s) and D(o) whereas D(t) presents a non monotonous evolution with a slight decrease at low loading followed by a sharp increase at higher loading. Such decrease of D(t) which has never been evidenced in any microporous systems comes from the atypical evolution of the thermodynamic correction factor that reaches values below 1 at low loading. This implies that, due to intermolecular interactions, the CO(2) molecules in MIL-47(V) do not behave like an ideal gas. Further, molecular simulations enabled us to elucidate unambiguously a 3D diffusion mechanism within the pores of MIL-47(V). PMID:19957953

  10. Measurement of double polarized asymmetries in quasi-elastic processes ${}^3\\vec{He}(\\vec{e},e' d)$ and ${}^3\\vec{He}(\\vec{e},e' p)$

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovic, Miha

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to a study of a spin-isospin structure of the polarized 3He. First, an introduction to the spin structure of 3He is given, followed by a brief overview of past experiments. The main focus of the thesis is the E05-102 experiment at Jefferson Lab, in which the reactions ${}^3\\vec{He}(\\vec{e},e' d)$ and ${}^3\\vec{He}(\\vec{e},e' p)$ in the quasi-elastic region were studied. The purpose of this experiment was to better understand the effects of the S'- and D-state contributions to the 3He ground-state wave-functions by a precise measurement of beam-target asymmetries Ax and Az in the range of recoil momenta from 0 to about 300 MeV/c. The experimental equipment utilized in these measurements is described, with special attention devoted to the calibration of the hadron spectrometer, BigBite. Results on the measured asymmetries are presented, together with first attempts at their comparison to the state-of-the art Faddeev calculations. The remaining open problems and challenges for future work are also discussed.

  11. Study of the (e,e'p) quasi-elastic reaction in complex nuclei: theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Herraiz, Joaquin Lopez

    2010-03-01

    Experimental coincidence cross section and transverse-longitudinal asymmetry ATL have been obtained for the quasielastic (e,e'p) reaction in 16O, 12C, and {sup 208}Pb in constant q-ω kinematics in the missing momentum range -350 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. In these experiments, performed in experimental Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB), the beam energy and the momentum and angle of the scattered electrons were kept fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer q was varied in order to map out the missing momentum distribution. The experimental cross section and ATL asymmetry have been compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations with both relativistic and non-relativistic spinor structure. The spectroscopic factors obtained for both models are in agreement with previous experimental values, while ATL measurements favor the relativistic DWIA calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup, the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the final cross sections and the ATL, the ingredients of the theoretical calculations employed and the comparison of the results with the simulations based on these theoretical models.

  12. In-medium effect with muon-neutrino and anti-muon-neutrino quasi-elastic scattering from 12C nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the in-medium effect by density-dependent axial and weak-vector form factors on muon-neutrino ({{ν }μ }) and anti-muon-neutrino ({{\\bar{ν }}μ }) scattering in the quasi-elastic (QE) region from nucleons (N*) bound in a nucleus or immersed in a nuclear medium via neutral current (NC) and charged current (CC). For the density-dependent form factors, we exploited a quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model. We found that the {{ν }μ }({{\\bar{ν }}μ })-{{N}*} scattering cross sections via NC in the QE region usually decrease with an increased medium density, while those using CC were increased. However, their rate of change was sensitive to the four-momentum transfer given to a bound nucleon through scattering. We compared these results obtained by the elementary process corrected by the in-medium effect to the BNL and MiniBooNE data, which measured {{ν }μ } scattering cross sections per nucleon through {{ν }μ } - 12C scattering in 12C composite targets. The incident energy range was 550 \\lt {{E}ν }\\lt 3000 MeV. We increased the energy up to 100 GeV to compare our results to the NOMAD experimental data. In order to study the density effects on a nucleon embedded in 12C, we exploited the QMC form factors evaluated at ρ =0.5{{ρ }o}, where the normal density {{ρ }o}˜ 0.15 f{{m}-3}. The strangeness contributions in NC scattering are also incorporated into the form factors for comparison with experimental data. Our numerical results show that most of the experimental data can be explained in a satisfactory manner by the density-dependent elementary process, but there are some remaining deviations resulting from the nuclear structure, particularly in the low and high momentum-transfer regions.

  13. Monitoring the dynamics of miscible P3HT:PCBM blends: A quasi elastic neutron scattering study of organic photovoltaic active layers

    SciTech Connect

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Ratnaweera, Dilru; Morgan, Brian; Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-02-02

    Our work reports on the detailed molecular dynamic behavior of miscible blends of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and their pure counterparts by quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements (QENS). The study provides the measure of relaxation processes on pico-to-nanosecond time scales. A single relaxation process was observed in pure P3HT and PCBM while two relaxation processes, one fast and one slow, were observed in the blends. The fast process was attributed to the dynamics of P3HT while the slow process was correlated to the dynamics of PCBM. The results show that the relaxation process is a balance between two opposing effects: increased mobility due to thermal activation of P3HT molecules and decrease mobility due to the presence of PCBM which is correlated to the percent crystallinity of P3HT and local packing density of PCBM in the amorphous phase. The threshold for the domination of the thermally activated relaxation is between 5 and 9 vol.% of PCBM loading. Two distinct spatial dependences of the relaxation processes, in which the crossover length scale depends neither on temperature nor composition, were observed for all the samples. They were attributed to the collective motions of the hexyl side chains and the rotational motions of the C-C single bonds of the side chains. Finally, these results provide an understanding of the effects of PCBM loading and temperature on the dynamics of the polymer-fullerene blends which provides a tool to optimize the efficiency of charge carrier and exciton transport within the organic photovoltaic (OPV) active layer to improve the high performance of organic solar cells.

  14. Monitoring the dynamics of miscible P3HT:PCBM blends: A quasi elastic neutron scattering study of organic photovoltaic active layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Ratnaweera, Dilru; Morgan, Brian; Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-02-02

    Our work reports on the detailed molecular dynamic behavior of miscible blends of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and their pure counterparts by quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements (QENS). The study provides the measure of relaxation processes on pico-to-nanosecond time scales. A single relaxation process was observed in pure P3HT and PCBM while two relaxation processes, one fast and one slow, were observed in the blends. The fast process was attributed to the dynamics of P3HT while the slow process was correlated to the dynamics of PCBM. The results show that the relaxation process is a balance betweenmore » two opposing effects: increased mobility due to thermal activation of P3HT molecules and decrease mobility due to the presence of PCBM which is correlated to the percent crystallinity of P3HT and local packing density of PCBM in the amorphous phase. The threshold for the domination of the thermally activated relaxation is between 5 and 9 vol.% of PCBM loading. Two distinct spatial dependences of the relaxation processes, in which the crossover length scale depends neither on temperature nor composition, were observed for all the samples. They were attributed to the collective motions of the hexyl side chains and the rotational motions of the C-C single bonds of the side chains. Finally, these results provide an understanding of the effects of PCBM loading and temperature on the dynamics of the polymer-fullerene blends which provides a tool to optimize the efficiency of charge carrier and exciton transport within the organic photovoltaic (OPV) active layer to improve the high performance of organic solar cells.« less

  15. Diffusion and adsorption of methane confined in nanoporous carbon aerogel: a combined quasi-elastic and small-angle neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Mavila Chathoth, Suresh; Mamontov, Eugene; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Zamponi, Michaela M

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of methane confined in nano-porous carbon aerogel with the average pore size 48 {angstrom} and porosity 60% was investigated as a function of pressure at T = 298 K using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The diffusivity of methane shows a clear effect of confinement: it is about two orders of magnitude lower than in bulk at the same thermodynamic conditions and is close to the diffusivity of liquid methane at 100 K (i.e. {approx} 90 K below the liquid-gas critical temperature T{sub C} {approx} 191 K). The diffusion coefficient (D) of methane initially increases with pressure by a factor of {approx}2.5 from 3.47 {+-} 0.41 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 0.482 MPa to D = 8.55 {+-} 0.33 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 2.75 MPa and starts to decrease at higher pressures. An explanation of the observed non-monotonic behavior of the diffusivity in the confined fluid is based on the results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments of the phase behavior of methane in a similar carbon aerogel sample. The initial increase of the diffusion coefficient with pressure is explained as due to progressive filling of bigger pores in which molecular mobility in the internal pore volume is less affected by the sluggish liquid-like molecular mobility in the adsorbed phase. Subsequent decrease of D, is associated with the effect of intermolecular collisions, which result in a lower total molecular mobility with pressure, as in the bulk state. The results are compared with the available QENS data on the methane diffusivity in zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and porous silica as well as with the molecular dynamics simulations of methane in nano-porous carbons and silica zeolites.

  16. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslett, O.; Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R. W.; Barker, J.; Friedman, G.; Hovorka, O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner-Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  17. Software Based Barriers To Integration Of Renewables To The Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-06-01

    The future distribution grid has complex analysis needs, which may not be met with the existing processes and tools. In addition there is a growing number of measured and grid model data sources becoming available. For these sources to be useful they must be accurate, and interpreted correctly. Data accuracy is a key barrier to the growth of the future distribution grid. A key goal for California, and the United States, is increasing the renewable penetration on the distribution grid. To increase this penetration measured and modeled representations of generation must be accurate and validated, giving distribution planners and operators confidence in their performance. This study will review the current state of these software and modeling barriers and opportunities for the future distribution grid.

  18. Stress Distribution on Blasting Gallery Barrier Pillar due to Goaf Formation During Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Reddy, Sandi; Sastry, Vedala Rama

    2015-09-01

    Semi-mechanised blasting gallery mining is a sustainable option to achieve higher production and productivity from underground thick coal seams. Judicious design of underground blasting gallery panel requires understanding of stress distribution on barrier pillars during different stages of extraction. This paper presents a study of stress distribution in and around barrier pillar for the different stages of extraction in the blasting gallery panel. Finite difference analysis taken up for final excavation (depillaring) in the panel with different stages of extraction. Analysis revealed that the stress transferred on barrier pillar increased as progress of excavation increased. Maximum stress was observed at a distance of 10 and 12 m from the pillar edge for virgin and goaved out panel sideby respectively, which gradually decreased towards centre of the pillar.

  19. Concordant genetic structure in two species of woodpecker distributed across the primary West African biogeographic barriers.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Bowie, Rauri C K

    2015-07-01

    The lowland forests of western and central tropical Africa are separated by several potential biogeographic barriers to dispersal for forest adapted vertebrates. The two primary barriers are (1) the Dahomey Gap, a savanna corridor that reaches the coast of southern Ghana, Togo and Benin, and separates the West African rainforest into the Upper (Ghana west to Guinea) and Lower Guinea (Nigeria to Uganda and Angola) forest blocks, and (2) the Lower Niger River, a large delta that separates Western and Eastern Nigeria. Previous studies on terrestrial vertebrates (lizards, mammals and birds) have highlighted a genetic break in the Dahomey Gap/Lower Niger River area although the relative importance of each barrier has not been assessed due to limitations in geographic sampling. We compared the phylogeographic history of two co-distributed sister-species of woodpeckers (Campethera caroli and C. nivosa) using data from three loci representing all inheritance modes. Our analyses revealed that both the Dahomey Gap and possibly the Lower Niger River acted as strong biogeographic barriers for the two woodpecker species, with the Lower Niger River being the first barrier to have formed, leading to three distinct populations of C. nivosa. Our divergence time analyses revealed that both these biogeographic barriers formed during the Pleistocene, supporting the Pleistocene refuge hypothesis, with the Dahomey Gap likely appearing about 0.5 myr BP. No genetic structure was recovered among sampled populations in either the Upper or the Lower Guinea Forest Block for both species, despite the considerable geographic area covered. PMID:25800284

  20. First passage time distributions of anomalous biased diffusion with double absorbing barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the first passage time (FPT) problem of anomalous diffusion governed by the Galilei variant fractional diffusion-advection equation in the semi-infinite and finite domains subject to an absorbing boundary condition. We obtain explicit solutions for the FPT distributions and the corresponding Laplace transforms for both zero and constant drift cases by using the method of separation of variables as well as the properties of the Fox H function. An important relation between the FPT distributions corresponding to one and two absorbing barriers is revealed to determine the conditional FPT distributions. It shows that the proportion between the conditional FPT distributions only depends on the general Péclet number. We further discuss the asymptotic behavior of the FPT distributions and confirm our theoretical analysis by numerical results.

  1. Impact of roadside noise barriers on particle size distributions and pollutants concentrations near freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhi; Hudda, Neelakshi; Daher, Nancy; Kam, Winnie; Herner, Jorn; Kozawa, Kathleen; Mara, Steven; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-08-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence has established an association between a host of adverse health effects and exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and co-pollutants, especially those emitted from motor vehicles. Although PM and their co-pollutants dispersion profiles near the open freeway have been extensively characterized by means of both experimental measurements and numerical simulations in recent years, such investigations near freeways with roadside barriers have not been well documented in the literature. A few previous studies suggested that the presence of roadside structures, such as noise barriers and vegetation, may impact the decay of pollutant concentrations downwind of the freeway by limiting the initial dispersion of traffic emissions and increasing their vertical mixing due to the upward deflection of airflow. Since the noise barriers are now common roadside features of the freeways, particularly those running through populated urban areas, it is pertinent to investigate the impact of their presence on the particles and co-pollutants concentrations in areas adjacent to busy roadways. This study investigated two highly trafficked freeways (I-710 and I-5) in Southern California, with two sampling sites for each freeway, one with and the other without the roadside noise barriers. Particle size distributions and co-pollutants concentrations were measured in the immediate proximity of freeways and at different distances downwind of the freeways. The results showed the formation of a "concentration deficit" zone in the immediate vicinity of the freeway with the presence of roadside noise barrier, followed by a surge of pollutant concentrations further downwind at 80-100 m away from freeway. The particle and co-pollutants concentrations reach background levels at farther distances of 250-400 m compared to 150-200 m at the sites without roadside noise barriers.

  2. Barrier distribution from 28Si+154Sm quasielastic scattering: Coupling effects in the fusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Behera, B. R.; Jhingan, A.; Nayak, B. K.; Dubey, R.; Sharma, Priya; Thakur, Meenu; Mahajan, Ruchi; Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Khushboo; Kumar, A.; Mandal, S.; Saxena, A.; Sugathan, P.; Rowley, N.

    2016-05-01

    Barrier distribution for the 28Si+154Sm system has been extracted from large angle quasielastic scattering measurement to investigate the role of various channel couplings on fusion dynamics. The coupled channel calculations, including the collective excitation of the target and projectile, are observed to reproduce the experimental BD rather well. It seems that the role of neutron transfer, relative to collective excitation, is in fact weak in the 28Si+154Sm system even though it has positive Q-value for neutron transfer channels.

  3. Total reaction cross sections from elastic {alpha}-nucleus scattering angular distributions around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.; Galaviz, D.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.

    2010-10-15

    The total reaction cross section {sigma}{sub reac} is a valuable measure for the prediction of {alpha}-induced reaction cross sections within the statistical model and for the comparison of scattering of tightly bound projectiles to weakly bound and exotic projectiles. Here we provide the total reaction cross sections {sigma}{sub reac} derived from our previously published angular distributions of elastic {alpha}-nucleus scattering on {sup 89}Y, {sup 92}Mo, {sup 112,124}Sn, and {sup 144}Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  4. Entry Distribution, Fission Barrier, and Formation Mechanism of N{sup 254}{sub 102}o

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, P.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Ahmad, I.; Amzal, N.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Butler, P. A.

    2000-04-17

    The entry distribution in angular momentum and excitation energy for the formation of {sup 254}No has been measured after the {sup 208}Pb( {sup 48}Ca, 2 n) reaction at 215 and 219 MeV. This nucleus is populated up to spin 22({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and excitation energy (greater-or-similar sign)6 MeV above the yrast line, with the half-maximum points of the energy distributions at {approx}5 MeV for spins between 12({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 22({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) . This suggests that the fission barrier is (greater-or-similar sign)5 MeV and that the shell-correction energy persists to high spin. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Effect of parallax distribution and crosstalk on visual comfort in parallax barrier autostereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-05-01

    Although autostereoscopic display is considered to be mainstream in the three-dimensional (3-D) display market for the near future, practical quality problems still exist due to various challenges such as the accommodation-vergence conflict and crosstalk. A number of studies have shown that these problems reduce the visual comfort and reliability of the perceived workload. We present two experiments for investigating the effect of parallax distribution, which affects the behavior of the accommodation and vergence responses and crosstalk on visual comfort in autostereoscopic display. We measured the subjective visual scores and perceived depth position for watching under various conditions that include foreground parallax, background parallax, and crosstalk levels. The results show that the viewers' comfort is significantly influenced by parallax distribution that induces a suitable conflict between the accommodation and vergence responses of the human visual system. Moreover, we confirm that crosstalk changes significantly affect visual comfort in parallax barrier autostereoscopic display. Consequently, the results can be used as guidelines to produce or adjust the 3-D image in accordance with the characteristics of parallax barrier autostereoscopic display.

  6. A Precision Measurement of the Transverse Asymmetry A{sub T} from Quasi-elastic {sup 3}He(e,e') process, and the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor GNM at low Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xu

    2002-06-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities in describing the underlying electromagnetic structure of nucleons. While proton electromagnetic form factors have been determined with good precision, neutron form factors are known poorly, largely due to the lack of free neutron targets. Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E95-001, a ''precise measurement of the transverse asymmetry A{sub T}' from the quasielastic {sup 3}He(e, e') process,'' was therefore designed to determine precisely the neutron magnetic form factor, G{sub M}{sup n} at low momentum transfer values and was successfully completed in Spring 1999. High precision A{sub T}'data in the quasi-elastic region at Q{sup 2} values of 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} were obtained using a high-pressure spin-exchange optically-pumped polarized {sup 3}He gas target with an average polarization of 30%, a longitudinally polarized e{sup -} beam, and two High Resolution Spectrometers: HRSe and HRSh. HRSe was employed to detect scattered electrons from the quasi-elastic kinematic region, and HRSh was employed as a elastic polarimetry to monitor the product of the beam and target polarizations. The extraction of form factors is usually model-dependent. Significant constraints on theoretical calculations are provided bu additional high precision quasi-elastic asymmetry data at Q{sup 2} values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c){sup 2} in {sup 3}He breakup region, where effects of final state interactions (FSI) and meson exchange currents (MEC) are expected to be large [71]. G{sub M}{sup n} is extracted from a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation which includes both FSI and MEC at Q{sup 2} values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The uncertainties of G{sub M}{sup n} at these Q{sup 2} values are comparable to those of recent experiments with deuterium targets [58]. At the higher Q{sup 2} values from this experiment, G{sub M}{sup n} is extracted from Plane-Wave Impulsive Approximation (PWIA) calculations with a relatively large theoretical

  7. Transverse electron momentum distribution in tunneling and over the barrier ionization by laser pulses with varying ellipticity.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I A; Kheifets, A S; Calvert, J E; Goodall, S; Wang, X; Xu, Han; Palmer, A J; Kielpinski, D; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T

    2016-01-01

    We study transverse electron momentum distribution in strong field atomic ionization driven by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the transverse electron momentum distribution in the tunneling and over the barrier ionization regimes evolves in a qualitatively different way when the ellipticity parameter describing polarization state of the driving laser pulse increases. PMID:26740072

  8. Transverse electron momentum distribution in tunneling and over the barrier ionization by laser pulses with varying ellipticity

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Calvert, J. E.; Goodall, S.; Wang, X.; Xu, Han; Palmer, A. J.; Kielpinski, D.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    We study transverse electron momentum distribution in strong field atomic ionization driven by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the transverse electron momentum distribution in the tunneling and over the barrier ionization regimes evolves in a qualitatively different way when the ellipticity parameter describing polarization state of the driving laser pulse increases. PMID:26740072

  9. Surface anisotropy broadening of the energy barrier distribution in magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pérez, N; Guardia, P; Roca, A G; Morales, M P; Serna, C J; Iglesias, O; Bartolomé, F; García, L M; Batlle, X; Labarta, A

    2008-11-26

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the distribution of energy barriers in magnetic fine particles of nanometer size is discussed within the framework of the Tln(t/τ(0)) scaling approach. The comparison between the distributions of the anisotropy energy of the particle cores, calculated by multiplying the volume distribution by the core anisotropy, and of the total anisotropy energy, deduced by deriving the master curve of the magnetic relaxation with respect to the scaling variable Tln(t/τ(0)), enables the determination of the surface anisotropy as a function of the particle size. We show that the contribution of the particle surface to the total anisotropy energy can be well described by a size-independent value of the surface energy per unit area which permits the superimposition of the distributions corresponding to the particle core and effective anisotropy energies. The method is applied to a ferrofluid composed of non-interacting Fe(3-x)O(4) particles of 4.9 nm average size and x about 0.07. Even though the size distribution is quite narrow in this system, a relatively small value of the effective surface anisotropy constant K(s) = 2.9 × 10(-2) erg cm(-2) gives rise to a dramatic broadening of the total energy distribution. The reliability of the average value of the effective anisotropy constant, deduced from magnetic relaxation data, is verified by comparing it to that obtained from the analysis of the shift of the ac susceptibility peaks as a function of the frequency. PMID:21836285

  10. Mitochondrial evidence for panmixia despite perceived barriers to gene flow in a widely distributed waterbird.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Rebekah A; Reudink, Matthew W; Nocera, Joseph J; Somers, Christopher M; Green, M Clay; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    We examined the mitochondrial genetic structure of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) to: 1) verify or refute whether American white pelicans are panmictic and 2) understand if any lack of genetic structure is the result of contemporary processes or historical phenomena. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region haplotypes of 367 individuals from 19 colonies located across their North American range revealed a lack of population genetic or phylogeographic structure. This lack of structure was unexpected because: 1) Major geographic barriers such as the North American Continental Divide are thought to limit dispersal; 2) Differences in migratory behavior are expected to promote population differentiation; and 3) Many widespread North American migratory bird species show historic patterns of differentiation resulting from having inhabited multiple glacial refugia. Further, high haplotype diversity and many rare haplotypes are maintained across the species' distribution, despite frequent local extinctions and recolonizations that are expected to decrease diversity. Our findings suggest that American white pelicans have a high effective population size and low natal philopatry. We suggest that the rangewide panmixia we observed in American white pelicans is due to high historical and contemporary gene flow, enabled by high mobility and a lack of effective physical or behavioral barriers. PMID:21705489

  11. Numerical investigation of the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical species in an atmospheric surface barrier-discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. I.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Using a one dimensional time dependent convection-reaction-diffusion model, the temporal and spatial distributions of species propagating downstream of an atmospheric pressure air surface barrier discharge was studied. It was found that the distribution of negatively charged species is more spatially spread compared to positive ions species, which is attributed to the diffusion of electrons that cool down and attach to background gas molecules, creating different negative ions downstream of the discharge region. Given the widespread use of such discharges in applications involving the remote microbial decontamination of surfaces and liquids, the transport of plasma generated reactive species away from the discharge region was studied by implementing mechanical convection through the discharge region. It was shown that increased convection causes the spatial distribution of species density to become uniform. It was also found that many species have a lower density close to the surface of the discharge as convection prevents their accumulation. While for some species, such as NO2, convection causes a general increase in the density due to a reduced residence time close to the discharge region, where it is rapidly lost through reactions with OH. The impact of the applied power was also investigated, and it was found that the densities of most species, whether charged or neutral, are directly proportional to the applied power.

  12. Precise Extraction of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor from Quasi-elastic 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') at Q^2 = 0.1-0.6 (GeV/c)^2

    SciTech Connect

    Jens-ole Hansen; Brian Anderson; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; John Calarco; Lawrence Cardman; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jiang-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; G Corrado; Christopher Crawford; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Dipangkar Dutta; John Finn; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; Jacek Golak; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Calvin Howell; Emlyn Hughes; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Piotr Zolnierczuk; Cornelis De Jager; John Jensen; Xiaodong Jiang; Cathleen Jones; Mark Jones; R Kahl; H Kamada; A Kievsky; Ioannis Kominis; Wolfgang Korsch; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; Enkeleida Lakuriqi; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; John LeRose; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Jeffery Martin; Kathy McCormick; Robert McKeown; Kevin McIlhany; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Greg Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; Emanuele Pace; Tina Pavlin; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; David Pripstein; David Prout; Ronald Ransome; Yves Roblin; Marat Rvachev; Giovanni Salme; Michael Schnee; Charles Seely; Taeksu Shin; Karl Slifer; Paul Souder; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Mark Sutter; Bryan Tipton; Luminita Todor; M Viviani; Branislav Vlahovic; John Watson; Claude Williamson; H Witala; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Feng Xiong; Wang Xu; Jen-chuan Yeh

    2006-05-05

    We have measured the transverse asymmetry A{sub T'} in the quasi-elastic {sup 3}/rvec He/(/rvec e/,e') process with high precision at Q{sup 2}-values from 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The neutron magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} was extracted at Q{sup 2}-values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c){sup 2} using a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation which includes both final-state interactions (FSI) and meson-exchange currents (MEC). Theoretical uncertainties due to the FSI and MEC effects were constrained with a precision measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry in the threshold region of {sup 3}/rvec He/(/rvec e/,e'). We also extracted the neutron magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} at Q{sup 2}-values of 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} based on Plane Wave Impulse Approximation calculations.

  13. Testing charged current quasi-elastic and multinucleon interaction models in the NEUT neutrino interaction generator with published datasets from the MiniBooNE and MINERνA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C.; Terri, R.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bercellie, A.; Bronner, C.; Cartwright, S.; de Perio, P.; Dobson, J.; Duffy, K.; Furmanski, A. P.; Haegel, L.; Hayato, Y.; Kaboth, A.; Mahn, K.; McFarland, K. S.; Nowak, J.; Redij, A.; Rodrigues, P.; Sánchez, F.; Schwehr, J. D.; Sinclair, P.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Stamoulis, P.; Stowell, P.; Tacik, R.; Thompson, L.; Tobayama, S.; Wascko, M. O.; Żmuda, J.

    2016-04-01

    There has been a great deal of theoretical work on sophisticated charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interaction models in recent years, prompted by a number of experimental results that measured unexpectedly large CCQE cross sections on nuclear targets. As the dominant interaction mode at T2K energies, and the signal process in oscillation analyses, it is important for the T2K experiment to include realistic CCQE cross section uncertainties in T2K analyses. To this end, T2K's Neutrino Interaction Working Group has implemented a number of recent models in NEUT, T2K's primary neutrino interaction event generator. In this paper, we give an overview of the models implemented and present fits to published νμ and ν¯ μ CCQE cross section measurements from the MiniBooNE and MINER ν A experiments. The results of the fits are used to select a default cross section model for future T2K analyses and to constrain the cross section uncertainties of the model. We find strong tension between datasets for all models investigated. Among the evaluated models, the combination of a modified relativistic Fermi gas with multinucleon CCQE-like interactions gives the most consistent description of the available data.

  14. Measurement of the νμ Charged Current π+ to Quasi-Elastic Cross Section Ratio on Mineral Oil in a 0.8 GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Charged current single pion production (CCπ+) and charged current quasi-elastic scattering (CCQE) are the most abundant interaction types for neutrinos at energies around 1 GeV, a region of great interest to oscillation experiments. The cross-sections for these processes, however, are not well understood in this energy range. This dissertation presents a measurement of the ratio of CCπ+ to CCQE cross-sections for muon neutrinos on mineral oil (CH2) in the MiniBooNE experiment. The measurement is presented here both with and without corrections for hadronic re-interactions in the target nucleus and is given as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < Eν < 2.4 GeV. With more than 46,000 CCπ+ events collected in MiniBooNE, and with a fractional uncertainty of roughly 11% in the region of highest statistics, this measurement represents a dramatic improvement in statistics and precision over previous CCπ+ and CCQE measurements.

  15. Distribution, abundance and diversity of crustose coralline algae on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Angela J.; Steneck, Robert S.; Tager, Danika; Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-06-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem. Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are important contributors to reef calcium carbonate and can facilitate coral recruitment. Despite the importance of CCA, little is known about species-level distribution, abundance, and diversity, and how these vary across the continental shelf and key habitat zones within the GBR. We quantified CCA species distributions using line transects ( n = 127) at 17 sites in the northern and central regions of the GBR, distributed among inner-, mid-, and outer-shelf regions. At each site, we identified CCA along replicate transects in three habitat zones: reef flat, reef crest, and reef slope. Taxonomically, CCA species are challenging to identify (especially in the field), and there is considerable disagreement in approach. We used published, anatomically based taxonomic schemes for consistent identification. We identified 30 CCA species among 12 genera; the most abundant species were Porolithon onkodes, Paragoniolithon conicum (sensu Adey), Neogoniolithon fosliei, and Hydrolithon reinboldii. Significant cross-shelf differences were observed in CCA community structure and CCA abundance, with inner-shelf reefs exhibiting lower CCA abundance than outer-shelf reefs. Shelf position, habitat zone, latitude, depth, and the interaction of shelf position and habitat were all significantly associated with variation in composition of CCA communities. Collectively, shelf position, habitat, and their interaction contributed to 22.6 % of the variation in coralline communities. Compared to mid- and outer-shelf sites, inner-shelf sites exhibited lower relative abundances of N. fosliei and Lithophyllum species. Reef crest habitats exhibited greater abundance of N. fosliei than reef flat and reef slope habitats. Reef slope habitats exhibited lower abundance of P. onkodes, but greater abundance of Neogoniolithon clavycymosum than reef crest and reef slope habitats. These findings

  16. Microbubble Type and Distribution Dependence of Focused Ultrasound Induced Blood Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Focused Ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles has been used to non-invasively induce reversible blood brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study aims at identifying the dependence of the BBB opening properties on the polydisperse microbubble (since all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using clinically approved UCA (Definity®) and in-house made polydisperse microbubbles (IHP) in mice. A total of 18 C57BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse received either Definity® or IHP microbubbles via tail vein injection. The concentration and size distribution of both the activated Definity® and IHP microbubbles were measured and diluted to 6×108/ml prior to injection. Immediately after the microbubble administration, FUS sonications were carried out with the following parameters: frequency of 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures of 0.3 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm the BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. The permeability of the treated region and volumes of BBB opening using the two types of microbubbles did not show significant difference (P > 0.05) for PRPs of 0.45 MPa and 0.6 MPa, while IHP microbubbles showed significantly higher permeability and volume of opening (P < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that the microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on the FUS-induced BBB opening at lower, but less important at higher, pressure levels, possibly due to the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher FUS pressure levels where inertial cavitation typically occurs. PMID:24239362

  17. Ring distributions leading to species formation: a global topographic analysis of geographic barriers associated with ring species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    importance of features that define barriers, (ii) can be replicated using any kind of continuously distributed environmental variable, and (iii) generates spatially explicit hypotheses of geographic species formation. The methods developed here - combined with study of the geographical ecology and genetics of taxa in their environments - should enable recognition of ring species phenomena throughout the world. PMID:22410314

  18. Performance of distributed bagged stone dust barrier in combating coal-dust explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Plessis, J.J.L. du; Vassard, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    The Kloppersbos Research Facility of the CSIR's Division of Mining Technology has developed a new method of building stone dust barriers. The new barrier makes use of a previous concept of containing stone dust in a bag, but incorporates a new method of rupturing the bag. This was achieved by adapting the closing mechanism and by balancing the stone dust content with the void in the bag. The bagged barrier was extensively tested in the 200-m test gallery. During these tests, it became evident that these bags could be made to rupture and spread stone dust when subjected to smaller forces than those required for the most commonly used passive barrier, the Polish light barrier. To validate this, as well as to gain international acceptance of this new barrier, tests were conducted in the German experimental mine, DMT Tremonia, Dortmund. The barrier was evaluated against numerous methane-initiated coal-dust explosions. The paper describes the successful inhibition of coal-dust explosions at Kloppersbos and DMT tremonia. The barrier has been proven successfully for static pressures of 44 to 82 kpa, dynamic pressures of 12 to 36 kpa and for flame speeds as low as 23 m/s. This barrier is now accepted by the South African government and has been implemented in numerous South African collieries.

  19. Fission-fragment angular distributions for the 19F + 208Pb near- and sub-barrier fusion-fission reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanqiao, Zhang; Zuhua, Liu; Jincheng, Xu; Kan, Xu; Jun, Lu; Ming, Ruan

    1990-06-01

    Fission cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for the 19F + 208Pb reaction at bombarding energies from 83 to 105 MeV. The fission excitation function is well reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The fission-fragment angular distributions are calculated in terms of the transition-state theory, with the transmission coefficients extracted from the excitation function calculation. It is found that a discrepancy between the observations and the predictions in angular anisotropy of fission fragments exists at near- and sub-barrier energies, except for lower and higher energy regions where the discrepancy tends to disappear. Moreover, the anisotropies as a function of the center-of-mass energy show a shoulder around 82 MeV. Our results clearly indicate the considerable effects of the coupling on the sub-barrier fusion cross section and on the near-barrier compound-nucleus spin distribution, and confirm the prediction of an approximately constant value for the mean square spin of a compound nucleus produced in a far sub-barrier fusion reaction.

  20. Double Gaussian distribution of barrier height observed in densely packed GaN nanorods over Si (111) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma; Mukundan, Shruthi; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Roul, Basanta

    2014-12-21

    GaN nanorods were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on intrinsic Si (111) substrates which were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The current–voltage characteristics of the GaN nanorods on Si (111) heterojunction were obtained from 138 to 493 K which showed the inverted rectification behavior. The I-V characteristics were analyzed in terms of thermionic emission model. The temperature variation of the apparent barrier height and ideality factor along with the non-linearity of the activation energy plot indicated the presence of lateral inhomogeneities in the barrier height. The observed two temperature regimes in Richardson's plot could be well explained by assuming two separate Gaussian distribution of the barrier heights.

  1. Effects of a reactive barrier and aquifer geology on metal distribution and mobility in a mine drainage impacted aquifer.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Nora A; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W

    2005-06-01

    The Nickel Rim aquifer has been impacted for five decades by a metal-rich plume generated from the Nickel Rim mine tailings impoundment. Metals released by the oxidation of pyrrhotite in the unsaturated zone of the tailings migrate into the downgradient aquifer, affecting both the groundwater and the aquifer solids. A reactive barrier has been installed in the aquifer to remove sulfate and metals from the groundwater. The effect of the reactive barrier on metal concentrations in the aquifer solids has not previously been studied. In this study, a series of selective extraction procedures was applied to cores of aquifer sediment, to ascertain the distribution of metals among various solid phases present in the aquifer. Extraction results were combined with groundwater chemistry, geochemical modelling and solid-phase microanalyses, to assess the potential mobility of metals under changing geochemical conditions. Reactions within the reactive barrier caused an increase in the solid-phase carbonate content downgradient from the barrier. The concentrations of poorly crystalline, oxidized phases of Mn and Fe, as well as concentrations of Cr(III) associated with oxidized Fe, and poorly crystalline Zn, are lower downgradient from the barrier, whereas total solid-phase metal concentrations remain constant. Iron and Mn accumulate as oxidized, easily extractable forms in a peat layer overlying the aquifer. Although these oxides may buffer reducing plumes, they also have the potential to release metals to the groundwater, should a reduced condition be imposed on the aquifer by remedial actions. PMID:15949605

  2. Distribution and abundance of stream fishes in relation to barriers: implications for monitoring stream recovery after barrier removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Coghlan Jr., Stephen M.; Gardner, C.; Saunders, R.

    2011-01-01

    Dams are ubiquitous in coastal regions and have altered stream habitats and the distribution and abundance of stream fishes in those habitats by disrupting hydrology, temperature regime and habitat connectivity. Dam removal is a common restoration tool, but often the response of the fish assemblage is not monitored rigorously. Sedgeunkedunk Stream, a small tributary to the Penobscot River (Maine, USA), has been the focus of a restoration effort that includes the removal of two low-head dams. In this study, we quantified fish assemblage metrics along a longitudinal gradient in Sedgeunkedunk Stream and also in a nearby reference stream. By establishing pre-removal baseline conditions and associated variability and the conditions and variability immediately following removal, we can characterize future changes in the system associated with dam removal. Over 2 years prior to dam removal, species richness and abundance in Sedgeunkedunk Stream were highest downstream of the lowest dam, lowest immediately upstream of that dam and intermediate farther upstream; patterns were similar in the reference stream. Although seasonal and annual variation in metrics within each site was substantial, the overall upstream-to-downstream pattern along the stream gradient was remarkably consistent prior to dam removal. Immediately after dam removal, we saw significant decreases in richness and abundance downstream of the former dam site and a corresponding increase in fish abundance upstream of the former dam site. No such changes occurred in reference sites. Our results show that by quantifying baseline conditions in a small stream before restoration, the effects of stream restoration efforts on fish assemblages can be monitored successfully. These data set the stage for the long-term assessment of Sedgeunkedunk Stream and provide a simple methodology for assessment in other restoration projects.

  3. Organisational Learning Barriers in Distributed Product Development: Observations from a Multinational Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieskes, Jose F. B.; Hyland, Paul W.; Magnusson, Mats G.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Continuous Improvement for Global Innovation Management model, organizational learning in a multinational corporation was investigated. Barriers included time pressures, cultural differences, and inflexible hierarchy. Units with different operational foci emphasized different types of learning. Participants represented different…

  4. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Nan; Ye, Ling

    2010-04-16

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential ({zeta}-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  5. Examination of the influence of transfer channels on the barrier height distribution: Scattering of 20Ne on 58Ni,60Ni, and 61Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzcińska, A.; Piasecki, E.; Amar, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Keeley, N.; Kisieliński, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kowalczyk, M.; Lommel, B.; Mutterer, M.; Siudak, R.; Stolarz, A.; Strojek, I.; Tiourin, G.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It was suggested that the shape of the barrier height distribution can be determined not only by strong reaction channels (collective excitations) but also by weak channels such as transfers and/or noncollective excitations. Purpose: The study of the barrier height distributions for the 20Ne+58,60,61Ni systems requires information on transfer cross sections at near-barrier energies. Methods: A measurement of the cross sections for various transfer channels at a backward angle (142 degrees), at a near-barrier energy was performed. Identification of products was based on time-of-flight and Δ E -E methods. A measurement of the angular distribution of α stripping in the 20Ne+61Ni system was performed using a gas Δ E -E telescope. Results: For all three systems studied: 20Ne+58Ni ,60Ni, and 61Ni total (sum of all transfer channels) cross sections are similar and dominated by α stripping. Conclusions: The results, as well as coupled reaction channel calculations, suggest that transfer is not responsible for smoothing the barrier height distribution in 20Ne+61Ni , supporting the hypothesis that barrier distribution shapes are influenced by noncollective excitations.

  6. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON AND SULFUR PRECIPITATING WITHIN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a wall of porous reactive material placed in the path of a dissolved contaminant plume for the purpose of removing contaminants from ground water. Chemical processes within these reactive materials remove both inorganic and organic contamina...

  7. Host-Specific Interactions with Environmental Factors Shape the Distribution of Symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Tonk, Linda; Sampayo, Eugenia M.; Weeks, Scarla; Magno-Canto, Marites; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Background The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST). To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) were compiled. Methodology/Principal Findings The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i) frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii) host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii) data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium) to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev) most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions. Conclusions/Significance Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding

  8. Mass resolved angular distribution of fission fragments for near-barrier fusion-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vorkapic, D.

    1997-05-01

    It is shown that K-equilibration fission can explain the decrease of mass resolved fission fragment anisotropy at larger mass asymmetries. Two competing mechanisms contribute to the anisotropy. The effective moment of inertia and K{sub 0}{sup 2} decreases with the increase of mass asymmetry and contribute to the increase of anisotropy. On the other hand, for larger asymmetries, the barriers are higher and lifetimes are longer. Such systems are more K equilibrated and will have smaller anisotropy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Could refuge theory and rivers acting as barriers explain the genetic variability distribution in the Atlantic Forest?

    PubMed

    Cazé, Ana Luiza R; Mäder, Geraldo; Nunes, Teonildes S; Queiroz, Luciano P; de Oliveira, Guilherme; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre F; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2016-08-01

    The Atlantic Forest is one of the most species-rich ecoregions in the world. The historical origins of this richness and the evolutionary processes that produced diversification and promoted speciation in this ecosystem remain poorly understood. In this context, focusing on Passiflora contracta, an endemic species from the Atlantic Forest distributed exclusively at sea level along forest edges, this study aimed to characterize the patterns of genetic variability and explore two hypotheses that attempt to explain the possible causes of the genetic diversity in this region: the refuge and riverine barrier theories. We employed Bayesian methods combined with niche modeling to identify genetically homogeneous groups, to determine the diversification age, and identify long-term climate stability areas to species survival. The analyses were performed using molecular markers from nuclear and plastid genomes, with samples collected throughout the entire geographic distribution of the species, and comparisons with congeners species. The results indicated that populations were genetically structured and provided evidence of demographic stability. The molecular markers indicated the existence of a clear structure and the presence of five homogeneous groups. Interestingly, the separation of the groups coincides with the geographical locations of local rivers, corroborating the hypothesis of rivers acting as barriers to gene flow in this species. The highest levels of genetic diversity and the areas identified as having long-term climate stability were found in the same region reported for other species as a possible refuge area during the climatic changes of the Quaternary. PMID:27188539

  10. ELECTROSTATIC BARRIER AGAINST DUST GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. CLASSIFYING THE EVOLUTION OF SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Takeuchi, Taku

    2011-04-20

    Collisional growth of submicron-sized dust grains into macroscopic aggregates is the first step of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. These grains are expected to carry nonzero negative charges in the weakly ionized disks, but its effect on their collisional growth has not been fully understood so far. In this paper, we investigate how the charging affects the evolution of the dust size distribution properly taking into account the charging mechanism in a weakly ionized gas as well as porosity evolution through low-energy collisions. To clarify the role of the size distribution, we divide our analysis into two steps. First, we analyze the collisional growth of charged aggregates assuming a monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We show that the monodisperse growth stalls due to the electrostatic repulsion when a certain condition is met, as was already expected in our previous work. Second, we numerically simulate dust coagulation using Smoluchowski's method to see how the outcome changes when the size distribution is allowed to freely evolve. We find that, under certain conditions, the dust undergoes bimodal growth where only a limited number of aggregates continue to grow, carrying a major part of the dust mass in the system. This occurs because remaining small aggregates efficiently sweep up free electrons to prevent the larger aggregates from being strongly charged. We obtain a set of simple criteria that allows us to predict how the size distribution evolves for a given condition. In Paper II, we apply these criteria to dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

  11. Suberin-Associated Fatty Alcohols in Arabidopsis: Distributions in Roots and Contributions to Seed Coat Barrier Properties1[W

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Sollapura J.; Kosma, Dylan K.; Pulsifer, Ian P.; Scandola, Sabine; Pascal, Stéphanie; Joubès, Jérôme; Dittrich-Domergue, Franziska; Lessire, René; Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Suberin is found in a variety of tissues, such as root endoderms and periderms, storage tuber periderms, tree cork layer, and seed coats. It acts as a hydrophobic barrier to control the movement of water, gases, and solutes as well as an antimicrobial barrier. Suberin consists of polymerized phenolics, glycerol, and a variety of fatty acid derivatives, including primary fatty alcohols. We have conducted an in-depth analysis of the distribution of the C18:0 to C22:0 fatty alcohols in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots and found that only 20% are part of the root suberin polymer, together representing about 5% of its aliphatic monomer composition, while the remaining 80% are found in the nonpolymeric (soluble) fraction. Down-regulation of Arabidopsis FATTY ACYL REDUCTASE1 (FAR1), FAR4, and FAR5, which collectively produce the fatty alcohols found in suberin, reduced their levels by 70% to 80% in (1) the polymeric and nonpolymeric fractions from roots of tissue culture-grown plants, (2) the suberin-associated root waxes from 7-week-old soil-grown plants, and (3) the seed coat suberin polymer. By contrast, the other main monomers of suberin were not altered, indicating that reduced levels of fatty alcohols did not influence the suberin polymerization process. Nevertheless, the 75% reduction in total fatty alcohol and diol loads in the seed coat resulted in increased permeability to tetrazolium salts and a higher sensitivity to abscisic acid. These results suggest that fatty alcohols and diols play an important role in determining the functional properties of the seed coat suberin barrier. PMID:24019425

  12. Environmental Factors Controlling the Distribution of Symbiodinium Harboured by the Coral Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Timothy F.; Berkelmans, Ray; Ulstrup, Karin E.; Weeks, Scarla; Radford, Ben; Jones, Alison M.; Doyle, Jason; Canto, Marites; O'Leary, Rebecca A.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Symbiodinium community associated with scleractinian corals is widely considered to be shaped by seawater temperature, as the coral's upper temperature tolerance is largely contingent on the Symbiodinium types harboured. Few studies have challenged this paradigm as knowledge of other environmental drivers on the distribution of Symbiodinium is limited. Here, we examine the influence of a range of environmental variables on the distribution of Symbiodinium associated with Acropora millepora collected from 47 coral reefs spanning 1,400 km on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Methodology/Principal Findings The environmental data included Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data at 1 km spatial resolution from which a number of sea surface temperature (SST) and water quality metrics were derived. In addition, the carbonate and mud composition of sediments were incorporated into the analysis along with in situ water quality samples for a subset of locations. Analyses were conducted at three spatio-temporal scales [GBR (regional-scale), Whitsunday Islands (local-scale) and Keppel Islands/Trunk Reef (temporal)] to examine the effects of scale on the distribution patterns. While SST metrics were important drivers of the distribution of Symbiodinium types at regional and temporal scales, our results demonstrate that spatial variability in water quality correlates significantly with Symbiodinium distribution at local scales. Background levels of Symbiodinium types were greatest at turbid inshore locations of the Whitsunday Islands where SST predictors were not as important. This was not the case at regional scales where combinations of mud and carbonate sediment content coupled with SST anomalies and mean summer SST explained 51.3% of the variation in dominant Symbiodinium communities. Conclusions/Significance Reef corals may respond to global-scale stressors such as climate change through changes in their resident symbiont

  13. Brain distribution of 6-mercaptopurine is regulated by the efflux transport system in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Y; Yokoyama, Y; Sakamoto, T; Hayashi, H; Naito, T; Yamada, S; Kimura, R

    2000-01-01

    6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) has been used clinically for 40 years to maintain remission in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, central nervous system (CNS) relapses frequently occur in patients with ALL who continuously receive anticancer drugs, including 6-MP, during remission maintenance therapy. The cause of such CNS relapse is not well understood. One possible reason may involve the restricted distribution of 6-MP in the brain. This study, therefore, investigates the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport which largely regulates 6-MP distribution in the brain using a quantitative microdialysis technique and centers on the efflux transport of 6-MP across the BBB. The brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or hippocampal interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration of 6-MP was very low compared with the unbound plasma concentration, suggesting that 6-MP distribution in the brain is highly restricted. Kinetic analyses of this BBB transport showed that the efflux clearance from brain ISF to plasma across the BBB (CLout) is approximately 20-times greater than the influx clearance from plasma to brain (CLin). The CLout was significantly reduced by 1mM N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a sulfhydryl-modifying agent, suggesting the participation of transport protein in the efflux of 6-MP across the BBB. In addition, efflux transport was inhibited by an intracerebral infusion of probenecid (1.5 mM), p-aminohippuric acid (PAH, 3.0 mM), benzoate (3.6 mM), or salicylate (3.7 mM) administered through a microdialysis probe, but neither choline (0.8 mM) nor tetraethylammonium (TEA, 0.7 mM) had any effect. These data suggest that the restricted 6-MP brain distribution may be ascribed to efficient efflux from the brain, possibly via both the organic anion transport system, shared with probenecid and PAH, and the monocarboxylic acid transport system, shared with benzoate and salicylate. PMID:10794520

  14. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  15. A permeable reactive barrier for the bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated groundwater: Microbial community distribution and removal efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chi-Hui; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2010-06-15

    This study was conducted with column experiments, batch experiments, and bench-scale permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for monitoring the PRB in the relation between BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene) decomposition efficiency and the distribution of a microbial community. To obtain the greatest amount of dissolved oxygen from oxygen-releasing compounds (ORCs), 20-d column tests were conducted, the results of which showed that the highest average amount of dissolved oxygen (DO) of 5.08 mg l(-1) (0.25 mg-O(2)d(-1)g(-1)-ORC) was achieved at a 40% level of CaO(2). In the batch experiments, the highest concentrations of benzene and toluene in which these compounds could be completely degraded were assumed to be 80 mg l(-1). Long-term monitoring for a PRB indicated that ORCs made with the oxygen-releasing rate of 0.25 mg-O(2)d(-1)g(-1)-ORC were applicable for use in the PRB because these ORCs have a long-term effect and adequately meet the oxygen demand of bacteria. The results from the DGGE of 16S rDNAs and real-time PCR of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene revealed the harmful effects of shock-loading on the microbial community and reduction in the removal efficiencies of BTEX. However, the efficiencies in the BTEX decomposition were improved and the microbial activities could be recovered thereafter as evidenced by the DGGE results. PMID:20122795

  16. Power law size-distributed heterogeneity explains colloid retention on soda lime glass in the presence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy; Trauscht, Jacob; Dame, Brittany; Johnson, William P

    2014-05-20

    This article concerns reading the nanoscale heterogeneity thought responsible for colloid retention on surfaces in the presence of energy barriers (unfavorable attachment conditions). We back out this heterogeneity on glass surfaces by comparing mechanistic simulations incorporating discrete heterogeneity with colloid deposition experiments performed across a comprehensive set of experimental conditions. Original data is presented for attachment to soda lime glass for three colloid sizes (0.25, 1.1, and 1.95 μm microspheres) under a variety of ionic strengths and fluid velocities in an impinging jet system. A comparison of mechanistic particle trajectory simulations incorporating discrete surface heterogeneity represented by nanoscale zones of positive charge (heterodomains) indicates that a power law size distribution of heterodomains ranging in size from 120 to 60 nm in radius was able to explain the observed retention for all conditions examined. In contrast, uniform and random placement of single-sized heterodomains failed to capture experimentally observed colloid retention across the range of conditions examined. PMID:24773424

  17. Diet and cross-shelf distribution of rabbitfishes (f. Siganidae) on the northern Great Barrier Reef: implications for ecosystem function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, A. S.; Brandl, S. J.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Herbivorous fishes are a critical functional group on coral reefs, and there is a clear need to understand the role and relative importance of individual species in reef processes. While numerous studies have quantified the roles of parrotfishes and surgeonfishes on coral reefs, the rabbitfishes (f. Siganidae) have been largely overlooked. Consequently, they are typically viewed as a uniform group of grazing or browsing fishes. Here, we quantify the diet and distribution of rabbitfish assemblages on six reefs spanning the continental shelf in the northern Great Barrier Reef. Our results revealed marked variation in the diet and distribution of rabbitfish species. Analysis of stomach contents identified four distinct groups: browsers of leathery brown macroalgae ( Siganus canaliculatus, S. javus), croppers of red and green macroalgae ( S. argenteus, S. corallinus, S. doliatus, S. spinus) and mixed feeders of diverse algal material, cyanobacteria, detritus and sediment ( S. lineatus, S. punctatissimus, S. punctatus, S. vulpinus). Surprisingly, the diet of the fourth group ( S. puellus) contained very little algal material (22.5 %) and was instead dominated by sponges (69.1 %). Together with this variation in diet, the distribution of rabbitfishes displayed clear cross-shelf variation. Biomass was greatest on inner-shelf reefs (112.7 ± 18.2 kg.ha-1), decreasing markedly on mid- (37.8 ± 4.6 kg.ha-1) and outer-shelf reefs (9.7 ± 2.2 kg.ha-1). This pattern was largely driven by the browsing S. canaliculatus that accounted for 50 % of the biomass on inner-shelf reefs, but was absent in mid- and outer-shelf reefs. Mixed feeders, although primarily restricted to the reef slope and back reef habitats, also decreased in abundance and biomass from inshore to offshore, while algal cropping taxa were the dominant group on mid-shelf reefs. These results clearly demonstrate the extent to which diet and distribution vary within the Siganidae and emphasise the importance of

  18. Influence of riffle characteristics, surficial geology, and natural barriers on the distribution of the channel darter, Percina copelandi, in the Lake Ontario basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, S.M.; Carl, L.M.; Lean, J.

    2005-01-01

    The channel darter, Percina copelandi, is a small benthic fish with a wide but disjunct distribution across central North America. The development of conservation and recovery strategies for Canadian populations is limited by a lack of knowledge regarding ecology, population size and other factors that affect its distribution and abundance. We sampled five rivers in the Lake Ontario basin to test whether the distribution of P. copelandi reflected riffle habitat characteristics or landscape-scale factors such as surficial geology and natural barriers (waterfalls). At most sites yielding P. copelandi, riffles flowed into deep sand bottomed run or pool habitats. Despite a lack of association with local surficial geology or riffle habitat characteristics, both the upstream limits of P. copelandi occurrence and distribution of suitable habitats reflected the distribution of waterfalls, chutes and bedrock outcroppings. In contrast to P. copelandi, distributions of Etheostoma flabellare, P. caprodes and Rhinichthys cataractae reflected among site differences in riffle habitat. ?? Springer 2005.

  19. Influence of P-glycoprotein inhibition on the distribution of the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline over the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Ejsing, Thomas B; Linnet, Kristian

    2005-03-01

    The distribution of the antidepressant drug nortriptyline (NT) and its main metabolite E-10-hydroxy-nortriptyline (E-10-OH-NT) across the blood-brain barrier was considered in relation to inhibition of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Rats received NT in doses of 25 mg/kg orally, 10 mg/kg i.p. or 25 mg/kg i.p. Half the rats were treated with the P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) (200 mg/kg) 2 h prior to NT administration, and the other half served as a control group. NT and the metabolite were extracted from brain and serum by liquid-liquid extraction and analysed by HPLC with UV-detection. The brain to serum ratio of NT was increased in the CsA treated groups (22.3-26.8) compared with the control groups (16.5-22.7), the difference being statistically significant in two of the three experiments (p<0.05). Increased brain-serum ratios were also found for E-10-OH-NT, but the differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that inhibition of P-gp by CsA increases the accumulation of NT in the brain. Administration of the antipsychotic drug risperidone (0.5 mg/kg s.c.), which is a P-gp substrate, instead of CsA did not exert any measurable influence on the blood-brain ratio of NT concentrations. In conclusion, the results show that drug-drug interaction at P-gp may influence the intracerebral NT concentration, but apparently, a major inhibition of P-gp is necessary to attain a measurable effect. PMID:15624117

  20. Study of the homogeneity of the current distribution in a dielectric barrier discharge in air by means of a segmented electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, M. V.; Moshkunov, S. I.; Khomich, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The current distribution in a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric-pressure air at a natural humidity of 40-60% was studied experimentally with a time resolution of 200 ps. The experimental results are interpreted by means of numerically simulating the discharge electric circuit. The obtained results indicate that the discharge operating in the volumetric mode develops simultaneously over the entire transverse cross section of the discharge gap.

  1. The rotational barrier of ethane and some of its hexasubstituted derivatives in terms of the forces acting on the electron distribution.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Cuevas, Gabriel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2015-07-15

    A novel and alternative explanation of the rotational barrier of ethane and several hexasubstituted derivatives, CX3CX3 (X = H, F, CH3, Cl, Br), is suggested based on the evaluation of the properties of the electron distribution. The forces exerted on the electron density of the topological atoms making up a molecule, the Ehrenfest forces, are analyzed and, with the help of the virial theorem, they are used to explain the experimental rotational barriers. According to this approach, the barrier is mainly a consequence of the decrease of the always attractive Ehrenfest forces (EFs) linking the two C atoms. In addition, the behavior of the EFs is related to a decrease of stability of the central C atoms, which is not compensated by the stabilization of the substituents. Also, during rotation from the staggered to the equilibrium conformation, the electron density at the C-C bond critical point and the electron delocalization between C atoms decrease and are accompanied by an increase of electron delocalization between the substituents. According to the analysis of the EF field lines and to the behavior of the integrated forces, the rotational barrier cannot be explained as a result of any repulsive forces acting on the electron density, although a possible interpretation of the quantum force that balances the EF in stationary states as a measure of traditional Pauli repulsions is also examined. PMID:26126983

  2. Spectroscopic measurements of the electron number density, electron temperature and OH(A) rotational distribution in a liquid electrode dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krähling, Tobias; Geisler, Sebastian; Okruss, Michael; Florek, Stefan; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The electron temperature and number density as well as the OH(A) rotational distribution of a discharge with flowing liquid electrode and dielectric barrier coupling (a liquid electrode dielectric barrier discharge, LE-DBD) were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy. By using the Stark broadening of three Strontium lines, the electron number density Ne and the lower bound of the electron temperature Te can be simultaneously measured. The values obtained were Ne = (0.8 - 1.6) × 1016 cm- 3 and Te > 1.1 eV, respectively. The OH(A) rotational distribution deviates from equilibrium and can be described by a superposition of two Boltzmann distributions with T1 = (3230 ± 90) K for K ' ≤ 15 and T2 = (7300 ± 300) K for K ' ≥ 16. Consideration of the formation mechanisms of OH(A) and reaction rates suggests that the dissociative recombination of H2O+ and H3O+ is responsible for the higher rotational state distribution, where these ions can only be produced in the LE-DBD through an electrospray-like process.

  3. Distribution of sea snakes in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: observations from 10 yrs of baited remote underwater video station (BRUVS) sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udyawer, Vinay; Cappo, Mike; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi

    2014-09-01

    The distributions of three species of sea snake (olive sea snake: Aipysurus laevis, spine-bellied sea snake: Lapemis curtus, and ornate sea snake: Hydrophis ocellatus) were estimated over 14° of latitude within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) using data from baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS). A total of 2,471 deployments of BRUVS were made in a range of locations, in sites open and closed to trawl fishing. Sightings of sea snakes were analysed alongside six spatial factors [depth, relative distance across (longitude) and along (latitude) the GBRMP, proximity to land, proximity to the nearest reef, and habitat complexity] to determine the factors that most strongly influenced the distribution and abundance of sea snakes. The results showed a strong latitudinal effect on the distribution of all three sea snake species, with the highest densities and diversities occurring in central and southern GBRMP locations, while the northern Great Barrier Reef was relatively depauperate in terms of both occurrence and diversity. Shallow inshore areas were identified as key habitats for A. laevis and L. curtus, whereas deeper offshore habitats were most important for H. ocellatus. No significant difference was found in the mean number of snakes sighted per hour between sites open and closed to trawling. There was a high degree of congruence in the distribution of sea snakes estimated from the BRUVS data and results from previous trawl and underwater visual surveys, demonstrating the utility of BRUVS to estimate distribution and relative abundance in these species of sea snake at broad spatial scales in a non-extractive manner.

  4. Geological characteristics and spatial distribution of paleo-inlet channels beneath the outer banks barrier islands, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallinson, David J.; Smith, Curtis W.; Culver, Stephen J.; Riggs, Stanley R.; Ames, Dorothea

    2010-06-01

    Nearly 200 km of high-resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were acquired along the Outer Banks barrier island system of North Carolina, USA. GPR data combined with lithofacies and biofacies data reveal multiple depositional facies including inlet channel, flood-tide delta, overwash, peat and inner shelf. Previously undocumented paleo-inlet channels constitute a significant portion of the shallow geologic framework between Oregon Inlet and Cape Hatteras. GPR data reveal the complex stratigraphy associated with multiple sequences of cut-and-fill within inlet channels. Two types of paleochannels (non-migrating and migrating) were classified based on geometry and fill-patterns. Sediments and foraminifera collected from vibracores were correlated to GPR data to define the regional shallow stratigraphic framework. Channel-fill facies are characterized by clinoform packages, sometimes bounded by erosional surfaces, indicating variable sediment transport directions from the ocean and sound sides. Channels are incised into older flood-tide delta deposits corresponding to older inlet activity when barriers existed further seaward. Flood-tide delta deposits are capped with marsh peat and overwash units. Migrating inlet facies occur under the widest portions of the island, whereas narrow portions of the island are underlain by the non-migrating inlet facies or flood-tide delta/overwash facies. This geologic/geomorphic relationship is attributed to the successional stage of island evolution during transgression, and sediment transport processes associated with the different inlet types. The radar facies, lithofacies, and biofacies provide a comprehensive dataset that will permit more precise identification of barrier island facies in the geologic record.

  5. Fission fragment angular distribution for the 19F+197Au fusion-fission reaction at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.; Reddy, A. V.; Mahata, K.; Goswami, A.

    2005-04-01

    Angular distribution of fission fragments have been measured for 19F+197Au reaction at bombarding energies from 91 to 110 MeV. Fission fragment angular distributions have been calculated by transition state model with the transmission coefficients obtained using the coupled-channels theory. The calculated angular anisotropies are in good agreement with the experimental anisotropies. The experimental fission cross sections have also been reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The results of angular distribution measurement do not show any significant contribution from quasifission as was reported in the literature based on the measurement of evaporation residues and mass distribution.

  6. Investigation of the effect of the uneven distribution of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein in the intestine on the barrier function against xenobiotics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takao; Maeda, Kazuya; Nakai, Chikako; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2013-09-01

    CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) have similar substrate specificities and work together to form an intestinal absorption barrier against xenobiotics. Previous reports have indicated that CYP3A4 expression decreases gradually, whereas P-gp expression increases, from the upper to lower small intestine. The physiological rationale for this uneven distribution of CYP3A4 and P-gp as a barrier against xenobiotics has not been determined. To clarify the effect of these distribution patterns on barrier function, we constructed a mathematical model that included passive membrane permeation, P-gp-mediated apical efflux, and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism, and we simulated the effects of these distribution patterns on the fraction absorbed of co-substrates without changing their overall activities. The simulation showed that the physiological distribution patterns of both CYP3A4 and P-gp result in the lowest fraction absorbed, but not for drugs with low CYP3A4 and high P-gp-mediated clearances. These results suggest that the distribution pattern of CYP3A4 is especially important for the barrier function. On the other hand, physiological distribution pattern of P-gp exerts the maximum barrier function for dual good substrates for P-gp and CYP3A4, but even distribution of P-gp mostly suppresses the intestinal absorption of good P-gp, but poor CYP3A4 substrates. PMID:23754337

  7. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  8. Quasi-elastic light scattering from structured particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Holz, M; Tartaglia, P

    1977-01-01

    We present a formulation by which the scattered field correlation function of a nonstationary structured particle can be calculated. Specifically, we consider the case of micron-size bacteria, where the Rayleigh- Gans-Debye approximation may be used to evaluate the correlation function. We show that the width of the intensity correlation spectrum (as measured, for example, by the photon correlation technique) exhibits I an oscillatory behavior which is characteristic of the interference pattern produced by the internal structure. Two cases are of interest: diffusion and motility are considered in detail, and some evidence of the predicted behavior is shown from the photon correlation measurement of E. coli bacteria. PMID:20168450

  9. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  10. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  11. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Anne-Marie; Gaver, Donald P

    2012-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the "airway reopening" process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  12. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  13. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Liwen Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-28

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  14. Parallax adjustment for visual comfort enhancement using the effect of parallax distribution and cross talk in parallax-barrier autostereoscopic three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-12-01

    Visual discomfort is a common problem in three-dimensional (3D) videos, and this issue is the subject of many current studies. Among the methods to overcome visual discomfort presented in current research, parallax adjustment methods provide little guidance in determining the condition for parallax control. We propose a parallax adjustment based on the effects of parallax distribution and cross talk on visual comfort, where the visual comfort level is used as the adjustment parameter, in parallax-barrier-type autostereoscopic 3D displays. We use the horizontal image shift method for parallax adjustment to enhance visual comfort. The speeded-up robust feature is used to estimate the parallax distribution of 3D sequences, and the required amount for parallax control is chosen based on the predefined effect of parallax distribution and cross talk on visual comfort. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we used commercial 3D equipment with various intrinsic cross-talk levels. Subjective tests were conducted at the fixed optimal viewing distance for each piece of equipment. The results show that comfortable videos were generated based on the proposed parallax adjustment method.

  15. Historical habitat barriers prevent ring-like genetic continuity throughout the distribution of threatened Alameda Striped Racers (Coluber lateralis euryxanthus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Wood, Dustin A.; Swaim, Karen; Fisher, Robert N.; Vandergast, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We used microsatellites and mtDNA sequences to examine the mixed effects of geophysical, habitat, and contemporary urban barriers on the genetics of threatened Alameda Striped Racers (Coluber lateralis euryxanthus), a species with close ties to declining coastal scrub and chaparral habitat in the eastern San Francisco Bay area of California. We used cluster assignments to characterize population genetic structuring with respect to land management units and approximate Bayesian analysis to rank the ability of five alternative evolutionary hypotheses to explain the inferred structure. Then, we estimated rates of contemporary and historical migration among the major clusters and measured the fit of different historical migration models to better understand the formation of the current population structure. Our results reveal a ring-like pattern of historical connectivity around the Tri-Valley area of the East Bay (i.e., San Ramon, Amador, and Livermore valleys), with clusters largely corresponding to different management units. We found no evidence of continuous gene flow throughout the ring, however, and that the main gap in continuity is centered across the Livermore Valley. Historical migration models support higher rates of gene flow away from the terminal ends of the ring on the north and south sides of the Valley, compared with rates into those areas from western sites that border the interior San Francisco Bay. We attribute the break in ring-like connectivity to the presence of unsuitable habitat within the Livermore Valley that has been reinforced by 20th century urbanization, and the asymmetry in gene flow rates to spatial constraints on movement and east–west environmental gradients influenced by the proximity of the San Francisco Bay.

  16. Distribution and abundance of anadromous Sea Lamprey Spawners in a fragmented stream: Current status and potential range expansion following barrier removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Gardner, Cory; Coghlan Jr., Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Dams fragment watersheds and prevent anadromous fishes from reaching historic spawning habitat. Sedgeunkedunk Stream, a small tributary to the Penobscot River (Maine), has been the focus of efforts to reestablish marine-freshwater connectivity and restore anadromous fishes via the removal of two barriers to fish migration. Currently, Petromyzon marinus (Sea Lamprey) is the only anadromous fish known to spawn successfully in the stream downstream of the lowermost dam. Here, we describe the distribution and abundance of a spawning population of Sea Lamprey in Sedgeunkedunk Stream, prior to and in anticipation of habitat increase after the completion of one barrier removal. In 2008, we estimated the abundance of Sea Lamprey and its nests using daily stream surveys and an open-population mark-recapture model. We captured 47 Sea Lamprey and implanted each with a PIT tag so that we could track movements and nest associations of individual fish. The spawning migration began on 18 June, and the last living individual was observed on 27 June. We located 31 nests, distributed from head-of-tide to the lowermost dam; no spawners or nests were observed in the tidally influenced zone or upstream of this dam. Mean longevity in the stream and the number of nests attended were correlated with arrival date; early migrants were alive longer and attended more nests than later migrants. Males were more likely to be observed away from a nest, or attending three or more nests, than were females, which attended usually one or two nests. We observed a negative association between nest abundance and substrate cover by fine sediment. Based on their observed movements in the system, and the extent of their habitat use, we anticipate that spawning Sea Lamprey will recolonize formerly inaccessible habitat after dam removals.

  17. Elastic and inelastic angular distributions of the 7Li+120Sn system for energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Gasques, L. R.; Alcántara-Núñez, J. A.; Duarte, J. G.; Aguiar, V. P.; Medina, N. H.; Seale, W. A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Freitas, A.; Lubian, J.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Genezini, F. A.; Rossi, E. S., Jr.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of 7Li+120Sn has been measured at bombarding energies of 21, 24 and 27 MeV. The {2}+\\to {0}+ γ -ray transition in 120Sn was observed and the angular distribution for the 2+ excited state was obtained. Coupled channels and coupled-reaction channels calculations, including the dynamical polarization potential due to the projectile break-up, obtained from continuum discretized coupled channel calculations, were performed. The comparison between the existing experimental elastic angular distribution with the coupled-reaction channels calculations indicates that the 1n stripping transfer is the most intense channel to be coupled and the 2n stripping reaction occurs sequentially rather than directly, however, further data must be analyzed to confirm this indication. The experimental elastic and inelastic scattering data were well described by the calculations, but some discrepancies in these channels may indicate the need for corrections to the nuclear potential and/or the necessity to incorporate further channels.

  18. Ion energy and angular distributions onto polymer surfaces delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments in air: II. Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure streamers intersecting particles are of interest in the context of plasma aided combustion, where the particle may be a fuel aerosol droplet, or in sterilization of air, where the particle may be a bacterium. The ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) incident on the particles, small curved dielectric surfaces, then in part determine the propensity for activating chemical reactions or, in the case of bacteria, the plasma's sterilization capability. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of IEADs on small particles (45 µm radius) produced by atmospheric pressure discharge. Streamers intersecting a particle momentarily generate a large sheath potential as the streamer passes by as the particle charges towards the plasma floating potential. During that time, ions of energies up to 3-10 eV can strike the particle. The permittivity of the particle and the streamer polarity in part determine the character of the IEAD.

  19. Power distribution between electrons and ions in the dielectric barrier discharge in Xe-Cl2 mixtures and radiation of Xe2* and XeCl* excimer molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avtaeva, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Power distribution between electrons and positive and negative ions and effect of the distribution on radiative efficiency of XeCl* (308 nm) and Xe2* (172 nm) excimer molecules in the dielectric barrier discharge in Xe-Cl2 at various pressures and supply voltages have been studied and discussed. The discharge characteristics were simulated using the 1D fluid model. It was shown that at small chlorine fraction in the mixture ~0.1-1% the most emission of the DBD is observed in the B-->X band of XeCl* molecules at 308 nm: in most cases about 90%-95% of the discharge emission falls on the XeCl* radiation. Highest emission in the B-->X band of XeCl* is observed when electrons adsorb about 50 or a bit higher percent of the discharge power. In this case an optimum between emission power and radiative efficiency of XeCl* UV emission is achieved. When the power absorbed by electrons reaches 70%, the radiation efficiency of Xe2* (at 172 nm) sharply increases and riches 10-11% at small increase or even decrease in radiation efficiency of XeCl* (at 308 nm).

  20. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2013-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research. PMID:23169788

  1. Barriers and benefits: implications of artificial night-lighting for the distribution of common bats in Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Fiona; Roche, Niamh; Aughney, Tina; Jones, Nicholas; Day, Julie; Baker, James; Langton, Steve

    2015-05-01

    Artificial lighting is a particular problem for animals active at night. Approximately 69% of mammal species are nocturnal, and one-third of these are bats. Due to their extensive movements-both on a nightly basis to exploit ephemeral food supplies, and during migration between roosts-bats have an unusually high probability of encountering artificial light in the landscape. This paper reviews the impacts of lighting on bats and their prey, exploring the direct and indirect consequences of lighting intensity and spectral composition. In addition, new data from large-scale surveys involving more than 265 000 bat calls at more than 600 locations in two countries are presented, showing that prevalent street-lighting types are not generally linked with increased activity of common and widespread bat species. Such bats, which are important to ecosystem function, are generally considered 'light-attracted' and likely to benefit from the insect congregations that form at lights. Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) may be an exception, being more frequent in lit than dark transects. For common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus), lighting is negatively associated with their distribution on a landscape scale, but there may be local increases in habitats with good tree cover. Research is now needed on the impacts of sky glow and glare for bat navigation, and to explore the implications of lighting for habitat matrix permeability. PMID:25780236

  2. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical–electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human–computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices.

  3. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical-electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human-computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices. PMID:27053577

  4. Barriers and benefits: implications of artificial night-lighting for the distribution of common bats in Britain and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Fiona; Roche, Niamh; Aughney, Tina; Jones, Nicholas; Day, Julie; Baker, James; Langton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting is a particular problem for animals active at night. Approximately 69% of mammal species are nocturnal, and one-third of these are bats. Due to their extensive movements—both on a nightly basis to exploit ephemeral food supplies, and during migration between roosts—bats have an unusually high probability of encountering artificial light in the landscape. This paper reviews the impacts of lighting on bats and their prey, exploring the direct and indirect consequences of lighting intensity and spectral composition. In addition, new data from large-scale surveys involving more than 265 000 bat calls at more than 600 locations in two countries are presented, showing that prevalent street-lighting types are not generally linked with increased activity of common and widespread bat species. Such bats, which are important to ecosystem function, are generally considered ‘light-attracted’ and likely to benefit from the insect congregations that form at lights. Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) may be an exception, being more frequent in lit than dark transects. For common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus), lighting is negatively associated with their distribution on a landscape scale, but there may be local increases in habitats with good tree cover. Research is now needed on the impacts of sky glow and glare for bat navigation, and to explore the implications of lighting for habitat matrix permeability. PMID:25780236

  5. The distribution of henipaviruses in Southeast Asia and Australasia: is Wallace's line a barrier to Nipah virus?

    PubMed

    Breed, Andrew C; Meers, Joanne; Sendow, Indrawati; Bossart, Katharine N; Barr, Jennifer A; Smith, Ina; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Wang, Linfa; Field, Hume E

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) (Genus Henipavirus) is a recently emerged zoonotic virus that causes severe disease in humans and has been found in bats of the genus Pteropus. Whilst NiV has not been detected in Australia, evidence for NiV-infection has been found in pteropid bats in some of Australia's closest neighbours. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of henipaviruses in fruit bat (Family Pteropodidae) populations to the north of Australia. In particular we tested the hypothesis that Nipah virus is restricted to west of Wallace's Line. Fruit bats from Australia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Indonesia were tested for the presence of antibodies to Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus, and tested for the presence of HeV, NiV or henipavirus RNA by PCR. Evidence was found for the presence of Nipah virus in both Pteropus vampyrus and Rousettus amplexicaudatus populations from East Timor. Serology and PCR also suggested the presence of a henipavirus that was neither HeV nor NiV in Pteropus alecto and Acerodon celebensis. The results demonstrate the presence of NiV in the fruit bat populations on the eastern side of Wallace's Line and within 500 km of Australia. They indicate the presence of non-NiV, non-HeV henipaviruses in fruit bat populations of Sulawesi and Sumba and possibly in Papua New Guinea. It appears that NiV is present where P. vampyrus occurs, such as in the fruit bat populations of Timor, but where this bat species is absent other henipaviruses may be present, as on Sulawesi and Sumba. Evidence was obtained for the presence henipaviruses in the non-Pteropid species R. amplexicaudatus and in A. celebensis. The findings of this work fill some gaps in knowledge in geographical and species distribution of henipaviruses in Australasia which will contribute to planning of risk management and surveillance activities. PMID:23637812

  6. Ecology of the ciguatera causing dinoflagellates from the Northern Great Barrier Reef: changes in community distribution and coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mark P; Lewis, Richard J; Morton, Steve

    2013-12-15

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is known to be caused by the ciguatoxins from the dinoflagellate genus Gambierdiscus, however, there is the potential for other toxins such as okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins from the genus Prorocentrum, and palytoxin from the genus Ostreopsis, to contaminate seafood. These genera may also be indicators of ecosystem health and potentially impact on coral reef ecosystems and the role they may play in the succession of coral to macroalgae dominated reefs has not been researched. Sixteen GBR field sites spanning inshore, mid-lagoon and outer lagoon (offshore) regions were studied. Samples were collected from September 2006 to December 2007 and abundance of benthic dinoflagellates on different host macroalgae and concentration of nutrients present in the water column were determined. The maximum abundance of Prorocentrum, Ostreopsis and Gambierdiscus found was 112, 793 and 50 cells per gram wet weight of host macroalgae, respectively. The average level of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN) in the water column across all sites (0.03 mg/L) was found to be more than double the threshold critical value (0.013 mg/L) for healthy coral reefs. Compared to a previous study 1984, there is evidence of a major shift in the distribution and abundance of these dinoflagellates. Inshore reefs have either of Prorocentrum (as at Green Island) or Ostreopsis (as at Magnetic Island) dominating the macroalgal surface niche which was once dominated by Gambierdiscus, whilst at offshore regions Gambierdiscus is still dominant. This succession may be linked to the ongoing eutrophication of the GBR lagoon and have consequences for the sources of toxins for ongoing cases of ciguatera. PMID:24210944

  7. Quantitative evaluation of brain distribution and blood-brain barrier efflux transport of probenecid in rats by microdialysis: possible involvement of the monocarboxylic acid transport system.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Y; Nozawa, K; Yamada, S; Yokoyama, Y; Kimura, R

    1997-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate quantitatively the brain distribution and the efflux transport across the blood-brain barrier of probenecid, using in vivo microdialysis and in situ brain perfusion techniques. The brain interstitial fluid (ISF)-to-plasma cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-plasma and brain tissue-to-plasma unbound concentration ratios of probenecid at steady state were less than unity, which suggests restricted distribution in the brain. An uphill concentration gradient from ISF to plasma and a downhill concentration gradient from CSF to ISF were observed. Kinetic analysis revealed that the efflux clearance from brain ISF to plasma (0.0373 ml/min/g brain) was significantly greater than the influx clearance from plasma to brain (0.00733 ml/min/g brain). The ratio of the ISF concentration (Cisf) to the plasma unbound concentration (Cp,f) of probenecid was increased 2- to 3-fold by salicylate (3.7 mM) and benzoate (3.6 mM), which are accepted as substrates of the monocarboxylic acid transport system, compared with the same ratio for the control. In addition, the ratio Cisf/Cp,f was increased by treatment with N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl-modifying agent, whereas p-aminohippuric acid and choline did not produce increasing effects on Cisf/Cp,f. These data suggest that the restricted distribution of probenecid in the brain may be ascribed to efficient efflux from the brain ISF, which may be regulated by the monocarboxylic acid transport system at a relatively high ISF concentration. PMID:9023263

  8. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  9. U-Th age distribution of coral fragments from multiple rubble ridges within the Frankland Islands, Great Barrier Reef: Implications for past storminess history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Entao; Zhao, Jian-xin; Feng, Yue-xing; Leonard, Nicole D.; Clark, Tara R.; Roff, George

    2016-07-01

    Prograded coral rubble ridges have been widely used as archives for reconstructing long-term storm or storminess history. Chronologies of ridge systems in previous studies are often based on a limited number of low-resolution radiocarbon or optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages per ridge (usually only one age per ridge), which carry intrinsic age uncertainties and make interpretation of storm histories problematic. To test the fidelity of storm ridges as palaeo-storm archives, we used high-precision U-Th dating to examine whether different samples from a single ridge are temporally constrained. We surveyed three transects of ridge systems from two continental islands (Normanby Island and High Island) within the Frankland Islands, Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and obtained 96 U-Th dates from coral rubble samples collected from within and between different ridges. Our results revealed significant differences in age ranges between the two islands. The steeper and more defined rubble ridges present on Normanby Island revealed that the majority of U-Th ages (over 60%) from a single ridge clustered within a narrow age range (∼100 years). By contrast, the lower and less defined ridges on High Island, which were more likely formed during both storm and non-storm high-energy events, revealed significant scatter in age distribution (>>200 years) with no notable clustering. The narrower age ranges obtained from the steeper and more defined rubble ridges suggest that previous approaches of using either limited samples from a single ridge or low-precision dating methods to establish chronologies are generally valid at centennial to millennial timescales, although caution must be taken to use such approaches for storm history reconstruction on shorter timescales (e.g. decadal). The correlation between U-Th mortality ages of coral rubble and historical stormy periods highlights the possibility of using coral rubble age distribution from rubble ridges to reconstruct the long

  10. Isomer-selective distribution of 3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) hydroxylated metabolites, 3-hydroxy-NBP and 10-hydroxy-NBP, across the rat blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Xing-xing; Zhong, Kan; Li, Xiu-li; Zhong, Da-fang; Chen, Xiao-yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the isomer-selective distribution of 3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) hydroxylated metabolites, 3-hydroxy-NBP (3-OH-NBP) and 10-hydroxy-NBP (10-OH-NBP), across the blood brain barrier (BBB). Methods: After oral administration of NBP (20 mg/kg) to rats, the pharmacokinetics of two major hydroxylated metabolites, 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP, in plasma and brains were investigated. Plasma and brain protein binding of 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP was also assessed. To evaluate the influences of major efflux transporters, rats were pretreated with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar (10 mg/kg, iv) and BCRP inhibitor pantoprazole (40 mg/kg, iv), then received 3-OH-NBP (12 mg/kg, iv) or 10-OH-NBP (3 mg/kg, iv). The metabolic profile of NBP was investigated in rat brain homogenate. Results: After NBP administration, the plasma exposure of 3-OH-NBP was 4.64 times that of 10-OH-NBP, whereas the brain exposure of 3-OH-NBP was only 11.8% of 10-OH-NBP. In the rat plasma, 60%±5.2% of 10-OH-NBP was unbound to proteins versus only 22%±2.3% of 3-OH-NBP being unbound, whereas in the rat brain, free fractions of 3-OH-NBP and 10-OH-NBP were 100%±9.7% and 49.9%±14.1%, respectively. In the rats pretreated with tariquidar and pantoprazole, the unbound partition coefficient Kp,uu of 3-OH-NBP was significantly increased, while that of 10-OH-NBP showed a slight but not statistically significant increase. Incubation of rat brain homogenate with NBP yielded 3-OH-NBP but not 10-OH-NBP. Conclusion: The isomer-selective distribution of 10-OH-NBP and 3-OH-NBP across the BBB of rats is mainly attributed to the differences in plasma and brain protein binding and the efflux transport of 3-OH-NBP. The abundant 10-OH-NBP is not generated in rat brains. PMID:26567730

  11. Only Above Barrier Energy Components Contribute to Barrier Traversal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galapon, Eric A.

    2012-04-01

    A time of arrival operator across a square potential barrier is constructed. The expectation value of the barrier time of arrival operator for a sufficiently localized incident wave packet is compared with the expectation value of the free particle time of arrival operator for the same wave packet. The comparison yields an expression for the expected traversal time across the barrier. It is shown that only the above barrier components of the momentum distribution of the incident wave packet contribute to the barrier traversal time, implying that below the barrier components are transmitted without delay. This is consistent with the recent experiment in attosecond ionization in helium indicating that there is no real tunneling delay time [P. Eckle , Science 322, 1525 (2008)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1163439].

  12. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-07-01

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle.

  13. Elastic scattering measurement for the system 17O + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies with silicon strip detectors exploiting ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, C.; Manea, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Di Meo, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Boiano, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Sandoli, M.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Veronese, F.

    2013-03-01

    The quasi elastic scattering of a 17O projectile from a 58Ni target has been studied at beam energies ranging from 42.5 to 55.0 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The total reaction cross sections were derived from the measured angular distributions by using an optical model fit within the coupled-channel code FRESCO. These cross sections are very similar to those measured for 17F (loosely bound by 0.6 MeV), mirror nucleus of 17O (tightly bound by 4.14 MeV). This outcome points out that, in this energy range, the small binding energy of the 17F valence proton has negligible influence onto the reactivity of such a loosely bound projectile, contrary to simple expectations, and to what observed for other loosely bound nuclei. The reaction dynamics seems to be influenced mainly by the Coulomb interaction which is similar for both mirror projectiles.

  14. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  15. Fission-fragment angular distributions and excitation functions in fission following complete fusion and targetlike-fragment fission reactions of 19F+232Th at near- and sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, P.; Biswas, D. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Nadkarni, D. M.; Saxena, A.

    1995-06-01

    The fragment angular distributions and excitation functions of the fission following complete fusion (FFCF) have been measured after separating them from targetlike-fragment fission (TLFF) for the 19F+232Th system in the bombarding energy range of 84.5 to 106.5 MeV. The fraction of the targetlike-fragment fission was observed to increase with decreasing bombarding energy below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation function for fission following complete fusion reaction agrees well with coupled channel calculations. However, the values derived from the fragment anisotropy data of the FFCF events are found to be much larger than those calculated using the coupled channel transmission coefficient values. The discrepancy between the experimental and calculated values increases as the bombarding energy is decreased below the barrier.

  16. Overcoming Barriers.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Schmidt, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Neal-Boylan's program of scholarship has always focused on nurse workforce issues. She recently published two books related to how nurses work. One (The Nurse's Reality Gap: Overcoming Barriers Between Academic Achievement and Clinical Success; Neal-Boylan, 2013) focused on the experience of new graduates from baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs. The second book, The Nurse's Reality Shift: Using Our History to Transform Our Future (Neal-Boylan, 2014), focuses on the problems nursing continues to face throughout our history and has failed to correct. PMID:26200309

  17. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  18. Is there a sphingomyelin-based hydrogen bond barrier at the mammalian host-schistosome parasite interface?

    PubMed

    Migliardo, Federica; Tallima, Hatem; El Ridi, Rashika

    2014-03-01

    Schistosomes develop, mature, copulate, lay eggs, and live for years in the mammalian host bloodstream, importing nutrients across the tegument, but entirely impervious to the surrounding elements of the immune system. We have hypothesized that sphingomyelin (SM) in the parasite apical lipid bilayer is responsible for these sieving properties via formation of a tight hydrogen bond network with the surrounding water. Here we have used quasi-elastic neutron scattering for characterizing the diffusion of larval and adult Schistosoma mansoni and adult Schistosoma haematobium in the surrounding medium, under various environmental conditions. The results documented the presence of a hydrogen bond barrier around larvae and adult schistosomes. The hydrogen bond network readily collapses if worms are subjected to hypoxic conditions, likely via activation of the parasite tegument-associated neutral sphingomyelinase, and consequent excessive SM hydrolysis. The slower dynamics of lung-stage larvae as compared to adult worms has been related to the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of different strength and then to their differential resistance to immune attacks. PMID:23943053

  19. Nonclassical transport in fractal media with a diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretskaya, O. A. Kondratenko, P. S.

    2013-04-15

    We investigate the impurity transport in a randomly heterogeneous fractal medium with a diffusion barrier. The barrier is due to low permeable medium surrounding the source. The transport regimes and asymptotic (large-distance) concentration distributions are found. The presence of the diffusion barrier results in the retardation of the transport regimes at short times. As regards the asymptotic concentration distribution, the barrier influence persists for long times as well.

  20. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  1. Efficiency of single noise barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hothersall, D. C.; Chandler-Wilde, S. N.; Hajmirzae, M. N.

    1991-04-01

    A numerical model is described which enables the sound field in the region of outdoor noise barriers to be calculated by using the boundary element method. The non-uniqueness of solution of the method, producing unreliable results in some conditions, is discussed. The model can be applied to barriers of arbitrary cross-sectional shape and arbitrary distribution of surface cover. The model is two-dimensional, but results are shown to agree well with those obtained for the three-dimensional problem of propagation from a point source over a noise barrier of infinite length. The model is used to compare the efficiency of a wide range of constructions of single noise barriers of different height, cross-sectional shape and surface cover. The effects of the ground cover are also considered. Comparison is made by examining spectra of the insertion loss of the barriers, and also broadband insertion losses for a source with a characteristic A-weighted road traffic noise spectrum. Single-figure estimates are presented of the relative efficiency, in terms of insertion loss, in the deep shadow zone, of a wide range of barrier configurations.

  2. Angular momentum distribution for the formation of evaporation residues in fusion of 19F with 184W near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Prasad, E.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Shidling, P. D.; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Sinha, A. K.; Pal, Santanu

    2011-01-01

    We present γ-ray multiplicity distributions for the formation of evaporation residues in the fusion reaction 19F + 184W → 20383Bi 120 at beam energies in the range of 90-110 MeV. The measurements were carried out using a 14 element BGO detector array and the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. The data have been unfolded to obtain angular momentum distributions with inputs from the statistical model calculation. Comparison with another neighboring system, viz. 19F + 175Lu → 19480Hg 114 with nearly similar entrance-channel mass asymmetry, hints at the depletion of higher angular momenta after crossing of the Z=82 shell in the compound nucleus.

  3. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  4. The efficacy of the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775 combined with temozolomide is limited by heterogeneous distribution across the blood-brain barrier in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Jenny L.; Calligaris, David; Gupta, Shiv K.; Iyekegbe, Dennis O.; Mueller, Dustin; Bakken, Katrina K.; Carlson, Brett L.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Evans, Debra L.; Lou, Zhenkun; Decker, Paul A.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Pucci, Vincenzo; Ma, Bennett; Shumway, Stuart D.; Elmquist, William; Agar, Nathalie Y.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Wee1 regulates key DNA damage checkpoints, and in this study, the efficacy of the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775 was evaluated in GBM xenograft models alone and in combination with radiation and/or temozolomide (TMZ). Experimental design In vitro MK-1775 efficacy alone and in combination with TMZ, and the impact on DNA damage was analyzed by western blotting and γH2AX foci formation. In vivo efficacy was evaluated in orthotopic and heterotopic xenografts. Drug distribution was assessed by conventional mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) -MS imaging. Results GBM22 (IC50 = 68 nM) was significantly more sensitive to MK-1775 compared to 5 other GBM xenograft lines including GBM6 (IC50 >300 nM), and this was associated with a significant difference in pan-nuclear γH2AX staining between treated GBM22 (81% cells positive) and GBM6 (20% cells positive) cells. However, there was no sensitizing effect of MK-1775 when combined with TMZ in vitro. In an orthotopic GBM22 model, MK-1775 was ineffective when combined with TMZ, while in a flank model of GBM22, MK-1775 exhibited both single agent and combinatorial activity with TMZ. Consistent with limited drug delivery into orthotopic tumors, the normal brain to whole blood ratio following a single MK-1775 dose was 5%, and MALDI-MS imaging demonstrated heterogeneous and markedly lower MK-1775 distribution in orthotopic as compared to heterotopic GBM22 tumors. Conclusions Limited distribution to brain tumors may limit the efficacy of MK-1775 in GBM. PMID:25609063

  5. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier. PMID:19929072

  6. Nanomedicine Faces Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Debbage, Paul; Thurner, Gudrun C.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticles have the potential to improve drug delivery efficiencies by more than two orders of magnitude, from the ~ 0.1% which is common today. Most pharmacologically agents on the market today are small drug molecules, which diffuse across the body’s blood-tissue barriers and distribute not only into the lesion, but into almost all organs. Drug actions in the non-lesion organs are an inescapable part of the drug delivery principle, causing “side-effects” which limit the maximally tolerable doses and result in inadequate therapy of many lesions. Nanoparticles only cross barriers by design, so side-effects are not built into their mode of operation. Delivery rates of almost 90% have been reported. This review examines the significance of these statements and checks how far they need qualification. What type of targeting is required? Is a single targeting sufficient? What new types of clinical challenge, such as immunogenicity, might attend the use of targeted nanoparticles?

  7. Threshold energy for sub-barrier fusion hindrance phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.; Zhang, H. Q.

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between the threshold energy for a deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance phenomenon and the energy at which the regime of interaction changes (the turning-off of the nuclear forces and friction) in the sub-barrier capture process is studied within the quantum diffusion approach. The quasielastic barrier distribution is shown to be a useful tool to clarify whether the slope of capture cross section changes at sub-barrier energies.

  8. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  9. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  10. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    Although surviving in situ micro-organisms eventually consume spilled oil, extensive inundation of shore biota by oil requires cleanup to enable ecological recovery within normal time scales. Although effective in calm seas and quiet waters, oil is advected over and under conventional curtain oil booms by wave actions and currents when seas are running. Most sorbent booms are not reusable, and are usually disposed of in landfills, creating excessive waste. A new concept is proposed for a floating oil barrier, to be positioned off vulnerable coasts, to interdict, contain, and sequester spilled oil, which can then be recovered and the barrier reused. While conventional oil boom designs rely principally on the immiscibility of oil in water and its relative buoyancy, the new concept barrier avoids the pitfalls of the former by taking advantage of the synergistic benefits of numerous fluid and material properties, including: density, buoyancy, elasticity, polarity, and surface area to volume ratio. Modeled after Zostera marina, commonly called eelgrass, the new barrier, referred to as synthetic eelgrass (SE), behaves analogously. Eelgrass has very long narrow, ribbon-like, leaves which support periphyton, a complex matrix of algae and heterotrophic microbes, which position themselves there to extract nutrients from the seawater flowing past them. In an analogous fashion, oil on, or in, seawater, which comes in contact with SE, is adsorbed on the surface and sequestered there. Secured to the bottom, in shoal waters, SE rises to the surface, and, if the tide is low enough, floats on the sea surface down wind, or down current to snare floating oil. The leaves of SE, called filaments, consist of intrinsically buoyant strips of ethylene methyl acrylate, aka EMA. EMA, made of long chain, saturated, hydrocarbon molecules with nearly homogeneous electron charge distributions, is a non-polar material which is oleophilic and hydrophobic. Oil must be in close proximity to the

  11. Synthesis and small-animal positron emission tomography evaluation of [11C]-elacridar as a radiotracer to assess the distribution of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dörner, Bernd; Kuntner, Claudia; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Stanek, Johann; Wanek, Thomas; Stundner, Gloria; Mairinger, Severin; Löscher, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver; Erker, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer to assess the distribution of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vivo, the potent third-generation P-gp inhibitor elacridar (1) was labeled with 11C by reaction of O-desmethyl 1 with [11C]-methyl triflate. In vitro autoradiography and small-animal PET imaging of [11C]-1 was performed in rats (n=3), before and after administration of unlabeled 1, as well as in wild-type, Mdr1a/b(−/−) and Bcrp1(−/−) mice (n=3). In PET experiments in rats, administration of unlabeled 1 increased brain activity uptake 5.4-fold, whereas blood activity levels remained unchanged. In Mdr1a/b(−/−) mice, brain activity uptake was 2.5-fold higher compared to wild-type animals, whereas in Bcrp1(−/−) mice brain activity uptake was only 1.3-fold higher. In vitro autoradiography showed that 63% of [11C]-1 binding was displaceable by an excess of unlabeled 1. As the signal obtained with [11C]-1 appeared to be specific for P-gp at the BBB, its utility for the visualization of cerebral P-gp merits further investigation. PMID:19711894

  12. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1989-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor that support these conclusions, are detailed.

  13. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  14. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å-1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  15. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å−1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  16. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth's deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å(-1) corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  17. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies on dynamics of water confined in nanoporous copper rubeanate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Yonamine, Ryo; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Nagao, Michihiro; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2011-11-24

    We have investigated the mechanism of the first order transition and proton conductivity in copper rubeanate hydrates from microscopic and dynamical points of view. Three different types of neutron spectrometer-time-of-flight, backscattering, and neutron spin echo-were used to cover a wide dynamic range (1 ps to 100 ns). We found that the water molecules adsorbed in the pore are divided into "free water" having diffusion coefficients similar to those of bulk water at room temperature and "condensed water" which is about 10 times slower than bulk water owing to the interaction with the pore wall. The hydrogen atoms in the pore wall exhibited no relaxation within the measured time scales. The free water has, in the framework of the jump-diffusion model, smaller activation energy, longer residence time, and longer jump distance than bulk water. The neutron spin echo measurement revealed that the first order transition is a kind of liquid-liquid transition at which the free water is condensed on the pore surface in the low temperature phase. On cooling the condensed water, the relaxation time starts to deviate from the VFT equation around 200 K as previously observed in the water confined in nanoporous silicates. The free water plays an important role as the proton carrier but the proton conductivity is mainly governed by the number of protons provided into the adsorbed water from the pore wall. PMID:21999477

  18. Quasi-elastic light-scattering studies of single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, R C; Carlson, F D

    1981-01-01

    Measurements were made of the intensity autocorrelation function, g(2)[tau], of light scattered from intact frog muscle fibers. During the tension plateau of an isometric tenanus, scattered field statistics were approximately Gaussian and intensity fluctuations were quasi-stationary. The half time, tau 1/2, for the decay of g(2)[tau] was typically 70 ms at a scattering angle of 30 degrees. The decay rate, 1/tau 1/2, of g(2)[tau] varied roughly linearly with the projection of the scattering vector on the fiber axis. 1/tau 1/2 was greater during the tension creep phase of tetani of highly stretched fibers, but was roughly independent of sarcomere length during the tension plateau. g(2)[tau] measured during rest or on diffraction pattern maxima during isometric contraction were flat with low amplitudes. These results are consistent with a model of a 200-mu m segment of an isometrically contracting fiber in which scattering material possesses relative axial velocities of 1-2 mu m/s accompanied by relative axial displacements greater than 0.1 mu m. The slow (1-2 mu m/s) motion of one portion of the fiber relative to another observed under the microscope (500X) during isometric contraction is consistent with the light-scattering results. Structural fluctuations on the scale of the myofibrillar sarcomere which may arise from asynchronous cycling of cross-bridges must involve relative axial velocities less than 3 mu m/s or relative axial displacements less than 0.05 mu m. PMID:6974014

  19. Coherent Dynamics of meta-Toluidine Investigated by QuasiElastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Faraone, Antonio; Hong, Kunlun; Kneller, Larry; Ohl, Michael E; Copley, John R. D.

    2012-01-01

    The coherent dynamics of a typical fragile glass former, meta-toluidine, was investigated at the molecular level using quasielastic neutron scattering, with time-of-flight and neutron spin echo spectrometers. It is well known that the static structure factor of meta-toluidine shows a prepeak originating from clustering of the molecules through hydrogen bonding between the amine groups. The dynamics of meta-toluidine was measured for several values of the wavevector transfer Q, which is equivalent to an inverse length scale, in a range encompassing the prepeak and the structure factor peak. Data were collected in the temperature range corresponding to the liquid and supercooled states, down to the glass transition. At least two dynamical processes were identified. This paper focuses on the slowest relaxation process in the system, the {alpha}-relaxation, which was found to scale with the macroscopic shear viscosity at all the investigated Q values. No evidence of 'de Gennes' narrowing associated with the prepeak was observed, in contrast with what happens at the Q value corresponding to the interparticle distance. Moreover, using partially deuterated samples, the dynamics of the clusters was found to be correlated to the single-particle dynamics of the meta-toluidine molecules.

  20. Microscopic properties of liquid gallium from quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Puchkov, A. V.; Savostin, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The results of the neutron diffraction study of liquid gallium on the DIN-2PI spectrometer (IBR-2 reactor, JINR, Dubna) have been discussed. The analysis of the experimental data has provided temperature dependences of diffusion and relaxation characteristics of liquid gallium in the temperature range of 313-793 K. It has been found that an increase in the temperature is accompanied by the gradual deviation of the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient from the known dependences obtained from the data on viscosity. Such a behavior is explained by the beginning clustering of liquid gallium induced by the prevailing covalent character of interatomic bonds.

  1. Patterned arrays of capped platinum nanowires with quasi-elastic mechanical response to lateral force

    SciTech Connect

    Hottes, M. Muench, F.; Rauber, M.; Stegmann, C.; Ensinger, W.; Dassinger, F.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2015-02-02

    In this Letter, we describe the electrodeposition of capped, micro-sized Pt nanowire arrays in ion-track etched polymer templates and measure their collective mechanical response to an external force. By using an aperture mask during the irradiation process, it was possible to restrict the creation of pores in the templates to defined areas, allowing the fabrication of small nanowire arrays in different geometries and sizes. The simultaneous and highly reliable formation of many nanowire arrays was achieved using a pulsed electrodeposition technique. After deposition, the polymer matrix was removed using a gentle, dry oxygen plasma treatment, resulting in an excellent preservation of the array nanostructure as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. A force measuring station was set up to perform mechanical characterization series on free-standing arrays. The nanowire arrays show a high robustness and respond sensitively to the applied force, making them attractive as spring elements in miniaturized inertial sensors, for example.

  2. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  3. Changes in the Expression and Distribution of Claudins, Increased Epithelial Apoptosis, and a Mannan-Binding Lectin-Associated Immune Response Lead to Barrier Dysfunction in Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Rat Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bosi; Zhou, Shuping; Lu, Youke; Liu, Jiong; Jin, Xinxin; Wan, Haijun; Wang, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims This animal study aimed to define the underlying cellular mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction. Methods Rats were fed 4% with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce experimental colitis. We analyzed the sugars in 24-hour urine output by high pressure liquid chromatography. The expression of claudins, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MBL-associated serine proteases 2 (MASP-2) were detected in the colonic mucosa by immunohistochemistry; and apoptotic cells in the colonic epithelium were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling method assay. Results The lactulose and sucralose excretion levels in the urine of rats with DSS-induced colitis were significantly higher than those in the control rats. Mannitol excretion was lower and lactulose/mannitol ratios and sucralose/mannitol ratios were significantly increased compared with those in the control group (p<0.05). Compared with the controls, the expression of sealing claudins (claudin 3, claudin 5, and claudin 8) was significantly decreased, but that of claudin 1 was increased. The expression of pore-forming claudin 2 was upregulated and claudin 7 was downregulated in DSS-induced colitis. The epithelial apoptotic ratio was 2.8%±1.2% in controls and was significantly increased to 7.2%±1.2% in DSS-induced colitis. The expression of MBL and MASP-2 in the intestinal mucosa showed intense staining in controls, whereas there was weak staining in the rats with colitis. Conclusions There was increased intestinal permeability in DSS-induced colitis. Changes in the expression and distribution of claudins, increased epithelial apoptosis, and the MASP-2-induced immune response impaired the intestinal epithelium and contributed to high intestinal permeability. PMID:25717051

  4. Bulk-barrier transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.; Mueller, R.; Beinvogl, W.

    1983-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on a bulk-barrier transistor (BBT). In this device the charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier, which is located inside a semiconductor. The barrier is the result of a space-charge region in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin middle layer. The height of the energy barrier, which is adjustable by technological parameters, can be controlled by an external voltage.

  5. Assessing barriers to immunization.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Victoria; Ferris, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Parental barriers to childhood immunizations vary among countries, states and communities. There is a plethora of studies that exist to examine barriers to immunizations including many intervention studies designed to improve immunization rates in children. Often, intervention studies designed to minimize barriers and increase immunization uptake among children lack the inclusion of a standardized instrument to measure accurately parental barriers to childhood immunizations before and after interventions. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles To Shots (SHOTS) survey is a standardized survey instrument to measure parental barriers to childhood immunizations. In several studies, the SHOTS survey has demonstrated consistent reliability and has been validated in diverse populations. The inclusion of the SHOTS survey instrument in studies to examine barriers to childhood immunization will provide researchers and clinicians with a better understanding of parents' individualized barriers to immunizations. Furthermore, use of the SHOTS survey instrument to collect information about parental barriers to immunizations can lead to targeted interventions to minimize these obstacles at the individual and community level and to help us to achieve our national, state and community childhood immunization goals. PMID:26810618

  6. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  7. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  8. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  9. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  10. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  11. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  12. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  13. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  14. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  15. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  18. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Seifert, Gary

    2009-01-31

    This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho.

  19. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  20. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  1. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  2. Information barriers and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D. W.; Wolford, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  3. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  4. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  5. Convective mixing in formations with horizontal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenius, Maria T.; Gasda, Sarah E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that convective mixing in porous media flow is important for applications such as saltwater intrusion and geological storage of carbon dioxide. In the latter case, dissolution from the injected phase to the resident brine is assisted by convective mixing, which leads to enhanced storage security through reduced buoyancy. Here, we focus on the effect of horizontal barriers on the efficiency of convective mixing. Previous investigations of the effect of heterogeneity on mixing efficiency have focused on random permeability fields or barriers of small extent compared to the intrinsic finger wavelength. The effect of horizontal barriers of larger extent, such as mudstone inclusions or thin shale deposits, has not been given sufficient attention. We perform detailed numerical investigations to represent the continuous solution of this problem in semi-infinite domains with barriers arranged in a periodic manner. The results show that mass flux into the domain, which is a measure of the efficiency of redistribution of the solute, is inversely proportional to the barrier length and proportional to the horizontal and vertical aperture between the barriers, for the cases studied. The flow structure is complex, and it depends not only on the total area of barriers but also largely on the distribution of barriers. Therefore, neither simple analytical models nor simple upscaling methods that lack information about the flow paths, can be used to predict the behavior. However, we compute the effective vertical permeability by flow-based upscaling and show that it can be used to directly obtain a first-order approximation to the mass flux into the domain.

  6. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  7. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  8. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  9. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  10. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  11. Segmented Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The article has a macro-segmented thermal barrier coating due to the presence of a pattern of three-dimensional features. The features may be a series of raised ribs formed on the substrate surface and being spaced from 0.05 inches to 0.30 apart. The ribs have a width ranging from 0.005 inches to 0.02 inches, and a height ranging from 25% to 100% of the thickness of the barrier coating. Alternately, the features may be a similar pattern of grooves formed in the surface of the substrate. Other embodiments provide segmentation by grooves or ribs in the bond coat or alternately grooves formed in the thermal barrier layer.

  12. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  13. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  14. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  15. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  16. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  17. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  18. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  19. A double barrier memristive device

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M.; Ziegler, M.; Kolberg, L.; Soni, R.; Dirkmann, S.; Mussenbrock, T.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits. PMID:26348823

  20. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  1. Dissecting gene expression at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Melanie A.; Bien-Ly, Nga; Daneman, Richard; Watts, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of genome-wide expression data for the blood-brain barrier is an invaluable resource that has recently enabled the discovery of several genes and pathways involved in the development and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, particularly in rodent models. The broad distribution of published data sets represents a viable starting point for the molecular dissection of the blood-brain barrier and will further direct the discovery of novel mechanisms of blood-brain barrier formation and function. Technical advances in purifying brain endothelial cells, the key cell that forms the critical barrier, have allowed for greater specificity in gene expression comparisons with other central nervous system cell types, and more systematic characterizations of the molecular composition of the blood-brain barrier. Nevertheless, our understanding of how the blood-brain barrier changes during aging and disease is underrepresented. Blood-brain barrier data sets from a wider range of experimental paradigms and species, including invertebrates and primates, would be invaluable for investigating the function and evolution of the blood-brain barrier. Newer technologies in gene expression profiling, such as RNA-sequencing, now allow for finer resolution of transcriptomic changes, including isoform specificity and RNA-editing. As our field continues to utilize more advanced expression profiling in its ongoing efforts to elucidate the blood-brain barrier, including in disease and drug delivery, we will continue to see rapid advances in our understanding of the molecular mediators of barrier biology. We predict that the recently published data sets, combined with forthcoming genomic and proteomic blood-brain barrier data sets, will continue to fuel the molecular genetic revolution of blood-brain barrier biology. PMID:25414634

  2. Barrier Free Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Richard K., Ed.

    The booklet provides information for the design and evaluation of a barrier free outdoor environment for handicapped individuals. Section 1 discusses the scope of the study, defines terms, cites pertinent laws and legislation, describes cost/benefit factors, and surveys population statistics. Section 2 considers recommended design details in the…

  3. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  4. Barriers Regarding Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekenoogen, John Russell

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) used an open-source course management system (CMS) called Sakai. Sakai was the fourth CMS the university has used to help teach live, blended (or hybrid), and online courses over the past ten years. The objective of this dissertation was to identify what barriers may be preventing university personnel from using…

  5. Overcoming Language Barriers

    PubMed Central

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  6. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  7. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success. PMID:18395160

  8. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  9. Breaking Down Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty at 11 higher education institutions in California, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico have been experimenting with computer conferencing on the BESTNET (Bilingual English-Spanish Telecommunications Network). The growing system is credited with creating an international student-faculty community that crosses cultural barriers for…

  10. Barriers to Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurman, Ernest B.

    The under-representation of women in prestigious occupations and the lower average pay women earn has been of concern for many years. This study investigated two alternative explanations for this under-representation of females in prestigious and higher paying occupations. The first explanation was external barriers such as discrimination, and the…