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1

Quasi-periodic solutions for quasi-periodically forced nonlinear Schrödinger equations with quasi-periodic inhomogeneous terms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, it is shown that there exist many small amplitude quasi-periodic solutions for non-autonomous, quasi-periodically forced in time nonlinear Schrödinger equations with quasi-periodic inhomogeneous terms, under periodic spatial boundary conditions, via KAM theory.

Rui, Jie; Si, Jianguo

2014-10-01

2

Quasi-periodic bifurcations in reversible systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Invariant tori of integrable dynamical systems occur both in the dissipative and in the conservative context, but only in the latter the tori are parameterized by phase space variables. This allows for quasi-periodic bifurcations within a single given system, induced by changes of the normal behavior of the tori. It turns out that in a non-degenerate reversible system all semi-local bifurcations of co-dimension 1 persist, under small non-integrable perturbations, on large Cantor sets.

Hanßmann, Heinz

2011-02-01

3

Quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays produced by electrochemical synthesis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We discuss a ''gentle'' electrochemical technique for fabricating quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays. The technique exploits a self-organizing phenomenon to produce quasi-periodic arrangement of dots and provides excellent control over dot size and interdo...

S. Bandyopadhyay, A. E. Miller, D. F. Yue, G. Banerjee, R. E. Ricker

1994-01-01

4

Quasi-periodicities in Chinese precipitation time series  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although climate change deeply affects China, climatic time series are expected to show quasi-periodic behavior. This hypothesis has been tested by means of Autocorrelation Spectral Analysis (ASA) to detect quasi-periodicities in precipitation time series of 132 climate stations spread over China for the period from 1951 to 2002. A Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) has also been applied in order to examine if these quasi-periods are stable in time. Finally, it has been tested whether precipitation series recorded at neighboring stations show similar spectral behavior and can thus be grouped. All in all, our hypothesis regarding quasi-periodicities has been verified. Most of the time series show significant quasi-periods. A 2-3 year quasi-periodicity is predominant in many different regions of China. The result of ASA is that precipitation series from neighboring stations often show similar quasi-periods and therefore a grouping seems to be justified. However, the outcome of CWT provides more detailed information. In north-eastern China several series show similar quasi-periods which are statistically significant at different times; here, a grouping would be incorrect. In addition, the results of CWT show a less uniform pattern of quasi-periods in the southern inland regions. Whereas ASA shows a relatively uniform pattern of 2-3 year quasi-periods, CWT detects 2-3, 4-5 and 6-7 year quasi-periods. Nevertheless, although the quasi-periods are detected as being unstable, time series from neighboring stations sometimes show analogous significant quasi-periods within the same time frame and can thus be grouped. This can be seen in the northern part of central China, near the border to North Korea and along the coast of the South China Sea.

Hartmann, H.; Becker, S.; King, L.

2008-05-01

5

Quasi-Periodic Solutions and Stability for a Weakly Damped Nonlinear Quasi-Periodic Mathieu Equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quasi-Periodic (QP) solutions are investigated for a weakly dampednonlinear QP Mathieu equation. A double parametric primary resonance(1:2, 1:2) is considered. To approximate QP solutions, a double multiple-scales method is applied to transform the original QP oscillator to anautonomous system performing two successive reductions. In a first step,the multiple-scales method is applied to the original equation to derive afirst reduced differential

K. Guennoun; M. Houssni; M. Belhaq

2002-01-01

6

Multispacecraft observations of quasi-periodic emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are VLF electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-5 kHz which exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation period is usually on the order of a few tens of seconds. The generation mechanism of these emissions is still not understood, but at least in some cases it appears to be related to ULF magnetic field pulsations which result in periodic modifications of the resonant conditions in the source region. We use multipoint measurements of QP emissions by the 4 Cluster spacecraft. The observations are obtained close to the equatorial region at radial distances of about 4 Earth radii, i.e. close to a possible generation region. A combined analysis of the high resolution data obtained by the WBD instruments and the ULF magnetic field data obtained by the FGM instruments allows for a detailed case-study analysis of these unique emissions. The presented analysis benefits from the recent close-separation configuration of three of the Cluster spacecraft (?20-100 km) and a related timing analysis, which would be impossible otherwise.

Nemec, Frantisek; Picket, Jolene S.; Santolik, Ondrej

2014-05-01

7

Quasi-periodic oscillations in superfluid magnetars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the time evolution of axisymmetric oscillations of superfluid magnetars with a poloidal magnetic field and an elastic crust, working in Newtonian gravity. Extending earlier models, we study the effects of composition gradients and entrainment on the magneto-elastic wave spectrum and on the potential identification of the observed quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We use two-fluid polytropic equations of state to construct our stellar models, which mimic realistic composition gradient configurations. The basic features of the axial axisymmetric spectrum of normal fluid stars are reproduced by our results and in addition we find several magneto-elastic waves with a mixed character. In the core, these oscillations mimic the shear mode pattern of the crust as a result of the strong dynamical coupling between these two regions. Incorporating the most recent entrainment configurations in our models, we find that they have a double effect on the spectrum: the magnetic oscillations of the core have a frequency enhancement, while the mixed magneto-elastic waves originating in the crust are moved towards the frequencies of the single-fluid case. The distribution of lower frequency magneto-elastic oscillations for our models is qualitatively similar to the observed magnetar QPOs with ? < 155 Hz. In particular, some of these QPOs could represent mixed magneto-elastic oscillations with frequencies not greatly different from the crustal modes of an unmagnetized star. We find that many QPOs could even be accounted for using a model with a relatively weak polar field of Bp ? 3 × 1014 G, because of the superfluid enhancement of magnetic oscillations. Finally, we discuss the possible identification of 625 and 1837 Hz QPOs either with non-axisymmetric modes or with high-frequency axisymmetric QPOs excited by crustal mode overtones.

Passamonti, A.; Lander, S. K.

2014-02-01

8

Quasi-periodic solutions for the quasi-periodically forced cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation on {T}d  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we discuss the existence of time quasi-periodic solutions for quasi-periodically forced cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation of higher spatial dimension with basic frequency vector ? = (?1, ?2, …, ?m). By constructing a KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theorem for a dissipative system which depends on time in a quasi-periodic way, we obtain a Cantorian branch of m + 2-dimensional invariant tori for the equation.

Cheng, Hongyu; Si, Jianguo

2013-08-01

9

Phase Equations for Quasi-Periodic Oscillators Alper Demir  

E-print Network

Phase Equations for Quasi-Periodic Oscillators Alper Demir Chenjie Gu Jaijeet Roychowdhury Koc¸ University Istanbul, Turkey University of California Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract--Oscillations and rhythmic activity are seen in natural and man-made systems. Dynamics of oscillators can be compactly described

Roychowdhury, Jaijeet

10

Cassini and Galileo Observations of Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simultaneous measurements of many Jovian plasma and radio emissions were ob- tained by the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft during the Cassini flyby of Jupiter (clos- est approach was on December 30, 2000). Jovian type III radio emissions, also known as quasi-periodic (QP) emissions, were often detected by both spacecraft. This type of emission has been detected by Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo,

G. B. Hospodarsky; W. S. Kurth; D. A. Gurnett; M. L. Kaiser; P. Zarka; N. Krupp; J. H. Waite

2002-01-01

11

Stability for quasi-periodically perturbed Hill's equations  

E-print Network

's equation of the form ¨ + (p0(t) + p1(t)) = 0, where p0 is real analytic and periodic, p1 is real analytic than analyticity, we prove that quasi-periodic solutions of the unperturbed equation can be continued as a solution of a generalized Riccati equation associated to Hill's problem. 1 Introduction In the present work

Gentile, Guido

12

Transition Curves for the Quasi-Periodic Mathieu Equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we investigate an extension of Mathieu's equation, the quasi-periodic(QP) Mathieu equation given by # +[# + # (cos t + cos #t)] # =0for small # and irrational #. Of interest is the generation of stability diagrams that identify thepoints or regions in the #-# parameter plane (for fixed #) for which all solutions of the QP

Randolph S. Zounes; Richard H. Rand

1998-01-01

13

Explicit quasi-periodic solutions of the Vakhnenko equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The trigonal curve associated with the Vakhnenko equation is introduced by using the Lax matrix for the nth stationary positive flow. Based on the theory of the trigonal curve and the properties of the three kinds of Abel differentials, the Riemann theta function representation for the Baker-Akhiezer function is derived, from which the straightening out of flows in the Jacobian variety is exactly given through the Abel maps. We finally arrive at quasi-periodic solutions of the Vakhnenko equation.

Zhai, Yunyun; Geng, Xianguo; He, Guoliang

2014-05-01

14

Cassini and Galileo Observations of Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simultaneous measurements of many Jovian plasma and radio emissions were ob- tained by the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft during the Cassini flyby of Jupiter (clos- est approach was on December 30, 2000). Jovian type III radio emissions, also known as quasi-periodic (QP) emissions, were often detected by both spacecraft. This type of emission has been detected by Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, and Cassini, with pe- riodicities ranging from about a minute to many tens of minutes (often around 40 minutes). Other quasi-periodic events have been detected in the energetic particle data of Ulysses, Galileo and Cassini and in the x-ray spectrum obtained by the Chandra spacecraft, usually with periodicities around 40 minutes. The multiple observations of similar quasi-periodic events suggests that there may be a common source for these phenomena. Many examples of simultaneous detection of the QP radio emissions were obtained by the Cassini and Galileo plasma wave and radio instruments. The charac- teristics of the QP emissions observed by each spacecraft are very similar, and when the difference in the travel time of a radio emission from Jupiter to each spacecraft is taken into account, the QP bursts are observed to occur simultaneously at each space- craft. These similar characteristics of the emissions, even when the two spacecraft are separated by many hours in local time and many degrees of system III longitude, sug- gest a broadly beamed 'strobe light' source for the emission, and not a narrow beam which rotates with the planet. The implications of these simultaneous observations will be discussed.

Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Krupp, N.; Waite, J. H.

15

Development of a quasi-periodic undulator for the HLS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China's first quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) has been developed for the Hefei Light Source (HLS). It uses a magnetic configuration with varied thicknesses of NdFeB blocks, which is based on the QPU of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The depression of 3rd harmonic radiation is significantly improved over the ESRF QPU, as deduced from the measured magnetic fields. A method of configuring shims of different geometries and sizes, based on a symmetric principle to correct multi-pole field integrals, is demonstrated.

Yang, Yu-Feng; Lu, Hui-Hua; Chen, Wan; Jia, Qi-Ka; Sun, Shu-Chen; Li, Zhi-Qiang

2014-07-01

16

Development of a Quasi-Periodic Undulator for the HLS  

E-print Network

China's first quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) has been developed for the Hefei Light Source (HLS). It uses a magnetic configuration with varied thicknesses of NdFeB blocks, based on the QPU of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Depression of 3rd harmonic radiation is significantly improved over the ESRF QPU, as deduced from the measured magnetic fields. A method of configuring shims of different geometries and sizes, based on a symmetric principle to correct multi-pole field integrals, was demonstrated.

Yufeng Yang; Huihua Lu; Wan Chen; Qika Jia; Shuchen Sun; Zhiqiang Li

2014-03-11

17

Quasi-periodic oscillations in GX 17 + 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray observations of GX 17 + 2 were made in March and April, 1988 with the Large Area Counter of the Ginga satellite. The source was observed in the flaring, normal, and horizontal branches. Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were oberved in all three of these branches. The relationship between QPO behavior and the X-ray spectral properties of GX 17 + 2 is examined. Continuous variation of QPO behavior is observed as GX 17 + 2 moves from the normal to flaring branch, indicating that the normal-branch QPO and the flaring-branch QPO are probably one physical phenomenon. This QPO behavior is similar to that observed in Sco X-1. Also, it is found that GX 17 + 2 is an example of the Z-type sources defined by Hasinger et al. (1989).

Penninx, W.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Van Der Klis, M.; Van Paradijs, J.

1990-01-01

18

Quasi-periodic fluctuations in climate due to sea ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new mechanism behind the occurrence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events is proposed. Paleo-proxy observations suggests that these quasi-periodic fluctuations occurred during the last glacial period, and similar fluctuations are also observed in the present interglacial (Bond events). The persistent occurrence of a quasi-periodic fluctuation under different background climates is explained by the interaction between deep water formation and sea ice in the North Atlantic. A simple ocean circulation model coupled to a thermodynamic sea ice model is shown to exhibit self-sustained oscillations in the overturning circulation strength. The physical mechanism behind the oscillations is the insulating property of sea ice in cutting off ocean-atmosphere heat exchange. During periods of extended sea ice, heat builds up in the top layers of the polar ocean which subsequently contributes to the retreat of sea ice and the loss of heat. The dynamics of the system is such that there is a net loss of heat in each cycle of sea ice advance and retreat. Gradually over several cycles, a convective situation results with the top oceanic layers reaching the same density as the bottom layers, and the system abruptly switches to an enhanced circulation mode for a brief period of time before returning to its preferred state from where the cycle repeats. The periodic relaxation oscillations can be modulated by external freshwater or solar forcing. A pulsed freshwater injection mimicking Heinrich events produces packets of fluctuations with similar characteristics to D-O events. Numerical experiments with the model suggests that the volume of the ocean that comes under sea ice is an important parameter in determining the periodicity of oscillations. In this respect, the geometry of the ocean basin could be the determinant of the natural oscillation time-scale of the sea ice-circulation system. When subjected to freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events, the model produces packets of progressively weaker fluctuations (top). This pattern resembles D-O events between 30 and 50 ky before present (bottom).

Saha, R.

2013-12-01

19

Quasi-Periodicities, Magnetic Clusters and Solar Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate quasi-periodicities, 12 hour averages of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field and the solar wind speed, covering ~ 42 (1963-2005) years were analyzed. A Lomb periodogram for data up to 1998 showed a dominant period of 27.03 days as fpund in earlier results. Including cycle 23, a dominant period of 27.06 days was identified. Analysis of the solar cycles independently showed a dominant period of 27.03 days in solar cycle 20, but not in the other cycles. To investigate the degree of persistency of a particular signal, the technique of complex demodulation was applied since it permits the determination of continuous changes in time of the amplitude and frequency of the signal relative to the test signal. It was found that a period of ~27.6 days gave an overall flat phase function in time, while other periods < ~0.5 day shorter and longer, with comparable but lesser amplitude, come and go. To investigate the solar sources of these periods, the method of principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to ~ 27 years (1976-2003) of synoptic maps obtained with the NSO Kitt Peak Vaccum Telescope. Before the analysis, the original synoptic maps were shifted relative to the previous maps using the period under investigation. Using PCA the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs) and Pricipal Components (PCs) were found for the set of synoptic maps rescaled to the rotation rate 27.03 days in 1999-2003. The patterns characterized by EOFs 1 and 2 are mostly axisymmetric and PCs 1 and 2 show solar cycle variability. EOF3 shows only one well-localized pattern in the Southern Hemisphere which is markedly non-axisymmetric and PC3 has peaks at times when fast CMEs occur.

Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Sandor, C.; Ruzmaikin, A.

2006-12-01

20

Quasi-periodic emissions observed by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions in the frequency range of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic modulation of wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. Although there are many observations of these events by ground-based instruments, satellite observations are still rather sparse. Nevertheless, these are of great importance, as they allow us to analyze wave properties in situ, close to the probable generation region, and, moreover, they are not affected by the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We present a survey of QP events observed by the WBD instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft during their perigee passes at radial distances of about 4 RE. Moreover, a conjugate observation of a QP event by Cluster spacecraft and by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft has been identified. Simultaneous observations of the same event by several different spacecraft enable us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the phenomenon. It is shown that during a QP event, the same modulation is observed at the same time at very different locations of the inner magnetosphere. The results of a detailed wave analysis based on multi-component measurements by the STAFF-SA instruments indicate that the emissions propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at larger geomagnetic latitudes. Finally, ULF magnetic field data are inspected for the presence of magnetic field fluctuations with a period corresponding to the period of modulation and a possible generation mechanism of the events is discussed.

Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Hayosh, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

2012-12-01

21

Quasi-periodic solutions for two-level systems Guido Gentile  

E-print Network

generalized Riccati equation. We prove the existence of quasi-periodic solutions of the latter equation are the Pauli matrices and f(t) is a real analytic quasi-periodic function with frequency vector ; the real of a generalized Riccati equation (see next section). In particular in [1] it was found that quasi

Gentile, Guido

22

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP  

E-print Network

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP F. Gabern1 `A. Jorba1 Abstract We make a local semi-analytical study of a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP particle near the triangular points of the Sun-Jupiter system. In order to perform this study, we use

Barcelona, Universitat de

23

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP  

E-print Network

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP F. Gabern 1 #18; A. Jorba 1 Abstract We make a local semi-analytical study of a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP of a small particle near the triangular points of the Sun-Jupiter system. In order to perform this study, we

Barcelona, Universitat de

24

Omnidirectional reflection from Fibonacci quasi-periodic one-dimensional photonic crystal  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that omnidirectional reflection (ODR) is possible from quasi-periodic isotropic dielectric stacks following a Fibonacci sequence (FS). The transition from truly periodic to fully quasi-periodic structure is investigated by building periodic structures having unit cells made of FS of order j. The number of periods required to achieve ODR decreases as j increases until only a single period

D. Lusk; I. Abdulhalim; F. Placido

2001-01-01

25

Quasi-Periodicity in Medieval and Islamic architecture and ornament , Helmer Aslaksen2  

E-print Network

Quasi-Periodicity in Medieval and Islamic architecture and ornament Ser Zheng1 , Helmer Aslaksen2 1 Medieval Islamic tilings are examples of aperiodic and quasiperiodic tilings. The tilings have five- or ten regarding quasi-periodicity in Medieval Islamic tilings. We will focus on three properties: the method

Aslaksen, Helmer

26

POINTWISE EXISTENCE OF THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENT FOR A QUASI-PERIODIC EQUATION  

E-print Network

understood only for a few models, most prominently, for the almost Mathieu equation when v(x) = 2 cos(x)). 0POINTWISE EXISTENCE OF THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENT FOR A QUASI-PERIODIC EQUATION ALEXANDER FEDOTOV AND FR´ED´ERIC KLOPP 0. Introduction 0.1. Quasi-periodic finite difference equations. Consider the finite difference

Boyer, Edmond

27

POINTWISE EXISTENCE OF THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENT FOR A QUASI-PERIODIC EQUATION  

E-print Network

understood only for a few models, most prominently, for the almost Mathieu equation when v(x) = 2#21; cosPOINTWISE EXISTENCE OF THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENT FOR A QUASI-PERIODIC EQUATION ALEXANDER FEDOTOV AND FR #19; ED #19; ERIC KLOPP 0. Introduction 0.1. Quasi-periodic #12;nite di#11;erence equations. Consider

Recanati, Catherine

28

TRANSITION CURVES FOR THE QUASI-PERIODIC MATHIEU RANDOLPH S. ZOUNES AND RICHARD H. RAND  

E-print Network

TRANSITION CURVES FOR THE QUASI-PERIODIC MATHIEU EQUATION RANDOLPH S. ZOUNES AND RICHARD H. RAND­1115, August 1998 004 Abstract. In this work we investigate an extension of Mathieu's equation, the quasi-periodic (QP) Mathieu equation given by ¨ + [ + (cos t + cos t)] = 0 for small and irrational . Of interest

Rand, Richard H.

29

On Quasi-Periodic Variations of Cosmic Rays Observed at Earth: Direct Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Important role in space weather related studies play cosmic rays (CR). Their temporal variability, both of quasi-periodic character as well as of irregular one, is studied on the ground from direct measurements as well as from cosmogenic nuclides, over long time. We attempt to describe the current knowledge on selected quasi-periodicities in CR flux, especially in energy range above the atmospheric threshold, from direct measurement. Quasi-periodicities in relativistic electron flux near Earth is discussed shortly too. The power spectrum density (PSD) of the CR time series at a single station has rather complicated character. Along with the shape (slope) of PSD the knowledge of contribution of quasi-periodic variations to the CR signal is of importance for the modulation as well as for the checking the links of CR to space weather and/or space climate effects. Rotation of the Earth and solar rotation cause two types of mechanisms behind the certain quasi-periodicities observed in secondary CR on the Earth's surface. Solar activity and solar magnetic field cyclicities contribute to the quasi-periodic signals in CR if studied over longer time periods. The complexity of spatial structure of IMF and its evolution within the heliosphere as well as the changes in the geomagnetic field cause variability in contributions of the quasi-periodicities in CR. Wavelet spectra are useful tool for checking the fine strucure of quasi-periodicities and their temporal behaviour. Over long time the neutron monitors and muon telescopes provide the informations about quasi-periodicities in CR. In addition to that, in recent years there are new installations on the ground from which the unique information about CR variability can be deduced (higher statistical accuracy, different response function to primaries). The unsolved questions and few tasks for the future studies are listed.

Kudela, K.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.

2013-05-01

30

Predictive Tracking of Quasi Periodic Signals for Active Relative Motion Cancellation in Robotic Assisted Coronary  

E-print Network

Assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery by Jason Rotella Submitted in partial fulfillment Bypass Graft Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Robotic Surgical SolutionsPredictive Tracking of Quasi Periodic Signals for Active Relative Motion Cancellation in Robotic

Cavusoglu, Cenk

31

The quasi-periodic nature of wall slip for molten plastics in large amplitude oscillatory shear  

E-print Network

-Periodicity Experimental LLDPE XU4R (Mw= 116000) . Strain Amplitude and Onset of Quasi-Periodicity Effect of Molecular Weight . . V. CONCLUSION VI. RECOMMENDATIONS . . 53 , , 67 67 70 . . 77 77 . 77 . . 83 88 88 . . 96 96 . 99 101 REFERENCES 102...-Periodicity Experimental LLDPE XU4R (Mw= 116000) . Strain Amplitude and Onset of Quasi-Periodicity Effect of Molecular Weight . . V. CONCLUSION VI. RECOMMENDATIONS . . 53 , , 67 67 70 . . 77 77 . 77 . . 83 88 88 . . 96 96 . 99 101 REFERENCES 102...

Adrian, David Warren

2012-06-07

32

Nonlinear Dynamics (2005) 40: 195203 c Springer 2005 2:1:1 Resonance in the Quasi-Periodic Mathieu Equation  

E-print Network

of the quasi-periodic Mathieu equation ¨x + ( + cos t + cos t)x = 0 in the neighborhood of the point = 0 equation 1. Introduction The following quasi-periodic Mathieu equation, ¨x + ( + cos t + cos t)x = 0 (1 which relate their relative sizes. #12;Quasi-Periodic Mathieu Equation 197 The title of this paper

Rand, Richard H.

33

Exciton photoluminescence in resonant quasi-periodic Thue-Morse quantum wells.  

PubMed

This Letter investigates exciton photoluminescence (PL) in resonant quasi-periodic Thue-Morse quantum wells (QWs). The results show that the PL properties of quasi-periodic Thue-Morse QWs are quite different from those of resonant Fibonacci QWs. The maximum and minimum PL intensities occur under the anti-Bragg and Bragg conditions, respectively. The maxima of the PL intensity gradually decline when the filling factor increases from 0.25 to 0.5. Accordingly, the squared electric field at the QWs decreases as the Thue-Morse QW deviates from the anti-Bragg condition. PMID:24487847

Hsueh, W J; Chang, C H; Lin, C T

2014-02-01

34

A MODEL FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SIGNALS WITH APPLICATION TO RAIN ESTIMATION FROM MICROWAVE LINK GAIN  

E-print Network

A MODEL FOR QUASI-PERIODIC SIGNALS WITH APPLICATION TO RAIN ESTIMATION FROM MICROWAVE LINK GAIN from attenuation due to rain [1]. From this observation, it has been suggested to estimate rain- fall in this way would be a welcome complement to rain gauges and rain radar mea- surements [2,3]. However

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

35

Quasi-periodic intermediate orbits for major planets and zero-order resonances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particular quasi-periodic solutions of the equations of motion of the major planets in rectangular heliocentric coordinates have been constructed by means of successive iterations with respect to the planetary masses. These solutions are presented as exponential series in multiples of the mean longitudes of the planets, the sum of all exponential indices in every term being equal to zero. The

V. A. Brumberg; L. S. Evdokimova; V. I. Skripnichenko

1975-01-01

36

Quasi-periodic solutions for two-level systems Guido Gentile  

E-print Network

of a related generalized Riccati equation. We prove the existence of quasi-periodic solutions of the latter:1) where #27; 1 ; #27; 2 ; #27; 3 are the Pauli matrices and f(t) is a real analytic quasiodinger equation (1.2) were shown to be expressible in terms of particular solutions of a generalized Riccati

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

37

Quasi-periodic solutions for two-level systems Guido Gentile  

E-print Network

, and that they are not analytic in ", according to the conjecture proposed in [1]; in fact they are de#12;ned on a set of values.1) was shown in [1] to be expressible in terms of a particular solution of a generalized Riccati equation (see which is quasi-periodic in time and non-analytic in the p

38

Asymptotic solutions for a damped non-linear quasi-periodic Mathieu equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quasi-periodic (QP) solutions of a weakly damped non-linear QP Mathieu equation are investigated near a double primary parametric resonance. A double multiple scales method is applied to reduce the original QP oscillator to an autonomous system performing two successive reduction. The problem for approximating QP solutions of the original system is then transformed to the study of stationary regimes of

Mohamed Belhaq; Kamar Guennoun; Mohamed Houssni

2002-01-01

39

Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar hard X-ray and microwave flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For more than a decade, various studies have pointed out that hard X-ray and microwave time profiles of some solar flares show quasi-periodic fluctuations or pulsations. Nevertheless, it was not until recently that a flare displaying large amplitude quasi-periodic pulsations in X-rays and microwaves was observed with good spectral coverage and with a sufficient time resolution. The event occurred on June 7, 1980, at approximately 0312 UT, and exhibits seven intense pulses with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 8 seconds in microwaves, hard X-rays, and gamma-ray lines. On May 12, 1983, at approximately 0253 UT, another good example of this type of flare was observed both in hard X-rays and in microwaves. Temporal and spectral characteristics of this flare are compared with the event of June 7, 1980. In order to further explore these observational results and theoretical scenarios, a study of nine additional quasi-periodic events were incorporated with the results from the two flares described. Analysis of these events are briefly summarized.

Kosugi, Takeo; Kiplinger, Alan L.

1986-01-01

40

Non thermal small black holes  

E-print Network

In this chapter we review the current theoretical state of the art of small black holes at the LHC. We discuss the production mechanism for small non thermal black holes at the LHC and discuss new signatures due to a possible discrete mass spectrum of these black holes.

Xavier Calmet; Dionysios Fragkakis; Nina Gausmann

2012-01-21

41

Narrowband DWDM filters based on Fibonacci-class quasi-periodic structures.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a narrowband DWDM filter structure, whose reflection band characteristics, meets the ITU-T standard. The proposed filter structure is based on Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures composed of multilayers with large index differences. Studying the effects of the optical and geometrical parameters of Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures on its filtering properties, we have realized that to achieve the ITU-T standard, we need to cascade two successive structures both with the same generation numbers j=4 and orders n=25 and apodized refractive indices. The apodization process helps to minimize the stop band sidelobes. We have also demonstrated that beside Fibonacci's order, n, the layers dimensions, and their refractive index ratios are the main design parameters. PMID:19547405

Golmohammadi, S; Moravvej-Farshi, M K; Rostami, A; Zarifkar, A

2007-08-20

42

Quasi-Periodicity in global solar radio flux at metric wavelengths during Noise Storms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present observational results from studying the quasi-periodicities in global solar radio flux during periods of enhanced noise storm activity, over durations of ~4 hr a day (`intra-day' variations), observed at 77.5 MHz with the newly commissioned log-periodic array tracking system at the Gauribidanur Radio Observatory. Positional information on the storm centers was obtained with the radio imaging data from the Nan\\c cay Radio Heliograph (NRH), while their active region counterparts on the photosphere (and the overlying chromosphere ) were located from the H? images of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The quasi-periodicity in flux was found to be 110 min, with the fluctuation in flux being 3(+/-1.5) solar flux units (s.f.u.). The results of such pulsations are interpreted qualitatively as evidence for coronal seismology.

Sundaram, G. A. Shanmugha; Subramanian, K. R.

2004-08-01

43

Quasi-periodic oscillations of the magnetopause during northward sheath magnetic field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Geotail satellite quasi-periodically crossed the dawn flank of magnetopause more than ten times during an interval of 1.5 hours on November 4, 1992. Magnetopause crossings were characterized by quasi-periodic pulses of a sawtooth wave form in the magnetic field and the plasma flow components tangential to the magnetopause. The magnetic field strength in the magnetosheath was larger than that in the magnetosphere. The direction of magnetic field outside the magnetopause current layer was northward with antisunward tilt, indicating the draping of magnetic field on the magnetopause. Boundary normals of wavy magnetopause systematically incline sunward on the upstream side, while they tend to incline antisunward with considerable deviation on the downstream side. Comparison with other multiple crossing events suggests that the November 4 event exhibits wavy structure of the dawn flank magnetopause associated with the northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF).

Kokubun, S.; Kawano, H.; Nakamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Matsuoka, A.; Frank, L. A.

1994-01-01

44

Pure point spectrum for two-level systems in a strong quasi-periodic eld  

E-print Network

that if the #12;eld is an analytic function with zero average, then for a large set of values of its frequency and f(t) is assumed to be a real analytic quasi-periodic function with frequency (or rotation) vector particular solution g of the generalized Riccati equation dG dt iG 2 2if(t) G+ i" 2 = 0: (1:5) To come back

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

45

2:1:1 Resonance in the Quasi-Periodic Mathieu Equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a small e perturbation analysis of the quasi-periodic Mathieu equation\\u000a$$\\u000a\\\\ddot x + (\\\\delta + \\\\epsilon \\\\cos t + \\\\epsilon \\\\cos \\\\omega t) x=0\\u000a$$\\u000ain the neighborhood of the point d = 0.25 and ? = 0.5. We use multiple scales including terms of O(e2) with three time scales. We obtain an asymptotic expansion for an

Richard Rand; Tina Morrison

2005-01-01

46

Quasi-periodic variations of gamma-ray intensity in the atmosphere and atmospheric buoyancy waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-altitude balloons have been used to measure gamma rays with energies above 40 MeV in the stratosphere near the equator and at midlatitudes. Quasi-periodic fluctuations (QPF) of the gamma rays were observed which can be explained in terms of atmospheric buoyancy waves: in propagating, these waves modulate the amount of matter in the residual atmosphere above the instrument and thus

A. M. Galper; L. P. Gorbachev; L. V. Kurnosova; N. G. Leikov; B. I. Luchkov

1985-01-01

47

Long-lived quasi-periodic Bloch oscillations by spatially selective photoexcitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show, through accurate numerical simulations, that long-lived, large-amplitude quasi-periodic Bloch oscillations can be achieved through a spatially selective photoexcitation process in semiconductor superlattices. Specifically, by doping a single interior well of a GaAs/Al_xGa_1-xAs superlattice with a low level (typically less than 2%) of In, it becomes possible to photoexcite electrons to a small number of In-perturbed Wannier-Stark levels. This procedure circumvents the dephasing effects of interface roughness that is associated with conventional photoexcitation methods, where electrons are excited to Wannier-Stark levels essentially over the entire superlattice.

Reynolds, Joseph P.; Luban, Marshall; Luscombe, James H.

1997-03-01

48

Quasi-periodic oscillations in low-mass x ray binaries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variability on short time scales in the x-ray flux is a very general property of binary x-ray sources. Not until after the discovery of intensity-dependent quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and associated red noise form luminous low-mass x-ray binaries were systematic studies of the shape of the power-spectral components made. A brief account is given of the main developments since this discovery which have led to a new picture of the properties of low-mass x-ray binaries.

Lewin, Walter H. G.; Vanparadijs, J.; Vanderklis, M.

1991-01-01

49

Quasi-Periodic Solutions of (3+1) Generalized BKP Equation By Using Riemann Theta Functions  

E-print Network

This paper is focused on quasi-periodic wave solutions of (3+1) generalized BKP equation. Because of some difficulties in calculations of N=3 periodic solutions, hardly ever has there been a study on these solutions by using Rieamann theta function. In this study, we obtain one and two periodic wave solutions as well as three periodic wave solutions for (3+1) generalized BKP equation. Moreover we analyse the asymptotic behavior of the periodic wave solutions tend to the known soliton solutions under a small amplitude limit.

Seçil Demiray; Filiz Ta?can Güney

2014-09-24

50

THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm-1 in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm-1, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers.

Malyshev, K. V.

2013-06-01

51

Quasi-periodic behavior of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

The ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated in an unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. The one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. It is shown that ion temperature plays a critical role in the dynamics of quantum electron ion plasma, especially for arbitrary amplitude nonlinear waves. In the small amplitude region Korteweg-de Vries equation describes the solitonic nature of the waves. However, for arbitrary amplitude waves, in the fully nonlinear regime, the system exhibits possible existence of quasi-periodic behavior for small values of ion temperature.

Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India); Poria, Swarup [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta Kolkata-700009 (India); Narayan Ghosh, Uday [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University Santiniketan (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute Kolkata-700108 (India)

2012-05-15

52

THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices  

SciTech Connect

The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

Malyshev, K V [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-06-30

53

A Resonance Model of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries  

E-print Network

We try to understand the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in low-mass neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries by a resonance model in warped disks with precession. Our main concern is high-frequency QPOs, hectohertz QPOs, and horizontal-branch QPOs in the z sources and the atoll sources, and the correponding QPOs in black-hole X-ray binaries. Our resonance model can qualitatively, but systematically, explain these QPOs by regarding hectohertz QPOs as a precession of warp.

Shoji Kato

2005-05-11

54

Towards a renormalization theory for quasi-periodically forced one dimensional maps I. Existence of reducibility loss bifurcations  

E-print Network

We propose an extension of the one dimensional (doubling) renormalization operator to the case of maps on the cylinder. The kind of maps considered are commonly referred as quasi-periodic forced one dimensional maps. We prove that the fixed point of the one dimensional renormalization operator extends to a fixed point of the quasi-periodic forced renormalization operator. We also prove that the operator is differentiable around the fixed point and we study its derivative. Then we consider a two parametric family of quasi-periodically forced maps which is a unimodal one dimensional map with a full cascade of period doubling bifurcations plus a quasi-periodic perturbation. For one dimensional maps it is well known that between one period doubling and the next one there exists a parameter value where the $2^n$-periodic orbit is superatracting. Under appropriate hypotheses, we prove that the two parameter family has two curves of reducibility loss bifurcation around these points.

Rabassa, Pau; Tatjer, Joan Carles

2011-01-01

55

GENERATION OF QUASI-PERIODIC WAVES AND FLOWS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY OSCILLATORY RECONNECTION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the long-term evolution of an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube emerging into a gravitationally stratified coronal hole environment and report on the resulting oscillations and outflows. We perform 2.5-dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations, generalizing the models of McLaughlin et al. and Murray et al. We find that the physical mechanism of oscillatory reconnection naturally generates quasi-periodic vertical outflows, with a transverse/swaying aspect. The vertical outflows consist of both a periodic aspect and evidence of a positively directed flow. The speed of the vertical outflow (20-60 km s{sup -1}) is comparable to those reported in the observational literature. We also perform a parametric study varying the magnetic strength of the buoyant flux tube and find a range of associated periodicities: 1.75-3.5 minutes. Thus, the mechanism of oscillatory reconnection may provide a physical explanation to some of the high-speed, quasi-periodic, transverse outflows/jets recently reported by a multitude of authors and instruments.

McLaughlin, J. A.; Verth, G. [School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R., E-mail: james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: gary.verth@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2012-04-10

56

Generation of Quasi-periodic Waves and Flows in the Solar Atmosphere by Oscillatory Reconnection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the long-term evolution of an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube emerging into a gravitationally stratified coronal hole environment and report on the resulting oscillations and outflows. We perform 2.5-dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations, generalizing the models of McLaughlin et al. and Murray et al. We find that the physical mechanism of oscillatory reconnection naturally generates quasi-periodic vertical outflows, with a transverse/swaying aspect. The vertical outflows consist of both a periodic aspect and evidence of a positively directed flow. The speed of the vertical outflow (20-60 km s-1) is comparable to those reported in the observational literature. We also perform a parametric study varying the magnetic strength of the buoyant flux tube and find a range of associated periodicities: 1.75-3.5 minutes. Thus, the mechanism of oscillatory reconnection may provide a physical explanation to some of the high-speed, quasi-periodic, transverse outflows/jets recently reported by a multitude of authors and instruments.

McLaughlin, J. A.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

2012-04-01

57

QUASI-PERIODIC WIGGLES OF MICROWAVE ZEBRA STRUCTURES IN A SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect

Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s{sup –1}. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

Yu, Sijie; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A., E-mail: sjyu@nao.cas.cn [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2013-11-10

58

Ginga observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in type II bursts from the Rapid Burster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During Ginga observations of the 'Rapid Burster' in August 1988, strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected in its X-ray intensity. The QPOs had centroid frequencies of 5 and 2 Hz during type II X-ray bursts which lasted for 10 and 30 s, respectively. The presence of the QPOs is correlated with the time scale-invariant burst profile. They are very strong during the initial peak in the burst, absent in the second peak, and strong again at the onset of the third peak. From an analysis of the X-ray spectrum as observed during the maxima and minima of the oscillations, it is found that the oscillations can be described by changes of the temperature of a blackbody emitter of constant apparent area.

Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Kawai, N.

1990-01-01

59

Extended states for polyharmonic operators with quasi-periodic potentials in dimension two  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a polyharmonic operator H = ( - ?)l + V(x) in dimension two with l ? 2, l being an integer, and a quasi-periodic potential V(x). We prove that the absolutely continuous spectrum of H contains a semiaxis and there is a family of generalized eigenfunctions at every point of this semiaxis with the following properties. First, the eigenfunctions are close to plane waves ei?k, x? at the high energy region. Second, the isoenergetic curves in the space of momenta k corresponding to these eigenfunctions have a form of slightly distorted circles with holes (Cantor type structure). A new method of multiscale analysis in the momentum space is developed to prove these results.

Karpeshina, Yulia; Shterenberg, Roman

2012-10-01

60

Multiscale analysis in momentum space for quasi-periodic potential in dimension two  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a polyharmonic operator H=(-?)^l+V({x}) in dimension two with l ? 2, l being an integer, and a quasi-periodic potential V({x}). We prove that the absolutely continuous spectrum of H contains a semiaxis and there is a family of generalized eigenfunctions at every point of this semiaxis with the following properties. First, the eigenfunctions are close to plane waves e^{i< {\\varkappa },{x}rangle } at the high energy region. Second, the isoenergetic curves in the space of momenta {\\varkappa } corresponding to these eigenfunctions have a form of slightly distorted circles with holes (Cantor type structure). A new method of multiscale analysis in the momentum space is developed to prove these results.

Karpeshina, Yulia; Shterenberg, Roman

2013-07-01

61

Casimir Effect Under Quasi-Periodic Boundary Condition Inspired by Nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When one studies the Casimir effect, the periodic (anti-periodic) boundary condition is usually taken to mimic a periodic (anti-periodic) structure for a scalar field living in a flat space with a non-Euclidean topology. However, there could be an arbitrary phase difference between the value of the scalar field on one endpoint of the unit structure and that on the other endpoint, such as the structure of nanotubes. Then, in this paper, a periodic condition on the ends of the system with an additional phase factor, which is called the "quasi-periodic" condition, is imposed to investigate the corresponding Casimir effect. And an attractive or repulsive Casimir force is found, whose properties depend on the phase angle value. Especially, the Casimir effect disappears when the phase angle takes a particular value. High dimensional spacetime case is also investigated.

Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou; Zhai, Xiang-Hua

2014-01-01

62

Statistical investigation of six years of the Demeter measurements of the VLF quasi-periodic emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) VLF emissions are wideband emissions which are observed inside or near the plasmapause. They are characterized by a periodic modulation of the wave intensity with typical periods from several seconds up to a few minutes. The source region of QP emissions is probably located close to the geomagnetic equatorial plane. We have systematically analyzed six years of measurements from the Demeter spacecraft in order to determine the direction of propagation of QP emissions as a function of geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, L-parameter, and frequency. A large database of time-frequency structured QP emissions in the range from 0.1 to 1200 Hz has been used for our analysis.

Hayosh, M.; Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.

2013-12-01

63

Statistical investigation of the VLF quasi-periodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a survey of quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions detected on board the DEMETER satellite (altitude of about 700 km, nearly Sun-synchronous orbit at 10:30/22:30 LT). Five years of data have been visually inspected for the presence of QP emissions. It is found that QP events occur in about 3 percents of daytime half-orbits, while they are basically absent during the night (note that we were likely to miss QP events with the modulation periods lower than about 10 s or the frequency bandwidth lower than about 400 Hz). The events occur predominantly during quiet geomagnetic conditions following the periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity. Their occurrence and properties are systematically analyzed.

Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Nemec, František; Santolík, Ond?ej; Pasmanik, Dmitry; Parrot, Michel

2013-04-01

64

Casimir Effect under Quasi-Periodic Boundary Condition Inspired by Nanotubes  

E-print Network

When one studies the Casimir effect, the periodic (anti-periodic) boundary condition is usually taken to mimic a periodic (anti-periodic) structure for a scalar field living in a flat space with a non-Euclidean topology. However, there could be an arbitrary phase difference between the value of the scalar field on one endpoint of the unit structure and that on the other endpoint, such as the structure of nanotubes. Then, in this paper, a periodic condition on the ends of the system with an additional phase factor, which is called the ``quasi-periodic" condition, is imposed to investigate the corresponding Casimir effect. And an attractive or repulsive Casimir force is found, whose properties depend on the phase angle value. Especially, the Casimir effect disappears when the phase angle takes a particular value. High dimensional space-time case is also investigated.

Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li; Xiang-Hua Zhai

2013-12-06

65

Quasi-periodic oscillations in the Z source GX 5-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed study has been conducted of the time variability in the Z source GX 5-1 using Ginga, which observed the source in the horizontal and normal branches (HB, NB). Intensity-dependent HF, quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) were observed in the HB, in which the source flux varied by a factor of 1.9. The QPO frequency in this portion of the HB ranges from about 13 to 17 Hz; this is lower than previously observed in any Z source. The HF and LF QPO were simultaneously observed in the NB. The strength of both forms of QPO and the strength of the LF noise increase rapidly with increasing photon energy.

Lewin, Walter H. G.; Lubin, Lori M.; Tan, Jianmin; Van Der Klis, Michiel; Van Paradijs, Jan; Penninx, Wim; Dotani, Tadayasu; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

1992-01-01

66

Long Term Simulations Of Astrophysical Jets; Energy Structure and Quasi-Periodic Ejection  

E-print Network

We have performed self-consistent 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD numerical simulations of jet formation as long as possible, including the dynamics of accretion disks. Although the previous nonsteady MHD simulations for astrophysical jets revealed that the characteristics of nonsteady jets are similar to those of steady jets, the calculation time of these simulations is very short compared with the time scale of observed jets. Thus we have investigated long term evolutions of mass accretion rate, mass outflow rate, jet velocity, and various energy flux. We found that the ejection of jet is quasi-periodic. The period of the ejection is related to the time needed for the initial magnetic filed to be twisted to generate toroidal filed. We compare our results with both the steady state theory and previous 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD simulations.

Ahmed Ibrahim; Kazunari Shibata

2007-04-23

67

Long Term Simulations Of Astrophysical Jets; Energy Structure and Quasi-Periodic Ejection  

E-print Network

We have performed self-consistent 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD numerical simulations of jet formation as long as possible, including the dynamics of accretion disks. Although the previous nonsteady MHD simulations for astrophysical jets revealed that the characteristics of nonsteady jets are similar to those of steady jets, the calculation time of these simulations is very short compared with the time scale of observed jets. Thus we have investigated long term evolutions of mass accretion rate, mass outflow rate, jet velocity, and various energy flux. We found that the ejection of jet is quasi-periodic. The period of the ejection is related to the time needed for the initial magnetic filed to be twisted to generate toroidal filed. We compare our results with both the steady state theory and previous 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD simulations.

Ibrahim, Ahmed

2007-01-01

68

Phase-resolved spectroscopy of low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in GRS 1915+105  

E-print Network

X-ray radiation from black hole binary (BHB) systems regularly displays quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). In principle, a number of suggested physical mechanisms can reproduce their power spectral properties, thus more powerful diagnostics which preserve phase are required to discern between different models. In this paper, we first find for two Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the BHB GRS 1915+105 that the QPO has a well defined average waveform. That is, the phase difference and amplitude ratios between the first two harmonics vary tightly around a well defined mean. This enables us to reconstruct QPO waveforms in each energy channel, in order to constrain QPO phase-resolved spectra. We fit these phase resolved spectra across 16 phases with a model including Comptonisation and reflection (Gaussian and smeared edge components) to find strong spectral pivoting and a modulation in the iron line equivalent width. The latter indicates the observed reflection fraction is changing throughout th...

Ingram, Adam

2014-01-01

69

Non-thermal plasma treatment of textiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article attempts to give an overview of the literature on the treatment of textiles with non-thermal plasmas. Because of the enormous amount of potential uses of non-thermal plasmas for the modification of textile products, categorizing the applications is difficult, and therefore a review is given on plasma treatment effects or results rather than on the textile applications that benefit

R. Morent; N. De Geyter; J. Verschuren; K. De Clerck; P. Kiekens; C. Leys

2008-01-01

70

Optimizing light absorption in a thin-film p-i-n solar cell using a quasi-periodic grating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A p-i-n solar cell is best suited for strong absorbers with poor collection capabilities. However, the absorption naturally decreases at photon energies close to the electronic bandgap of the semiconductor. We hypothesized that a quasi-periodic surface textures in the role of diffraction gratings at the back contact can efficiently scatter light increasing the optical path length inside the absorber layer. The effect of quasi-periodic corrugated backing metallic contact of various types was studied theoretically. To help optimizing the design of the quasi periodic grating the corresponding canonical problem was considered. The absorption of light was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The n- and i-layers consist of isotropic nonhomogeneous multilayered semiconductor.

Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.

2014-03-01

71

Multi-splitting and self-similarity of band gap structures in quasi-periodic plates of Cantor series  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors have demonstrated the multi-splitting and self-similarity of the band gap structures in quasi-periodic plates of Cantor series. The splitting peaks give the regularity of tri-branching. A semi-quantitative explanation is proposed in which the inherent cavity-like structure is proven to play the essential role in the phenomena of multi-splitting and self-similarity, which gives a reliable way to predict where and how the band gap is splitting in the quasi-periodic systems. Possible applications are discussed.

Ding, Hong-Xing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Ni, Xiao-Wu; Zhu, Xue-Feng

2012-02-01

72

Experimental realization of broadband parametric generation in a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO3.  

PubMed

We have achieved broadband parametric generation by using a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO(3) crystal as frequency converter. Tuning wavelength rang from 0.609 microm to 5.208 microm, which covered three quasi-phase-matching processes, was obtained by means of changing the pump wavelength from 0.530 microm to 1.184 microm. The experiment results are in good agreement with theory. The maximum conversion efficiency is 62% with a 10 Hz-5 ns pump source, at the average pump power of 0.5 mW. Our results exhibit a possible application of quasi-periodic superlattice in laser technology. PMID:19581947

Pan, S D; Yuan, Y; Zhao, L N; Lv, X J; Zhu, S N

2008-11-10

73

A Model for Backscattering from Quasi Periodic Corn Canopies at L-Band  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this study, a model for backscattering at L-band from a corn canopy is proposed. The canopy consists of a quasi-periodic distribution of stalks and a random distribution of leaves. The Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) is employed to calculate the single scattered return from the corn field. The new feature of the method is that the coherence of the stalks in the row direction is incorporated in the model in a systematic fashion. Since the wavelength is on the order of the distance between corn stalks in a row, grating lobe behavior is observed at certain azimuth angles of incidence. The results are compared with experimental values measured in Huntsville, Alabama in 1998. The mean field and the effective dielectric constant of the canopy are obtained by using the Foldy approximation. The stalks are placed in the effective medium in a two dimensional lattice to simulate the row structure of a corn field. In order to mimic a real corn field, a quasi-periodic stalk distribution is assumed where the stalks are given small random perturbations about their lattice locations. Corn leaves are also embedded in the effective medium and the backscattered field from the stalks and the leaves is computed. The backscattering coefficient is calculated and averaged over successive stalk position perturbations. It is assumed that soil erosion has smoothed the soil sufficiently so that it can be assumed flat. Corn field backscatter data was collected from cornfields during the Huntsville 98 experimental campaign held at Alabama A&M University Research Station, Huntsville, Alabama in 1998 using the NASA/GW truck mounted radar. Extensive ground truth data was collected. This included soil moisture measurements and corn plant architectural data to be used in the model. In particular, the distances between the stalks in a single row have been measured. The L-band radar backscatter data was collected for both H and V polarizations and for look angles of 15o and 45o over a two week period under varying soil moisture conditions. These measured backscattering values will be compared with the model backscattering values and a discussion of the results will be presented.

Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Zhao, Q.; O'Neill, P.

2010-01-01

74

OBSERVABLE QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS PRODUCED BY STEEP PULSE PROFILES IN MAGNETAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the tails of the giant gamma-ray flares seen in SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 are thought to be produced by starquakes in the flaring magnetar. However, the large fractional amplitudes (up to {approx}20%) observed are difficult to reconcile with predicted amplitudes of starquakes. Here, we demonstrate that the steeply pulsed emission profile in the tail of the giant flare can enhance the observed amplitude of the underlying oscillation, analogous to a beam of light oscillating in and out of the line of sight. This mechanism will also broaden the feature in the power spectrum and introduce power at harmonics of the oscillation. The observed strength of the oscillation depends on the amplitude of the underlying starquake, the orientation and location of the emission on the surface of the star, and the gradient of the light curve profile. While the amplification of the signal can be significant, we demonstrate that, even with uncertainties in the emission geometry, this effect is not sufficient to produce the observed QPOs. This result excludes the direct observation of a starquake and suggests that the observed variations come from modulations in the intensity of the emission.

D'Angelo, C. R.; Watts, A. L., E-mail: c.r.dangelo@uva.nl [Instituut Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1098 XH (Netherlands)

2012-06-01

75

Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-print Network

In early 1996 a series of discoveries begun with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of a new, up to then unknown astrophysical phenomenon. It turned out that accreting low magnetic-field neutron stars show quasi-periodic oscillations in their X-ray flux at rates of up to more than a kilohertz. These kHz QPO, now reported from eleven different systems, are among the fastest phenomena in the sky and can provide us with new information about the fundamental properties of neutron stars and help testing general relativity in the strong-field regime. If, for example, their frequencies can be identified with the Keplerian frequencies of matter in orbit around a 1.4 Solar-mass neutron star, then the radius of the star would have to be less than 15 km, which directly constrains the equation of state of bulk nuclear-density matter, and for an only slightly tighter orbit or slightly more massive neutron star the orbital radius would equal the Schwarzschild-geometry general-relativistic marginally stable orbit (12.5 km for a 1.4 Solar mass object). So far all models that have been put forward for explaining the new phenomenon have encountered problems. In this paper I review the relatively simple and highly suggestive phenomenology as it has emerged from the data up to now, and discuss some of the proposed models.

M. van der Klis

1997-04-28

76

Detection of quasi-periodic processes in complex systems: how do we quantitatively describe their properties?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that in reality at least two general scenarios of data structuring are possible: (a) a self-similar (SS) scenario when the measured data form an SS structure and (b) a quasi-periodic (QP) scenario when the repeated (strongly correlated) data form random sequences that are almost periodic with respect to each other. In the second case it becomes possible to describe their behavior and express a part of their randomness quantitatively in terms of the deterministic amplitude-frequency response belonging to the generalized Prony spectrum. This possibility allows us to re-examine the conventional concept of measurements and opens a new way for the description of a wide set of different data. In particular, it concerns different complex systems when the ‘best-fit’ model pretending to be the description of the data measured is absent but the barest necessity of description of these data in terms of the reduced number of quantitative parameters exists. The possibilities of the proposed approach and detection algorithm of the QP processes were demonstrated on actual data: spectroscopic data recorded for pure water and acoustic data for a test hole. The suggested methodology allows revising the accepted classification of different incommensurable and self-affine spatial structures and finding accurate interpretation of the generalized Prony spectroscopy that includes the Fourier spectroscopy as a partial case.

Nigmatullin, Raoul R.; Khamzin, Airat A.; Tenreiro Machado, J.

2014-01-01

77

Correlations between X-ray Spectral Characteristics and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Sco X-1  

E-print Network

Correlations between 1-10 Hz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and spectral power law index have been reported for black hole (BH) candidate sources and one neutron star source, 4U 1728-34. An examination of QPO frequency and index relationships in Sco X-1 is reported herein. We discovered that Sco X-1, representing Z-source groups, can be adequately modeled by a simple two-component model of Compton up-scattering with a soft photon electron temperature of about 0.4 keV, plus an Iron K-line. The results show a strong correlation between spectral power law index and kHz QPOs. Because Sco X-1 radiates near the Eddington limit, one can infer that the geometrical configuration of the Compton cloud (CC) is quasi-spherical because of high radiation pressure in the CC. Thus, we conclude that the high Thomson optical depth of the Compton cloud, in the range of ~5-6 from the best-fit model parameters, is consistent with the neutron star's surface being obscured by material. Moreover, a spin frequency of Sco X-1 is li...

Bradshaw, C F; Kuznetsov, S; Bradshaw, Charles F.; Titarchuk, Lev; Kuznetsov, Sergey

2007-01-01

78

DISCOVERY OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE RECURRENT BURST EMISSION FROM SGR 1806-20  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the recurrent outburst emission from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20 using NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations. By searching a sample of 30 bursts for timing signals at the frequencies of the QPOs discovered in the 2004 December 27 giant flare from the source, we find three QPOs at 84, 103, and 648 Hz in three different bursts. The first two QPOs lie within {approx}1{sigma} from the 92 Hz QPO detected in the giant flare. The third QPO lies within {approx}9{sigma} from the 625 Hz QPO also detected in the same flare. The detected QPOs are found in bursts with different durations, morphologies, and brightness, and are vindicated by Monte Carlo simulations, which set a lower limit confidence interval {>=}4.3{sigma}. We also find evidence for candidate QPOs at higher frequencies in other bursts with lower statistical significance. The fact that we can find evidence for QPOs in the recurrent bursts at frequencies relatively close to those found in the giant flare is intriguing and can offer insight about the origin of the oscillations. We confront our finding against the available theoretical models and discuss the connection between the QPOs we report and those detected in the giant flares. The implications to the neutron star properties are also discussed.

El-Mezeini, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Alaa I., E-mail: amezeini@aucegypt.ed, E-mail: ai@aucegypt.ed, E-mail: amiae2@cam.ac.u, E-mail: ai@space.mit.ed [Department of Physics, American University in Cairo, New Cairo 11835 (Egypt)

2010-10-01

79

Correlations between X-ray Spectral Characteristics and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Sco X-1  

E-print Network

Correlations between 1-10 Hz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and spectral power law index have been reported for black hole (BH) candidate sources and one neutron star source, 4U 1728-34. An examination of QPO frequency and index relationships in Sco X-1 is reported herein. We discovered that Sco X-1, representing Z-source groups, can be adequately modeled by a simple two-component model of Compton up-scattering with a soft photon electron temperature of about 0.4 keV, plus an Iron K-line. The results show a strong correlation between spectral power law index and kHz QPOs. Because Sco X-1 radiates near the Eddington limit, one can infer that the geometrical configuration of the Compton cloud (CC) is quasi-spherical because of high radiation pressure in the CC. Thus, we conclude that the high Thomson optical depth of the Compton cloud, in the range of ~5-6 from the best-fit model parameters, is consistent with the neutron star's surface being obscured by material. Moreover, a spin frequency of Sco X-1 is likely suppressed due to photon scattering off CC electrons. Additionally, we demonstrate how the power spectrum evolves when Sco X-1 transitions from the horizontal branch to the normal branch.

Charles F. Bradshaw; Lev Titarchuk; Sergey Kuznetsov

2007-03-16

80

Extended States for the Schrödinger Operator with Quasi-periodic Potential in Dimension Two  

E-print Network

We consider a Schr\\"odinger operator $H=-\\Delta+V(\\vec x)$ in dimension two with a quasi-periodic potential $V(\\vec x)$. We prove that the absolutely continuous spectrum of $H$ contains a semiaxis and there is a family of generalized eigenfunctions at every point of this semiaxis with the following properties. First, the eigenfunctions are close to plane waves $e^{i\\langle \\vec \\varkappa,\\vec x\\rangle}$ at the high energy region. Second, the isoenergetic curves in the space of momenta $\\vec \\varkappa$ corresponding to these eigenfunctions have a form of slightly distorted circles with holes (Cantor type structure). A new method of multiscale analysis in the momentum space is developed to prove these results. The result is based on the previous paper [1] on quasiperiodic polyharmonic operator $(-\\Delta)^l+V(\\vec x)$, $l>1$. We address here technical complications arising in the case $l=1$. However, this text is self-contained and can be read without familiarity with [1].

Yulia Karpeshina; Roman Shterenberg

2014-08-25

81

Timing studies of X Persei and the discovery of its transient quasi-periodic oscillation feature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a timing analysis of X Persei (X Per) using observations made between 1998 and 2010 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and with the INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager (ISGRI). All pulse arrival times obtained from the RXTE-PCA observations are phase-connected and a timing solution is obtained using these arrival times. We update the long-term pulse frequency history of the source by measuring its pulse frequencies using RXTE-PCA and ISGRI data. From the RXTE-PCA data, the relation between the frequency derivative and X-ray flux suggests accretion via the companion's stellar wind. However, the detection of a transient quasi-periodic oscillation feature, peaking at ˜0.2 Hz, suggests the existence of an accretion disc. We find that double-break models fit the average power spectra well, which suggests that the source has at least two different accretion flow components dominating the overall flow. From the power spectrum of frequency derivatives, we measure a power-law index of ˜- 1, which implies that, on short time-scales, disc accretion dominates over noise, while on time-scales longer than the viscous time-scales, the noise dominates. From pulse profiles, we find a correlation between the pulse fraction and the count rate of the source.

Acuner, Z.; ?nam, S. Ç.; ?ahiner, ?.; Serim, M. M.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.

2014-10-01

82

Quasi-periodic oscillations as global hydrodynamic modes in the boundary layers of viscous accretion disks  

E-print Network

The observational characteristics of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from accreting neutron stars strongly indicate the oscillatory modes in the innermost regions of accretion disks as a likely source of the QPOs. The inner regions of accretion disks around neutron stars can harbor very high frequency modes related to the radial epicyclic frequency $\\kappa $. The degeneracy of $\\kappa $ with the orbital frequency $\\Omega $ is removed in a non-Keplerian boundary or transition zone near the magnetopause between the disk and the compact object. We show, by analyzing the global hydrodynamic modes of long wavelength in the boundary layers of viscous accretion disks, that the fastest growing mode frequencies are associated with frequency bands around $\\kappa $ and $\\kappa \\pm \\Omega $. The maximum growth rates are achieved near the radius where the orbital frequency $\\Omega $ is maximum. The global hydrodynamic parameters such as the surface density profile and the radial drift velocity determine which modes of free oscillations will grow at a given particular radius in the boundary layer. In accordance with the peak separation between kHz QPOs observed in neutron-star sources, the difference frequency between two consecutive bands of the fastest growing modes is always related to the spin frequency of the neutron star. This is a natural outcome of the boundary condition imposed by the rotating magnetosphere on the boundary region of the inner disk.

M. Hakan Erkut; Dimitrios Psaltis; M. Ali Alpar

2008-07-05

83

Quasi-phase-matched generation of tunable blue light in a quasi-periodic structure.  

PubMed

We present what is to our knowledge a new approach to generating tunable blue light by cascaded nonlinear frequency conversion in a single LiTaO3 crystal. Simultaneous quasi-phase matching of an optical parametric generation process and a sum-frequency mixing process is achieved by means of structuring the crystal with a quasi-periodic optical superlattice. The spectral (wavelength tuning and bandwidth) and power characteristics of the blue-light generation are studied with a fixed-wavelength 532-nm picosecond laser and a wavelength-tunable nanosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as the pump sources. By tuning the OPO wavelength, we could tune the blue output over approximately 20 nm. Temperature tuning of the blue output at a fixed pump wavelength of 532 nm was limited to approximately 1.5 nm. A maximum blue power of 15 microW was generated at a pump power of 0.5 mW, corresponding to an efficiency of 3%. PMID:14719672

Xu, Ping; Li, Kun; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Shi-ning; Du, Yan; Ji, Shuai-hua; Zhu, Yong-yuan; Ming, Nai-ben; Luo, L; Li, K F; Cheah, K W

2004-01-01

84

Quasi-periodic components of solar microwave emission preceded CME's onset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of observations at the radio-astronomical station NIRFI "Zimenki" are examined. Pre-eruption manifestations can be detected over different time scales: from several days, which is typical to the evolution of active region in whole, to several hours and tens of minutes, which leads to the formation of conditions for CME initiation and propagation. Primarily this process is developed as wave motion. For example, a study of the evolution of radio emission in January 2005 discovered the growth of amplitude of long-period pulsations with a period of more than 20 minutes in centimetre solar radio emission three days before coronal mass ejections. During the time intervals of 25 to 15 minutes prior to CMEs registration the oscillations of substantially smaller period (t 6-22 s) occurred, which were apparently connected to waves in coronal loops. The obtained result is close to the results of other authors, based on the observations of solar radio emission with the high spatial resolution. Thus, it is shown that the use of patrol multi wave observational data with the high sensitivity and a sufficient time resolution is possible for the analysis of the quasi-periodic components of radio emission and their dynamics.

Sheyner, Olga; Fridman, Vladimir

85

Quantitative Evaluation of Energy Coupling between Quasi-Periodic Substorms and High-Speed Coronal Streams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been known that high-speed solar wind streams associated with coronal holes lead to quasi-periodic substorms that occur approximately every 2˜4 hours. In this paper we examined 222 repetitive substorms that occurred during high-speed stream periods in July through December in 2003 to quantitatively determine a range of energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere between two consecutive substorms. For this study, we have used the Akasofu \\varepsilon-parameter to time-integrate it for the interval between two consecutive substorms, and have applied this method to the 222 substorms. We find that the average amount of solar wind input energy between two adjacent substorms is 1.28×10^{14}J and about 85% out of the 222 substorms occur after an energy input of 2×10^{13}˜2.3×10^{14}J. Based on these results, we suggest that it is not practical to predict when a substorm will occur after a previous one occurs purely based on the solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling. We provide discussion on several possible factors that may affect determining substorm onset times during high-speed streams.

Park, M. Y.; Lee, D.-Y.; Kim, K. C.; Choi, C. R.; Park, K. S.

2008-06-01

86

SUBMILLIMETER QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN MAGNETICALLY CHOKED ACCRETION FLOW MODELS OF SgrA*  

SciTech Connect

High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetically choked accretion flows around rapidly rotating black holes (BHs). We perform polarized radiative transfer calculations with the ASTRORAY code to explore the manifestations of these QPOs for SgrA*. We construct a simulation-based model of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and find model parameters by fitting the mean polarized source spectrum. The simulated QPOs have a total submillimeter flux amplitude up to 5% and a linearly polarized flux amplitude up to 2%. The oscillations reach high levels of significance 10{sigma}-30{sigma} and high-quality factors Q Almost-Equal-To 5. The oscillation period T Almost-Equal-To 100 M Almost-Equal-To 35 minutes corresponds to the rotation period of the BH magnetosphere that produces a trailing spiral in resolved disk images. The total flux signal is significant over noise for all tested frequencies 87 GHz, 230 GHz, and 857 GHz and inclination angles 10 Degree-Sign , 37 Degree-Sign , and 80 Degree-Sign . The non-detection in the 230 GHz SubMillimeter Array light curve is consistent with a low signal level and a low sampling rate. The presence of submillimeter QPOs in SgrA* will be better tested with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

Shcherbakov, Roman V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McKinney, Jonathan C., E-mail: roman@astro.umd.edu [Joint Space Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-09-10

87

Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and broad iron line from LMC X-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the temporal and energy spectral characteristics of the persistent black hole X-ray binary LMC X-1 using two XMM-Newton and a Suzaku observation. We report the discovery of low-frequency (˜26-29 m Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We also report the variability of the broad iron K? line studied earlier with Suzaku. The QPOs are found to be weak with fractional rms amplitude in the ˜1-2 per cent range and quality factor Q ˜ 2-10. They are accompanied by weak red noise or zero-centred Lorentzian components with rms variability at the ˜1-3 per cent level. The energy spectra consist of three varying components - multicolour disc blackbody (kTin ˜ 0.7-0.9 keV), high-energy power-law tail (? ˜ 2.4-3.3) and a broad iron line at 6.4-6.9 keV. The broad iron line, the QPO and the strong power-law component are not always present. The QPOs and the broad iron line appear to be clearly detected in the presence of a strong power-law component. The broad iron line is found to be weaker when the disc is likely truncated and absent when the power-law component almost vanished. These results suggest that the QPO and the broad iron line together can be used to probe the dynamics of the accretion disc and the corona.

Alam, Md. Shah; Dewangan, G. C.; Belloni, T.; Mukherjee, D.; Jhingan, S.

2014-12-01

88

Drift-free position estimation of periodic or quasi-periodic motion using inertial sensors.  

PubMed

Position sensing with inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes usually requires other aided sensors or prior knowledge of motion characteristics to remove position drift resulting from integration of acceleration or velocity so as to obtain accurate position estimation. A method based on analytical integration has previously been developed to obtain accurate position estimate of periodic or quasi-periodic motion from inertial sensors using prior knowledge of the motion but without using aided sensors. In this paper, a new method is proposed which employs linear filtering stage coupled with adaptive filtering stage to remove drift and attenuation. The prior knowledge of the motion the proposed method requires is only approximate band of frequencies of the motion. Existing adaptive filtering methods based on Fourier series such as weighted-frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), and band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) are modified to combine with the proposed method. To validate and compare the performance of the proposed method with the method based on analytical integration, simulation study is performed using periodic signals as well as real physiological tremor data, and real-time experiments are conducted using an ADXL-203 accelerometer. Results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed method outperforms the existing analytical integration method. PMID:22163935

Latt, Win Tun; Veluvolu, Kalyana Chakravarthy; Ang, Wei Tech

2011-01-01

89

Drift-Free Position Estimation of Periodic or Quasi-Periodic Motion Using Inertial Sensors  

PubMed Central

Position sensing with inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes usually requires other aided sensors or prior knowledge of motion characteristics to remove position drift resulting from integration of acceleration or velocity so as to obtain accurate position estimation. A method based on analytical integration has previously been developed to obtain accurate position estimate of periodic or quasi-periodic motion from inertial sensors using prior knowledge of the motion but without using aided sensors. In this paper, a new method is proposed which employs linear filtering stage coupled with adaptive filtering stage to remove drift and attenuation. The prior knowledge of the motion the proposed method requires is only approximate band of frequencies of the motion. Existing adaptive filtering methods based on Fourier series such as weighted-frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), and band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) are modified to combine with the proposed method. To validate and compare the performance of the proposed method with the method based on analytical integration, simulation study is performed using periodic signals as well as real physiological tremor data, and real-time experiments are conducted using an ADXL-203 accelerometer. Results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed method outperforms the existing analytical integration method. PMID:22163935

Latt, Win Tun; Veluvolu, Kalyana Chakravarthy; Ang, Wei Tech

2011-01-01

90

Low-cost, Deterministic Quasi-periodic Photonic Structures for light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Light trapping has been an important issue for thin film silicon solar cells because of the low absorption coefficient in the near infrared range. In this paper, we present a photonic structure which combines anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) in the backside of thin film silicon. Simulation results show that this quasi-periodic AAO structure has

Xing Sheng; Jifeng Liu; Jurgen Michel; Anuradha M. Agarwal; Lionel C. Kimerling

2009-01-01

91

Towards a renormalization theory for quasi-periodically forced one dimensional maps II. Asymptotic behavior of reducibility loss bifurcations  

E-print Network

In this paper we are concerned with quasi-periodic forced one dimensional maps. We consider a two parametric family of quasi-periodically forced maps such that the one dimensional map (before forcing) is unimodal and it has a full cascade of period doubling bifurcations. Between one period doubling and the next one it is known that there exist a parameter value where the $2^n$-periodic orbit is superatracting. In a previous work we proposed an extension of the one-dimensional (doubling) renormalization operator to the quasi-periodic case. We proved that, if the family satisfies suitable hypotheses, the two parameter family has two curves of reducibility loss bifurcation around these parameter values. In the present work we study the asymptotic behavior of these bifurcations when $n$ grows to infinity. We show that the asymptotic behavior depends on the Fourier expansion of the quasi-periodic coupling of the family. The theory developed here provides a theoretical explanation to the behavior that can be observ...

Rabassa, Pau; Tatjer, Joan Carles

2011-01-01

92

SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?  

SciTech Connect

High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

Barret, Didier, E-mail: didier.barret@irap.omp.eu [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

2013-06-10

93

Entrainment, instability, quasi-periodicity, and chaos in a compound neural oscillator.  

PubMed

We studied the dynamical behavior of a class of compound central pattern generator (CPG) models consisting of a simple neural network oscillator driven by both constant and periodic inputs of varying amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. We focused on a specific oscillator composed of two mutually inhibiting types of neuron (inspiratory and expiratory neurons) that may be considered as a minimal model of the mammalian respiratory rhythm generator. The simulation results demonstrated how a simple CPG model--with a minimum number of neurons and mild nonlinearities--may reproduce a host of complex dynamical behaviors under various periodic inputs. In particular, the network oscillated spontaneously only when both neurons received adequate and proportionate constant excitations. In the presence of a periodic source, the spontaneous rhythm was overridden by an entrained oscillation of varying forms depending on the nature of the source. Stable entrained oscillations were inducible by two types of inputs: (1) anti-phase periodic inputs with alternating agonist-antagonist drives to both neurons and (2) a single periodic drive to only one of the neurons. In-phase inputs, which exert periodic drives of similar magnitude and phase relationships to both neurons, resulted in varying disruptions of the entrained oscillations including magnitude attenuation, harmonic and phase distortions, and quasi-periodic interference. In the absence of significant phasic feedback, chaotic motion developed only when the CPG was driven by multiple periodic inputs. Apneic episodes with repetitive alternation of active (intrinsic oscillation) and inactive (cessation of oscillation) states developed when the network was driven by a moderate periodic input of low frequency. Similar results were demonstrated in other, more complex oscillator models (that is, half-center oscillator and three-phase respiratory network model). These theoretical results may have important implications in elucidating the mechanisms of rhythmogenesis in the mature and developing respiratory CPG as well as other compound CPGs in mammalian and invertebrate nervous systems. PMID:9540048

Matsugu, M; Duffin, J; Poon, C S

1998-03-01

94

MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES  

SciTech Connect

We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. BOX 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cumming, A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Keek, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-04-01

95

ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect

We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency {kappa} to the orbital frequency {Omega} the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches {Omega} + {kappa} and {Omega} to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio ({Omega} + {kappa})/({Omega}) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

Erkut, M. Hakan, E-mail: m.erkut@iku.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Istanbul Kueltuer University, Atakoey Campus, Bak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rkoey 34156, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-12-10

96

Imaging Observations of Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar Flare Loops with SDO/AIA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to ?-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s-1, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be ~10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

Su, J. T.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mao, X. J.

2012-08-01

97

MASS-ANGULAR-MOMENTUM RELATIONS IMPLIED BY MODELS OF TWIN PEAK QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Twin peak quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in the X-ray power-density spectra of several accreting low-mass neutron star (NS) binaries. Observations of the peculiar Z-source Circinus X-1 display unusually low QPO frequencies. Using these observations, we have previously considered the relativistic precession (RP) twin peak QPO model to estimate the mass of the central NS in Circinus X-1. We have shown that such an estimate results in a specific mass-angular-momentum (M - j) relation rather than a single preferred combination of M and j. Here we confront our previous results with another binary, the atoll source 4U 1636-53 that displays the twin peak QPOs at very high frequencies, and extend the consideration to various twin peak QPO models. In analogy to the RP model, we find that these imply their own specific M - j relations. We explore these relations for both sources and note differences in the {chi}{sup 2} behavior that represent a dichotomy between high- and low-frequency sources. Based on the RP model, we demonstrate that this dichotomy is related to a strong variability of the model predictive power across the frequency plane. This variability naturally comes from the radial dependence of characteristic frequencies of orbital motion. As a consequence, the restrictions on the models resulting from observations of low-frequency sources are weaker than those in the case of high-frequency sources. Finally we also discuss the need for a correction to the RP model and consider the removing of M - j degeneracies, based on the twin peak QPO-independent angular momentum estimates.

Toeroek, Gabriel; Bakala, Pavel; Sramkova, Eva; Stuchlik, Zdenek; Urbanec, Martin; Goluchova, Katerina, E-mail: pavel.bakala@fpf.slu.cz, E-mail: martin.urbanec@fpf.slu.cz, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz, E-mail: terek@volny.cz, E-mail: sram_eva@centrum.cz [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezrucovo nam. 13, CZ-746 01 Opava (Czech Republic)

2012-12-01

98

Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event observed simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft enabled us to obtain high-resolution frequency-time spectrograms of the event close to the equatorial region over a large range of radial distances, while the measurements by the STAFF-SA instrument allowed us to perform a detailed wave analysis. Conjugate observations by the DEMETER spacecraft have been used to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the emissions. The analyzed QP event lasted as long as 5 h and it spanned over the L-shells from about 1.5 to 5.5. Simultaneous observations of the same event by DEMETER and Cluster show that the same QP modulation of the wave intensity is observed at the same time at very different locations in the inner magnetosphere. ULF magnetic field fluctuations with a period roughly comparable to, but somewhat larger than the period of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, suggesting these are likely to be related to the QP generation. Results of a detailed wave analysis show that the QP emissions detected by Cluster propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at higher geomagnetic latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N?Mec, F.; SantolíK, O.; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PASJ...60..871I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-Time Simulations of Astrophysical Jets: Energy Structure and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Ejection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have performed self-consistent 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD numerical simulations of jet formation as long as possible, including the dynamics of accretion disks. Previous simulations showed that, in the case where the calculation time of the simulations is very short as compared with the time scale of observed jets, there is no significant difference between the characteristics of the nonsteady and steady MHD simulations. Thus, we have investigated long-time evolutions of the mass-accretion rate, mass-outflow rate, jet velocity, and various energy fluxes. We found that the ejection of a jet is <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span>. The period of the ejection, Tejection, is related to the time needed for the initial magnetic field, B0, to be twisted to generate a toroidal filed, Tejection ? VA-1 ? B0-1 ? Emg-1/2, where VA is the Alfvén velocity and Emg the initial magnetic energy. We compared our results with both the steady-state theory and the previous 2.5-dimensional nonsteady MHD simulations. We found that the time-averaged velocity of the jet, Vjet,avg, is ˜ 0.1 VK and ˜ 0.1 Vjet,max, where VK is the Keplerian velocity at (r, z) = (1. 0) and Vjet,max the maximum velocity of the jet. Nevertheless, the characteristics of our simulations are consistent with those of the steady solution and previous short-time simulations. We found that the dependences of the time-averaged velocity and the mass-outflow rate, dot{M}w,avg, on the initial magnetic field are approximately Vjet,avg ? B00.3 and dot{M}w,avg ? B00.32, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ibrahim, Ahmed; Shibata, Kazunari</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030022796&hterms=resonance&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dresonance"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Resonance in <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillators of Neutron Star Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a large quantity of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data presented in the literature, I offer a detailed investigation into the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency determination. The QPO phenomenon seen in X-ray binaries is possibly a result of the resonance of the intrinsic (eigen) oscillations and harmonic driving forces of the system. I show that the resonances, in the presence of the damping of oscillations, occur at frequencies that are systematically and randomly shifted with respect to the eigenfrequencies of the system. The shift value strongly depends on the damping rate that is measured by the half-width of the QPO feature. Taking into account this effect, I analyze the QPO data for four Z sources, Scorpius X-I, GX 340+0, GX 5-1, and GX 17+2, and two atoll sources, 4U 1728-34 and 4U 0614+09. The transition-layer model (TLM) predicts the existence of the invariant quantity delta, an inclination angle of the magnetospheric axis with respect to the normal to the disk. I calculate delta and the error bars of delta using the resonance shift, and I find that the inferred delta-values are consistent with constants for these four Z sources, in which horizontal-branch oscillation and kilohertz frequencies have been detected and correctly identified. It is shown that the inferred delta are in the range between 5.5 deg and 6.5 deg. I conclude that the TLM seems to be compatible with the data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJMPA..2850141Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Bremsstrahlung Radiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By applying a method of virtual quanta we derive formulae for relativistic <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> bremsstrahlung radiation from relativistic electrons as well as from protons and heavier particles with power-law momentum distribution N(p)dp = k p-qdp. We show that emission which originates from an electron scattering on an ion, represents the most significant component of relativistic <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> bremsstrahlung. Radiation from an ion scattering on electron, known as inverse bremsstrahlung, is shown to be negligible in overall <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> bremsstrahlung emission. These results arise from theory refinement, where we introduce the dependence of relativistic kinetic energy of an incident particle, upon the energy of scattered photon. In part, it is also a consequence of a different mass of particles and relativistic effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zekovi?, Vladimir; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardži?, Aleksandra; Pavlovi?, Marko Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9801168v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Occultation by a Precessing Accretion Disk and Other Variabilities of SMC X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have investigated the variability of the binary X-ray pulsar, SMC X-1, in data from several X-ray observatories. We confirm the ~60-day cyclic variation of the X-ray flux in the long-term monitoring data from the RXTE and CGRO observatories. X-ray light curves and spectra from the ROSAT, Ginga, and ASCA observatories show that the uneclipsed flux varies by as much as a factor of twenty between a high-flux state when 0.71 second pulses are present and a low-flux state when pulses are absent. In contrast, during eclipses when the X-rays consist of radiation scattered from circumsource matter, the fluxes and spectra in the high and low states are approximately the same. These observations prove that the low state of SMC X-1 is not caused by a reduction in the intrinsic luminosity of the source, or a spectral redistribution thereof, but rather by a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> blockage of the line of sight, most likely by a precessing tilted accretion disk. In each of two observations in the midst of low states a brief increase in the X-ray flux and reappearance of 0.71 second pulses occurred near orbital phase 0.2. These brief increases result from an opening of the line of sight to the pulsar that may be caused by wobble in the precessing accretion disk. The records of spin up of the neutron star and decay of the binary orbit are extended during 1991-1996 by pulse-timing analysis of ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE PCA data. The pulse profiles in various energy ranges from 0.1 to >21 keV are well represented as a combination of a pencil beam and a fan beam. Finally, there is a marked difference between the power spectra of random fluctuations in the high-state data from the RXTE PCA below and above 3.4 keV. Deviation from the fitted power law around 0.06 Hz may be QPO.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. S. Wojdowski; G. W. Clark; A. M. Levine; J. W. Woo; S. N. Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCoPh.262..262B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapidly convergent two-dimensional <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> Green function throughout the spectrum-including Wood anomalies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We introduce a new methodology, based on new <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> Green functions which converge rapidly even at and around Wood-anomaly configurations, for the numerical solution of problems of scattering by periodic rough surfaces in two-dimensional space. As is well known the classical <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> Green function ceases to exist at Wood anomalies. The approach introduced in this text produces fast Green function convergence throughout the spectrum on the basis of a certain “finite-differencing” approach and smooth windowing of the classical Green function lattice sum. The resulting Green-function convergence is super-algebraically fast away from Wood anomalies, and it reduces to an arbitrarily-high (user-prescribed) algebraic order of convergence at Wood anomalies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruno, Oscar P.; Delourme, Bérangère</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhLA..378..153E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> bifurcations and “amplitude death” in low-dimensional ensemble of van der Pol oscillators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics of the four dissipatively coupled van der Pol oscillators is considered. Lyapunov chart is presented in the parameter plane. Its arrangement is discussed. We discuss the bifurcations of tori in the system at large frequency detuning of the oscillators. Here are <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> saddle-node, Hopf and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations. The effect of increase of the threshold for the “amplitude death” regime and the possibilities of complete and partial broadband synchronization are revealed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emelianova, Yu. P.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Turukina, L. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1010.1000v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the No-Hair Theorem with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum. III. <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An observational test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variability observed in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in black-hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If, on the other hand, the pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black-hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI observations of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging observations and the detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tim Johannsen; Dimitrios Psaltis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27693867"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ABC of Low-Frequency <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations in Black Hole Candidates: Analogies with Z Sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three main types of low-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (LFQPOs) have been observed in black hole candidates. We reanalyzed RXTE data of the bright systems XTE J1859+226, XTE J1550-564, and GX 339-4, which show all three types. We review the main properties of these LFQPOs and show that they follow a well-defined correlation in a fractional rms versus softness diagram. We show</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Casella; T. Belloni; L. Stella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26382050"> <span id="translatedtitle">The spectroscopy on <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of controlled thermonuclear research presents problems ; different from those generally treated by the astrophysicist. These differences ; can be mainly ascribed to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> nature of the high temperature ; laboratory plasma. The problems posed by this type of plasma, and progress ; toward their solutions, are outlined. (auth);</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Wilson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1962-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...610..897A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Inward Shock Formations in the System of a Black Hole and an Accretion Disk and Application to <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations in Galactic Black Hole Candidates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We performed 1.5-dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with a Kerr metric to construct a model for high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in microquasars. The simulations were performed assuming an initial accretion disk without viscosity rotating around a Kerr black hole at sub-Keplerian velocity (sub-Keplerian case), which induces various wave modes everywhere in the disk. We found that <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> inward shock waves propagate from the accretion disk toward the black hole. The frequency of the shock formation is about the maximum epicyclic frequency in the disk (?max), which depends on the rotation of the black hole. In order to understand the mechanism of the shock formation, we also performed a simulation assuming an initial linear perturbation injected at one point in the Keplerian disk (linear perturbation case) and found an oscillation with frequency ~? at the point where the perturbation injection occurred. To explain the simulation result, we derived an analytic solution for the time evolution of the linear perturbation of physical variables near the point of the perturbation injection and found that the time evolution of the oscillation can be described well. From comparison of the result in the sub-Keplerian case with that of the linear perturbation case, we found that the periodicity of the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> shock formation in the sub-Keplerian case is due to a filtering effect by the epicyclic frequency distribution in the disk, which acts on the wave propagation toward the black hole. The only necessary condition for <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> shock formation is having a nonsteady character for the disks, which can be a source of acoustic waves. The frequency of the shock formation (~?max) is on the order of the frequency of the high-frequency QPOs in microquasars and depends on the rotation of the black hole. Hence, we can estimate the spin parameter (a) of a black hole candidate (BHC) in a microquasar by comparing the frequency of the high-frequency QPO with ?max. The spin parameters of the BHCs in microquasars are roughly estimated to be a=0.345+/-0.345 for GRS 1915+105 and a=0.895+/-0.105 for GRO J1655-40.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aoki, Seiichiro I.; Koide, Shinji; Kudoh, Takahiro; Nakayama, Kunji; Shibata, Kazunari</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008epsc.conf..507K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodical</span> variations of pulsars spin as mimicry of differential rotation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT Observation of pulsars is a powerful source of information for studying the dynamics and internal structure of neutron stars. Known about <span class="hlt">quasi-periodical</span> fluctuations of the time-of-arrival of radiation(TOA) for some pulsars, which we explain as Chandler wobble, Free core nutation, Free inner core nutation and Inner core wobble in case three layer model. Using hamilton approximation to theory rotation of multilayer celestial bodies we estimate dynamical flattening for different layers for PSR B1828-11. It is known that an innate feature of pulsar radiation is high stability of the time-of-arrival (TOA) of pulses, and therefore the analysis of TOA fluctuations can reflect subtle effects of neutron stars dynamics. TOA variations of pulsars can be interpreted by three reasons: gravitational perturbation of pulsar by planetary bodies, peculiarities of a pulsar interior like Tkachenko oscillations and free precession motion, when axis of rotation do not coincide with vectors of the angular moment of solid crust, liquid outer core and crystal core. The radial velocity of a star is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the Doppler effect in its spectrum. Stars showing a small amplitude variation of the radial velocity can be interpreted as systems having planetary companions. Assuming that the pulsar PSR B1257+12 has a mass of 1:35M¯, the Keplerian orbital radii are 0.9, 1.4 and 2.1 AU and with masses are 3:1M©=sin(i), 10:2M©=sin(i), 4:6M©=sin(i), where i is the orbital inclination [7]. In 2000, Stairs, Lyne and Shemar reported about their discovery of long-term, highly-periodic and correlated variations of pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of the pulsar PSR B182811 with period variations approximately 1000, 500, 250 and 167 days, which may be a result of the spin axis caused by an asymmetry in the shape of the pulsar. The long-periodic precession phenomenon was also detected for a few pulsars: PSR 2217+47, PSR 0531+21, PSR B083345, PSR B182811, PSR B164203 [2,3,6,]. The rotation of the terrestrial planets having rigid mantle, outer liquid and inner solid cores is characterized by Chandler wobble, Inner core wobble, Free Core Nutation, Free Inner Core Nutation. Like the Earth, a neutron star can undergo a free precession [4]. The period of precession is defined by deformation of a pulsar and tension in crust and mantle. If the crust and the core of pulsar have differential rotation then axis of a pulsar rotation will be precess, because axis of deformation will not coincide with axis of rotation. The three-layer model is more complicated than the previous case therefore classical methods fail. Escapa, Getino and Ferrandiz [1] developed a canonical formulation for an three-layer Earth model. We research model of pulsar, which includes three layers (fig. 1): an axis symmetrical rigid mantle, a fluid outer core (FOC) and a solid inner core (SIC). Flattened of the pulsar, it's FOC and SIC are Here A;C;Af ;Cf ;As;Cs;Ac;Cc are moments of inertia of the pulsar, FOC, SIC and total core accordingly; e, ef , ec are the flattening of total pulsar, FOC, core and SIC accordingly. In case rotation of a three-layer neutron star we have variations of next types: the Chandler Wobble (CW) is a motion of the pulsar rotation axis around its dynamical figure due to the bulges of the pulsar (it is the only global rotational mode for completely solid pulsar); the Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a differential rotation of the liquid core relatively the crust rotation; This mode does exist only if the core is liquid; the Free Inner Core Nutation (FICN) is a mode related to the differential rotation of the inner core with respect to the other layers of the pulsar. The mode exists only if the pulsar has two-layer core contains outer liquid and inner solid components; the Inner Core Wobble (ICW) is a differential rotation of the figure axis of the pulsar core with respect to the rotation axis of the pulsar and is due to the flattened of the inner core, having an excess of density with respect to the liquid core. This mode does exist only if</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kitiashvili, I.; Gusev, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..GECCT2005S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasmas in dentistry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasmas are very efficient in the deactivation of bacteria. A relatively new area is the use of these plasmas in biomedical and dental applications. In this work, application of a novel device in dentistry is investigated, the plasma needle. The plasma needle is used to generate a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric micro-plasma. A promising application of this micro-plasma is the treatment of dental cavities, to stop caries without causing pain and removing too much healthy tissue. Various bacterial model systems are used to test the bactericidal efficiency of the plasma needle: bacteria in droplets, thin films and (multi-species) biofilms. The effects of plasma needle treatment on bacterial viability, growth and composition are discussed. The results indicate that plasma can become a useful tool for dental treatment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1080929"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission in Sagittarius B?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we summarize three recent papers which point out possible <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission arising from the Sgr B region in the Galactic Center. We also present a high-resolution and sensitive image of the Sgr B region at 1.4 GHz made with the VLA. Using this image and a matched-array 327 MHz VLA image, we derive a thermal spectrum for the Sgr B complex and suggest that the radio emission is a mixture of optically thin and optically thick emission over the frequency range discussed here (255 MHz to 1.4 GHz). In addition, we show that the the apparent <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power law slope for the Sgr B2 continuum temperature observed by the GBT is likely determined by source structure and provides limited information about the physical processes in the Sgr B region. While the structure Sgr B region is complex and furthermore confused by the Galactic background, there does not appear to be substantial evidence for a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component in Sgr B.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lang, Cornelia C; Goss, W M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OptEL...9..289W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extraordinary optical properties of Fibonacci <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> 1D superconducting photonic crystals in near-zero-permittivity operation range</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In near-zero-permittivity operation range, the position-dependent extraordinary optical properties of a one dimensional (1D) Fibonacci <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> superconducting photonic crystal (PC), which consists of alternating superconductor and dielectric layers, are theoretically investigated by using the transfer matrix method. Based on the calculated reflectance spectrum, it is shown that the extraordinary optical properties depend on the relative positions of the threshold wavelength and the photonic band gaps (PBGs). By suitably choosing the thickness of the superconducting or dielectric layer, a transmission narrow band filter or resonator can be designed without introducing any physical defect in this structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Ji-jiang; Gao, Jin-xia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1176H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) VLF wave emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present case studies of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) VLF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER satellite. The analyzed events with modulation periods from 40 s to 80 s were observed at geomagnetic latitudes larger than 40 degrees. The magnetometers of the CARISMA network along the same geomagnetic longitude (within 5 degrees) were used for monitoring simultaneous fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. Correlated ULF magnetic field pulsations with periods corresponding to the modulation periods of QP emissions are detected. These ULF pulsations in the Pc3 - Pc5 range are likely related to the generation mechanism of the QP emissions. We attempt to define the spatial extent of the disturbed area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolik, Ondrej; Parrot, Michel; Nemec, Frantisek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...569A..12N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a high-quality <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> rapidly propagating wave train using SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. We present a new event of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains observed in EUV wavebands that rapidly propagate away from an active region after a flare. Aims: We measured the parameters of a wave train observed on 7 December 2013 after an M1.2 flare, such as the phase speeds, periods and wavelengths, in relationship to the local coronal environment and the energy sources. Methods: We compared our observations with a numerical simulation of fast magnetoacoustic waves that undergo dispersive evolution and leakage in a coronal loop embedded in a potential magnetic field. Results: The wave train is observed to propagate as several arc-shaped intensity disturbances for almost half an hour, with a speed greater than 1000 km s-1 and a period of about 1 min. The wave train followed two different patterns of propagation, in accordance with the magnetic structure of the active region. The oscillatory signal is found to be of high-quality, i.e. there is a large number (10 or more) of subsequent wave fronts observed. The observations are found to be consistent with the numerical simulation of a fast wave train generated by a localised impulsive energy release. Conclusions: Transverse structuring in the corona can efficiently create and guide high-quality <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> propagating fast wave trains. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nisticò, G.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Ap%26SS.343..511T"> <span id="translatedtitle">The mid-term and long-term solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles and the possible relationship with planetary motions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work investigates the solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles with multi-timescales and the possible relationships with planetary motions. The solar cycles are derived from long-term observations of the relative sunspot number and microwave emission at frequency of 2.80 GHz. A series of solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles with multi-timescales are registered. These cycles can be classified into three classes: (1) the strong PLC (PLC is defined as the solar cycle with a period very close to the ones of some planetary motions, named as planetary-like cycle) which is related strongly with planetary motions, including nine periodic modes with relatively short period ( P<12 yr), and related to the motions of the inner planets and of Jupiter; (2) the weak PLC, which is related weakly to planetary motions, including two periodic modes with relatively long period ( P>12 yr), and possibly related to the motions of outer planets; (3) the non-PLC, for which so far there has been found no clear evidence to show the relationship with any planetary motions. Among the planets, Jupiter plays a key role in most periodic modes due to its sidereal motion or spring tidal motions associated with other planets. Among planetary motions, the spring tidal motion of the inner planets and of Jupiter dominates the formation of most PLCs. The relationships between multi-timescale solar periodic modes and the planetary motions will help us to understand the essential nature and prediction of solar activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, Baolin; Cheng, Zhuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0801.2168v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission in Sagittarius B?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We summarize three recent publications which suggest that the Galactic center region Sagittarius B (Sgr B) may contain <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio components (Crocker et al. 2007, Hollis et al. 2007 and Yusef-Zadeh et al. 2007a). Based on new VLA matched-resolution continuum data at 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz, we find no evidence for large scale <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission at these frequencies; the spectral behavior is likely determined by the complex summation of multiple HII region components with a wide range of emission measures and hence radio turn-over frequencies. Also, we discuss a possible additional interpretation of the radio continuum spectrum of individual component Sgr B2-F carried out by Yusef-Zadeh et al; confusion from nearby HII components with widely different turn-over frequencies may contribute to the the change in slope of the radio continuum in this direction at low frequencies. Finally, we discuss the uncertainties in the determination of the spectral index of the GBT continuum data of Sgr B carried out by Hollis et al. We find that the apparent spectral index determined by their procedure is also likely due to a summation over the many diverse thermal components in this direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cornelia C. Lang; Patrick Palmer; W. M. Goss</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT.........1V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> radio emission from single</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this dissertation we present theoretical models for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission from single O stars. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission is due to synchrotron-emitting electrons that attain relativistic energies through the first-order Fermi acceleration in wind-embedded shocks associated with an unstable, chaotic wind. The goal of this work is to investigate what properties a synchrotron model should have to reproduce the observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio spectra of the most likely single <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitters, Cyg OB2 No. 9, HD 168112 and 9 Sgr. By looking at all models that fit the observations, meaningful constraints on the model parameters, each with a clear physical interpretation, can be obtained. We first develop a simple parametrised synchrotron model, in which we assume that the emission region extends continuously out to an outer boundary which relates to the last shock. A major result of this model is that shocks must persist up to large distances in the stellar wind. Also, to produce the observed fluxes with a negative spectral index, the synchrotron emissivity must decrease more slowly than expected from a density law that falls off with distance squared. This result appears to be a general feature of synchrotron models that explain the observations (also for the more sophisticated ones). We improve the previous model by taking into account the cooling of relativistic electrons. Then the synchrotron emission is confined to narrow layers behind the shock. Furthermore, we show that the synchrotron emission depends strongly on the shock strength. The strongest shocks in the stellar wind produce the bulk of the emission, so that the emergent radio flux can be described as coming from a small number of shocks. When we assume that the shock strength is constant in the wind, we find that a multiple shock model can explain the observations. However, when the radial decline of the shock strength predicted by hydrodynamical simulations is taken into account, we find that the synchrotron emissivity rapidly decreases as a function of radius. This leads to a radio spectrum with a positive spectral index, contrary to the observations. We find that the observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio spectra can only be reproduced by counteracting the rapid radial decrease of the emissivity. We investigate a number of possibilities to do so, none of which appears to be physically plausible. We conclude that the observed emission is probably not from wind-embedded shocks associated with an unstable, chaotic wind. The most likely alternative is synchrotron emission from shocks associated with colliding winds. In this hypothesis, the radio flux changes would be due to changes in the orbital motion. A radio light curve should then show good repeatability from one period to another. We find that Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 168112 indeed show these features.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Loo, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910055709&hterms=voronoi&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dvoronoi"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> structures in the large-scale galaxy distribution and three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been suggested that the void and wall structure associated with the large-scale galaxy distribution might be qualitatively, or perhaps even physically, modeled by a Voronoi tessellation, and that such structure might account for the surprisingly regular, sharp peaks in the galaxy redshift distributions obtained from 'pencil beam' surveys. Taking cell wall crossings by random line segments to correspond to such redshift peaks, an exact expression is derived for the distribution of spacings of these intersections in a three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. This result verifies that the spacings are nonrandom and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span>, qualitatively resembling the observed pattern, even though the cell wall structure is generated from randomly placed seeds. Finally, moments of the spacing distribution are used to show that apparently periodic samples, similar to those recently reported, represent only one to two sigma fluctuations in a Voronoi tesselation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ikeuchi, Satoru; Turner, Edwin L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0507012v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of new <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in the X-ray transient source V~0332+53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of a new <span class="hlt">quasi-period</span> oscillation (QPO) at 0.22 Hz, centered on the source spin frequency of the high mass X-ray binary system V~0332+53 when the source was observed during its November 2004/March 2005 outburst by {\\em RXTE}. Besides this new QPO, we also detected the known 0.05 Hz QPO. Both the 0.22 and 0.05 Hz QPOs stand out clearly at a mid-flux level of the outburst within January 15--19 2005, and later at an even lower flux level as the width of 0.22 Hz QPO drops. No evolution of the centroid frequency with the flux is seen in either QPO. The rms value below 10 keV is around 4--6% for both QPOs and decreases at higher energies. We discuss our results in the context of current QPO models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Qu; S. Zhang; L. Song; M. Falanga</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120015660&hterms=Tidal+Power&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DTidal%2BPower"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 200-Second <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodicity</span> After the Tidal Disruption of a Star by a Dormant Black Hole</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supermassive black holes are known to exist at the center of most galaxies with sufficient stellar mass, In the local Universe, it is possible to infer their properties from the surrounding stars or gas. However, at high redshifts we require active, continuous accretion to infer the presence of the SMBHs, often coming in the form of long term accretion in active galactic nuclei. SMBHs can also capture and tidally disrupt stars orbiting nearby, resulting in bright flares from otherwise quiescent black holes. Here, we report on a approx.200-s X-ray <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicity</span> around a previously dormant SMBH located in the center of a galaxy at redshift z = 0.3534. This result may open the possibility of probing general relativity beyond our local Universe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reis, R. C.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Gueltkinm K.; Maitra, D.; King, A. L.; Strohmayer, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22859817"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 200-second <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicity</span> after the tidal disruption of a star by a dormant black hole.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supermassive black holes (SMBHs; mass is greater than or approximately 10(5) times that of the Sun) are known to exist at the center of most galaxies with sufficient stellar mass. In the local universe, it is possible to infer their properties from the surrounding stars or gas. However, at high redshifts we require active, continuous accretion to infer the presence of the SMBHs, which often comes in the form of long-term accretion in active galactic nuclei. SMBHs can also capture and tidally disrupt stars orbiting nearby, resulting in bright flares from otherwise quiescent black holes. Here, we report on a ~200-second x-ray <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicity</span> around a previously dormant SMBH located in the center of a galaxy at redshift z = 0.3534. This result may open the possibility of probing general relativity beyond our local universe. PMID:22859817</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reis, R C; Miller, J M; Reynolds, M T; Gültekin, K; Maitra, D; King, A L; Strohmayer, T E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51901022"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma: Sources and applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. P. Napartovich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1014014"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fuel injector utilizing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma activation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...572A..79K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Super-spinning compact objects and models of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations observed in Galactic microquasars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have previously applied several models of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) to estimate the spin of the central Kerr black hole in the three Galactic microquasars, GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE J1550-564. Here we explore the alternative possibility that the central compact body is a super-spinning object (or a naked singularity) with the external space-time described by Kerr geometry with a dimensionless spin parameter a ? cJ/GM2> 1. We calculate the relevant spin intervals for a subset of HF QPO models considered in the previous study. Our analysis indicates that for all but one of the considered models there exists at least one interval of a> 1 that is compatible with constraints given by the ranges of the central compact object mass independently estimated for the three sources. For most of the models, the inferred values of a are several times higher than the extreme Kerr black hole value a = 1. These values may be too high since the spin of superspinars is often assumed to rapidly decrease due to accretion when a ? 1. In this context, we conclude that only the epicyclic and the Keplerian resonance model provides estimates that are compatible with the expectation of just a small deviation from a = 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotrlová, Andrea; Török, Gabriel; Šrámková, Eva; Stuchlík, Zden?k</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22403709"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spike-interval triggered averaging reveals a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> spiking alternative for stochastic resonance in catfish electroreceptors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodically</span> produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lankheet, Martin J M; Klink, P Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G; Noest, André J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JAP...116i4903A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Fibonacci and periodic one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals of porous silicon: Experiment and simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A one-dimensional Fibonacci phononic crystal and a distributed Bragg reflector were constructed from porous silicon. The structures had the same number of layers and similar acoustic impedance mismatch, and were electrochemically etched in highly boron doped silicon wafers. The thickness of the individual layers in the stacks was approximately 2 ?m. Both types of hypersonic band gap structure were studied by direct measurement of the transmittance of longitudinal acoustic waves in the 0.1-2.6 GHz range. Acoustic band gaps deeper than 50 dB were detected in both structures. The experimental results were compared with model calculations employing the transfer matrix method. The acoustic properties of periodic and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> structures in which half-wave retarding bi-layers do not consist of two quarter-wave retarding layers are discussed. The strong correlation between width and depth of gaps in the transmission spectra is demonstrated. The dominant mechanisms of acoustic losses in porous multilayer structures are discussed. The elastic constants remain proportional over our range of porosity, and hence, the Grüneisen parameter is constant. This simplifies the expression for the porosity dependence of the Akhiezer damping.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aliev, Gazi N.; Goller, Bernhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...791...16S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060009467&hterms=current+events&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcurrent%2Bevents"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cluster observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> impulsive signatures in the dayside northern lobe: High-latitude flux transfer events?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a series of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> reversals in GSM B(sub Z) observed by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern dayside lobe poleward of the cusp on 23 February 2001. During an interval of about 35 min, multiple reversals (negative to positive) in B(sub Z) of approximately 1-min duration with an approximate 8-min recurrence time were observed. The individual structures do not resemble low-latitude flux transfer events (FTE) [Russell and Elphic, 1979] but the 8-min recurrence frequency suggests that intermittent reconnection may be occurring .Measurements (appropriately lagged) of the solar wind at ACE show that the IMF was southward-oriented with a strong B(sub X) and that a modest dynamic pressure increased as the events started. The multi-point observations afforded by the Cluster spacecraft were used to infer the motion (direction and speed) of the observed magnetic field reversals. The associated currents were also calculated and they are consistent with the spatial confinement of the observed magnetic field reversals. We propose that the observed reversals are due to flux tubes reconnecting with closed field lines on the dayside. Ancillary data from the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments were used to develop a physical picture of the reversals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kistler, L. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRA..118.4523H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> ELF/VLF wave emissions and electron precipitation by DEMETER satellite: A case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results of case studies of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) ELF/VLF hiss emissions detected onboard the DEMETER satellite. Three events with simultaneous periodic modulation in VLF wave intensity and energetic electron precipitation are found. In each event we observe exact coincidence of one or two busts of VLF wave intensity with energetic electron precipitation peaks. To our knowledge, such observations made onboard satellites have not been reported earlier. All events are observed at fairly quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp <3). The dynamic spectrum of the VLF waves in these QP events was characterized by a regular frequency increase in each burst, and the repetition period was less than or about 20 s. These features allow us to suggest that the observed events belong to the QP2-class, i.e., events which are not associated with geomagnetic pulsations. We also analyze energetic electron data from NOAA-17 spacecraft which has helio-synchronous circular orbit similar to DEMETER spacecraft and measured in the same region of the magnetosphere within 30 min for the analyzed events. NOAA-17 data confirm that the QP emissions were detected by DEMETER in the region of isotropization of energetic electrons, which is typically associated with the development of the cyclotron instability. Modulation of electron flux with a period close to the QP emission period is observed in two events. Based on the observed correlation between bursts of wave intensity and energetic particle flux, we estimate the location and spatial extent of the source region for QP emissions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayosh, M.; Pasmanik, D. L.; Demekhov, A. G.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Titova, E. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1517137"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting Long-Duration Narrow-Band Gravitational Wave Transients Associated with Soft Gamma Repeater <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have performed an in-depth concept study of a gravitational wave data analysis method which targets repeated long quasi-monochromatic transients (triggers) from cosmic sources. The algorithm concept can be applied to multi-trigger data sets in which the detector-source orientation and the statistical properties of the data stream change with time, and does not require the assumption that the data is Gaussian. Reconstructing or limiting the energetics of potential gravitational wave emissions associated with <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray lightcurve tails of soft gamma repeater flares might be an interesting endeavour of the future. Therefore we chose this in a simplified form to illustrate the flow, capabilities, and performance of the method. We investigate performance aspects of a multi-trigger based data analysis approach by using O(100 s) long stretches of mock data in coincidence with the times of observed QPOs, and by using the known sky location of the source. We analytical...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murphy, David; Raffai, Peter; Bartos, Imre; Khan, Rubab; Marka, Zsuzsa; Matone, Luca; Redwine, Keith; Marka, Szabolcs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006MNRAS.368..361P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf nova oscillations and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in cataclysmic variables - V. Results from an extensive survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present observations of dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs), longer-period dwarf nova oscillations (lpDNOs), and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in 13 cataclysmic variable stars. In the six systems, WW Cet, BP CrA, BR Lup, HP Nor, AG Hya and V1193 Ori, rapid, quasi-coherent oscillations are detected for the first time. For the remainder of the systems discussed, we have observed more classes of oscillations, in addition to the rapid oscillations they were already known to display, or previously unknown aspects of the behaviour of the oscillations. The period of a QPO in RU Peg is seen to change by 84 per cent over the 10 nights of the decline from outburst - the largest evolution of a QPO period observed to date. A period-luminosity relation similar to the relation that has long been known to apply to DNOs is found for lpDNOs in X Leo; this is the first clear case of the lpDNO frequency scaling with accretion luminosity. WX Hyi and V893 Sco are added to the small list of dwarf novae that have shown oscillations in quiescence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pretorius, Magaretha L.; Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22078460"> <span id="translatedtitle">LOW-FREQUENCY <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATION FROM THE 11 Hz ACCRETING PULSAR IN TERZAN 5: NOT FRAME DRAGGING</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on six RXTE observations taken during the 2010 outburst of the 11 Hz accreting pulsar IGR J17480-2446 located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. During these observations we find power spectra which resemble those seen in Z-type high-luminosity neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, with a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) in the 35-50 Hz range simultaneous with a kHz QPO and broadband noise. Using well-known frequency-frequency correlations, we identify the 35-50 Hz QPOs as the horizontal branch oscillations, which were previously suggested to be due to Lense-Thirring (LT) precession. As IGR J17480-2446 spins more than an order of magnitude more slowly than any of the other neutron stars where these QPOs were found, this QPO cannot be explained by frame dragging. By extension, this casts doubt on the LT precession model for other low-frequency QPOs in neutron stars and perhaps even black hole systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Altamirano, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Wijnands, R. [Astronomical Institute, 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ingram, A. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Linares, M.; Homan, J., E-mail: d.altamirano@uva.nl [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://depts.washington.edu/bdecon/papers/pdfs/lcstark5.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linearly Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates: From Rabi Oscillations and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Solutions to Oscillating Domain Walls and Spiral Waves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Linearly Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates: From Rabi Oscillations and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Solutions-component generalization of the Rabi oscillations between two-level atomic systems. It is used here to derive a host a time-honored history as fundamental nonlinear excitations in optical fibers and waveguides (see, e</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deconinck, Bernard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA51B1129L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherent Scatter Imaging Radar Observations: Insights Provided By a New Tool for Studies of Midlatitude Sporadic E and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Echo Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of the coherent scatter radar imaging technique has provided a unique new tool for studying the structure of plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. This in-beam or aperture synthesis technique was applied extensively in an experiment carried out in June and July 2002 on the island of St. Croix in the Caribbean in which the coherent scatter looked westward toward the island of Puerto Rico. In particular, the imaging radar instrumentation was used in conjunction with the Arecibo Observatory incoherent scatter radar to study the horizontal and vertical spatial structure in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echoes associated with sporadic E layers located over Puerto Rico. The imaging technique has provided new measurements with unprecedented resolution that show both the spatial structure and movement of the irregularities. The St. Croix observations show that the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> structures are localized in the vertical and horizontal directions. Although there is a slight preference for propagation along the northeast to southwest direction, other propagation directions also occur. Especially when viewed in the context of recent rocket and radar experiments, such as the SEEK 2 experiment that was carried out in Japan, the St. Croix data provide an important new perspective on the dynamics associated with the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echo structures. The types of measurements that can be provided by the imaging technique will be presented, and the observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echo structures will be analyzed in the context of other recent rocket and radar experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larsen, M. F.; Hysell, D. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57398047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma on Mammalian Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with living</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sameer Kalghatgi; Crystal M. Kelly; Ekaterina Cerchar; Behzad Torabi; Oleg Alekseev; Alexander Fridman; Gary Friedman; Jane Azizkhan-Clifford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0810.0203v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corotational Instability of Inertial-Acoustic Modes in Black Hole Accretion Discs and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the global stability of non-axisymmetric p-modes (also called inertial-acoustic modes) trapped in the inner-most regions of accretion discs around black holes. We show that the lowest-order (highest-frequency) p-modes, with frequencies $\\omega=(0.5-0.7) m\\Omega_{\\rm ISCO}$, can be overstable due to general relativistic effects, according to which the radial epicyclic frequency is a non-monotonic function of radius near the black hole. The mode is trapped inside the corotation resonance radius and carries a negative energy. The mode growth arises primarily from wave absorption at the corotation resonance, and the sign of the wave absorption depends on the gradient of the disc vortensity. When the mode frequency is sufficiently high, such that the slope of the vortensity is positive at corotation positive wave energy is absorbed at the resonance, leading to the growth of mode amplitude. We also study how the rapid radial inflow at the inner edge of the disc affects the mode trapping and growth. Our analysis of the behavior of the fluid perturbations in the transonic flow near the ISCO indicates that, while the inflow tends to damp the mode, the damping effect is sufficiently small under some conditions so that net mode growth can still be achieved. We further clarify the role of the Rossby wave instability and show that it does not operate for black hole accretion discs with smooth-varying vortensity profiles. Overstable non-axisymmetric p-modes driven by the corotational instability provide a plausible explanation for the high-frequency (> 100 Hz) <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (HFQPOs) observed from a number of black-hole X-ray binaries in the very high state. The absence of HFQPOs in the soft (thermal) state may result from mode damping due to the radial infall at the ISCO.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dong Lai; David Tsang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RMxAC..44R.154G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Twin-peak <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in X-ray binaries: clues from their amplitude and coherence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with either a black hole or a neutron star show power spectra characterized by several enhanced fractions of power at given frequencies, such as <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs). Twin-peak high-frequency QPOs (HF QPOs) are typical of the orbital motion time-scale for matter orbiting within 10 r_{g} from the compact object (r_{g}=GM/c^{2} is the gravitational radius of the compact object). Thus, such modulations could arise from the energy released by accreting clumps of matter interacting with the strong gravitational field of the compact object. Twin-peak HF QPOs are characterized by their central frequency ?, root mean square amplitude (rms) and coherence Q=???, where ?? is the width of the peak. Here we investigate on the characteristic behavior of the rms observed in several LMXBs. We highlight the work done by the strong tidal force as root source of the energy (rms) released by a QPO. By means of the Schwarzschild potential we estimate the maximum allowed radius of clumps of matter that can survive to tides in the inner part of the accretion disk. It turns to be R˜ 40 m for matter in an accretion disk around a 2 M_{odot} neutron star and R˜ 150 m for matter around a 10 M_{odot } black hole. The work loaded by tides on the clump of matter depends on the Schwarzschild potential shape for the given orbit. We highlight that for orbits approaching to the inner most stable circular orbit (ISCO) the changing Schwarzschild potential shape may account for the observed behavior of the energy (rms) carried by the twin-peak HF QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Germanà, C.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; Gomes, A. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0207508v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of the <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequencies of White Dwarf, Neutron Star, and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using data obtained in 1994 June/July with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer deep survey photometer and in 2001 January with the Chandra X-ray Observatory Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph, we investigate the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray oscillations of the dwarf nova SS Cyg in outburst. We find <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) at nu_0 ~ 0.012 Hz and nu_1 ~ 0.13 Hz in the EUV flux and at nu_0 ~ 0.0090 Hz, nu_1 ~ 0.11 Hz, and possibly nu_2 ~ nu_0 + nu_1 ~ 0.12 Hz in the soft X-ray flux. These data, combined with the optical data of Woudt & Warner for VW Hyi, extend the Psaltis, Belloni, & van der Klis nu_high-nu_low correlation for neutron star and black hole low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) nearly two orders of magnitude in frequency, with nu_low ~ 0.08 nu_high. This correlation identifies the high-frequency quasi-coherent oscillations (so-called ``dwarf nova oscillations'') of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with the kilohertz QPOs of LMXBs, and the low-frequency QPOs of CVs with the horizontal branch oscillations (or the broad noise component identified as such) of LMXBs. Assuming that the same mechanisms produce the QPOs in white dwarf, neutron star, and black hole binaries, we find that the data exclude the relativistic precession model and the magnetospheric and sonic-point beat-frequency models (as well as any model requiring the presence or absence of a stellar surface or magnetic field); more promising are models that interpret QPOs as manifestations of disk accretion onto any low-magnetic field compact object.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher W. Mauche</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020086982&hterms=hz+frequency+bands&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhz%2Bfrequency%2Bbands"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a Second High-Frequency <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation from the Microquasar GRS 1915+105</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery in archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of a approx. 40 Hz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation QPO) in the hard X-ray flux from the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105. The QPO is detected only in the hard X-ray band above approx. 13 keV and was discovered in observations in which the previously known 67 Hz QPO is present. The 40 Hz QPO has a typical rms amplitude of approx. 2% in the 13-27 keV band and a width of approx. 5.5 Hz (FWHM). We show that the 67 and 40 Hz QPOs are detected in the same observations in 1997 July and November. However, the QPO is not detected in observations from 1996 April, May, and June in which the 67 Hz QPO was first discovered. The frequency of the 67 Hz QPO is significantly higher in the 1997 observations by about 5% compared with the 1996 data. The identification of the 40 Hz QPO makes GRS 1915 + 105 the second black hole binary to show a pair of simultaneous high-frequency QPOs (the other being GRO J1655-40). The similarities between the properties of the 67 Hz QPO in GRS 1915+105 and the recently discovered 450 Hz QPO in GRO J1655-40 suggest that the pairs of frequencies in these systems may be produced by the same physical mechanism, with the frequency differences between the two being likely due to different black hole masses in the two systems. We discuss the implications of our result for the mass and spin of GRS 1915+105 as well as for models of X-ray variability in black holes and neutron stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.440.3275S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Broad iron emission line and kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in the neutron star system 4U 1636-53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Both the broad iron (Fe) line and the frequency of the kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) can potentially provide independent measures of the inner radius of the accretion disc. We use XMM-Newton and simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the LMXB 4U 1636-53 to test this hypothesis. We study the properties of the Fe K? emission line as a function of the spectral state of the source and the frequency of the kHz QPOs. We find that the inner radius of the accretion disc deduced from the frequency of the upper kHz QPO varies as a function of the position of the source in the colour-colour diagram, in accordance with previous work and with the standard scenario of accretion disc geometry. On the contrary, the inner disc radius deduced from the profile of the iron line is not correlated with the spectral state of the source. The values of the inner radius inferred from kHz QPOs and iron lines, in four observations, do not lead to a consistent value of the neutron star mass, regardless of the model used to fit the iron line. Our results suggest that either the kHz QPO or the standard relativistic Fe line interpretation does not apply for this system. Furthermore, the simultaneous detection of kHz QPOs and broad iron lines is difficult to reconcile with models in which the broadening of the iron line is due to the reprocessing of photons in an outflowing wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sanna, Andrea; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Belloni, Tomaso; Hiemstra, Beike; Linares, Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CMaPh.tmp..256B"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Abstract Nash-Moser Theorem and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Solutions for NLW and NLS on Compact Lie Groups and Homogeneous Manifolds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We prove an abstract implicit function theorem with parameters for smooth operators defined on scales of sequence spaces, modeled for the search of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> solutions of PDEs. The tame estimates required for the inverse linearised operators at each step of the iterative scheme are deduced via a multiscale inductive argument. The Cantor-like set of parameters where the solution exists is defined in a non inductive way. This formulation completely decouples the iterative scheme from the measure theoretical analysis of the parameters where the small divisors non-resonance conditions are verified. As an application, we deduce the existence of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> solutions for forced NLW and NLS equations on any compact Lie group or manifold which is homogeneous with respect to a compact Lie group, extending previous results valid only for tori. A basic tool of harmonic analysis is the highest weight theory for the irreducible representations of compact Lie groups.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berti, Massimiliano; Corsi, Livia; Procesi, Michela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/ja0605/2005JA011335/2005JA011335.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics and implications of Doppler spectra of E region <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echoes observed by the multibeam middle and upper atmosphere radar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present multibeam middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) echoes from 3.2-m field-aligned irregularities associated with plasma patches in the nighttime midlatitude sporadic E (Es) layers over Shigaraki, Japan, to give a cohesive view of the QP echo characteristics. Echo regions with zonal scales less than 50 km moved westward at altitudes near 105 km with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tadahiko Ogawa; Yuichi Otsuka; Mamoru Yamamoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CNSNS..19.4080N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> processes in repeated measurements: New approach for the fitting and clusterization of different data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many experimentalists were accustomed to think that any independent measurement forms a non-correlated measurement that depends weakly from others. We are trying to reconsider this conventional point of view and prove that similar measurements form a strongly-correlated sequence of random functions with memory. In other words, successive measurements "remember" each other at least their nearest neighbors. This observation and justification on real data help to fit the wide set of data based on the Prony's function. The Prony's decomposition follows from the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) properties of the measured functions and includes the Fourier transform as a partial case. New type of decomposition helps to obtain a specific amplitude-frequency response (AFR) of the measured (random) functions analyzed and each random function contains less number of the fitting parameters in comparison with its number of initial data points. Actually, the calculated AFR can be considered as the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS), which will be extremely useful in cases where the simple model pretending on description of the measured data is absent but vital necessity of their quantitative description is remained. These possibilities open a new way for clusterization of the initial data and new information that is contained in these data gives a chance for their detailed analysis. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements realized for empty resonator (pure noise data) and resonator containing a sample (CeO2 in our case) confirmed the existence of the QP processes in reality. But we think that the detection of the QP processes is a common feature of many repeated measurements and this new property of successive measurements can attract an attention of many experimentalists. To formulate some general conditions that help to identify and then detect the presence of some QP process in the repeated experimental measurements. To find a functional equation and its solution that yields the description of the identified QP process. To suggest some computing algorithm for fitting of the QP data to the analytical function that follows from the solution of the corresponding functional equation. The content of this paper is organized as follows. In the Section 2 we will try to find the answers on the problem posed in this introductory section. It contains also the mathematical description of the QP process and interpretation of the meaning of the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS). The GPS includes the conventional Fourier decomposition as a partial case. Section 3 contains the experimental details associated with receiving of the desired data. Section 4 includes some important details explaining specific features of application of general algorithm to concrete data. In Section 5 we summarize the results and outline the perspectives of this approach for quantitative description of time-dependent random data that are registered in different complex systems and experimental devices. Here we should notice that under the complex system we imply a system when a conventional model is absent[6]. Under simplicity of the acceptable model we imply the proper hypothesis ("best fit" model) containing minimal number of the fitting parameters that describes the behavior of the system considered quantitatively. The different approaches that exist in nowadays for description of these systems are collected in the recent review [7].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nigmatullin, R.; Rakhmatullin, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007A%26ARv..14..171D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission processes in massive binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, I present a general discussion of several astrophysical processes likely to play a role in the production of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in massive stars, with emphasis on massive binaries. Even though the discussion will start in the radio domain where the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission was first detected, the census of physical processes involved in the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from massive stars shows that many spectral domains are concerned, from the radio to the very high energies. First, the theoretical aspects of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from early-type stars will be addressed. The main topics that will be discussed are respectively the physics of individual stellar winds and their interaction in binary systems, the acceleration of relativistic electrons, the magnetic field of massive stars, and finally the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission processes relevant to the case of massive stars. Second, this general qualitative discussion will be followed by a more quantitative one, devoted to the most probable scenario where <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitters are massive binaries. I will show how several stellar, wind and orbital parameters can be combined in order to make some semi-quantitative predictions on the high-energy counterpart to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission detected in the radio domain. These theoretical considerations will be followed by a census of results obtained so far, and related to this topic. These results concern the radio, the visible, the X-ray and the ?-ray domains. Prospects for the very high energy ?-ray emission from massive stars will also be addressed. Two particularly interesting examples—one O-type and one Wolf-Rayet binary—will be considered in details. Finally, strategies for future developments in this field will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Becker, Michaël</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0503078v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies in solar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy to hot flare plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mpcengr.com/cal_awma_2002.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Destruction of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) using <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma (NTP)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Destruction of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) using <span class="hlt">Non</span>- <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma (NTP) Paper # (42930) Sandeep to determine the feasibility of using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) for destruction of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA stationary sources must be monitored and controlled. <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) is a new</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cal, Mark P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26248964"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma for diesel exhaust treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The review of application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technique to treat diesel exhaust is presented. The nanosecond corona discharge, dielectric barrier discharge and surface discharges are produced directly in gas. The formation of active particles is generated by electron impact with main components. The conversion NO initiated by discharges in different gas composition has been modeled and studied. The hydrocarbons lower</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J.-O. Chae</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9505072v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> radiative pair plasmas: processes and spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the emission and absorption spectra due to various photon and pair processes in a non-equilibrium pair plasma containing a significant density of photons. We present here some preliminary results from Monte-Carlo simulations. These investigations are likely to be useful in understanding the radiation and relaxation mechanisms in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> gamma-ray sources in astrophysics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ravi P. Pilla; Jacob Shaham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42037122"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrostatic solitary structures in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solitary electrostatic structures involving density depletions have been observed in the upper ionosphere by the Freja satellite [Dovner et al., 1994]. If these are interpreted as ion sound solitons, the difficulty arises that the standard Korteweg-de Vries description predicts structures with enhanced rather than depleted density. Here we show that the presence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons may change the nature of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Cairns; A. A. Mamum; R. Bingham; R. Boström; R. O. Dendy; C. M. C. Nairn; P. K. Shukla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=18854"> <span id="translatedtitle">FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR HYBRID <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA REACTORS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) reactor technology for DoD air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24809488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling and forecasting daily movement of ambient air mean PM?.? concentration based on the elliptic orbit model with weekly <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> extension: a case study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, the issue of air pollution has continuously been a global public health concern. Modeling and forecasting daily movement of ambient air mean PM2.5 concentration is an increasingly important task as it is intimately associated with human health that the air pollution has unignorable negative effects in reducing air quality, damaging environment, even causing serious harm to health. It is demonstrated that daily movement of mean PM?.? concentration approximately exhibits weekly cyclical variations as daily particle pollution in the air is largely influenced by human daily activities. Then, based on weekly <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> extension for daily movement of mean PM?.? concentration, the called elliptic orbit model is proposed to describe its movement. By mapping daily movement of mean PM?.? concentration as one time series into the polar coordinates, each 7-day movement is depicted as one elliptic orbit. Experimental result and analysis indicate workability and effectiveness of the proposed method. Here we show that with the weekly <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> extension, daily movements of mean PM?.? concentration at the given monitoring stations in Xiangtan of China are well described by the elliptic orbit model, which provides a vivid description for modeling and prediction daily movement of mean PM?.? concentration in a concise and intuitive way. PMID:24809488</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Zong-chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.1239N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging Observations of X-Ray <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations at 3 - 6 keV in the 26 December 2002 Solar Flare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in soft X-rays (SXR) are not well known due to the instrument limitations, especially the absence of imaging observations of SXR oscillations. We explore the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations of SXR at 3 - 6 keV in a solar flare observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 26 December 2002. This was a B8.1 class event and showed three X-ray sources (S1, S2, and S3) at 3 - 6 keV and two sources (S1 and S2) at 12 - 25 keV. The light curves of the total fluxes display a two-minute oscillation at 3 - 6 keV, but not in the energy bands above 8 keV. To investigate imaging observations of the oscillations, we prepared CLEAN images at seven energy bands between 3 keV and 20 keV with an eight-second integration. The light curves of three sources were analyzed after integrating the flux of each source region. We used the Fourier method to decompose each source light curve into rapidly varying and slowly varying components. The rapidly varying components show seven individual peaks which are well fitted with a sine function. Then we used the wavelet method to analyze the periods in the rapidly varying component of each source. The results show that three sources display damped <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations with a similar two-minute period. The damped oscillations timescale varies between 2.5 to 6 minutes. Source S1 oscillates with the same phase as S3, but is almost in anti-phase with S2. Analyzing the flaring images in more detail, we found that these oscillation peaks are well consistent with the appearance of S3, which seems to split from or merge with S2 with a period of two minutes. The flare images with a high cadence of one second at 3 - 6 keV show that source S3 appears with a rapid period of 25 seconds. The two-minute oscillation shows the highest spectral power. Source S3 seems to shift its position along the flare loop with a mean speed of 130 km s-1, which is of the same order as the local sound speed. This connection between the oscillation peaks and emission enhancement appears to be an observational constraint on the emission mechanism at 3 - 6 keV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ning, Zongjun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23115623"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma approaches in CO 2 utilization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">CO2 is the final product of combustion of all fossil fuels. CO2 itself has little value by far, but it contributes more than 50% to the man-made greenhouse effect among all the greenhouse gases. There is still no proven technology for the chemical utilization of such a plentiful carbon resource. Recently, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas have been found to be effective in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang-jun Liu; Gen-hui Xu; Timing Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910019793&hterms=proton+selection+process&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dproton%2Bselection%2Bprocess"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corona: Coordinated research on <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes in astrophysics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several problems in astrophysics are examined where departures from purely thermal behavior are expected to produce effects which are detectable by a variety of NASA satellites. The problems identified as worthy of study include coronal heating in stars, deposition of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle energy in stars from external sources, and turbulence in atmospheres and winds of stars. The progress in solving these problems is summarized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mullan, Dermott J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.440.3011O"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2:3:6 <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation structure in GRS 1915+105 and cubic subharmonics in the context of relativistic discoseismology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a simple toy model to explain the 2:3:6 <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) structure in GRS 1915+105 and, more generally, the 2:3 QPO structure in XTE J1550-564, GRO J1655-40 and H1743-322. The model exploits the onset of subharmonics in the context of discoseismology. We suggest that the observed frequencies may be the consequence of a resonance between a fundamental g mode and an unobservable p wave. The results include the prediction that, as better data become available, a QPO with a frequency of twice the higher twin frequency and a large quality factor will be observed in twin peak sources, as it might already have been observed in the especially active GRS 1915+105.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ortega-Rodríguez, M.; Solís-Sánchez, H.; López-Barquero, V.; Matamoros-Alvarado, B.; Venegas-Li, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6906175"> <span id="translatedtitle">Late Holocene shoreline behavior in embayments of Lake Michigan: Influence of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> lake-level variations and sediment supply</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lake Michigan contains numerous former embayments into glacial deposits or bedrock. Many of the embayments contain dunes, spits, and captured lakes, but others contain arcuate strandplains of beach ridges. The strandplains are a geologic record of shoreline behavior and lake-level variation throughout the late Holocene. The larger strandplains show similar long-term patterns of beach-ridge development. The similar patterns are expected because variations in lake level are a primary control on shoreline behavior, and all embayments would have experienced relatively the same lake-level changes. Some variations in the long-term pattern of shoreline development do occur between strandplains. These dissimilarities are primarily a function of different rates of sediment supply to the shoreline of each embayment. Beach-ridge development within embayments can be represented on a rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply diagram (Curray diagram) as three superimposed ovals on the positive rate of sediment supply side of the diagram. The three stacked ovals represent the three <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> lake-level variations defined by Thompson (1992) and show the position of the shoreline for a given time within the Curray diagram fields. For shorelines with a high rate of sediment supply, only the 30-year <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variation would reach the aggradation line. For shorelines having significantly less sediment supply, rising lake level on the 150- and 600-year variations would force the 30-year oval across the aggradation line and well into the depositional and possibly the erosional transgression fields. Under these conditions erosion would occur that may remove, stack, or at least prevent one or more beach ridges from being developed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Indiana Geological Survey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPD....42.2114L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct Imaging by SDO/AIA of <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Propagating Fast Mode Magnetosonic Waves of 2000 km/s in the Solar Corona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span>, propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here unprecedented evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new SDO/AIA instrument. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1-5% intensity variations emanating near the flare kernel and propagating outward along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2350 +/- 210 km/s. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-omega diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin, giving an equal phase and group velocity of 1630 +/- 760 km/s averaged over the event. This k-omega ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with prominent power at four non-harmonic frequencies, 5.5, 14.5, 25.1, and 37.9 mHz, among which the 14.5 mHz (period: 69 s) signal is the strongest. The signal at 5.5 mHz (period: 181 s, same as chromospheric 3-minute oscillations) temporally coincides with flare pulsations, suggesting a common origin of possibly <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> magnetic reconnection. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6)e7 ergs/cm2/s estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Wei; Title, A. M.; Zhao, J.; Ofman, L.; Schrijver, C. J.; Aschwanden, M. J.; De Pontieu, B.; Tarbell, T. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/68/07/77/PDF/Khacef.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of Toluene in Air by <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid , H. T. Pham</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Removal of Toluene in Air by <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System A. Khacef , H. T. Pham , A, Abstract: Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma (ANTP) technology for indoor air treatment has the disadvantage catalysts. The products of the toluene oxidation were CO and CO2. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> Plasma, Catalysis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/56/39/85/PDF/Khacef_et_al_corrigA_.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control: Toluene removal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Application of Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control rue d'Issoudun, BP 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 02, France. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> Plasma, Catalysis, Toluene, oxidation. Abstract The combination of heterogeneous catalysts with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (DBD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/33/54/29/PDF/Plasmas_et_applications.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1* , Jean Marie Cormier1. As an alternative, the application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) instead of thermal energy for removal of toxic and water treatment. In the present paper, we present results on the application of <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasmas</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/679325"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma: An emerging technology for VOCs control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effectiveness of applying <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma for destroying VOCs from gas streams is experimentally investigated in this study. p-Xylene, designated as air toxics in the 1990 US Clean Air Act Amendment, is selected as target pollutants due to its wide use in industrial processes. Exposure to fairly low levels of p-xylene (a few ppm) can cause irritation to nose, skin and eyes. In addition, it is odor-causing VOCs which has received much public concern especially in Taiwan due to its high population density. Various technologies have been developed for removing VOCs, e.g., condensation, activated carbon adsorption, thermal decomposition, heterogeneous catalysis and biofiltration. However, there are some limitations with these technologies. Recently, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technologies have been proposed as an innovative way for VOCs control. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma can be generated via various methods including dielectric barrier discharge, corona discharge, DC discharge, packed-bed discharge and RF discharge. The sinks of xylene in atmosphere are primarily involved with the reactions with O and OH atoms. Interestingly, O and OH atoms can be effectively generated via nonthermal plasma processes. A laboratory-scale reactor is designed and constructed for evaluating the effectiveness of nonthermal plasma for destroying p-xylene molecules. The nonthermal plasma is generated with dielectric barrier discharge operating at atmospheric pressure. Operating parameters investigated in this study include applied voltage, temperature and composition of the gas stream. Results indicate that as high as 100% p-xylene removal efficiencies can be achieved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, H.M.; Chang, M.B. [National Central Univ., Chungli (Taiwan, Province of China). Graduate Inst. of Environmental Engineering</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950024364&hterms=vhi&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dvhi"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studying the thermal/<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> crossover in solar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwartz, R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9903158v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Physics of Hybrid Thermal/<span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Models of the continuum radiation from accreting hot plasmas typically assume that the plasma heating mechanism produces energetic particles distributed in energy either as a Maxwellian (the ``thermal'' models) or as an extended power law (the ``<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>'' models). The reality, however, is that neither description is probably accurate. In other astrophysical contexts where we have been able to observe the actual particle energy distributions, e.g. solar system plasmas, and in many particle acceleration theories, the heating mechanism supplies only some fraction of the available energy to very energetic particles. The remainder goes into producing lower energy particles which settle into a quasi-Maxwellian energy distribution. Here, I review the arguments for ``thermal'' versus ``<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>'' plasmas in accreting black hole systems and discuss the physics and emission properties of ``hybrid'' plasmas, where the particle distribution energy is approximately a Maxwellian plus a power law tail. Using results from a new emission code, I then show that such plasmas may be relevant to explaining recent observations, particularly those of Galactic black hole candidates in their soft state.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paolo S. Coppi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-03-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004IJTFM.124..351T"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOx Removal from Flue Gases Using <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Air pollution caused by gas emission of pollutants produced from a wide range of sources including coal, oil and gas burning power plants, diesel engines, paper mills, steel and chemical production plants must be reduced drastically and urgently, as mandated by recent worldwide nation legislation which recently are being reinforced increasingly by international agreements. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma in which the mean energy of electrons is substantially higher than that of the gas offer advantages in reducing energy required to remove the pollutants. The electrical energy supplied into the discharge is used preferentially to create energetic electrons which are then used to produce radicals by dissociation and ionization of the carrier gas in which the pollutants are present. These radicals are used to decompose the pollutants. There are two technologically promising techniques for generating <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas in atmospheric gas pressure containing the pollutants, namely electron beam irradiation and electrical discharge techniques. Both techniques are undergoing intensive and continuous development worldwide. This is done to reduce the energy requirement for pollutant removal, and therefore the associated cost, as well as to obtain a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in reducing the pollutants. In the present paper only electrical discharge techniques for NOx removal from flue gases and exhaust emissions are reviewed. This paper summarizes the chemical reactions responsible for the removal of the major polluting constituents of NO and NO2 encountered in the flue gases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takaki, Koichi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1163782"> <span id="translatedtitle">Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/839988"> <span id="translatedtitle">MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V.K. Mathur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1950732"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the magnetars SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 Observed With RXTE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) observed in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been observed. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806-20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO observed from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain the giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; Gö?ü?, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CoTPh..62..245T"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Wave Solutions and Asymptotic Analysis to a (3+1)-Dimensional Generalized Kadomtsev—Petviashvili Equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, a (3+1)-dimensional generalized Kadomtsev—Petviashvili (GKP) equation is investigated, which can be used to describe many nonlinear phenomena in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Based on the generalized Bell's polynomials, we succinctly construct the Hirota's bilinear equation to the GKP equation. By virtue of multidimensional Riemann theta functions, a lucid and straightforward way is presented to explicitly construct multiperiodic Riemann theta function periodic waves (<span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> waves) for the (3+1)-dimensional GKP equation. Interestingly, the one-periodic waves are well-known cnoidal waves, which are considered as one-dimensional models of periodic waves. The two-periodic waves are a direct generalization of one-periodic waves, their surface pattern is two-dimensional that they have two independent spatial periods in two independent horizontal directions. Finally, we analyze asymptotic behavior of the multiperiodic periodic waves, and rigorously present the relationships between the periodic waves and soliton solutions by a limiting procedure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tian, Shou-Fu; Ma, Pan-Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1753945"> <span id="translatedtitle">A stable <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> 4.18 d oscillation and mysterious occultations in the 2011 MOST light curve of TWHya</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an analysis of the 2011 photometric observations of TW Hya by the MOST satellite; this is the fourth continuous series of this type. The large-scale light variations are dominated by a strong, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> 4.18 d oscillation with superimposed, apparently chaotic flaring activity; the former is most likely produced by stellar rotation with one large hot spot created by a stable accretion funnel in the stable regime of accretion while the latter may be produced by small hot spots, created at moderate latitudes by unstable accretion tongues. A new, previously unnoticed feature is a series of semi-periodic, well defined brightness dips of unknown nature of which 19 were observed during 43 days of our nearly-continuous observations. Re-analysis of the 2009 MOST light curve revealed the presence of 3 similar dips. On the basis of recent theoretical results, we tentatively conclude that the dips may represent occultations of the small hot spots created by unstable accretion tongues by hypothetical optic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siwak, Michal; Matthews, Jaymie M; Guenther, David B; Moffat, Anthony F J; Rowe, Jason F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1966218"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in solar and stellar flares: re-evaluating their nature in the context of power-law flare Fourier spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra, also referred to as 'red' noise processes, are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPP is needed. Here we adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/LYRA, Fermi/GBM, Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required in order to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately descri...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inglis, A R; Dominique, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0208212v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Low and High Frequency Correlation in <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations Among White Dwarfs, Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We interpret the correlation over five orders of magnitude between high frequency and low frequency in a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPO) found by Psaltis, Belloni & van der Klis (1999) for black hole (BH), neutron star (NS) systems and then extended by Mauche (2002) to white dwarf (WD) binaries. We argue that the observed correlation is a natural consequence of the Keplerian disk flow adjustment to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object. In the framework of the transition layer model the high frequency is related to the Keplerian frequency at the outer (adjustment) radius and the low frequency is related to the magnetoacoustic oscillation (MA) frequency. Using a relation between the MA frequency the magnetic and gas pressure and the density and the hydrostatic equilibrium condition in the disk we infer a linear correlation the Keplerian frequency and the MA frequency. We estimate the magnetic field strength near the TL outer radius for BHs NSs and WDs. The fact that the observed high-low frequency correlation over five orders of magnitude is valid for BHs, NSs, and down to WDs strongly rules out relativistic models for QPO phenomena. We come to the conclusion that the QPOs observations indicate the adjustment of the geometrically thin disk to sub-Keplerian motion near the central object. This effect is a common feature for a wide class of systems, starting from white dwarf binaries up to black hole binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Titarchuk; Kent Wood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0307276v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Importance of Searching for Oscillations of the Jovian Inner Radiation Belt with a <span class="hlt">Quasi-Period</span> of 40 Minutes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft discovered <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> bursts of relativistic electrons and of radio emissions with ~40-minute period(QP-40) from the south pole of Jupiter in February 1992. Such polar QP-40 burst activities were found to correlate well with arrivals of high-speed solar winds at Jupiter. We advance the physical scenario that the inner radiation belt(IRB) within ~2-3 Jupiter's radius, where ralativistic electrons are known to be trapped via synchrotron emissions, can execute global QP-40 magnetoinertial oscillations excited by arrivals of high-speed solar winds. Modulated by such QP-40 IRB oscillations, relativistic electrons trapped in the IRB may escape from the magnetic circumpolar regions during a certain phase of each 40-min period to form circumpolar QP-40 electron bursts. Highly beamed synchrotron emissions from such QP-40 burst electrons with small pitch angles relative to Jovian magnetic field at ~30-40 Jupiter radius give rise to QP-40 radio bursts with typical frequencies <0.2MHz. We predict that the synchrotron brightness of the IRB should vary on QP-40 timescales upon arrivals of high-speed solar winds with estimated magnitudes larger than 0.1Jy, detectable by ground-based radio telescopes. Using the real-time solar wind data from the spacecraft ACE, we show here that shch QP-40 pulsations of Jupiter's polar X-ray hot spot did in fact coincide with the arrival of high-speed solar wind at Jupiter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu-Qing Lou; Chen Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.444..327S"> <span id="translatedtitle">A stable <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> 4.18-d oscillation and mysterious occultations in the 2011 MOST light-curve of TW Hya</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an analysis of the 2011 photometric observations of TW Hya by the MOST satellite; this is the fourth continuous series of this type. The large-scale light variations are dominated by a strong, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> 4.18-d oscillation with superimposed, apparently chaotic flaring activity. The former is probably produced by stellar rotation with one large hotspot created by a stable accretion funnel, while the latter may be produced by small hotspots, created at moderate latitudes by unstable accretion tongues. A new, previously unnoticed feature is a series of semiperiodic, well-defined brightness dips of unknown nature, of which 19 were observed during 43 d of our nearly continuous observations. Re-analysis of the 2009 MOST light-curve revealed the presence of three similar dips. On the basis of recent theoretical results, we tentatively conclude that the dips may represent occultations of the small hotspots created by unstable accretion tongues by hypothetical optically thick clumps of dust.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siwak, Michal; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Guenther, David B.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...795..114H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of Magnetars SGR 1806–20 and SGR 1900+14 Observed with RXTE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) observed in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been observed. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806–20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO observed from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and strong variability on short timescales. In this regime, standard Fourier methodology and more sophisticated Fourier analyses fail in equal parts by yielding an unacceptably large number of false-positive detections. This problem is not straightforward to solve in the Fourier domain. Instead, we show how simulations of light curves can offer a viable solution for QPO searches in these light curves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, D.; Heil, L. M.; Watts, A. L.; Gö?ü?, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014QuEle..44..944B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of ? type</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A theory of a closed excitation contour (? system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhST..131a4017P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma on gas cleansing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma technologies are an interesting complement or alternative, for some conventional systems used for gas pollution control (i.e. wet scrubbers and catalytic converters) because they are able to remove simultaneously several gas pollutants, with quite good efficiency at a relatively low-energy consumption. In this work, a dielectric barrier discharge was used to remove nitric oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from a mixture of air and water vapor. A chemical model was developed to obtain a toxic gas removal mechanism and to observe the behavior of the species in the plasma. The influence of water vapor addition on the toxic gases removal efficiency is also investigated. Several experimental parameters such as power, frequency, initial concentration of NOx and SO2 were tested and analyzed. Results of numerical simulation demonstrated good agreement with experimental data of the removal process achieving about 95% of efficiency removal of toxic gases studied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pacheco, M.; Pacheco, J.; Moreno, H.; Santana, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...783L..21S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic Reconnection: An Efficient Source of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Particles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In magnetized astrophysical outflows, the dissipation of field energy into particle energy via magnetic reconnection is often invoked to explain the observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> signatures. By means of two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate anti-parallel reconnection in magnetically dominated electron-positron plasmas. Our simulations extend to unprecedentedly long temporal and spatial scales, so we can capture the asymptotic state of the system beyond the initial transients, and without any artificial limitation by the boundary conditions. At late times, the reconnection layer is organized into a chain of large magnetic islands connected by thin X-lines. The plasmoid instability further fragments each X-line into a series of smaller islands, separated by X-points. At the X-points, the particles become unmagnetized and they get accelerated along the reconnection electric field. We provide definitive evidence that the late-time particle spectrum integrated over the whole reconnection region is a power law whose slope is harder than -2 for magnetizations ? >~ 10. Efficient particle acceleration to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies is a generic by-product of the long-term evolution of relativistic reconnection in both two and three dimensions. In three dimensions, the drift-kink mode corrugates the reconnection layer at early times, but the long-term evolution is controlled by the plasmoid instability which facilitates efficient particle acceleration, analogous to the two-dimensional physics. Our findings have important implications for the generation of hard photon spectra in pulsar winds and relativistic astrophysical jets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1281.1692R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Simulation of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Food Preservation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApJ...577L..23T"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Low and High Frequency Correlation in <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations among White Dwarf, Neutron Star, and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We interpret the correlation over 5 orders of magnitude between high frequency ?high and low frequency ?low in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) found by Psaltis, Belloni, & van der Klis for black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) systems and then extended by Mauche to white dwarf (WD) binaries. The observed correlation strongly constrains theoretical models and provides clues to understanding the nature of the QPO phenomena at large. We argue that the observed correlation is a natural consequence of the Keplerian disk flow adjustment to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object that ultimately leads to the formation of the sub-Keplerian transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary (the star surface for the NS and WD and the horizon for the BH). In the frameworks of the TL model, ?high is related to the Keplerian frequency at the outer (adjustment) radius ?K, and ?low is related to the magnetoacoustic oscillation frequency ?MA. Using a relation between ?MA, the magnetic and gas pressure, and the density and the hydrostatic equilibrium condition in the disk, we infer a linear correlation between ?K and ?MA. Identification of ?high, ?low with ?K, ?MA, respectively, leads us to the determination of H/rout=1.5×10-2 and ?=0.1 (where H is the half-width of the disk and ? is a ratio of magnetic pressure to gas pressure). We estimate the magnetic field strength near the TL outer radius for BHs, NSs, and WDs. The fact that the observed high-low frequency correlation over 5 orders of magnitude is valid for BHs, NSs, and down to WDs strongly rules out relativistic models for QPO phenomena. We come to the conclusion that the QPO observations indicate the adjustment of the geometrically thin disk to sub-Keplerian motion near the central object. This effect is a common feature for a wide class of systems, starting from WD binaries up to BH binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Wood, Kent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047646"> <span id="translatedtitle">LOW-FREQUENCY (11 mHz) OSCILLATIONS IN H1743-322: A NEW CLASS OF BLACK HOLE <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) at {approx}11 mHz in two RXTE and one Chandra observations of the black hole candidate H1743-322. The QPO is observed only at the beginning of the 2010 and 2011 outbursts at similar hard color and intensity, suggestive of an accretion state dependence for the QPO. Although its frequency appears to be correlated with X-ray intensity on timescales of a day, in successive outbursts eight months apart, we measure a QPO frequency that differs by less than Almost-Equal-To 2.2 mHz while the intensity had changed significantly. We show that this {approx}11 mHz QPO is different from the so-called Type C QPOs seen in black holes and that the mechanisms that produce the two flavors of variability are most probably independent. After comparing this QPO with other variability phenomena seen in accreting black holes and neutron stars, we conclude that it best resembles the so-called 1 Hz QPOs seen in dipping neutron star systems, although having a significantly lower (1-2 orders of magnitude) frequency. If confirmed, H1743-322 is the first black hole showing this type of variability. Given the unusual characteristics and the hard-state dependence of the {approx}11 mHz QPO, we also speculate whether these oscillations could instead be related to the radio jets observed in H1743-322. A systematic search for this type of low-frequency QPOs in similar systems is needed to test this speculation. In any case, it remains unexplained why these QPOs have only been seen in the last two outbursts of H1743-322.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute, 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Strohmayer, T., E-mail: d.altamirano@uva.nl [Astrophysics Science Division, Mail Code 662, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120012493&hterms=evidence&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Devidence"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> X-ray Dips from an ULX: Implications for the Binary Motion and the Orbital Inclination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from long-term X-ray (0.3-8.0 keY) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy-dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days the amplitude of which decreases during the second half of the light curve and (3) energy spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data, possibly due to a change in the ionization state of the circumbinary material. We interpret the X-ray modulations in the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination low-mass X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk (similar to the phenomenon of dipping LMXBs), this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination approx > 60 deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...775...28S"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Spectral Study of the Rapid Transitions of Type-B <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations in the Black Hole Transient XTE J1859+226</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fast transitions of type-B and type-A <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) are rarely found, and they are observed at the peak of the outburst in black hole transient (BHT) sources. The associated spectral variations during such events are crucial to understand the origin and location of such QPOs in the accretion disk. During the 1999 outburst of XTE J1859+226, on four occasions a rapid transition of type-B/A QPOs was noted. We performed broadband spectral analysis on these four observations to unveil the responsible spectral parameter causing the rapid transitions. After invoking simple spectral models, it was observed that disk parameters were consistently varying along with disk and power-law fluxes, and almost no change was noted in the power-law index parameter. Though using a complex physical model showed consistent results, the spectral parameter variations across the transitions were not significant. It was observed that the type-B QPO was always associated with an inner disk front which is closer to the BH. In one observation, a type-A QPO appeared as the source count rate suddenly dropped, and the power-law index as well as disk normalization parameter considerably changed during this transition. The spectral changes in this particular observation were similar to the changes observed in XTE J1817-330, indicating a common underlying mechanism. We have also examined a similar observation of BHT source GX 339-4, where a sudden transition of a type-A/B QPO was noted. Similar spectral study again revealed that the disk parameters were changing. We discuss the results in the framework of a truncated disk model and conclude that the movement of the coupled inner disk-corona region is responsible for such rapid transitions of type-B QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sriram, K.; Rao, A. R.; Choi, C. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039312"> <span id="translatedtitle">EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> PULSATIONS IN A SOLAR POST-FLARE CUSP-SHAPE LOOP WITH SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present extreme-ultraviolet multi-wavelength observations with the SDO/AIA instruments of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) propagating along a cusp-shaped loop formed after an M2.2 flare on the Sun. Our motivation is to detect whether there were slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating along its protruding flux tube. To this end, with fast Fourier transform we extract the short (<3 minutes) and long (>3 minutes) period components of the QPPs from time-space diagrams of the tube slices. We find that velocity differences did exist among the short/long-period components of different wavelengths, but only one event in the long-period ones showed they were greater than the measurement errors (e.g., 65 km s{sup -1}), which were 330 km s{sup -1} detected in 171 A, 590 km s{sup -1} in 211 A, and 180 km s{sup -1} in 304 A. The intensity modulation in all wavelengths is found to be very large, e.g., {approx}60% of the emission trend for an event in the 171 A passband, which would be an order of magnitude higher than the perturbation of the plasma density in the slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Moreover, only the QPPs with upward velocities of 50-300 km s{sup -1} are found in the tube, and the downward ones of several tens of kilometers are never unambiguously detected. Therefore, most of the QPP events under study were likely the episodic outflows along the tube, and the one with a supersonic speed of 590 km s{sup -1} may be a kink wave.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, J. T. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010228&hterms=causal&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dcausal"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Fast-mode Wave Trains Within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO-AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first unambiguous detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances greater than approximately solar radius/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 kilometers per second decelerating to approximately 650 kilometers per second. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by approximately 50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22118675"> <span id="translatedtitle">DISCOVERY OF A 7 mHz X-RAY <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE IC 10 X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an Almost-Equal-To 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33{sigma} confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q {identical_to} {nu}/{Delta}{nu}, of Almost-Equal-To 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of Almost-Equal-To - 2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies {approx}>0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the 'heartbeat' mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz 'dipper QPOs' of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Mushotzky, Richard F. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: dheeraj@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: richard@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22270915"> <span id="translatedtitle">A SPECTRAL STUDY OF THE RAPID TRANSITIONS OF TYPE-B <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS IN THE BLACK HOLE TRANSIENT XTE J1859+226</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fast transitions of type-B and type-A <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) are rarely found, and they are observed at the peak of the outburst in black hole transient (BHT) sources. The associated spectral variations during such events are crucial to understand the origin and location of such QPOs in the accretion disk. During the 1999 outburst of XTE J1859+226, on four occasions a rapid transition of type-B/A QPOs was noted. We performed broadband spectral analysis on these four observations to unveil the responsible spectral parameter causing the rapid transitions. After invoking simple spectral models, it was observed that disk parameters were consistently varying along with disk and power-law fluxes, and almost no change was noted in the power-law index parameter. Though using a complex physical model showed consistent results, the spectral parameter variations across the transitions were not significant. It was observed that the type-B QPO was always associated with an inner disk front which is closer to the BH. In one observation, a type-A QPO appeared as the source count rate suddenly dropped, and the power-law index as well as disk normalization parameter considerably changed during this transition. The spectral changes in this particular observation were similar to the changes observed in XTE J1817-330, indicating a common underlying mechanism. We have also examined a similar observation of BHT source GX 339-4, where a sudden transition of a type-A/B QPO was noted. Similar spectral study again revealed that the disk parameters were changing. We discuss the results in the framework of a truncated disk model and conclude that the movement of the coupled inner disk-corona region is responsible for such rapid transitions of type-B QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, A. R., E-mail: astrosriram@yahoo.co.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...753...52L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Fast-mode Wave Trains within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first unambiguous detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances >~ R ?/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s-1 decelerating to ~650 km s-1. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by ~50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036924"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first unambiguous detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11882471"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA TECHNOLOGY FOR DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WASTEWATER CONTROL: A CRITICAL REVIEW</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma is an emerging technique in environmental pollution control technology, produced by the high-voltage discharge processes and therefore a large amount of high energy electrons and active species are generated. The degradation of difficult-degraded organic pollutions will be greatly enhanced by the active species generated from <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma process. However, research on <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technology on organic wastewater cleaning</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsu-Hui Cheng; Shiao-Shing Chen; Yu-Chi Wu; Din-Lit Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile103721.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas on selected mammalian cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">??<span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma… (more)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leduc, Mathieu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0801.2532v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simbol-X capability of detecting the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission of stellar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> relation, derived for solar flares, holds.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/663509"> <span id="translatedtitle">Feasibility analysis report for hybrid <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Examples of NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel-engine powered electrical generators. Examples of VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint-stripping, and parts cleaning. Because pollutant-containing air-emission streams within the Department of Defense (DoD) frequently span a broad range of pollutant concentrations, flow rates, and gas conditions (e.g., temperature, humidity), a single type of NTP reactor is not expected to fit all types of emissions streams. Additionally, stand-alone NTP reactors may provide neither an adequate means of pollutant removal nor an acceptable economic solution. Therefore, hybrid systems (combinations of different NTP reactor types or architectures), which employ adsorbents and/or catalytic media are being examined by researchers in this field. This report is intended to provide a preliminary summary analysis of a few representative hybrid systems as a means of introducing the hybrid or staged-system concept.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998tx19.confE.328B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Optical Flashes of Some LMXBs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a search for ultrafast optical variability among some LMXBs at 6 m telescope of SAO (Russia) and 2 m one of CASLEO (Argentina). Observations have been carried out by the complex MANIA (Multichannel Analysis of Nanosecond Intensity Alterations) with a time resolution of 10^{-7}s. Five extremely short flares of 0.5-5 ms duration, 0.1-1 ms rise times have been detected from the X-ray Nova A0620-00. Two flares of about 0.25 s duration have been recorded from the X-ray burster MXB1735-44. They showed fine structure on time scales of about 5-6 ms. Stochastic variability was detected from the X-ray Nova GRO J0422+32 on time scales of 5 ms - 100 s, simultaneously in different pairs of UBVR bands. The brightness temperature lower limits of all flares are 10^8-1010K therefore they are caused by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes. Comparison of the X-ray and optical fast variability of the LMXBs is carried out.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beskin, G.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bartolini, C.; Guarnieri, A.; Piccioni, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ASPC..422..178B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Radio Emission from Colliding Wind Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In colliding wind binaries, shocks accelerate a fraction of the electrons up to relativistic speeds. These electrons then emit synchrotron radiation at radio wavelengths. Whether or not we detect this radiation depends on the size of the free-free absorption region in the stellar winds of both components of the binary system. One expects long-period binaries to be detectable, but not the short-period ones. It was therefore surprising to find that Cyg OB2 #8A (P = 21.9d) does show variability locked with orbital phase. To investigate this, we developed a model for the relativistic electron generation (including cooling and advection) and the radiative transfer of the synchrotron emission through the stellar wind. Using this model, we show that the synchrotron emitting region in Cyg OB2 #8A does extend far enough beyond the free-free absorption region to generate orbit-locked variability in the radio flux. This model can also be applied to other <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emitters and will prove useful in interpreting observations from future surveys, such as COBRaS — the Cyg OB2 Radio Survey.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blomme, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...612..988T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%-90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT>~50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index ?~1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT<~5 keV; the index for this state, ?~2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a converging flow into the BH). In the TL model for the corona, the QPO frequency ?high is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency ?K at the outer (adjustment) radius and ?low is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency ?MA. The observed correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also suggest a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020085232&hterms=hz+frequency+bands&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhz%2Bfrequency%2Bbands"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a 450 Hz <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation from the Microquasar GRO J1655-40 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery with the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer of a 450 Hz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) in the hard X-ray flux from the Galactic microquasar GRO J1655-40. This is the highest frequency QPO modulation seen to date from a black hole. The QPO is detected only in the hard X-ray band above approx. 13 keV. It is both strong and narrow, with a typical rms (root mean square) amplitude of 4.5% in the 13-27 keV range and a width of approx. 40 Hz (FWHM). For two observations in which we detect the 450 Hz QPO, a previously known approx. 300 Hz QPO is also observed in the 2-13 keV band. We show that these two QPOs sometimes appear simultaneously, thus demonstrating the first detection of a pair of high-frequency QPOs in a black hole system. Prior to this, pairs of high-frequency QPOs have been detected only in neutron star systems. GRO J1655-40 is one of only a handful of black hole systems with a good dynamical mass constraint. For a nonrotating black hole with mass between 5.5 and 7.9 solar masses, the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) ranges from 45 to 70 km. For any mass in this range the radius at which the orbital frequency reaches 450 Hz is less than the ISCO radius, indicating that, if the modulation is caused by Kepler motion, the black hole must have appreciable spin. If the QPO frequency is set by the orbital frequency of matter at the ISCO, then for this mass range the dimensionless angular momentum lies in the range 0.15 < j < 0.5. Moreover, if the modulation is caused by oscillation modes in the disk or Lense-Thirring precession, then this would also require a rapidly rotating hole. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for models of X-ray variability in black holes and neutron stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:162350"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma for remediation of volatile organic compounds.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">??The University of ManchesterZaenab Abd AllahDoctor of Philosophy<span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma for remediation of volatile organic compounds29/02/2012<span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma generated in a dielectric barrier packed-bed reactor… (more)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abd Allah, Zaenab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0913/2009GL038715/2009GL038715.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emission of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report evidence for the emission of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave radiation by a deep Martian dust storm. The observations were made using an innovative detector that can discriminate between radiation of thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> origin by measuring the high order moments of its electric field strength. Measurements with this detector, installed in a 34 m radio telescope of the Deep Space</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher Ruf; Nilton O. Renno; Jasper F. Kok; Etienne Bandelier; Michael J. Sander; Steven Gross; Lyle Skjerve; Bruce Cantor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Ap%26SS.353...37K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical simulation of electromagnetic emissions in the solar wind plasma with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dynamics of fundamental and second harmonic electromagnetic emissions are simulated in the solar wind plasma in the presence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron distribution function in which primary Langmuir waves are driven by an electron beam. The electron velocity distribution function is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons (Maxwellian) and the suprathermal electrons (<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons). The effects of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons on the generation of primary Langmuir waves, emission rates of the fundamental (F) and harmonic waves (H) and their distributions are investigated. The both of the F and H emissions are sensitive to the characterizes of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons. It is found that in the presence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons the production of the Langmuir waves decreases and consequently the levels of fundamental and second harmonic waves are reduced. The emission rate of the fundamental transverse waves decreases and its peak moves slightly toward smaller wave-numbers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khalilpour, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19517034"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat. PMID:19517034</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008POBeo..84..405N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in flammable gas mixtures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations for charged particles (electrons, positive and negative ions), and with the electric circuit equation. The electric circuit comprises power supply, ballast resistor connected in series with the discharge and capacity. Rate coefficients for electron-assisted reactions were calculated from solving the two-term spherical harmonic expansion of the Boltzmann equation. Such an approach allows us to describe influence of thermal chemistry reactions (burning) on the discharge characteristics. Results of comparison between the discharge and thermal ignition effects for mixtures of hydrogen or ethylene with dry air will be reported. Effects of acceleration of ignition by discharge plasma will be analyzed. In particular, the role of singlet oxygen produced effectively in the discharge in ignition speeding up will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007Ap%26SS.308..101H"> <span id="translatedtitle">QED can explain the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from SGRs and AXPs: variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Owing to effects arising from quantum electrodynamics (QED), magnetohydrodynamical fast modes of sufficient strength will break down to form electron-positron pairs while traversing the magnetospheres of strongly magnetised neutron stars. The bulk of the energy of the fast mode fuels the development of an electron-positron fireball. However, a small, but potentially observable, fraction of the energy (˜1033 erg) can generate a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distribution of electrons and positrons far from the star. This paper examines the cooling and radiative output of these particles. Small-scale waves may produce only the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission. The properties of this <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in the absence of a fireball match those of the quiescent, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation recently observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from several anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft-gamma repeaters. Initial estimates of the emission as a function of angle indicate that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission should be beamed and therefore one would expect this emission to be pulsed as well. According to this model the pulsation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission should be between 90 and 180 degrees out of phase from the thermal emission from the stellar surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heyl, Jeremy S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4238021"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell death induced by ozone and various <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications. PMID:25410636</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25410636"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell death induced by ozone and various <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications. PMID:25410636</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Sárka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0502349v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">A QED Model for <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission from SGRs and AXPs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously, we showed that, owing to effects arising from quantum electrodynamics (QED), magnetohydrodynamic fast modes of sufficient strength will break down to form electron-positron pairs while traversing the magnetospheres of strongly magnetised neutron stars. The bulk of the energy of the fast mode fuels the development of an electron-positron fireball. However, a small, but potentially observable, fraction of the energy ($\\sim 10^{33}$ ergs) can generate a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distribution of electrons and positrons far from the star. In this paper, we examine the cooling and radiative output of these particles. We also investigate the properties of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in the absence of a fireball to understand the breakdown of fast modes that do not yield an optically thick pair plasma. This quiescent, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation associated with fast mode breakdown may account for the recently observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from several anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft-gamma repeaters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeremy S. Heyl; Lars Hernquist</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/41/02/00/PDF/Beroual_IMETI2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas for NOx Treatment Y.N. Jaffre, T. Aka-Ngnui and A. Beroual</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas for NOx Treatment Y.N. Jaffr´e, T. Aka-Ngnui and A. Beroual Ecole Centrale de to the determination of corona ig- nition threshold for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma generation and to the optimization: Corona Discharges, Energy, <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas, Gas Treatments 1 INTRODUCTION Nitrogen oxides (NOx</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1178642"> <span id="translatedtitle">Models of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from early-type binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The powerful wind-wind collision in massive star binaries creates a region of high temperature plasma and accelerates particles to relativistic energies. I briefly summarize the hydrodynamics of the wind-wind interaction and the observational evidence, including recent $\\gamma$-ray detections, of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from such systems. I then discuss existing models of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission and their application to date, before concluding with some future prospects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pittard, J M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ASPC..422..145P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Models of the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission from Early-Type Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The powerful wind-wind collision in massive star binaries creates a region of high temperature plasma and accelerates particles to relativistic energies. I briefly summarize the hydrodynamics of the wind-wind interaction and the observational evidence, including recent ?-ray detections, of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from such systems. I then discuss existing models of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission and their application to date, before concluding with some future prospects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pittard, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26248967"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma processing for environmental protection: decomposition of dilute VOCs in air</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma processing is one of the most hopeful air-cleaning technologies to remove toxic gas contaminants in air. The historical background of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma related with the electrostatics is described and the fundamental experimental system including the reactor designs and their power supplies is introduced. Some experimental results suggested the high potential of the plasma processing to decompose those</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Oda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26248561"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nitric oxide decomposition in air by using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma processing - with additives and catalyst</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">NO removal process by using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with catalyst (copper coated zeolite catalyst i.e. Cu-ZSM-5) was studied to enhance NO removal efficiency of the plasma chemical reactions. A hydrocarbon agent was added to the synthesized flue gas before the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma processing. Adding effects of hydrocarbon agent to the synthesized flue gas on the NO removal were also investigated. A</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tetsuiji Oda; Tomohide Kato; Tadashi Takahashi; Kazuo Shimizu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22016149"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE PERSPECTIVE ON <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> EMISSION IN HIFLUGCS GALAXY CLUSTERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The search for diffuse <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. In this work, we investigate 14-195 keV spectra from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey for evidence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> excess emission above the exponentially decreasing tail of thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. To account for the thermal contribution at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectral components can be determined simultaneously. We find marginally significant IC components in six clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single-temperature fits to the XMM-Newton data alone, we see no significant excess emission above that predicted by the thermal model determined at soft energies. This result also holds for the summed spectra of various subgroups, except for the subsample of clusters with diffuse radio emission. For clusters hosting a diffuse radio halo, a relic, or a mini-halo, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission is initially detected at the {approx}5{sigma} confidence level-driven by clusters with mini-halos-but modeling and systematic uncertainties ultimately degrade this significance. In individual clusters, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure of relativistic electrons is limited to {approx}< 10% of the thermal electron pressure, with stricter limits for the more massive clusters, indicating that these electrons are likely not dynamically important in the central regions of clusters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Tueller, Jack; Okajima, Takashi [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sarazin, Craig L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Zhang Yuying [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Mushotzky, Richard F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Clarke, Tracy E., E-mail: daniel.r.wik@nasa.gov [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18837237"> <span id="translatedtitle">TOPICAL REVIEW: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas in and in contact with liquids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last two decades atmospheric (or high) pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas in and in contact with liquids have received a lot of attention in view of their considerable environmental and medical applications. The simultaneous generation of intense UV radiation, shock waves and active radicals makes these discharges particularly suitable for decontamination, sterilization and purification purposes. This paper reviews the current</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter Bruggeman; Christophe Leys</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=29303"> <span id="translatedtitle">FIRST REPORT ON <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA REACTOR SCALING CRITERIA AND OPTIMIZATION MODELS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) reactor technology for DoD air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/5303"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma - Nanometer TiO2 Photocatalysis for Formaldehyde Decomposition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-nanometer TiO2 photocatalysis, the techniques of photocatalysis and plasma are combined, and do not need ultraviolet light. It can make use of some kinds of energy in the process of decomposing, while at the same time producing...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Q.; Feng, G.; Guang, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26486355"> <span id="translatedtitle">A comparative study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma assisted reforming technologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">On board hydrogen production out of hydrocarbons (reforming) for fuel cells feed is subject to problems when used with traditional catalysts. High device weight, a relatively long transient time and poisoning problems make the integration onboard a vehicle complex. In response to these challenges, hydrocarbons reforming processes assisted by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas for hydrogen production have been implemented over recent years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Petitpas; J.-D. Rollier; A. Darmon; J. Gonzalez-Aguilar; R. Metkemeijer; L. Fulcheri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://plantpath.ifas.ufl.edu/faculty/statewide/schuerger/Schuerger_2008_IJA_Plasmas-Bacillus.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft pressure glow-discharge (APGD) plasmas have been proposed for sterilizing spacecraft surfaces prior to launch. The advantages of APGD plasmas for the sterilization of spacecraft surfaces include low</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schuerger, Andrew C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/619732"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas as gas-phase advanced oxidation processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas are useful for generating reactive species (free radicals) in a gas stream. Because radical attack reaction rate constants are very large for many chemical species, entrained pollutants are readily decomposed by radicals. Such plasmas can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals; therefore, they show promise for treating a wide variety of pollutants.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ktb.engin.umich.edu/RSG/pubs_files/GRL-2009-36-13_Ruf_etal_Mars-lightning.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emission of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm Christopher Ruf,1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">- thermal origin by measuring the high order moments of its electric field strength. Measurements with this detector, installed in a 34 m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN), were made for about 5 hours June 2006. The spectrum of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation has significant peaks around predicted values</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruf, Christopher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=18855"> <span id="translatedtitle">EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD STUDIES OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMAS FOR NOX CONTROL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas (NTPs) represent a promising technology for the destruction of various toxic gases entrained in air streams. One challenging example of the need for hazardous gas control is the jet engine test cell (JETC) facility where very large amounts of NO(x)s are emitte...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://parikh.ucdavis.edu/pages/publications/Publications_pdf/mmm_parikh_Navrotsky_2004.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials Atul N of the microporous materials was comparable to or better than for materials derived by thermal calcination Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Zeolite; Structure directing agent; Calcination; Ultraviolet</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parikh, Atul N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...787..123H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetic Electron Propagation in the Decay Phase of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Flare Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/36/33/75/PDF/khacef2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22496503"> <span id="translatedtitle">The cholinergic blockade of both thermally and <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span> induced human eccrine sweating.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermally induced eccrine sweating is cholinergically mediated, but other neurotransmitters have been postulated for psychological (emotional) sweating. However, we hypothesized that such sweating is not noradrenergically driven in passively heated, resting humans. To test this, nine supine subjects were exposed to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> stimuli (palmar pain, mental arithmetic and static exercise) known to evoke sweating. Trials consisted of the following four sequential phases: thermoneutral rest; passive heating to elevate (by ~1.0°C) and clamp mean body temperature and steady-state sweating (perfusion garment and footbath); an atropine sulphate infusion (0.04 mg kg(-1)) with thermal clamping sustained; and following clamp removal. Sudomotor responses from glabrous (hairless) and non-glabrous skin surfaces were measured simultaneously (precursor and discharged sweating). When thermoneutral, these <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> stimuli elicited significant sweating only from the palm (P < 0.05). Passive heating induced steady-state sweating ranging from 0.20 ± 0.04 (volar hand) to 1.40 ± 0.14 mg cm(-2) min(-1) (forehead), with each <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> stimulus provoking greater secretion (P < 0.05). Atropine suppressed thermal sweating, and it also eliminated the sudomotor responses to these <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> stimuli when body temperatures were prevented from rising (P > 0.05). However, when the thermal clamp was removed, core and skin temperatures became further elevated and sweating was restored (P < 0.05), indicating that the blockade had been overcome, presumably through elevated receptor competition. These observations establish the dependence of both thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> eccrine sweating from glabrous and non-glabrous surfaces on acetylcholine release, and challenge theories concerning the psychological modulation of sweating. Furthermore, no evidence existed for the significant participation of non-cholinergic neurotransmitters during any of these stimulations. PMID:22496503</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Machado-Moreira, Christiano A; McLennan, Peter L; Lillioja, Stephen; van Dijk, Wilko; Caldwell, Joanne N; Taylor, Nigel A S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0412475v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cluster mergers and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> phenomena: expectations from a statistical magneto-turbulent model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The most important evidences for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> phenomena in galaxy clusters comes from the spectacular synchrotron radio emission diffused over Mpc scale observed in a growing number of massive clusters. A promising possibility to explain giant radio halos is given by the presence of relativistic electrons reaccelerated by some kind of turbulence generated in the cluster volume during merger events. With the aim to investigate the connection between thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> properties of the ICM, in this paper we develope a statistical magneto-turbulent model which describes in a self-consistent way the evolution of the thermal ICM and that of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from clusters. Making use of the extended Press & Schechter formalism, we follow cluster mergers and estimate the injection rate of the fluid turbulence generated during these energetic events. We then calculate the evolution of the spectrum of the relativistic electrons in the ICM during the cluster life by taking into account both the electron-acceleration due to the merger-driven turbulence and the relevant energy losses of the electrons. We end up with a synthetic population of galaxy clusters for which the evolution of the ICM and of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectrum emitted by the accelerated electrons is calculated. The generation of detectable <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio and hard X-ray emission in the simulated clusters is found to be possible during major merger events for reliable values of the model parameters. In addition the occurrence of radio halos as a function of the mass of the parent clusters is calculated and compared with observations. In this case it is found that the model expectations are in good agreement with observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Cassano; G. Brunetti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70025915"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slightly thermal springs and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PASJ...65S...6T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oscillating Magnetic Trap and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission from Solar Flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A comparative analysis of the fine time structure of microwave and hard X-ray emissions from the flare event on 1992 November 5 is given. Based on wavelet analysis, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations with a fundamental period of 6 s in both wave bands have been revealed. The anticorrelation of time profiles of microwave and hard X-ray emissions as well as time delays between the emission peaks in different wave bands are explained by the excitation of sausage oscillations of a flare loop modelling by a magnetic trap. It has been shown that the intermediate pitch angle diffusion regime of trapped electrons into the loss-cone should be realized in flare loops. The relation between time delays of emission peaks at different wave bands and the pulse duration has been investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsap, Yuri; Kopylova, Yulia; Goldvarg, Tatiana; Stepanov, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/61/71/41/PDF/Lebouvier_Exhaust_gas_fuel_reforming_Energy_Fuels2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration regeneration application. The plasma technology developed is based on a high voltage / low current non production, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> arc discharge, 1D model, plasma reformer, NOx trap regeneration application, Diesel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/80/53/47/PDF/lebouvier-ISPC19.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2 , G anti-pollution norm namely for Diesel powered vehicles. NOx (NO, NO2,...) are very irritant pollutants- nologies purge is the use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma. Plasma reforming of diesel fuel and exhaust gas mix- ture</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Icar..221..682Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mars exospheric thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> components: Seasonal and local variations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A model of the martian exosphere is built for average solar conditions. A Chamberlain's approach (Chamberlain, J.W. [1963]. Planet. Space Sci. 11, 901) is used to describe the O, CO, CO2, and O2 thermal exospheric components. The average thermal oxygen density at 300 km in altitude varies by about one order of magnitude with seasons. A Monte-Carlo test particle simulation is also developed in order to estimate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> oxygen component of the exosphere. The seasonal variation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> oxygen average density is much less than the thermal component but displays clear seasonal variations of its spatial distribution. The neutral oxygen atomic escaping flux varies from 2.9 to 5.3 × 1025 s-1 in good agreement with Valeille et al. (Valeille, A., Combi, M.R., Bougher, S.W., Tenishev, V., Nagy, A.F. [2009a]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 114, 11006; Valeille, A., Tenishev, V., Bougher, S.W., Combi, M.R., Nagy, A.F. [2009b]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 114, 11005). Mars's oxygen exosphere is thermal below 600 km and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> above 700 km at all seasons. The typical scale height is ˜45 km for thermal O and ˜500 km for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> oxygen density. The total photoionization rate above 300 km corresponds to a CO2+/O total production ratio between 0.004 and 0.02. When compared to the composition of the escaping flux measured by ASPERA-3/Mars Express, this suggests that ions formed below 300 km should significantly contribute to the escaping ion flux and/or that a significant part of the newly O+ ions reimpacts Mars. The simulated oxygen density profile is also compared to the recent observed profile by Alice/Rosetta (Feldman, P.D. et al. [2011]. Icarus 214, 394-399). Although the scale height of our simulated <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> oxygen exosphere and the transition from thermal to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> dominated exospheres are slightly higher than suggested by Feldman et al. (Feldman, P.D. et al. [2011]. Icarus 214, 394-399), a good agreement is found when taking into account the uncertainties of Alice/Rosetta observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yagi, M.; Leblanc, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Hess, S.; Modolo, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PPCF...49....1M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Industrial applications of atmospheric <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in environmental remediation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) has been recognized as an important tool for the abatement of pollutants and for promoting various chemical reactions in gas or in liquid. Indoor air cleaners have been mass-produced and proved to be effective for the removal of odour and allergen. NTP has various potential applications in environmental remediation, such as the removal of volatile organic pollutants, simultaneous removal of NOx and soot in diesel exhaust and sterilization of air and water. To improve the efficiency of plasma chemical processes, a combination of NTP and catalysts/absorbents is effective. Synergetic effects have been recognized; however, its mechanism remains subject to further investigations. The generation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> discharge plasma and several industrial applications are presented in this paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mizuno, Akira</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECUF1008M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0806.0228v3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Study of a Propagating <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MmSAI..82..523W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Swifts BAT search for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in HIFLUGCS clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detections of diffuse inverse Compton (IC) emission at hard X-ray energies have typically been controversial and/or of low significance. Consistency of the existing limits and detections may be possible only for very extended IC spatial distributions. To test this idea, we apply a method to characterize extended, hard X-ray emission from the Swifts BAT survey. Spatially coincident spectra from XMM-Newtons and Swifts are jointly fit to simultaneously constrain both thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> components, but no significant IC spectral component is seen in any of the clusters in the sample. For the Coma cluster, our upper limits exclude the most recently detected fluxes, regardless of the IC spatial distribution. Spectra from all clusters are summed, to enhance marginal IC emission possibly present in many clusters, but no aggregate <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> excess is found, although a hint of an excess is seen in the radio halo/relic subset.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26248611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corona induced <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas: Fundamental study and industrial applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our investigations on corona induced <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas include both fundamental study and products development. This paper presents our recent work in following subjects: investigation on characteristics of pulsed corona discharge in relation with flue gas cleaning; evaluation of high voltage power supply; design of plasma reactor; experimental study on DeNOx and DeSO2; decomposition of VOCs and indoor air cleaning.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keping Yan; Hexing Hui; Mi Cui; Jinsong Miao; Xiaoli Wu; Chongguang Bao; Ruinian Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22825115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combining <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with heterogeneous catalysis in waste gas treatment: A review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma driven catalysis is a promising technology for waste gas treatment characterized by higher energy efficiencies, high mineralization rates and low by-product formation. The combination of heterogeneous catalysts with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma can be operated in two configurations: positioning the catalyst in the discharge zone (in-plasma catalysis) or downflow the discharge zone (post plasma catalysis).In a first part of the review,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jim Van Durme; Jo Dewulf; Christophe Leys; Herman Van Langenhove</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23316957"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved oxidation of air pollutants in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The performance of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) for the removal of organic air pollutants (especially in low concentrations) is improved by the introduction of ferroelectric and catalytically active materials into the discharge zone of an NTP reactor. Experiments with model systems (various contaminants and packed-bed materials) have shown that such a modification of a homogeneous gas-phase plasma can overcome the most</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U. Roland; F. Holzer; F.-D. Kopinke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60622104"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Alternative to Waste Incineration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. L. Foutz; J. E. Rogers; J. D. Mather</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6708775"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> specialists</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110010267&hterms=galaxy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dgalaxy"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Swift BAT Perspective on <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The search for diffuse <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40098698"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in Ultraviolet Light Technology for <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Processing of Liquid Foods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A negative, public reaction is growing over the addition of chemical preservatives to liquid foods and beverages to extend\\u000a their shelf life and to protect against foodborne pathogens. As a physical method, ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation has\\u000a a positive consumer image and is of interest to the food industry as a low cost <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> method of preservation. Recent\\u000a advances in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tatiana Koutchma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/767461"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120012018&hterms=velocity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dvelocity"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result fro m many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity of 19-22 km/s in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find thai velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities measured.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22113484"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD681835"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic Radiation from <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Structures.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of theoretical and experimental research on log-periodic dipole arrays and their periodic protypes is summarized. A perturbational method for the analysis of boundary value problems with log-periodic boundary conditions is also discussed. The ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. B. Kieburtz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997APS..PAC..8W13N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wakefield Dynamics in <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The behavior of longitudinal wake fields of very short bunches, excited in in multicell accelerating structures, that are proposed for projects of Linear Colliders (TESLA, SBLC and NLC) has been studied. Computations were performed for bunch lengths down to 50 micrometers. The loss factor, which gives the global energy loss of the bunch and the profile of the wake function, which is of major interest for bunch energy spread calculations, has been carefully studied. A strong modification of wake fields along the finite train of multicell cavities was clearly found for short bunchlengths. In particular, the wakes induced by the bunch, as it proceeds down the successive cavities, decrease in amplitude and become more linear around the bunch center, with a profile very close to the integral of charge density. The loss factor, decreasing also with the number of cavities, becomes independent of bunchlength for very short bunches and tends asymptotically to a finite value. However, any periodicity (or multi-periodicity) break will spoil the wake distribution and increase the wakefield amplitude.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Novokhatski, Alexandre; Mosnier, Alban</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pdfserv.aip.org/APCPCS/vol_714/iss_1/383_1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unified Model of <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a new theoretical framework for interpreting observed spectral\\/temporal characteristics of accreting neutron star and black hole systems as gravity wave (g-mode oscillations). This model successfully incorporates features of earlier models (published by the present authors and colleagues over the last several years) into a more general scheme that reduces in one limit to a classic treatment by Chandrasekhar,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Titarchuk; Kent S. Wood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AIPC..714..383T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unified Model of <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a new theoretical framework for interpreting observed spectral/temporal characteristics of accreting neutron star and black hole systems as gravity wave (g-mode oscillations). This model successfully incorporates features of earlier models (published by the present authors and colleagues over the last several years) into a more general scheme that reduces in one limit to a classic treatment by Chandrasekhar, placing this paradigm in the tradition of his analysis. It goes beyond his treatment in the inclusion of radial dependence, the incorporation of MHD, and the application to X-ray timing phenomenology. The conceptual picture that goes with this idea is one in which the problem of disk accretion onto a (symmetrical) black hole is the starting point; accretion in geometries where symmetries are broken by magnetic fields is treated with extensions or perturbations to that case. Primary emphasis is on understanding QPO features and power spectrum breaks. Pairs or groups of QPOs that evolve in correlated ways are treated as splittings of eigenfrequencies in a fluid dynamics analysis rather than, say, as beat phenomena. One particular QPO is identified with the Kepler (gravitational) frequency and the other QPOs are related to that one. Because the Kepler frequency is Newtonian and not a General Relativistic effect, the entire treatment is Newtonian, but this helps explain how certain relationships appear to extend over ~ six orders of magnitude in frequency, linking white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes in a single comprehensive picture. The explanatory range of the theoretical framework is considerable: it addresses the magnetic field strength and configuration near the compact object, the extension of the Keplerian disk near the central object (and the location of the transition between Keplerian and non Keplerian flow), the presence of advection flow along with disk accretion and the conditions for shock formation in the accretion flow. Successes of earlier treatments, for example fitting the correlated drifts of as many as six persistent power density spectrum features (QPOs or breaks) with minimal parametrization are retained in the new unified scheme. Presented calculations are aimed at (i) extending the explanatory range of the model, (ii) working out details and consequences of the new framework that unifies it with Chandrasekhar's analysis, (iii) making it explicitly an MHD model and not simply hydrodynamics, and (iv) validating it with test. The goal is to have a theoretical synthesis of the existing QPO phenomenology that will serve as a starting point for future X-ray timing observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Wood, Kent S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22011812"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> EMISSIONS FROM COOL CORES HEATED BY COSMIC RAYS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions from cool cores in galaxy clusters. We adopted a recent model in which cosmic rays (CRs) prevail in the cores and stably heat them through CR streaming. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions come from the interaction between CR protons and intracluster medium (ICM). Comparison between the theoretical predictions and radio observations shows that the overall CR spectra must be steep, and most of the CRs in the cores are low-energy CRs. Assuming that the CRs are injected through active galactic nucleus activities, we study the nature of the shocks that are responsible for the CR acceleration. The steep CR spectra are likely to reflect the fact that the shocks travel in hot ICM with fairly small Mach numbers. We also study the dependence on the CR streaming velocity. The results indicate that synchrotron emissions from secondary electrons should be observed as radio mini-halos in the cores. In particular, low-frequency observations (e.g., LOFAR) are promising. However, the steepness of the spectra makes it difficult to detect <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from the cores. The low-energy CRs may be heating optical filaments observed in the cores.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Theory Centre, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...770...26S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ubiquitous <span class="hlt">Non-thermals</span> in Astrophysical Plasmas: Restating the Difficulty of Maintaining Maxwellians</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, Ke , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v 2(Ke )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v 2 ? w(15/8Ke )1/4 will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally Ke (s) <= 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of Ke along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> regime Ke > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0302186v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pressure Balance between Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445.3659L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a correlation between the frequency of the mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations and the neutron-star temperature in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We detected millihertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in an XMM-Newton observation of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53. These QPOs have been interpreted as marginally stable burning on the neutron-star surface. At the beginning of the observation the QPO was at around 8 mHz, together with a possible second harmonic. About 12 ks into the observation a type I X-ray burst occurred and the QPO disappeared; the QPO reappeared ˜25 ks after the burst and it was present until the end of the observation. We divided the observation into four segments to study the evolution of the spectral properties of the source during intervals with and without mHz QPO. We find that the temperature of the neutron-star surface increases from the QPO segment to the non-QPO segment, and vice versa. We also find a strong correlation between the frequency of the mHz QPO and the temperature of a blackbody component in the energy spectrum representing the temperature of neutron-star surface. Our results are consistent with previous results that the frequency of the mHz QPO depends on the variation of the heat flux from the neutron-star crust, and therefore supports the suggestion that the observed QPO frequency drifts could be caused by the cooling of deeper layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1951503"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a correlation between the frequency of the mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations and the neutron-star temperature in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We detected millihertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in an XMM-Newton observation of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53. These QPOs have been interpreted as marginally-stable burning on the neutron-star surface. At the beginning of the observation the QPO was at around 8 mHz, together with a possible second harmonic. About 12 ks into the observation a type I X-ray burst occurred and the QPO disappeared; the QPO reappeared ~25 ks after the burst and it was present until the end of the observation. We divided the observation into four segments to study the evolution of the spectral properties of the source during intervals with and without mHz QPO. We find that the temperature of the neutron-star surface increases from the QPO segment to the non-QPO segment, and vice versa. We also find a strong correlation between the frequency of the mHz QPO and the temperature of a black-body component in the energy spectrum representing the temperature of neutron-star surface. Our results are consistent ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lyu, Ming; Altamirano, Diego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004HEAD....8.1713Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photon-Energy Dependence of the Phase of <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations in Black Holes and Neutron Stars and the Implications for Models of Their X-Ray Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a new method to determine the relative phases of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) at low and high photon energies, we find that the 6 Hz oscillations of the QPOs in the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550-564 and in the 6 Hz normal branch oscillation (NBO) in the neutron star LMXB Sco X-1 exhibit similar trends. In both oscillations, the waveforms shift to later times with increasing photon energy up to about 6--8 keV. Above this energy the trend reverses and the waveforms shift to earlier times with increasing photon energy, eventually leading the waveforms observed at low photon energies. This behavior rules out the possibility that Compton up/down scattering mechanism is the only mechanism responsible for generating the phase shifts. We discuss the implications for models of QPO X-ray spectra and the origin of spectral variability in these X-ray sources. This research was supported in part by NASA grant NAG 5-12030, NSF grant AST 0098399, and the funds of the Fortner Endowed Chair at Illinois. WY thanks M. van der Klis for stimulating comments and the support of NWO grant 614.051.002 at the University of Amsterdam where this study was initiated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, W.; Lamb, F. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998AIPC..431..381W"> <span id="translatedtitle">KiloHertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in the Z sources GX 340+0, Cygnus X-2, GX 17+2, GX 5-1, and Scorpius X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have discovered kiloHertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (kHz QPOs) in five Z sources: GX 340+0, Cygnus X-2, GX 17+2, GX 5-1, and Scorpius X-1. In all sources the properties of these kHz QPOs are very similar and closely related to the position of the sources on the Z track traced out in the X-ray color-color diagram and the hardness-intensity diagram. The frequencies of the kHz QPOs increase when the sources move from the left end of the horizontal branch to horizontal/normal branch vertex, thus with inferred mass accretion rate. Only for Scorpius X-1 the kHz QPOs have been observed down the normal branch unto the flaring branch. The strength and the FWHM of the higher-frequency kHz QPOs decrease with mass accretion rate, but when the lower-frequency kHz QPOs are detected the strength and the FWHM of this QPO stay approximately constant with mass accretion rate. In Scorpius X-1 the frequency separation between the kHz QPOs decreases with mass accretion rate, but in the other Z sources the separation remains approximately constant, although a similar decrease in peak separation as found in Scorpius X-1 can not be excluded.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wijnands, Rudy; van der Klis, Michiel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...793..129H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intermittency and Lifetime of the 625 Hz <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillation in the 2004 Hyperflare from the Magnetar SGR 1806-20 as Evidence for Magnetic Coupling between the Crust and the Core</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ~100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ~625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ~0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Levin, Yuri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990A%26A...229..504A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of micro-flaring and secular and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variations in dMe flare stars. IV - Harmonic analysis of YZ Canis Minoris and a possible connection with the Ionson-Mullan hypothesis of coronal heating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Periodograms of U-band photometric data have been examined to search for "time signatures" in YZ Canis Minoris down to periods of about 6 seconds. <span class="hlt">Quasi-periods</span> are found at 7.1, 15.4, 33.2 and 92.9 s. From harmonic analysis the fundamental frequencies, 46.3 mHz (21.6s period) and 35.8 mHz (27.9 s) and 10.8 mHz (92.9 s), and several overtones and found. The 7.1-s "time signature" appears to be superposed overtones of these fundamentals. The 15.4-s "time signature" is very close to the 5th overtone of 10.8 mHz. Similarities with other dM4.5e stars, e.g. AT Microscopii (with "time signatures" 13.2 and 7.9 s), may be explicable in terms of a few such close fundamental frequencies. These fundamental frequencies and their overtones may have a bearing on the Ionson-Mullan hypothesis that coronal-heating is coupled to convective motion in late-type stars, and they are important new parameters possibly related to the flaring mechanism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, A. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008BAAA...51..293B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Powerful <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in black-hole powered sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Powerful <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission has been detected coming from relativistic collimated outflows launched in the vicinity of black holes of a very wide range of masses, from few to ~10^10 Msun. These collimated outflows or jets have large amounts of energy and momentum extracted from the black hole itself and/or from matter trapped in its potential well. The key ingredients for the formation of these powerful jets are accretion of matter with angular momentum, the huge gravitational potential of the compact object, the strong ordered magnetic fields near the black-hole horizon, the potentially large rotational energy in the case of a Kerr black hole, and an escape velocity close to c. At different scales along the outflows, i.e. ~10-10^10 RSch from the black hole, the local conditions can lead to the generation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> populations of particles via, e.g., magnetic reconnection, magneto-centrifugal mechanisms, diffusive processes, or the so-called converter mechanism. These <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> populations of particles, interacting with dense matter, magnetic, and radiation fields, could yield radio-to-gamma-ray emission via synchrotron process, inverse Compton scattering, relativistic Bremsstrahlung, proton-proton and photo-hadron colissions, and even heavy nuclei photo-disintegration. Other processes, like pair creation or the development of electromagnetic cascades, could be also relevant in black-hole jets and their surroundings. Black holes of different masses, accretion rates and environments show different phenomenologies, as can be observed in AGNs, GRBs or microquasars. Nonetheless, these sources basically share the same fundamental physics: accretion, black-hole rotation, plus an environment, but they are individualized due to their own specific conditions. In this paper, we qualitatively review the main characteristics of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission produced in jets from black holes, giving also a brief overview on the physical properties of black hole/jet systems. We comment as well on some important differences and similarities between classes of sources, and on the prospects for the study of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from astrophysical sources powered by black holes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bosch-Ramon, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005MNRAS.357.1313C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cluster mergers and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> phenomena: a statistical magneto-turbulent model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is now firm evidence that the intracluster medium (ICM) consists of a mixture of hot plasma, magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The most important evidence for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> phenomena in galaxy clusters comes from the spectacular synchrotron radio emission diffused over Mpc scales observed in a growing number of massive clusters and, more recently, in the hard X-ray tails detected in a few cases in excess of the thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum. A promising possibility to explain giant radio haloes is given by the presence of relativistic electrons reaccelerated by some kind of turbulence generated in the cluster volume during merger events. With the aim of investigating the connection between thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> properties of the ICM, in this paper we develop a statistical magneto-turbulent model which describes in a self-consistent way the evolution of the thermal ICM and that of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from clusters. Making use of the extended Press-Schechter formalism, we follow cluster mergers and estimate the injection rate of the fluid turbulence generated during these energetic events. We then calculate the evolution of the spectrum of the relativistic electrons in the ICM during the cluster life by taking into account both the electron acceleration due to the merger-driven turbulence and the relevant energy losses of the electrons. We end up with a synthetic population of galaxy clusters for which the evolution of the ICM and of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectrum emitted by the accelerated electrons is calculated. The generation of detectable <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio and hard X-ray emission in the simulated clusters is found to be possible during major merger events for reliable values of the model parameters. In addition the occurrence of radio haloes as a function of the mass of the parent clusters is calculated and compared with observations. In this case it is found that the model expectations are in good agreement with observations: radio haloes are found in about 30 per cent of the more massive clusters in our synthetic population (M>~ 1.8 × 1015Msolar) and in about 4 per cent of the intermediate massive clusters (9 × 1014 < M < 1.8 × 1015Msolar), while the radio halo phenomenon is found to be extremely rare in the case of the smaller clusters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3597921"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air plasma on dental instruments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PURPOSE Autoclaves and UV sterilizers have been commonly used to prevent cross-infections between dental patients and dental instruments or materials contaminated by saliva and blood. To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air plasma device was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS After inoculating E. coli and B. subtilis the diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were sterilized by exposing them to the plasma for different lengths of time (30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and, 240 seconds). The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were immersed in PBS solutions, cultured on agar plates and quantified by counting the colony forming units. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and significance was assessed by the LSD post hoc test (?=0.05). RESULTS The device was effective in killing E. coli contained in the plasma device compared with the UV sterilizer. The atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air plasma device contributed greatly to the sterilization of diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli and B. subtilis. Diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli was effective after 60 and 90 seconds. The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with B. subtilis was effective after 120 and 180 seconds. CONCLUSION The atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air plasma device was effective in killing both E. coli and B. subtilis, and was more effective in killing E. coli than the UV sterilizer. PMID:23508991</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W.; Jeong, Chang-Mo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles Mones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036905"> <span id="translatedtitle">RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> FLARE CHARACTERISTICS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book..381R"> <span id="translatedtitle">First Achievements and Opportunities for Cancer Treatment Using <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper summarizes the experimental results and plasma delivery strategy developed in Orléans for the evaluation of antitumor action of dielectric barrier discharge and plasma gun for cancer treatment. Detailed analysis of biological effects following <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasma application for both in vitro and in vivo experiments reveals the role of ROS, DNA damage induction, cell cycle modification and apoptosis induction. Recent characterization of plasma splitting and ­mixing in different capillary geometries, using the plasma gun, together with preliminary tolerance study dealing with lung and colon treatment indicate that endoscopic plasma delivery may be a new and valuable therapy in cancerology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert, Eric; Vandamme, Marc; Sobilo, Julien; Sarron, Vanessa; Ries, Delphine; Dozias, Sébastien; Brulle, Laura; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean Michel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/972295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) processor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MNRAS.344.1193W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf nova oscillations and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in cataclysmic variables - III. A new kind of dwarf nova oscillation, and further examples of the similarities to X-ray binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present measurements of the periods of dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs) and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), many culled from published literature, but also others newly observed (in VZ Pyx, CR Boo, OY Car, Z Cha, AQ Eri, TU Men, HX Peg, CN Ori, V893 Sco, WX Hyi and EC2117-54). These provide data for 26 systems. We show that in general PQPO~ 15 PDNO and that the correlation for CVs extends by three orders of magnitude lower in frequency the similar relationship found for X-ray binaries. In addition, we have found that there is a second type of DNO, previously overlooked, which have periods ~4 times those of the regular DNOs (as well as those mined from publications, we have observed them in VW Hyi, OY Car, AQ Eri, V803 Cen, CR Boo, VZ Pyx, HX Peg and EC2117-54). Often both types of DNO coexist. Unlike the standard DNOs, the periods of the new type, which we refer to as longer-period DNOs (lpDNOs), are relatively insensitive to accretion luminosity and can even appear in quiescence of dwarf novae. We interpret them as magnetically channelled accretion on to the differentially rotating main body of the white dwarf primary, rather than on to a rapidly slipping equatorial belt as in the case of the standard DNOs. This is supported by published measurements of v sin i for some of the primaries. Some similarities of the DNOs, lpDNOs and QPOs in CVs to the three types of QPO in X-ray binaries (burst pulsations, high- and low-frequency QPOs) are noted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick A.; Pretorius, Magaretha L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPD....42.1816C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical Determination and Comparison of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Velocity Distributions from EIS Full-CCD Linewidth Measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Excess broadening in the emission line spectra from <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions provide an unresolved energy input into the coronal plasma. The driving mechanism for and significance of the energy contributions of this <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component has been a subject of much discussion. Observationally constraining the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> contributions to line broadening in the coronal emission spectra provides valuable limitations which coronal physics models must take into account. Using full-CCD raster observations from EIS, we determine a distribution of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities for all lines in each full-CCD raster observation for both spatially-averaged and spatially-resolved EIS spectra. We present here composite <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity distributions incorporating a multiple elements, ionization states and temperatures for a variety of EIS observations including both active region and quiet sun emission. We determine an expectation value for the velocity of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component from this composite statistical approach. Initial spatially-averaged results from 7 independent EIS rasters show a strong Gaussian peak at approximately 20 km/s per second.. We address the implications of this consistent velocity and energy peak in the spatially-averaged results as well as present and compare our analysis from spatially-resolved spectra for each EIS raster included in the spatially-averaged study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, J. M.; Kilper, G. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhD...46H5401M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we investigate the influences of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mileti?, M.; Mojsilovi?, S.; Oki? ?or?evi?, I.; Maleti?, D.; Pua?, N.; Lazovi?, S.; Malovi?, G.; Milenkovi?, P.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj; Bugarski, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20167347"> <span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of volatile organic compounds in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma air purifier.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The degradation of volatile organic compounds in a commercially available <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma based air purifying system was investigated. Several studies exist that interrogate the degradation of VOCs in closed air systems using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma combined with a heterogeneous catalyst. For the first time, however, our study was performed under realistic conditions (normal indoor air, 297.5K and 12.5 g m(-3) water content) on an open system, in the absence of an auxiliary catalyst, and using standard operating air flow rates (up to 320 L min(-1)). Cyclohexene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene isomers were nebulized and guided through the plasma air purifier. The degradation products were trapped by activated charcoal tubes or silica gel tubes, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Degradation efficiencies of 11+/-1.6% for cyclohexene, <2% for benzene, 11+/-2.4% for toluene, 3+/-1% for ethylbenzene, 1+/-1% for sigma-xylene, and 3+/-0.4% for m-/rho-xylene were found. A fairly wide range of degradation products could be identified. On both trapping media, various oxidized species such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and one epoxide were observed. The formation of adipaldehyde from nebulized cyclohexene clearly indicates an ozonolysis reaction. Other degradation products observed suggests reactions with OH radicals. We propose that mostly ozone and OH radicals are responsible for the degradation of organic molecules in the plasma air purifier. PMID:20167347</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmid, Stefan; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0804.0435v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> X-ray Tail Emission of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paradigm for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) has evolved recently with the discovery by INTEGRAL and RXTE of flat, hard X-ray components in three AXPs. These <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectral components differ dramatically from the steeper quasi-power-law tails seen in the classic X-ray band in these sources, and can naturally be attributed to activity in the magnetosphere. Resonant, magnetic Compton upscattering is a candidate mechanism for generating this new component, since it is very efficient in the strong fields present near AXP surfaces. In this paper, results from an inner magnetospheric model for upscattering of surface thermal X-rays in AXPs are presented, using a kinetic equation formalism and employing a QED magnetic scattering cross section. Characteristically flat and strongly-polarized emission spectra are produced by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons injected in the emission region. Spectral results depend strongly on the observer's orientation and the magnetospheric locale of the scattering, which couple directly to the angular distributions of photons sampled. Constraints imposed by the Comptel upper bounds for these AXPs are mentioned.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew G. Baring; Alice K. Harding</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25116507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects by microwave irradiation in hydrolysis of waste-activated sludge.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activation energy (Ea) for waste-activated sludge (WAS) hydrolysis was compared between microwave irradiation (MW) and conventional heating (CH) methods to evaluate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effect of MW. The microwave-assisted hydrolysis of WAS was assumed to follow the first-order kinetics on the basis of volatile suspended solids (VSS) conversion to soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) for different initial VSS concentrations. By comparing the VSS decrement and the SCOD increment between MW and CH at different absolute temperatures of 323, 348 and 373 K, the average ratio of VSS conversion to SCOD was determined to range from 1.42 to 1.64 g SCOD/g VSS. These results corresponded to the theoretical value of 1.69 g SCOD/g VSS based on the assumption that the molecular formula of sludge was C10H19O3N. Consequently, the Ea of the MW-assisted WAS hydrolysis was much lower than that of CH for the same temperature conditions. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effect of MW in the hydrolysis of WAS could be identified with the lower Ea than that of CH. PMID:25116507</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byun, I G; Lee, J H; Lee, J M; Lim, J S; Park, T J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23487955"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Optimizing remediation conditions of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma for DDTs heavily contaminated soil].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of experiments were carried out in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> reactor to remove DDTs in heavily contaminated soil by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The study aims to investigate the effects of soil properties (including soil particle size and soil water content) and equipment working parameters (e. g. the plasma power, the processing time and discharge atmosphere) on the removal of DDTs from soil. The results showed that DDTs in soil were significantly degraded by the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma produced by dielectric barrier discharge. Removal rate of DDTs increased with increasing processing time. The removal efficiency of DDTs ranged from 95.3% to 99.9% in 20 minutes. The optimum conditions were as follows: 1 kW of the plasma power, 20 minutes of processing time in air discharge atmosphere, 0-0.9 mm soil particle size and 4.5% -10.5% of soil moisture content. The results also showed that o,p'-DDE might be the intermediate dechlorination and dehydrogenation product of the o,p'-DDT after the oxidization. PMID:23487955</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Hai-Hong; Luo, Yong-Ming; Teng, Ying; Liu, Wu-Xing; Pan, Cheng; Li, Zhen-Gao; Huang, Yu-Juan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC..968...93B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> X-ray Tail Emission of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paradigm for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) has evolved recently with the discovery by INTEGRAL and RXTE of flat, hard X-ray components in three AXPs. These <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectral components differ dramatically from the steeper quasi-power-law tails seen in the classic X-ray band in these sources, and can naturally be attributed to activity in the magnetosphere. Resonant, magnetic Compton upscattering is a candidate mechanism for generating this new component, since it is very efficient in the strong fields present near AXP surfaces. In this paper, results from an inner magnetospheric model for upscattering of surface thermal X-rays in AXPs are presented, using a kinetic equation formalism and employing a QED magnetic scattering cross section. Characteristically flat and strongly-polarized emission spectra are produced by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons injected in the emission region. Spectral results depend strongly on the observer's orientation and the magnetospheric locale of the scattering, which couple directly to the angular distributions of photons sampled. Constraints imposed by the Comptel upper bounds for these AXPs are mentioned.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25037598"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasmas as a novel candidate for preventive therapy of melanoma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to the increased ultraviolet radiation, the incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide more than that of any other cancer. In this study, the effects of irradiation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPPs) on benign melanocytic tumors from our original hairless model mice (HL-RET-mice), in which benign melanocytic tumors and melanomas spontaneously develop in the skin stepwise, were examined. Expression levels of melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA in melanomas were higher than those in benign melanocytic tumors in the mice. Repeated irradiation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPPs) for the benign tumors decreased the expression levels of MCAM and MMP-2 mRNA in the tumors from the mice. Previous studies showed that MCAM sites are upstream of MMP-2, that MCAM regulates transcription of MMP-2 in melanoma cells and that MMP-2 is associated with the conversion of a benign tumor to a malignant tumor. Therefore, our results suggest that the NEAPP irradiation-mediated decrease in the expression level of MMP-2 in benign melanocytic tumors is associated with decreased expression levels of MCAM. Moreover, NEAPP irradiation might be a potential candidate for therapy to prevent melanoma development through suppression of malignant conversion in benign melanocytic tumors. PMID:25037598</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Omata, Yasuhiro; Iida, Machiko; Yajima, Ichiro; Takeda, Kozue; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Hori, Masaru; Kato, Masashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167135"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140011109&hterms=primary+sources&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528primary%2Bsources%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Nature of the mHz X-ray <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22011724"> <span id="translatedtitle">MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD FITTING OF X-RAY POWER DENSITY SPECTRA: APPLICATION TO HIGH-FREQUENCY <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS FROM THE NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARY 4U1608-522</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) from weakly magnetized neutron stars display rapid frequency variability (second timescales) and high coherence with quality factors up to at least 200 at frequencies about 800-850 Hz. Their parameters have been estimated so far from standard min({chi}{sup 2}) fitting techniques, after combining a large number of power density spectra (PDS), to have the powers normally distributed (the so-called Gaussian regime). Before combining PDS, different methods to minimize the effects of the frequency drift to the estimates of the QPO parameters have been proposed, but none of them relied on fitting the individual PDS. Accounting for the statistical properties of PDS, we apply a maximum likelihood method to derive the QPO parameters in the non-Gaussian regime. The method presented is general, easy to implement, and can be applied to fitting individual PDS, several PDS simultaneously, or their average, and is obviously not specific to the analysis of kHz QPO data. It applies to the analysis of any PDS optimized in frequency resolution and for low-frequency variability or PDS containing features whose parameters vary on short timescales, as is the case for kHz QPOs. It is equivalent to the standard {chi}{sup 2} minimization fitting when the number of PDS fitted is large. The accuracy, reliability, and superiority of the method is demonstrated with simulations of synthetic PDS, containing Lorentzian QPOs of known parameters. Accounting for the broadening of the QPO profile, due to the leakage of power inherent to windowed Fourier transforms, the maximum likelihood estimates of the QPO parameters are asymptotically unbiased and have negligible bias when the QPO is reasonably well detected. By contrast, we show that the standard min({chi}{sup 2}) fitting method gives biased parameters with larger uncertainties. The maximum likelihood fitting method is applied to a subset of archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data of the neutron star X-ray binary 4U1608-522, for which we show that the lower kHz QPO parameters can be measured on timescales as short as 8 s. To demonstrate the potential use of the results of the maximum likelihood method, we show that in the observation analyzed the time evolution of the frequency is consistent with a random walk. We then show that the broadening of the QPO due to the frequency drift scales as {radical}T, as expected from a random walk (T is the integration time of the PDS). This enables us to estimate the intrinsic quality factor of the QPO to be {approx}260, whereas previous analysis indicated a maximum value around 200.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barret, Didier [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie and Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 31028, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Vaughan, Simon, E-mail: didier.barret@irap.omp.eu [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22140151"> <span id="translatedtitle">ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: dheeraj@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21378253"> <span id="translatedtitle">ION TEMPERATURE AND <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> VELOCITY IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION: USING EMISSION LINES OF DIFFERENT ATOMIC SPECIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the characteristics of the ion thermal temperature and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity in an active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer onboard Hinode. We used two emission lines of different atomic species (Fe XVI 262.98 A and S XIII 256.69 A) to distinguish the ion thermal velocity from the observed full width at half-maximum. We assumed that the sources of the two emission lines are the same thermal temperature. We also assumed that they have the same <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity. With these assumptions, we could obtain the ion thermal temperature, after noting that M{sub sulfur} approx 0.6M{sub iron}. We have carried out the ion thermal temperature analysis in the active region where the photon counts are sufficient (>4500). What we found is as follows: (1) the common ion thermal temperatures obtained by Fe XVI and S XIII are approx2.5 MK, (2) the typical <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities are approx13 km s{sup -1}, (3) the highest <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities (>20 km s{sup -1}) are preferentially observed between the bright points in Fe XVI, while (4) the hottest material (>3 MK) is observed relatively inside the bright points compared with the highest <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Imada, S.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1698483"> <span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewkow, Nicholas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0307500v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpenetrating plasma shells: near-equipartition magnetic field generation and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle acceleration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the collision of two interpenetrating plasma shells. The highly accurate plasma-kinetic "particle-in-cell" (with the total of $10^8$ particles) parallel code OSIRIS has been used. Our simulations show: (i) the generation of long-lived near-equipartition (electro)magnetic fields, (ii) <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle acceleration, and (iii) short-scale to long-scale magnetic field evolution, in the collision region. Our results provide new insights into the magnetic field generation and particle acceleration in relativistic and sub-relativistic colliding streams of particles, which are present in gamma-ray bursters, supernova remnants, relativistic jets, pulsar winds, etc..</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. O. Silva; R. A. Fonseca; J. Tonge; J. M. Dawson; W. B. Mori; M. V. Medvedev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......149R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raitt, Brittany J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PlST...15..439L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sterilization of Staphylococcus Aureus by an Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An atmospheric <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet was developed for sterilizing the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The plasma jet was generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), which was characterized by electrical and optical diagnostics. The survival curves of the bacteria showed that the plasma jet could effectively inactivate 106 cells of S. aureus within 120 seconds and the sterilizing efficiency depended critically on the discharge parameter of the applied voltage. It was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that the cell morphology was seriously damaged by the plasma treatment. The plasma sterilization mechanism of S. aureus was attributed to the active species of OH, N2+ and O, which were generated abundantly in the plasma jet and characterized by OES. Our findings suggest a convenient and low-cost way for sterilization and inactivation of bacteria.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Xiaohu; Hong, Feng; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005CRPhy...6..908M"> <span id="translatedtitle">LIF spectroscopy applied to the study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas for atmospheric pollutant abatement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas at atmospheric pressure are currently investigated for applications in flue gas cleaning for pollution control. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) brings an irreplaceable contribution to the study of atmospheric pollutant removal kinetics, and to the monitoring of key species involved in this non-equilibrium gas phase chemistry. This article gives an overview of LIF studies in discharges for pollution control, in particular recent results obtained on NO and OH radical using a time resolved LIF diagnostic coupled to a photo-triggered discharge. Such a discharge generates transient homogeneous plasma and allows useful comparison between experimental results and predictions from a self-consistent discharge and kinetic model. To cite this article: L. Magne, S. Pasquiers, C. R. Physique 6 (2005).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magne, Lionel; Pasquiers, Stéphane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......183L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission in astrophysical environments: From pulsars to supernova remnants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study of electromagnetic radiation from distant astrophysical objects provides essential data in understanding physics of these sources. In particular, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation provides great insight into the properties of local environments, particle populations, and emission mechanisms, knowledge which otherwise would remain untapped. Throughout the projects conducted for this dissertation, we modeled certain aspects of observed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from three classes of sources: radio pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. Orbital variation in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B can be used to probe the details of the magnetospheric structure of pulsar B. Strongly magnetized wind from pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B in a way similar to the solar wind's distortion of the Earth's magnetosphere. Using the two complimentary models of pulsar B's magnetosphere, adapted from the Earth's magnetosphere models by Dungey and Tsyganenko, we determine the precise location of the coherent radio emission generation region in pulsar B's magnetosphere. This analysis is complemented by modeling the observed evolution of the pulse profiles of B due to geodetic precession. The emission region is located at about 3750 stellar radii and has a horseshoe-like shape centered on the polar magnetic field lines. The best fit angular parameters of the emission region indicate that radio emission is generated on the field lines which, according to the theoretical models, originate close to the poles and carry the maximum current. When considered together, not only do the results of the two models converge, they can explain why the modulation of B's radio emission at A's period is observed only within a certain orbital phase region. We discuss the implications of these results for pulsar magnetospheric models and mechanisms of coherent radio emission generation. We also developed a spatially-resolved, analytic model for the high-energy <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Theoretically, synchrotron cooling should cause a gradual change in particle spectrum downstream. This effect is indeed observed in the X-ray spectra of The Crab Nebula , 3C 58, and G21.5.0.9. However, current theoretical models of PWNe that only account for the bulk motion in the pulsar outflow overestimate the steepening of the resulted emission spectrum. This implies that there is an additional mechanism of particle transport which would supply energetic particles to the outer layers of the PWN. Our model solves the lack of high-energy electrons in the outer regions of the nebula by taking the diffusion of particles into account. The resulting multi-wavelength spectra exhibits multiple breaks, which is in agreement with observations. Thin <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray filaments are often seen near shock fronts in young supernova remnants (SNRs), often spatially coincident with the high energy gamma-ray emission. The formation of such discrete features is likely influenced by the combined effects of radiative cooling, advection, and diffusion. Spatially-resolved spectral studies of the filaments may, therefore, provide significant insights into the relative importance of main physical processes involved in young SNRs. Using 1 Ms Chandra observation of Cassiopeia A, we perform advection-diffusion modeling of synchrotron emission of filaments to measure the magnetic field, shock obliquity, the diffusion strength and the plasma turbulence level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lomiashvili, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MNRAS.410..978Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission from the termination of microquasar jets interacting with the interstellar medium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a model to account for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation due to the interaction of the jet termination shock of a microquasar (MQ) with its ambient interstellar medium (ISM). In this model, relativistic electrons and protons are accelerated simultaneously in the jet termination reverse shock. These particles then diffuse into the ISM from a region shocked by the reverse shock and interact with another region shocked by the forward shock, which can produce detectable photon fluxes at different energies. Using numerical calculation, we present various photon spectra for a general MQ produced via synchrotron, inverse Compton, synchrotron self-Compton, relativistic bremsstrahlung and ?0-decay emissions. Finally, we apply this model to the MQ Cygnus X-1 by modifying various parameters. Our results show the extent of radiative emission from the ISM-jet interaction region, which may be detectable by the current Fermi Large Area Telescope and the future Cherenkov Telescope Array.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, J. F.; Feng, Y. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECAM1009L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..488..114M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Challenges in Computing Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission from Relativistic Outflows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multi-wavelength emission from relativistic outflows (e.g., jets and blast waves) provides us with valuable information about the physical conditions of the emitting plasma, its fluid dynamics and about the process which generates the outflows (i.e., the central engine). We use the relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) code MRGENESIS coupled to a radiative transfer code SPEV to simulate the dynamics and emission of relativistic jets in two astrophysical scenarios, one involving <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> synchrotron emission in radio, and the other where thermal emission in optical is predominant. We give an overview of the structure of two codes and explain how they are coupled to compute the time-dependent emission from the evolving relativistic fluid. A considerable attention is given to the computational challenges that we face when applying SPEV to compute the light curves and spectra of relativistic jets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mimica, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Cuesta-Martínez, C.; Aloy, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..GECFP2034H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric Pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas for surface treatment of polymer films</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas to surface treatment. In this work, we used an asymmetric glow dielectric-barrier discharge (GDBD), at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen, to improve the surface hydrophilicity of three kinds of polymer films, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), polyimide (PI), and triacetyl cellulose (TAC). This set-up consists of two asymmetric electrodes covered by dielectrics. And to prevent the filamentary discharge occur, the frequency, gas flow rate and uniformity of gas flow distribution should be carefully controlled. The discharge performance is monitored through an oscilloscope, which is connected to a high voltage probe and a current monitor. The physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces before and after GDBD treatment were analyzed via water contact angle (CA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Hsiao-Feng; Wen, Chun-Hsiang; Wei, Hsiao-Kuan; Kou, Chwung-Shan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030000747&hterms=local+literature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dlocal%2Bliterature"> <span id="translatedtitle">Steady State Transportation Cooling in Porous Media Under Local, <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Equilibrium Fluid Flow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analytical solution to the steady-state fluid temperature for 1-D (one dimensional) transpiration cooling has been derived. Transpiration cooling has potential use in the aerospace industry for protection against high heating environments for re-entry vehicles. Literature for analytical treatments of transpiration cooling has been largely confined to the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the porous matrix and fluid. In the present analysis, the fundamental fluid and matrix equations are coupled through a volumetric heat transfer coefficient and investigated in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> equilibrium. The effects of varying the thermal conductivity of the solid matrix and the heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results are also compared to existing experimental data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodriquez, Alvaro Che</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1956898"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Particles in Coronal Loops Heated Impulsively by Nanoflares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The physical processes causing energy exchange between the Sun's hot corona and its cool lower atmosphere remain poorly understood. The chromosphere and transition region (TR) form an interface region between the surface and the corona that is highly sensitive to the coronal heating mechanism. High resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveal rapid variability (about 20 to 60 seconds) of intensity and velocity on small spatial scales at the footpoints of hot dynamic coronal loops. The observations are consistent with numerical simulations of heating by beams of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons, which are generated in small impulsive heating events called "coronal nanoflares". The accelerated electrons deposit a sizable fraction of their energy in the chromosphere and TR. Our analysis provides tight constraints on the properties of such electron beams and new diagnostics for their presence in the nonflaring corona.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Testa, Paola; Allred, Joel; Carlsson, Mats; Reale, Fabio; Daw, Adrian; Hansteen, Viggo; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Liu, Wei; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy; Saar, Steve; Tian, Hui; Lemen, Jim; Title, Alan; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Tarbell, Ted; Wuelser, J P; Kleint, Lucia; Kankelborg, Charles; Jaeggli, Sarah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002APS..GECQWP091C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface Investigation of Bone Tissue Treated with <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma treatment of bio-materials is a technique directly derived from material surface processing. In future it may lead to a plasma-based cure for various skin and bone diseases. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasmas for medical treatment have been developed. In this work we use a low-pressure discharge as a model case to study plasma interactions with bone tissue. The samples have been exposed to the plasma, using different gases (argon, krypton, helium, and oxygen in mixture) and analyzed using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. This technique gives accurate information on the chemical composition of the surface of the tissue. Results have been compared with EDX, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and nano-indentation. We have also performed some ion beam diagnostics like RBS and ERDA. These complementary experiments allow us to determine the element composition of the bone tissue. The particular effects of plasma treatment on the tissue can be related to the plasma parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cigal, J.-C.; Maurice, C. Y. M.; Wagenaars, E.; van Ijzendoorn, L. J.; Baede, A. H. F. M.; Stoffels, E.; Huiskes, R.; Kroesen, G. M. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3432087"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Atmospheric Pressure <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacteria exist, in most environments, as complex, organised communities of sessile cells embedded within a matrix of self-produced, hydrated extracellular polymeric substances known as biofilms. Bacterial biofilms represent a ubiquitous and predominant cause of both chronic infections and infections associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and prostheses. Such infections typically exhibit significantly enhanced tolerance to antimicrobial, biocidal and immunological challenge. This renders them difficult, sometimes impossible, to treat using conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Effective alternative approaches for prevention and eradication of biofilm associated chronic and device-associated infections are therefore urgently required. Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas are gaining increasing attention as a potential approach for the eradication and control of bacterial infection and contamination. To date, however, the majority of studies have been conducted with reference to planktonic bacteria and rather less attention has been directed towards bacteria in the biofilm mode of growth. In this study, the activity of a kilohertz-driven atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet, operated in a helium oxygen mixture, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro biofilms was evaluated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exhibit marked susceptibility to exposure of the plasma jet effluent, following even relatively short (?10?s s) exposure times. Manipulation of plasma operating conditions, for example, plasma operating frequency, had a significant effect on the bacterial inactivation rate. Survival curves exhibit a rapid decline in the number of surviving cells in the first 60 seconds followed by slower rate of cell number reduction. Excellent anti-biofilm activity of the plasma jet was also demonstrated by both confocal scanning laser microscopy and metabolism of the tetrazolium salt, XTT, a measure of bactericidal activity. PMID:22952948</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y.; Algwari, Qais Th.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; O'Connell, Deborah; Gilmore, Brendan F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070022510&hterms=Black+Holes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2522Black%2BHoles%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gamma-ray Spectral Characteristics of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission from Three Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cygnus X-1 and the gamma-ray transients GROJ0422+32 and GROJ1719-24 displayed similar spectral properties when they underwent transitions between the high and low gamma-ray (30 keV to few MeV) intensity states. When these sources were in the high (gamma)-ray intensity state ((gamma)2, for Cygnus X-l), their spectra featured two components: a Comptonized shape below 200-300 keV with a soft power-law tail (photon index >= 3) that extended to 1 MeV or beyond. When the sources were in the low-intensity state ((gamma)0, for Cygnus X-l), the Comptonized spectral shape below 200 keV typically vanished and the entire spectrum from 30 keV to 1 MeV can be characterized by a single power law with a relatively harder photon index 2-2.7. Consequently the high- and low-intensity gamma-ray spectra intersect, generally in the 400 KeV - 1 MeV range, in contrast to the spectral pivoting seen previously at lower (10 keV) energies. The presence of the power-law component in both the high- and low-intensity gammaray spectra strongly suggests that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> process is likely to be at work in both the high and the low-intensity situations. We have suggested a possible scenario (Ling & Wheaton, 2003), by combining the ADAF model of Esin et al. (1998) with a separate jet region that produces the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> gamma-ray emission, and which explains the state transitions. Such a scenario will be discussed in the context of the observational evidence, summarized above, from the database produced by EBOP, JPL's BATSE earth occultation analysis system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ling, James C.; Wheaton, William A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19910483"> <span id="translatedtitle">Killing of adherent oral microbes by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma jet.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric plasma jets are being intensively studied with respect to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study was to test a microwave-powered <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma jet for its antimicrobial efficacy against adherent oral micro-organisms. Agar plates and dentin slices were inoculated with 6 log(10) c.f.u. cm(-2) of Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans, with Escherichia coli as a control. Areas of 1 cm(2) on the agar plates or the complete dentin slices were irradiated with a helium plasma jet for 0.3, 0.6 or 0.9 s mm(-2), respectively. The agar plates were incubated at 37 degrees C, and dentin slices were vortexed in liquid media and suspensions were placed on agar plates. The killing efficacy of the plasma jet was assessed by counting the number of c.f.u. on the irradiated areas of the agar plates, as well as by determination of the number of c.f.u. recovered from dentin slices. A microbe-killing effect was found on the irradiated parts of the agar plates for L. casei, S. mutans, C. albicans and E. coli. The plasma-jet treatment reduced the c.f.u. by 3-4 log(10) intervals on the dentin slices in comparison to recovery rates from untreated controls. The microbe-killing effect was correlated with increasing irradiation times. Thus, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma jets could be used for the disinfection of dental surfaces. PMID:19910483</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rupf, Stefan; Lehmann, Antje; Hannig, Matthias; Schäfer, Barbara; Schubert, Andreas; Feldmann, Uwe; Schindler, Axel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/195785"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric-pressure air streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Each of these methods can be implemented in many ways. There are many types of electrical discharge reactors, the variants depending on the electrode configuration and electrical power supply (pulsed, AC or DC). Two of the more extensively investigated types of discharge reactors are based on the pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge. Recently, compact low-energy (<200 keV) electron accelerators have been developed to meet the requirements of industrial applications such as crosslinking of polymer materials, curing of solvent-free coatings, and drying of printing inks. Special materials have also been developed to make the window thin and rugged. Some of these compact electron beam sources are already commercially available and could be utilized for many pollution control applications. In this paper we will present a comparative assessment of various nonthermal plasma reactors. The thrust of our work has been two-fold: (1) to understand the scalability of various <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to identify the byproducts to ensure that the effluent gases from the processor are either benign or much easier and less expensive to dispose of compared to the original pollutants. We will present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor and various types of electrical discharge reactors. We have used these reactors to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCS. We have studied the effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126956"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUZAKU/WAM AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> ELECTRONS IN SOLAR MICROFLARES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on hard X-ray spectroscopy of solar microflares observed by the Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM), on board the Suzaku satellite, and by RHESSI. WAM transient data provide wide energy band (50 keV-5 MeV) spectra over a large field of view ({approx}2{pi} sr) with a time resolution of 1 s. WAM is attractive as a hard X-ray solar flare monitor due to its large effective area ({approx}800 cm{sup 2} at 100 keV, {approx}13 times larger than that of RHESSI). In particular, this makes it possible to search for high energy emission in microflares that is well below the RHESSI background. The WAM solar flare list contains six GOES B-class microflares that were simultaneously observed by RHESSI between the launch of Suzaku in 2005 July and 2010 March. At 100 keV, the detected WAM fluxes are more than {approx}20 times below the typical RHESSI instrumental background count rates. The RHESSI and WAM <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectra are in good agreement with a single power law with photon spectral indices between 3.3 and 4.5. In a second step, we also searched the RHESSI microflare list for events that should be detectable by WAM, assuming that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power-law emission seen by RHESSI extends to >50 keV. From the 12 detectable events between 2005 July and 2007 February, 11 were indeed seen by WAM. This shows that microflares, similar to regular flares, can accelerate electrons to energies up to at least 100 keV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Krucker, Saem; Lin, Robert P. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: s.ishikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSH41E..05D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Motions in and above Flare Loop Tops Measured by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The plasma volume above the soft X-ray emitting loop tops is of particular interest for studying the formation of flare loops. We present observations of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions (turbulence) determined from spectral line profiles Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV ions. We compare the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions at temperatures near 10 MK with the motions along the same lines-of-sight determined from lines of coronal ions such as Fe XII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV formed at 1-2 MK. We discuss the results in terms of predictions of the effects of magnetic reconnection and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motion results obtained in flares from earlier X-ray Yohkoh observations of line profiles of Fe XXV and Ca XIX. Fe XXV is formed at significantly higher temperatures than any strong flare EUV spectral line observed by EIS or by imaging telescopes such as AIA or TRACE. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EPJD...54..153P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrohydrodynamic flow in a wire-plate <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor measured by 3D PIV method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work was aimed at measurements of the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) secondary flow in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor using three-dimensional particle image velocimetry (3D PIV) method. The wide-type <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor used in this work was an acrylic box with a wire discharge electrode and two plate collecting electrodes. The positive DC voltage was applied to the wire electrode through a 10 M? resistor. The collecting electrodes were grounded. The voltage applied to the wire electrode was 28 kV. Air flow seeded with a cigarette smoke was blown along the reactor duct with an average velocity of 0.6 m/s. The 3D PIV velocity fields measurements were carried out in four parallel planes stretched along the reactor duct, perpendicularly to the wire electrode and plate electrodes. The measured flow velocity fields illustrate complex nature of the EHD induced secondary flow in the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Podlinski, J.; Niewulis, A.; Mizeraczyk, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030001919&hterms=inverse+bremsstrahlung&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dinverse%2Bbremsstrahlung"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Hard X-Ray Emission in Galaxy Clusters Observed with the BeppoSAX PDS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied the X-ray emission in a sample of clusters using the BeppoSAX PDS instrument in the 20 -- 80 keV energy band. We estimated the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> cluster emission (HXR) by modeling the thermal contribution from the cluster gas and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> contamination from the AGN in the field, and propagating the corresponding uncertainties. We also evaluated and propagated the systematic uncertainties due to the background fluctuations. The resulting <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component is detected at a sigma level in approx. 50 % of the non-significantly AGN-contaminated clusters, i.e. in clusters A2142, A2256, A3376, Coma, Ophiuchus and Virgo. Furthermore, Virgo is detected at a 4 sigma level. All the clusters detected at a 2 sigma level exhibit some degree of merger signatures, i.e. deviations from the azimuthally symmetric brightness and temperature distributions, while the relaxed clusters are detected at a lower confidence. The data are consistent with a scenario whereby relaxed clusters have no <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hard X-ray component, whereas merger clusters do, with a 20 -- 80 keV luminosity of approx. 10(exp 42-44)((h(sub 50))(exp -2))(erg/s). Consistent with merger boosting of cluster temperatures, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> luminosity increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude between the average cluster temperatures 2 and 10 keV, as L(sub NTE) is proportional to T(sup j) with j = 2.4+/-0.3. These results corroborate the assumption which is the essential element in most <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hard X-ray emission models. The co-added spectrum of all non-significantly AGN-contaminated clusters indicates a power-law spectrum for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component with a photon index of 1.5+/-0.25 at 1 sigma confidence level. Unless there is a high energy cut-off in the electron velocity distribution, the total spectrum implies that Inverse Compton scatter of Cosmic Microwave Background photons from electron population dominates over the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> bremsstrahlung in producing hard X-rays in clusters on the merger shock acceleration of electrons in clusters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevalainen, Jukka H.; Oosterbroeck, T.; Bonamente, Max; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078877"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span>, pulsed electric field cell ablation: A novel tool for regenerative medicine and scarless skin regeneration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High voltage, short pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation method, in which defined PEF irreversibly destabilize cell membranes, while preserving other tissue components such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present report, we show that PEF ablated rat skin retains its microvascular blood supply and ECM structure. Complete regeneration of epidermis, hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and the panniculus carnosusis observed two months after the ablation. Our results clearly indicate that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> PEF has the potential to be a powerful and novel tool for scarless tissue regeneration. PMID:24999487</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Bohr, Stefan; Mihm, Martin C.; Austen, William G.; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T.; Yarmush, Martin L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AdSpR..54.1786E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves in electron-beam plasma system with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hot electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The properties of nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves have been investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless four-component plasma system consisting of a cold electron fluid, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hot electrons obeying a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distribution, an electron beam and stationary ions. It is found that the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The dependence of rogue wave profiles on the electron beam and energetic population parameter are discussed. The results of the present investigation may be applicable in auroral zone plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elwakil, S. A.; El-hanbaly, A. M.; Elgarayh, A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Kassem, A. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/829861"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21326172"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Alternative to Waste Incineration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......270B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Processes in the Intracluster Medium on Cosmological Cluster Observables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this thesis we describe the generation and analysis of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters and their intracluster medium (ICM), using large cosmological boxes to generate large samples, in conjunction with individual cluster computations. The main focus is the exploration of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes in the ICM and the effect they have on the interpretation of observations used for cosmological constraints. We provide an introduction to the cosmological structure formation framework for our computations and an overview of the numerical simulations and observations of galaxy clusters. We explore the cluster magnetic field observables through radio relics, extended entities in the ICM characterized by their of diffuse radio emission. We show that statistical quantities such as radio relic luminosity functions and rotation measure power spectra are sensitive to magnetic field models. The spectral index of the radio relic emission provides information on structure formation shocks, e.g., on their Mach number. We develop a coarse grained stochastic model of active galaxy nucleus (AGN) feed-back in clusters and show the impact of such inhomogeneous feedback on the thermal pressure profile. We explore variations in the pressure profile as a function of cluster mass, redshift, and radius and provide a constrained fitting function for this profile. We measure the degree of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure in the gas from internal cluster bulk motions and show it has an impact on the slope and scatter of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) scaling relation. We also find that the gross shape of the ICM, as characterized by scaled moment of inertia tensors, affects the SZ scaling relation. We demonstrate that the shape and the amplitude of the SZ angular power spectrum is sensitive to AGN feedback, and this affects the cosmological parameters determined from high resolution ACT and SPT cosmic microwave background data. We compare analytic, semi-analytic, and simulation-based methods for calculating the SZ power spectrum, and characterize their differences. All the methods must rely, one way or another, on high resolution large-scale hydrodynamical simulations with varying assumptions for modelling the gas of the sort presented here. We show how our results can be used to interpret the latest ACT and SPT power spectrum results. We provide an outlook for the future, describing follow-up work we are undertaking to further advance the theory of cluster science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Battaglia, Nicholas Ambrose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/215850"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1644249"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of volatile organic compounds from air streams and industrial flue gases by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gaseous pollution control technologies for acid gases (NOx , SOx, etc.), volatile organic compounds (VOC), greenhouse gases, ozone layer depleting substance (ODS), etc., have been commercialized based on catalysis, incineration and adsorption methods. However, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma techniques based on electron beams and corona discharges become significant due to advantages such as lower cost, higher removal efficiency, smaller space volume, etc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuniko Urashima; Jen-Shih Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=40751"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTERIM GUIDELINES FOR THE DISPOSAL/DESTRUCTION OF PCBS AND PCB ITEMS BY <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> METHODS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is an interim resource and guideline document to help EPA regional offices implement the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) regulations (40 CFR 761) for using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods of destroying/disposing of PCBs. The report describes and evaluates various alternative chemic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22270862"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Kurabashira, Kamitakaracho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40353221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Organic pollutants abatement and biodecontamination of brewery effluents by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> quenched plasma at atmospheric pressure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A preliminary study was carried out to investigate possible decontamination of the waste waters from a Cameroonian brewery by using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma. Samples of waste waters collected during periods of intense activity of production were first analysed for organoleptic, physical–chemical and organic parameters, and then exposed to a humid air electric discharge at ambient temperature and pressure. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Doubla; S. Laminsi; S. Nzali; E. Njoyim; J. Kamsu-Kom; J.-L. Brisset</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770035720&hterms=build+solar&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbuild%2Bsolar"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> processes during the 'build-up' phase of solar flares and in absence of flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hard X-ray and radio observations indicate production of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons as a common phenomenon of the active sun. A preliminary analysis of three hard X-ray bursts observed with the OGO-5 satellite and radio observations indicate that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particles are present in the flare region prior to the impulsive (flash) phase and also during the gradual rise and fall (GRF) bursts which are usually explained in terms of purely 'thermal' radiation. The principal difference between the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons observed before the flash phase and during the flash phase appears to be in their total number rather than in the hardness of their energy spectrum. Basic characteristics of the two acceleration processes are probably similar although the total energy converted into <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons is considerably larger in the flash phase. Transient absorbing H-alpha features and filament activations are discussed in terms of their ability to produce energetic particle events and magnetic energy release.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/68/72/70/PDF/Khacef_ISPC20.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed downstream to a multi-plans Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. In order to simulate Diesel engine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3885737"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pathology of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garcia, Paulo A.; Roberston, John L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24139886"> <span id="translatedtitle">Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism. PMID:24139886</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...776L..22L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-Ray Emission from HH 80</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s-1, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; Benaglia, P.; de Castro, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22315411Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission from a classical nova - V1723 Aql</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The outburst of classical nova V1723 Aql was observed on September 11, 2012. The long term radio observations so far show that it exhibits double-bump radio light curves and partially optically thin spectra. The first bump doesn't follow the classical Hubble Flow Mode which depicts the evolution of thick sphercially expanding thermal ejecta. The brightness temperature varies with time and frequencies(1e7 K at 1.38 GHz, 1e5 K at 36.53 GHz, around the first maximum). We examine whether the first bump can be explained by the model of a shock-heated thin shell lying above the main ejecta. The modified model with linear temperature gradient ( r^q, q=0,+/-1) and steep density profile (? ~ r^{-p},p=2,9) in the shell fails to explain the first bump light curves and flat spectra. The late-time observation day 800) implies a spectrum of f? ~ ?^{-0.65} (40 GHz>?>10 GHz) which strongly indicates the existance of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> (synchrotron) emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zheng, Yong; Sokoloski, J. L.; Rupen, M. P.; Weston, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Mukai, K.; Krauss, M. I.; Roy, N.; Nelson, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhD...44A4003H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C2Hx side products. H2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C2Hx products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H2 only.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoang, Trung Q.; Zhu, Xinli; Lobban, Lance L.; Mallinson, Richard G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22980582"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma water treatment reactor.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N(2), Ar, and O(2). The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N(2)<Ar<O(2)). Using O(2) as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O(2) or O(2)-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules. PMID:22980582</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito; Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon; Geremias, Reginaldo; de Souza, Ivan Gonçalvez; Debacher, Nito Angelo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21576690"> <span id="translatedtitle">RE-ACCELERATION OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PARTICLES AT WEAK COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of the pre-existing as well as freshly injected populations of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, cosmic-ray (CR) particles at weak cosmological shocks. Assuming simple models for thermal leakage injection and Alfvenic drift, we derive analytic, time-dependent solutions for the two populations of CRs accelerated in the test-particle regime. We then compare them with the results from kinetic DSA simulations for shock waves that are expected to form in intracluster media and cluster outskirts in the course of large-scale structure formation. We show that the test-particle solutions provide a good approximation for the pressure and spectrum of CRs accelerated at these weak shocks. Since the injection is extremely inefficient at weak shocks, the pre-existing CR population dominates over the injected population. If the pressure due to pre-existing CR protons is about 5% of the gas thermal pressure in the upstream flow, the downstream CR pressure can absorb typically a few to 10% of the shock ram pressure at shocks with a Mach number M {approx}< 3, yet the re-acceleration of CR electrons can result in a substantial synchrotron emission behind the shock. The enhancement in synchrotron radiation across the shock is estimated to be about a few to several for M {approx} 1.5 and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} for M {approx} 3, depending on the detail model parameters. The implication of our findings for observed bright radio relics is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0302269v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on distances to Galactic Centre <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filaments from HI absorption</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied HI absorption towards three <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filaments (NTFs) Sgr-C, G359.54+0.18 and G359.79+0.17 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Our study, for the first time, constrains the distance of the Sgr C NTF and the HII region seen associated with the NTF in the sky plane, to within a few hundred parsecs from the Galactic Centre (GC). A molecular cloud with a velocity of -100 km/s appears to be associated with the central part of the Sgr C NTF. Our study also indicates that the Sgr C HII region is relatively farther away than the NTF along our line of sight, and thereby provides evidence against any possible interaction between the two objects. The NTF G359.54+0.18 shows weak HI absorption (4 sigma detection) at a velocity of -140 km/s, which is the velocity of a known dense molecular cloud seen towards the NTF. This cloud is expected to be located within ~200 pc from the GC and thereby provides a lower limit to the distance. The upper limit to the distance of this NTF from the Sun is 10.5 kpc. The distance to the NTF G359.79+0.17 is between 5.1 and 10.5 kpc from the Sun.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Subhashis Roy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21565371"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> RADIO EMITTER HD 93250 RESOLVED BY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As the brightest O-type X-ray source in the Carina nebula, HD 93250 (O4 III(fc)) is X-ray overluminous for its spectral type and has an unusually hard X-ray spectrum. Two different scenarios have been invoked to explain its X-ray properties: wind-wind interaction and magnetic wind confinement. Yet, HD 93250 shows absolutely constant radial velocities over timescales of years suggesting either a single star, a binary system seen pole-on view or a very long period, and/or highly eccentric system. Using the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer, we resolved HD 93250 as a close pair with similar components. We measured a near-infrared flux ratio of 0.8 {+-} 0.1 and a separation of (1.5 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -3} arcsec. At the distance of Carina, this corresponds to a projected physical distance of 3.5 AU. While a quantitative investigation would require a full characterization of the orbit, the binary nature of HD 93250 allows us to qualitatively explain both its X-ray flux and hardness and its <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission in the framework of a colliding wind scenario. We also discuss various observational biases. We show that, due to line blending of two similar spectral components, HD 93250 could have a period as short as 1 to several years despite the lack of measurable radial velocity variations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sana, H.; De Koter, A. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Le Bouquin, J.-B. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble (France); De Becker, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique, Liege University, Allee du 6 Aout 17, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Berger, J.-P.; Merand, A., E-mail: h.sana@uva.nl [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO), Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book...79M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Damages of Biological Components in Bacteria and Bacteriophages Exposed to Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mechanism of inactivation of bio-particles exposed to dielectric barrier discharge, DBD, has been studied using E. coli and bacteriophages. States of different biological components were monitored during the course of inactivation. Analysis of green fluorescent protein, GFP, introduced into E.coli cells proved that <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma, NTP causes a prominent protein damages without cutting peptide bonds. We have developed a biological assay which evaluates in vitro DNA damage of the bacteriophages. Bacteriophage ? having double stranded DNA was exposed to DBD, then DNA was purified and subjected to in vitro DNA packaging reactions. The re-packaged phages consist of the DNA from discharged phages and brand-new coat proteins. Survival curves of the re-packaged phages showed extremely large D value (D = 25 s) compared to the previous D value (D = 3 s) from the discharged phages. The results indicate that DNA damage hardly contributed to the inactivation, and the damage in coat proteins is responsible for inactivation of the phages. M13 phages having single stranded DNA were also examined with the same manner. In this case, damage to DNA was as severe as that of the coat proteins.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mizuno, Akira; Yasuda, Hachiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/658275"> <span id="translatedtitle">First report on <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor scaling criteria and optimization models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Example NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel engine powered electrical generators. Example VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint stripping, and parts cleaning. To design and build NTP reactors that are optimized for particular DoD applications, one must understand the basic decomposition chemistry of the target compound(s) and how the decomposition of a particular chemical species depends on the air emissions stream parameters and the reactor operating parameters. This report is intended to serve as an overview of the subject of reactor scaling and optimization and will discuss the basic decomposition chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) and two representative VOCs, trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride, and the connection between the basic plasma chemistry, the target species properties, and the reactor operating parameters (in particular, the operating plasma energy density). System architecture, that is how NTP reactors can be combined or ganged to achieve higher capacity, will also be briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0105097v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in the hydrogen and calcium lines of stellar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is observational evidence showing that stellar and solar flares occur in a similar circumstance, although the former are usually much more energetic. It is expected that the bombardment by high energy electrons is one of the chief heating processes of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper we study how a precipitating electron beam can influence the line profiles of Ly_alpha, H_alpha, Ca II K and Ca II 8542. We use a model atmosphere of a dMe star and make non-LTE computations taking into account the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> collisional rates due to the electron beam. The results show that the four lines can be enhanced to different extents. The relative enhancement increases with increasing formation height of the lines. Varying the energy flux of the electron beam has different effects on the four lines. The wings of Ly_alpha and H_alpha become increasingly broad with the beam flux; change of the Ca II K and Ca II 8542 lines, however, is most significant in the line centre. Varying the electron energy (i.e., the low-energy cut-off for a power law beam) has a great influence on the Ly_alpha line, but little on the H_alpha and Ca II lines. An electron beam of higher energy precipitates deeper, thus producing less enhancement of the Ly_alpha line. The Ly_alpha/H_alpha flux ratio is thus sensitive to the electron energy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. D. Ding; C. Fang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0710.0441v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparative Analysis of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emissions and Study of Electron Transport in a Solar Flare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions in a solar flare occurring on 2003 May 29 by using RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) and Nobeyama microwave observations. This flare shows several typical behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions: time delay of microwave peaks relative to HXR peaks, loop-top microwave and footpoint HXR sources, and a harder electron energy distribution inferred from the microwave spectrum than from the HXR spectrum. In addition, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher-energy ($\\gsim 100$ keV) HXRs is similar to that of the microwaves, and is delayed from that of the lower-energy ($\\lsim 100$ keV) HXRs. We interpret these observations in terms of an electron transport model called {\\TPP}. We numerically solved the spatially-homogeneous {\\FP} equation to determine electron evolution in energy and pitch-angle space. By comparing the behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions predicted by the model with the observations, we discuss the pitch-angle distribution of the electrons injected into the flare site. We found that the observed spectral variations can qualitatively be explained if the injected electrons have a pitch-angle distribution concentrated perpendicular to the magnetic field lines rather than isotropic distribution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama; N. Mitani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0111282v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-ray Emission: An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass deposition rates are inferred from X-ray fluxes, our finding opens the possibility of significantly reducing cooling rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ian G. McCarthy; Michael J. West; Gary A. Welch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22215418"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVIDENCE OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9903311v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">RXTE and ASCA Constraints on <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission from the A2256 Galaxy Cluster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An 8.3 hour observation of the Abell 2256 galaxy cluster using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer proportional counter array produced a high quality spectrum in the 2 - 30 keV range. Joint fitting with the 0.7 - 11 keV spectrum obtained with the Advanced Satellite for Astrophysics and Cosmology gas imaging spectrometer gives an upperlimit of 2.3x10^-7 photons/cm^2/sec/keV for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission at 30 keV. This yields a lower limit to the mean magnetic field of 0.36 micro Gauss (uG) and an upperlimit of 1.8x10^-13 ergs/cm^3 for the cosmic-ray electron energy density. The resulting lower limit to the central magnetic field is ~1 - 3 uG While a magnetic field of ~0.1 - 0.2 uG can be created by galaxy wakes, a magnetic field of several uG is usually associated with a cooling flow or, as in the case of the Coma cluster, a subcluster merger. However, for A2256, the evidence for a merger is weak and the main cluster shows no evidence of a cooling flow. Thus, there is presently no satisfactory hypothesis for the origin of an average cluster magnetic field as high as >0.36 uG in the A2256 cluster.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Henriksen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37.2543R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particles with solar chromosphere and solar corona plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In our paper we present the results of the simultaneous high temporal resolution observations of the solar flares in the active region NOAA 10786 observed on 12 and 13 July 2005. The visual data were collected with the Multi-Channel Subtractive Double Pass (MSDP) spectrograph and Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) in Bialkow Observatory (University of Wroclaw, Poland) in H-alpha line with high temporal resolution of 0.04-0.075 s. The radio observations were collected in Ondrejov Observatory (Czech Republic) with 0.1 and 0.01 s cadence in 0.8- 2.0, 3.0 and 2.0-4.5 GHz bands using RT5, RT3 and RT4 radiotelescopes, respectively. The X-ray data were recorded with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite. We found high temporal correlation between the short lived radio emissions of type III, hard X-ray flux variations and short lasting variations of the brightness of the H- alpha flaring kernels observed simultaneously in line center and both wings. High cadence observations of solar flares has been used to investigate the interaction of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particles with solar chromosphere and solar corona plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Pawel; Karlicky, Marian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PMB....56..951G"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vivo <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 °C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golberg, A.; Laufer, S.; Rabinowitch, H. D.; Rubinsky, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RAA....14..285Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emissions from accreting X-ray binary pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions from cascade processes in accreting X-ray binary pulsars. In the framework of the magnetospheric gap model, we consider three photon fields, which are respectively from the polar cap of a pulsar, its surrounding accretion disk and a massive companion star with a circumstellar disk, to shield the gap. The gap-accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons emit high-energy photons via curvature radiation and an inverse Compton scattering process, in which part of these high-energy photons absorbed by interactions with the surrounding photon fields can facilitate the following electromagnetic cascades. We first carry out numerical calculations of the cascade processes in order to obtain the predicted emission spectra. As an example, we subsequently apply this model to reproduce observations of LS I +61° 303. We find that the results can fit observations ranging from hard X-ray to ?-ray bands. In particular, they can explain the spectral cutoff feature at a few GeV. Finally, we suggest that the emissions detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope from X-ray binary pulsars originate in the magnetosphere region of the pulsar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Jian-Fu; Jin, Hui; Dong, Ai-Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAP...114j4701S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> mechanism of weak microwave fields influence on neurons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mechanism of weak microwave field impact on a nerve fiber is proposed. It is shown that in the range of about 30-300 GHz, there are strongly pronounced resonances associated with the excitation of ultrasonic vibrations in the membrane as a result of interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The viscous dissipation limits the resonances and results in their broadening. These forced vibrations create acoustic pressure, which may lead to the redistribution of the protein transmembrane channels, and thus changing the threshold of the action potential excitation in the axons of the neural network. The influence of the electromagnetic microwave radiation on various specific areas of myelin nerve fibers was analyzed: the nodes of Ranvier, and the initial segment—the area between the neuron hillock and the first part of the axon covered with the myelin layer. It was shown that the initial segment is the most sensitive area of the myelined neurons from which the action potential normally starts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23229278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of palm oil refinery wastewaters by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gliding electric discharge in humid air is a source of activated species forming (e.g. (•)OH, (•)NO and their derivatives H2O2, ONO2H and NO3H) which are present in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure. These species are able to degrade organic pollutants in palm oil refinery wastewaters (PORW). The increase in acidity (pH decrease), conductivity and total dissolved solids (TDS) and the decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) of PORW samples exposed to the discharge are reported. More than 50% TOC abatement is obtained for 15 min treatment in batch conditions with a laboratory reactor. The organic pollutants of PORW, i.e. mainly fatty acids are degraded according to a pseudo first-order reaction (k*?=?0.06 min(-1)). Post discharge reactions are also observed after having switched off the discharge, which suggests that the pseudo first-order (k???0.05 min(-1)) degradation reactions should be attributed to the diffusion of soluble reactive species, e.g. H2O2 and ONOOH in the liquid target. PMID:23229278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mountapmbeme-Kouotou, P; Laminsi, S; Acayanka, E; Brisset, J-L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22437908"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among yellow monkeyflower populations from thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> soils in Yellowstone National Park.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In flowering plants, soil heterogeneity can generate divergent natural selection over fine spatial scales, and thus promote local adaptation in the absence of geographic barriers to gene flow. Here, we investigate phenotypic and genetic differentiation in one of the few flowering plants that thrives in both geothermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> soils in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus guttatus) growing at two geothermal ("thermal") sites in YNP were distinct in growth form and phenology from paired populations growing nearby (<500 m distant) in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> soils. In simulated thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> environments, thermal plants remained significantly divergent from <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plants in vegetative, floral, mating system, and phenological traits. Plants from both thermal populations flowered closer to the ground, allocated relatively more to sexual reproduction, were more likely to initiate flowering under short daylengths, and made smaller flowers that could efficiently self-fertilize without pollinators. These shared differences are consistent with local adaptation to life in the ephemeral window for growth and reproduction created by winter and spring snowmelt on hot soils. In contrast, habitat type (thermal vs. <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>) explained little of the genetic variation at neutral markers. Instead, we found that one thermal population (Agrostis Headquarters; AHQ-T) was strongly differentiated from all other populations (all F (ST) > 0.34), which were only weakly differentiated from each other (all F (ST) < 0.07). Phenotypic differentiation of thermal M. guttatus, but little population genetic evidence of long-term ecotypic divergence, encourages further investigations of the potential for fine-scale adaptation and reproductive isolation across the geothermal gradient in Yellowstone. PMID:22437908</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lekberg, Ylva; Roskilly, Beth; Hendrick, Margaret F; Zabinski, Catherine A; Barr, Camille M; Fishman, Lila</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23668811"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma treatment is associated with changes in transcriptome of human epithelial skin cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma has recently gained attention in the field of biomedical and clinical applications. In the area of plasma medicine research, one promising approach is to promote wound healing by stimulation of cells involved. To understand basic molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered by plasma treatment, we investigated biological effects of an argon plasma jet kinpen on human epithelial skin cells. For assessment of transcriptome changes cell culture medium was plasma treated and applied to the HaCaT keratinocyte cell culture (indirect treatment). Consequently, whole-genome microarrays were used to analyze this interaction in detail and identified a statistically significant modification of 3,274 genes including 1,828 up- and 1,446 downregulated genes. Particularly, cells after indirect plasma treatment are characterized by differential expression of a considerable number of genes involved in the response to stress. In this regard, we found a plasma-dependent regulation of oxidative stress answer and increased expression of enzymes of the antioxidative defense system (e.g. 91 oxidoreductases). Our results demonstrate that plasma not only induces cell reactions of stress-sensing but also of proliferative nature. Consistent with gene expression changes as well as Ingenuity Pathway Analysis prediction, we propose that stimulating doses of plasma may protect epithelial skin cells in wound healing by promoting proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, gene expression profiling may become an important tool in identifying plasma-related changes of gene expression. Our results underline the enormous clinical potential of plasma as a biomedical tool for stimulation of epithelial skin cells. PMID:23668811</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Anke; Wende, Kristian; Bekeschus, Sander; Bundscherer, Lena; Barton, Annemarie; Ottmüller, Katja; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Masur, Kai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0606492v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffuse, <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> X-ray Emission from the Galactic Star Cluster Westerlund 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the diffuse X-ray emission identified in Chandra observations of the young, massive Galactic star cluster Westerlund 1. After removing point-like X-ray sources down to a completeness limit of 2e31 erg/s, we identify 3e34 erg/s (2--8 keV) of diffuse emission. The spatial distribution of the emission can be described as a slightly-elliptical Lorentzian core with a half-width half-maximum along the major axis of 25+/-1", similar to the distribution of point sources in the cluster, plus a 5' halo of extended emission. The spectrum of the diffuse emission is dominated by a hard continuum component that can be described as a kT>3 keV thermal plasma that has a low iron abundance (<0.3 solar), or as <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission that could be stellar light that is inverse-Compton scattered by MeV electrons. Only 5% of the flux is produced by a kT=0.7 keV plasma. The low luminosity of the thermal emission and the lack of a 6.7 keV iron line suggests that <40,000 unresolved stars with masses between 0.3 and 2 Msun are present in the cluster. Moreover, the flux in the diffuse emission is a factor of two lower than would be expected from a supersonically-expanding cluster wind, and there is no evidence for thermal remnants produced by supernovae. Less than 1e-5 of the mechanical luminosity of the cluster is dissipated as 2--8 keV X-rays, leaving a large amount of energy that either is radiated at other wavelengths, is dissipated beyond the bounds of our image, or escapes into the intergalactic medium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael P. Muno; Casey Law; J. Simon Clark; Sean M. Dougherty; Richard de Grijs; Simon Portegies Zwart; Farhad Yusef-Zadeh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-06-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345484"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> cytocidal effect of infrared irradiation on cultured cancer cells using specialized device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As infrared penetrates the skin, thermal effects of infrared irradiation on cancer cells have been investigated in the field of hyperthermia. We evaluated <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of infrared irradiation using a specialized device (1100-18000 nm with filtering of wavelengths between 1400 and 1500 nm and contact cooling) on cancer cells. In in vitro study, five kinds of cultured cancer cell lines (MCF7 breast cancer, HeLa uterine cervical cancer, NUGC-4 gastric cancer, B16F0 melanoma, and MDA-MB435 melanoma) were irradiated using the infrared device, and then the cell proliferation activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. Proliferation of all the cancer cell lines was significantly suppressed by infrared irradiation. Total infrared output appeared to be correlated with cell survival. Increased temperature during infrared irradiation appeared not to play a role in cell survival. The maximum temperature elevation in the wells after each shot in the 20 and 40 J/cm(2) culture was 3.8 degrees C and 6.9 degrees C, respectively. In addition, we have shown that infrared irradiation significantly inhibited the tumor growth of MCF7 breast cancer transplanted in severe combined immunodeficiency mice and MDA-MB435 melanoma transplanted in nude mice in vivo. Significant differences between control and irradiated groups were observed in tumor volume and frequencies of TUNEL-positive and Ki-67-positive cells. These results indicate that infrared, independent of thermal energy, can induce cell killing of cancer cells. As this infrared irradiation schedule reduces discomfort and side effects, reaches the deep subcutaneous tissues, and facilitates repeated irradiations, it may have potential as an application for treating various forms of cancer. PMID:20345484</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanaka, Yohei; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Yan, Huimin; Nakayama, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0302027v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasmas in the Galaxy Cluster 3C 129</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe new Chandra spectroscopy data of the cluster which harbors the prototypical "head tail" radio galaxy 3C 129 and the weaker radio galaxy 3C 129.1. We combined the Chandra data with Very Large Array (VLA) radio data taken at 0.33, 5, and 8 GHz (archival data) and 1.4 GHz (new data). We also obtained new HI observations at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) to measure the neutral Hydrogen column density in the direction of the cluster with arcminute angular resolution. The Chandra observation reveals extended X-ray emission from the radio galaxy 3C 129.1 with a total luminosity of 1.5E+41 erg/s. The X-ray excess is resolved into an extended central source of ~2 arcsec (1 kpc) diameter and several point sources with an individual luminosity up to 2.1E+40 erg/s. In the case of the radio galaxy 3C 129, the Chandra observation shows, in addition to core and jet X-ray emission reported in an earlier paper, some evidence for extended, diffuse X-ray emission from a region east of the radio core. The 12 arcsec x 36 arcsec (6 kpc x 17 kpc) region lies "in front" of the radio core, in the same direction into which the radio galaxy is moving. We use the radio and X-ray data to study in detail the pressure balance between the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio plasma and the thermal Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) along the tail of 3C 129 which extends over 15 arcmin (427 kpc). Depending on the assumed lower energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum, the minimum pressure of the radio plasma lies a factor of between 10 and 40 below the ICM pressure for a large part of the tail. We discuss several possibilities to explain the apparent pressure mismatch.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Krawczynski; D. E. Harris; R. Grossman; W. Lane; N. Kassim; A. G. Willis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0510701v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030113139&hterms=inverse+bremsstrahlung&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dinverse%2Bbremsstrahlung"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Hard X-Ray Emission in Galaxy Clusters Observed with the BeppoSAX PDS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the X-ray emission in a Sample of galaxy clusters using the BeppoSAX PDS instrument in the 20 - 80 keV energy band. We estimate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hard X-ray cluster emission (HXR) by modeling the thermal contribution from the cluster gas and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> contamination from the unobscured AGN in the clusters. We also evaluate the systematic uncertainties due to the background fluctuations. Assuming negligible contamination from the obscured AGN, the resulting <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component is detected at a 2 sigma level in approx. 50% of the non-significantly AGN-contaminated clusters: A2142, A2199, A2256, A3376, Coma, Ophiuchus and Virgo. The data are consistent with a scenario whereby relaxed clusters have no hard X-ray component of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> origin, whereas merger clusters do. The co-added spectrum of the above clusters indicates a power-law spectrum for the HXR with a photon index of 2.8+0.3-0.4 in the 12 - 115 keV band, and we find indication that it has extended distribution. These indications argue against significant contamination from obscured AGN, which have harder spectra and centrally concentrated distribution. These results are supportive of the assumption of the merger shock acceleration of electrons in clusters, which has been proposed as a possible origin of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hard X-ray emission models. Assuming that the Cosmic Microwave Background photons experience Inverse Compton scattering from the merger-accelerated relativistic electrons, and thus produce the observed HXR, the measured hard X-ray slope corresponds to a differential momentum spectra of the relativistic electrons with a slope of mu = 3.8 - 5.0. In presence of cluster magnetic fields this relativistic electron population produces synchrotron emission with a spectral index of 1.4 - 2.1, consistent with radio halo observations of merger clusters. Thus both hard X-ray and radio observations of merger clusters are consistent with the Inverse Compton model. The observed slope of HXR is also consistent with that predicted by the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> bremsstrahlung, which chus cannot be ruled by the fit to the current data, even though this model requires an extreme, untenable cluster energetics. Assuming centrally concentrated distribution of HXR, the data requires a harder slope for the HXR spectrum, which is consistent with secondary electron models, but this model yields a worse fit to the PDS data and thus seems to be disfavored over the primary electron Inverse Compton model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevalainen, J.; Oosterbroek, T.; Bonamente, M.; Colafrancesco, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1710871"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron acceleration to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies in low Mach number (Mthermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M=3. We find that about 15 percent of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p~2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPhD...42j5203O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial plasma density propagation of barrier discharge <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma bullets in an atmospheric pressure argon gas stream</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The characteristics of volume-averaged plasma density on axial propagation for atmospheric argon (Ar) plasma bullets are experimentally investigated. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma bullets are ejected through a glass tube into the surrounding ambient air. Taking into consideration the time and space profile of the plasma movement, the plasma propagation is measured using a Rogowski coil. The plasma density is evaluated from the propagation velocity and the current magnitude. The plasma density profiles are presented as functions of the applied voltage and the length of growth. The plasma density is in the order of 1016 m-3 and the propagation velocity is in the order of 105 m s-1. These values are similar to those of weakly ionized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ohyama, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Nagai, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0105376v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of a power-law <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron tail on the ionization and recombination rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have investigated the effects of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron population on the ionization and recombination rates. The considered electron distribution is defined as a Maxwellian function below a break energy E_b and as a power-law function of index alpha above this energy. We have calculated the collisional (direct and excitation autoionization) ionization coefficient rates as well as the (radiative and dielectronic) recombination rates. Practical methods are given to calculate these rates in order to be easily included in a computer code. The ionization rates are very sensitive to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron population and can be increased by several orders of magnitude depending on the temperature and parameters of the power-law function (E_b and alpha). The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons have a much weaker effect on the (radiative and dielectronic) recombination rates. We have determined the mean electric charge of elements C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni for different values of the break energy and power-law index. The ionization balance is affected significantly, whereas the effect is smaller in ionizing plasmas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Porquet; M. Arnaud; A. Decourchelle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RScI...83j3506S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schäfer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Kewitz, T.; Šperka, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23126765"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas. PMID:23126765</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schäfer, J; Foest, R; Reuter, S; Kewitz, T; Šperka, J; Weltmann, K-D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3494719"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas. PMID:23126765</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schafer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book..445K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <100 ppm (MA) after 24 h. The PK-2 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <400 ppm (MA) after 24 h. Treatments showed reductions in spores of greater than 6 log10 after 24 h. Reductions were maintained without additional re-growth at 72 h. These results indicate that the PK-1 and PK-2 systems have the capacity to reduce Bacillus subtilis spores in an in-package ionization process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002A%26A...394..993R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A multi-wavelength investigation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitting O-star 9 Sgr</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the results of a multi-wavelength investigation of the O4 V star 9 Sgr (= HD 164794). Our data include observations in the X-ray domain with XMM-Newton, in the radio domain with the VLA as well as optical spectroscopy. 9 Sgr is one of a few presumably single OB stars that display <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission. This phenomenon is attributed to synchrotron emission by relativistic electrons accelerated in strong hydrodynamic shocks in the stellar wind. Given the enormous supply of photospheric UV photons in the wind of 9 Sgr, inverse Compton scattering by these relativistic electrons is a priori expected to generate a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power law tail in the X-ray spectrum. Our EPIC and RGS spectra of 9 Sgr reveal a more complex situation than expected from this simple theoretical picture. While the bulk of the thermal X-ray emission from 9 Sgr arises most probably in a plasma at temperature ~ 3 x 106 K distributed throughout the wind, the nature of the hard emission in the X-ray spectrum is less clear. Assuming a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> origin, our best fitting model yields a photon index of >=2.9 for the power law component which would imply a low compression ratio of <=1.79 for the shocks responsible for the electron acceleration. However, the hard emission can also be explained by a thermal plasma at a temperature >=2 x 107 K. Our VLA data indicate that the radio emission of 9 Sgr was clearly <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> at the time of the XMM-Newton observation. Again, we derive a low compression ratio (1.7) for the shocks that accelerate the electrons responsible for the synchrotron radio emission. Finally, our optical spectra reveal long-term radial velocity variations suggesting that 9 Sgr could be a long-period spectroscopic binary. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and the USA (NASA). Also based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and with the Very Large Array. The VLA is a facility of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory which is operated by the Associated Universities Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rauw, G.; Blomme, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Runacres, M. C.; Sana, H.; Stevens, I. R.; Van Loo, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........12O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary focus of this research is to investigate <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of keeping the liquid surface clean and the distortion of information by the interference of equilibrium dense vapor above the liquid. By using the liquid jet technique the ejection of ions from surface of micron sized liquid can be adequately probed with a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The photoionization of pure water and aqueous solutions of NaOH, NaCl and HCl is presented in Chapter 4. The aim of this investigation was to provide a fundamental understanding of the structure of water/vacuum interfaces. In Chapter 5, the ejection of ions from salt solutions containing divalent cations is also presented. The goal of the experiment was to figure out the solvation structure and reaction dynamics of divalent metal ions, M2+ on the surface of aqueous solution. A lot of work has been done in the gas phase either by a pickup-type cluster source or by collision induced dissociation of ejected ions from electrospray. For the first time the direct monitoring of ions ejected from liquid into gas phase is explored. Possible ejection mechanisms for the ejection of cations are discussed extensively in both Chapters 4 and 5. The results presented in this thesis is a combination of experiments performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which includes experiments on ice and micro-jet respectively. The results in Chapters 2 and 3 have been submitted to the Journal of Chemical Physics and the Journal of Physical Chemistry respectively. It is important to note that the data presented in Chapter 3 was originally taken by Dr Janine Herring-Captain as part of her thesis work. It is also presented in this thesis due to effort in analyzing the data and preparation of the submitted manuscript. Chapter 4 and 5 represents papers which will also be submitted for publication in the open scientific literature. All the work leading to the results presented in these two chapters were done during my visit to PNNL and I would like to acknowledge that the instrumentation and data acquisition were done in collaboration with Nikolai Pet</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olanrewaju, Babajide O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/390806"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Galactic Center Filament (G358.85+0.47) Parallel to the Galactic Plane</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of a new <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filament, G358.85+0.47, the ``Pelican'', located ~225 pc in projection from SgrA, and oriented parallel to the Galactic plane. VLA continuum observations at 20 cm reveal that this 7' (17.5 pc) structure bends at its northern extension and is comprised of parallel strands, most apparent at its ends. Observations at 6 and 3.6 cm reveal that the Pelican is a synchrotron-emitting source and is strongly linearly polarized over much of its extent. The spectral index of the filament changes from alpha(20/6)=-0.8 to alpha(6/3.6)=-1.5. The rotation measures exhibit a smooth gradient, with values ranging from -1000 rad/m2 to +500 rad/m2. The intrinsic magnetic field is well-aligned along the length of the filament. Based on these properties, we classify the Pelican as one of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filaments unique to the Galactic center. Since these filaments (most of which are oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane) are believed to trace the overall magnetic field in the inn...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lang, C C; Kassim, N E; Lazio, T J W; Lang, Cornelia C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9906285v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Galactic Center Filament (G358.85+0.47) Parallel to the Galactic Plane</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of a new <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filament, G358.85+0.47, the ``Pelican'', located ~225 pc in projection from SgrA, and oriented parallel to the Galactic plane. VLA continuum observations at 20 cm reveal that this 7' (17.5 pc) structure bends at its northern extension and is comprised of parallel strands, most apparent at its ends. Observations at 6 and 3.6 cm reveal that the Pelican is a synchrotron-emitting source and is strongly linearly polarized over much of its extent. The spectral index of the filament changes from alpha(20/6)=-0.8 to alpha(6/3.6)=-1.5. The rotation measures exhibit a smooth gradient, with values ranging from -1000 rad/m2 to +500 rad/m2. The intrinsic magnetic field is well-aligned along the length of the filament. Based on these properties, we classify the Pelican as one of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> filaments unique to the Galactic center. Since these filaments (most of which are oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane) are believed to trace the overall magnetic field in the inner Galaxy, the Pelican is the first detection of a component of this field parallel to the plane. The Pelican may thus mark a transition region of the magnetic field orientation in the inner kiloparsec of the Galaxy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cornelia C. Lang; K. R. Anantharamaiah; N. E. Kassim; T. J. W. Lazio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-06-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book..215Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reviews our recent research results of using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013A%26A...559A..13M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studying the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> lobes of IRAS 16547-4247 through a multi-wavelength approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years, massive protostars have turned out to be a possible population of high-energy emitters. Among the best candidates is IRAS 16547-4247, a protostar that presents a powerful outflow with clear signatures of interaction with its environment. This source has been revealed to be a potential high-energy source because it displays <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission of synchrotron origin, which is evidence of relativistic particles. To improve our understanding of IRAS 16547-4247 as a high-energy source, we analyzed XMM-Newton archival data and found that IRAS 16547-4247 is a hard X-ray source. We discuss these results in the context of a refined one-zone model and previous radio observations. From our study we find that it may be difficult to explain the X-ray emission as <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation coming from the interaction region, but it might be produced by thermal Bremsstrahlung (plus photo-electric absorption) by a fast shock at the jet end. In the high-energy range, the source might be detectable by the present generation of Cherenkov telescopes, and may eventually be detected by Fermi in the GeV range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Munar-Adrover, P.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Iwasawa, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...789...49F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-dimensional Simulations of the <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Broadband Emission from Young Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supernova remnants are believed to be major contributors to Galactic cosmic rays. In this paper, we explore how the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from young remnants can be used to probe the production of energetic particles at the shock (both protons and electrons). Our model couples hydrodynamic simulations of a supernova remnant with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. We include two important back-reaction loops upstream of the shock: energetic particles can (1) modify the flow structure and (2) amplify the magnetic field. As the latter process is not fully understood, we use different limit cases that encompass a wide range of possibilities. We follow the history of the shock dynamics and of the particle transport downstream of the shock, which allows us to compute the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from the remnant at any given age. We do this in three dimensions, in order to generate projected maps that can be compared with observations. We observe that completely different recipes for the magnetic field can lead to similar modifications of the shock structure, although to very different configurations of the field and particles. We show how this affects the emission patterns in different energy bands, from radio to X-rays and ?-rays. High magnetic fields (>100 ?G) directly impact the synchrotron emission from electrons, by restricting their emission to thin rims, and indirectly impact the inverse Compton emission from electrons and also the pion decay emission from protons, mostly by shifting their cut-off energies to respectively lower and higher energies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferrand, Gilles; Decourchelle, Anne; Safi-Harb, Samar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1967555"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> superbubble in IC 10: the generation of cosmic ray electrons caught in the act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Superbubbles are crucial for stellar feedback, with supposedly high (of the order of 10 per cent) thermalization rates. We combined multiband radio continuum observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) with Effelsberg data to study the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> superbubble (NSB) in IC 10, a starburst dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. Thermal emission was subtracted using a combination of Balmer H$\\alpha$ and VLA 32 GHz continuum maps. The bubble's <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectrum between 1.5 and 8.8 GHz displays curvature and can be well fitted with a standard model of an ageing cosmic ray electron population. With a derived equipartition magnetic field strength of $44\\pm 8~\\rm\\mu G$, and measuring the radiation energy density from Spitzer MIPS maps as $5\\pm 1\\times 10^{-11}~\\rm erg\\, cm^{-3}$, we determine, based on the spectral curvature, a spectral age of the bubble of $1.0\\pm 0.3~\\rm Myr$. Analysis of the LITTLE THINGS HI data cube shows an expanding HI hole with 100 pc diameter and a dynamical age of $3.8\\pm 0.3~\\rm Myr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heesen, Volker; Krause, Martin G H; Harwood, Jeremy J; Rau, Urvashi; Rupen, Michael P; Hunter, Deidre A; Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Kitchener, Ged</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4049833"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/206855"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma (NTP) session overview: Second International Symposium on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Advanced Oxidation Technologies (used in pollution control and treating hazardous wastes) has expanded from using hydroxyl radicals to treat organic compounds in water, to using reductive free radicals as well, and to application to pollutants in both gases and aqueous media. <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma (NTP) is created in a gas by an electrical discharge or energetic electron injection. Highly reactive species (O atoms, OH, N radicals, plasma electrons) react with entrained hazardous organic chemicals in the gas, converting them to CO2, H2O, etc. NTP can be used to simultaneously remove different kinds of pollutants (eg, VOCs, SOx, NOx in flue gases). This paper presents an overview of NTP technology for pollution control and hazardous waste treatment; it is intended as an introduction to the NTP session of the symposium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17509648"> <span id="translatedtitle">Organic pollutants abatement and biodecontamination of brewery effluents by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> quenched plasma at atmospheric pressure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A preliminary study was carried out to investigate possible decontamination of the waste waters from a Cameroonian brewery by using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma. Samples of waste waters collected during periods of intense activity of production were first analysed for organoleptic, physical-chemical and organic parameters, and then exposed to a humid air electric discharge at ambient temperature and pressure. The resultant pollution abatement and germicidal effects are both ascribed to strong oxidising effects of OH and NO radicals formed in the plasma. The BOD removal efficiency of the process with brewery industrial wastewaters under BOD concentration of 385 and 1018 mg l(-1) were 74% and 98% respectively. The alkaline wastewaters are rapidly neutralised due to the pH lowering effects of the plasma treatment. PMID:17509648</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doubla, A; Laminsi, S; Nzali, S; Njoyim, E; Kamsu-Kom, J; Brisset, J-L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT........27Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), and other by-product's may also form, including ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and decomposed hydrocarbons. Several organic compounds, such as BTEX, ethylene, n-heptane, isooctane, methanol and NH3, were tested in an AP-CNTP system. Parametric experiments were carried out by varying plasma discharge power, flowrates, and initial concentrations. The degradation efficiency varied depending on the chemical nature of the compounds. A plasmochemical kinetic model was derived for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and n-heptane.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yin, Shu-Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...794..153G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron acceleration to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with Ms = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ~= 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RScI...85kE419P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons at Aditya tokamaka)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Purohit, S.; Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons at Aditya tokamak.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented. PMID:25430326</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Purohit, S; Joisa, Y S; Raval, J V; Ghosh, J; Tanna, R; Shukla, B K; Bhatt, S B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE94014013"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrochemical synthesis of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> quantum dot arrays.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The conventional route to nanosynthesis involves beam nanolithography (electron beam, ion beam or-x-ray lithography). Exposure to these beams during pattern delineation however causes severe radiation damage to nanostructures which is further compounded d...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. E. Miller, D. F. Yue, G. Banerjee, S. Bandyopadhyay, R. E. Ricker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ASPC..479..531B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Connections between <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodicity</span> and Modulation in Pulsating Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The observations of the photometric space telescopes CoRoT and Kepler show numerous Blazhko RR Lyrae stars which have non-repetitive modulation cycles. The phenomenon can be explained by multi-periodic, stochastic or chaotic processes. From a mathematical point of view, almost periodic functions describe all of them. We assumed band-limited almost periodic functions either for the light curves of the main pulsation or for the modulation functions. The resulting light curves can generally be described analytically and may also be examined by numerical simulations. This presentation is a part of our systematic study on the modulation of pulsating stars (Benk? et al. 2009, 2011, 2012).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benk?, J. M.; Paparó, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.luth.obspm.fr/~luthier/vincent/pdf/RAG2013.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations from Rossby Wave instability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">spectrum / rms / astrometry... 3/16 Frédéric VINCENT Rossby wave QPO #12;QPO Rossby Synchrotron Magnetic wave instability Vortices develop at some rext ( rISCO) when the disk extends down to ISCO Density waves extend on both sides of rext r > rext wave faster than gas rotation r</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gourgoulhon, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.luth.obspm.fr/~luthier/vincent/pdf/GR20.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations from Rossby Wave instability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">spectrum / rms / astrometry... 3/13 Frédéric VINCENT Rossby wave QPO #12;QPO Rossby Synchrotron Magnetic Rossby Epicyclic frequency extremum Meheut+10 Credit : P. Varniere Rossby wave instability Vortices of rext r > rext wave faster than gas rotation r gas rotation Spiral wave 7</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gourgoulhon, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pagines.ma1.upc.edu/~jpuig/preprints/puig0402.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cantor Spectrum for <span class="hlt">QuasiPeriodic</span> Schrodinger Joaquim Puig #</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">'s equation), is a discretization of the classical Mathieu equation, x ## + (a + b cos(t)) x = 0. which equation and Mathieu equation are quite striking and their comparison throws light on the diË?odinger operators. These are obtained studying the dynamics of the corre­ sponding eigenvalue equations, specially</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puig. Joaquim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mat.uniroma2.it/~perfetti/lavori/catania/proccata.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">INFINITE DIMENSIONAL <span class="hlt">QUASI--PERIODIC</span> SOLUTIONS PAOLO PERFETTI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">) distance L from j; in formulae: g j j g j (' (L) ) ; ' (L) j f' k g k2B j (L) ; B j (L) j fk : jk \\Gamma jj such that, 8 l â?? 1, j P l k=1 ! i k n i k j \\Gamma1 Ÿ fl( P l k=1 jn i k j) l , with n i k 2 Z, P l k=1 jn i program ``Metodi variazionali ed equazioni differenziali nonlineari'' 1 #12; 2 short range; fix L â?? 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perfetti, Paolo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070018790&hterms=periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dperiodic%2Btable"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Variability in NGC 5408 X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of quasiperiodic variability in the 0.2 - 10 keV X-ray flux from the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1. The average power spectrum of all EPIC-pn data reveals a strong 20 mHz QPO with an average amplitude (rms) of 9%, and a coherence, Q identical with nu(sub 0)/sigma approximately equal to 6. In a 33 ksec time interval when the 20 mHz QPO is strongest we also find evidence for a 2nd QPO peak at 15 mHz, the first indication for a close pair of QPOs in a ULX source. Interestingly, the frequency ratio of this QPO pair is inconsistent with 3:2 at the 3 sigma level, but is consistent with a 4:3 ratio. A powerlaw noise component with slope near 1.5 is also present below 0.1 Hz with evidence for a break to a flatter slope at about 3 mHz. The source shows substantial broadband variability, with a total amplitude (rms) of about 30% in the 0.1 - 100 mHz frequency band, and there is strong energy dependence to the variability. The power spectrum of hard X-ray photons (greater than 2 keV) shows a "classic" flat-topped continuum breaking to a power law with index 1.5 - 2. Both the break and 20 mHz QPO are detected in the hard band, and the 20 mHz QPO is essentially at the break. The QPO is both strong and narrow in this band, having an amplitude (rms) of 15%, and Q approx. equal to 25. The energy spectrum is well fit by three components, a "cool" disk with kT = 0.15 keV, a steep power law with index 2.56, and a thermal plasma at kT = 0.87 keV. The disk, power law, and thermal plasma components contribute 35, 60, and 5% of the 0.3 - 10 keV flux, respectively. Both the timing and spectral properties of NGC 5408 X-1 are strikingly reminiscent of Galactic black hole systems at high inferred accretion rates, but with its characteristic frequencies (QPO and break frequencies) scaled down by a factor of 10 - 100. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of models for ULXs, and their implications for the object's mass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa; Soria, Roberto; Uttley, Phil; Cropper, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0208314v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of the helium resonance lines in the solar atmosphere by suprathermal electron excitation I: <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> transport of helium ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Models of the solar transition region made from lines other than those of helium cannot account for the strength of the helium lines. However, the collisional excitation rates of the helium resonance lines are unusually sensitive to the energy of the exciting electrons. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> motions in the transition region could drive slowly-ionizing helium ions rapidly through the steep temperature gradient, exposing them to excitation by electrons characteristic of higher temperatures than those describing their ionization state. We present the results of calculations which use a more physical representation of the lifetimes of the ground states of He I and He II than was adopted in earlier work on this process. New emission measure distributions are used to calculate the temperature variation with height. The results show that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions can lead to enhancements of the He I and He II resonance line intensities by factors that are comparable with those required. Excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions would reduce the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> transport. The effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions are more consistent with the observed spatial distribution of helium emission than are those of excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions alone. In particular, they account better for the observed line intensity ratio I(537.0 A)/I(584.3 A), and its variation with location.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. R. Smith; C. Jordan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25308660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of electricity on anthocyanin degradation during ohmic heating of jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) juice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of electricity on anthocyanin degradation during ohmic heating of jaboticaba juice. For this, temperature profiles during conventional and ohmic heating processes were matched, and the degradation kinetics of anthocyanins were compared at temperatures ranging from 70 to 90°C. The monomeric anthocyanin content was quantified by UV-Visible spectroscopy using the pH-differential method. Anthocyanin degradation was fitted to a first-order model. The rate constants ranged from 1.7 to 7.5×10(-3)min(-1) and from 1.8 to 7.6×10(-3)min(-1) for ohmic and conventional heating, respectively. The analysis of variance (?=0.05) showed no significant differences between rate constants of the ohmic and conventional heating at the same temperatures. All kinetic and thermodynamic parameters evaluated showed similar values for both technologies. These results indicate that the presence of the oscillating electric field did not affect the degradation rates of anthocyanins during ohmic heating. PMID:25308660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Gurak, Poliana Deyse; Schmitz, Frederico; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900002982&hterms=inverse+bremsstrahlung+mass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dinverse%2Bbremsstrahlung%2Bmass"> <span id="translatedtitle">The behavior of beams of relativistic <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons under the influence of collisions and synchrotron losses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For many astrophysical situations, such as in solar flares or cosmic gamma-ray bursts, continuum gamma rays with energies up to hundreds of MeV were observed, and can be interpreted to be due to bremsstrahlung radiation by relativistic electrons. The region of acceleration for these particles is not necessarily the same as the region in which the radiation is produced, and the effects of the transport of the electrons must be included in the general problem. Hence it is necessary to solve the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons, including all the interactions and loss mechanisms relevant at such energies. The resulting kinetic equation for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons, including the effects of Coulomb collisions and losses due to synchrotron emission, was solved analytically in some simple limiting cases, and numerically for the general cases including constant and varying background plasma density and magnetic field. New approximate analytic solutions are presented for collision dominated cases, for small pitch angles and all energies, synchrotron dominated cases, both steady-state and time dependent, for all pitch angles and energies, and for cases when both synchrotron and collisional energy losses are important, but for relativistic electrons. These analytic solutions are compared to the full numerical results in the proper limits. These results will be useful for calculation of spectra and angular distribution of the radiation (x rays, gamma-rays, and microwaves) emitted via synchrotron or bremsstrahlung processes by the electrons. These properties and their relevance to observations will be observed in subsequent papers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mctiernan, James M.; Petrosian, Vahe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JCAP...12..002P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-minimal Higgs inflation and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> leptogenesis in a supersymmetric Pati-Salam model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider a supersymmetric (SUSY) Grand Unified Theory (GUT) based on the gauge group GPS = SU(4)C × SU(2)L × SU(2)R, which incorporates non-minimal chaotic inflation, driven by a quartic potential associated with the Higgs fields involved in the spontaneous breaking of GPS. The inflationary model relies on renormalizable superpotential terms and does not lead to overproduction of magnetic monopoles. It is largely independent of the one-loop radiative corrections and can become consistent with the current observational data on the inflationary observables, with the symmetry breaking scale of GPS assuming its SUSY value. Within our model, the strong CP and the ? problems of the minimal SUSY standard model can be resolved via a Peccei-Quinn symmetry. Moreover baryogenesis occurs via <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> leptogenesis realized by the out-of-equilibrium decay of the right-handed neutrinos, which are produced by the inflaton's decay. We consider two versions of such a scenario, assuming that the inflaton decays to the lightest or to the next-to-lightest right-handed neutrino. Both scenaria can become compatible with the constraints arising from the baryon asymmetry of the universe, the gravitino limit on the reheating temperature and the upper bound on the light neutrino masses, provided that the gravitino is somehow heavy. In the second scenario, extra restrictions from the SU(4)C GUT symmetry on the heaviest Dirac neutrino mass and the data on the atmospheric neutrino oscillations can be also met.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pallis, C.; Toumbas, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25072139"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acetaldehyde removal using an atmospheric <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma combined with a packed bed: role of the adsorption process.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work is an attempt in order to help towards understanding the influence of the adsorption process on the removal of a VOC (acetaldehyde, CH3CHO) using cyclic <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasma (NTP) combined with a packed-bed of a catalyst support, ?-Al2O3. In the first part, the results obtained by placing the saturated alumina pellets inside the plasma discharge zone are discussed, in terms of acetaldehyde removal, CO and CO2 production. In the second part, adsorption of CH3CHO, CO, CO2 and O3 was carried out, from single and multicomponent mixtures of the different compounds. The results showed that (i) the adsorption capacities followed the order CH3CHO?? CO2>CO; (ii) O3 was decomposed on the alumina surface; (iii) CO oxidation occurred on the surface when O3 was present. In the third part, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to follow the alumina surface during acetaldehyde adsorption. DRIFTS measurements demonstrated that besides the bands of molecularly adsorbed acetaldehyde, several absorptions appeared on the spectra showing the intermediate surface transformation of acetaldehyde already at 300K. Finally, the relationship between the adsorption results and the NTP combined with a packed-bed process is discussed. PMID:25072139</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klett, C; Duten, X; Tieng, S; Touchard, S; Jestin, P; Hassouni, K; Vega-González, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AdSpR..41..512T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Possible Suzaku detection of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray signals from a rotating magnetized white dwarf</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although rotating neutron stars (NSs) have been regarded as being textbook examples of astrophysical particle acceleration sites for decades, details of the acceleration mechanism remain a mystery; for example, we cannot yet observationally distinguish “polar cap” models from “outer gap” models. To solve the model degeneracy, it is useful to study similar systems with much different physical parameters. Strongly magnetized white dwarfs (WDs) are ideal for this purpose, because they have essentially the same system geometry as NSs, but differ largely from NSs in the system parameters, including the size, magnetic field, and the rotation velocity, with the induced electric field expected to reach 1013 1014 eV. Based on this idea, the best candidate among WDs, AE Aquarii, was observed with the fifth Japaneses X-ray satellite, Suzaku. The hard X-ray detector (HXD) on-board Suzaku has the highest sensitivity in the hard X-ray band over 10 keV. A marginal detection in the hard X-ray band was achieved with the HXD, and was separated from the thermal emission. The flux corresponds to about 0.02% of its spin-down energy. If the signal is real, this observation must be a first case of the detection of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from WDs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Terada, Y.; Ishida, M.; Mukai, K.; Dotani, T.; Makishima, K.; Naik, S.; Hayashi, T.; Okada, S.; Nakamura, R.; Enoto, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19348341"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compatibility studies of promethazine hydrochloride with tablet excipients by means of thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The compatibility of promethazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with various tableting excipients has been investigated by isothermal stress testing (IST) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms of PMZ and each of the excipients investigated were compared with their corresponding physical mixtures (1:1) for evaluation. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) data was used to corroborate the results of DSC and IST. A preliminary sustained release tablet formulation of the drug, prepared using compatible excipients, was stored under accelerated storage conditions (40 degrees C/75% RH) and analyzed for stability, drug release and bioadhesion characteristics for up to 3 months. Based on DSC results alone, drug-excipient interactions were observed with Pearlitol SD200, lactose monohydrate and zinc stearate. Chromatographic analysis of the stressed binary mixture (stored at 55 degrees C for 3 weeks) containing PMZ-lactose monohydrate showed brown discoloration indicating potential interaction. However, stressed physical mixtures of PMZ-Pearlitol SD200 and PMZ-zinc stearate indicated compatibility as opposed to the thermal analysis. The tablet formulation was found to be very stable after 3 months of storage at accelerated stability conditions. Also, the release profiles and bioadhesive properties were found to be unaltered. Thus, both thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods were utilized to successfully evaluate the compatibility of excipients with PMZ and the tablet formulation was found to be stable. PMID:19348341</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thumma, S; Repka, M A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24513449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance evaluation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in simulated flue gas at 110°C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg(0) was oxidized and 20.5?gkJ(-1) of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9JL(-1). A maximal Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O2, H2O, SO2, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N2 metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg(0) oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. PMID:24513449</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Jiang, Yuze; Wang, Tiecheng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19129890"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> desorption/ablation of molecular solids induced by ultra-short soft x-ray pulses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the first observation of single-shot soft x-ray laser induced desorption occurring below the ablation threshold in a thin layer of poly (methyl methacrylate)--PMMA. Irradiated by the focused beam from the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) at 21.7 nm, the samples have been investigated by atomic-force microscope (AFM) enabling the visualization of mild surface modifications caused by the desorption. A model describing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> desorption and ablation has been developed and used to analyze single-shot imprints in PMMA. An intermediate regime of materials removal has been found, confirming model predictions. We also report below-threshold multiple-shot desorption of PMMA induced by high-order harmonics (HOH) at 32 nm. Short-time exposure imprints provide sufficient information about transverse beam profile in HOH's tight focus whereas long-time exposed PMMA exhibits radiation-initiated surface ardening making the beam profile measurement infeasible. PMID:19129890</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chalupský, J; Juha, L; Hájková, V; Cihelka, J; Vysín, L; Gautier, J; Hajdu, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Jurek, M; Krzywinski, J; London, R A; Papalazarou, E; Pelka, J B; Rey, G; Sebban, S; Sobierajski, R; Stojanovic, N; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Valentin, C; Wabnitz, H; Zeitoun, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1966717"> <span id="translatedtitle">The link between broad emission line fluctuations and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from the inner AGN jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AGN reverberate when the broad emission lines respond to changes of the ionizing thermal continuum emission. Reverberation measurements have been commonly used to estimate the size of the broad-line region (BLR) and the mass of the central black hole. However, reverberation mapping studies have been mostly performed on radio-quiet sources where the contribution of the jet can be neglected. In radio-loud AGN, jets and outflows may affect substantially the relation observed between the ionizing continuum and the line emission. To investigate this relation, we have conducted a series of multiwavelength studies of radio-loud AGN, combining optical spectral line monitoring with regular VLBI observations. Our results suggest that at least a fraction of the broad-line emitting material can be located in a sub-relativistic outflow ionized by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> continuum emission generated in the jet at large distances (> 1pc) from the central engine of AGN. This finding may have a strong impact on black hole mass estimates ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">León-Tavares, J; Lobanov, A; Valtaoja, E; Arshakian, T G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25311730"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the effect of low-power, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability. PMID:25311730</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and UV-light for removal of odour from sludge treatment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) systems can be used for abatement of odour nuisances. Odour reductions are achieved by radical-initiated oxidation and dust collection in the plasma reactor. For some emissions a sequence of NTP followed by UV-light can improve the odour reduction further. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of NTP technology combined with UV-light towards odour emissions from sludge treatment. Air from a pilot sludge dryer was treated with a pilot NTP and a UV unit. The effect of using an acid scrubber upstream the NTP system was also tested. Thermal desorption gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to analyse samples taken from the inlet and the outlet of the NTP system. The TD-GC/MS used was also equipped with a sniffing port that made it possible to record odour-active compounds eluting from the column. Relative amounts of odour-active compounds in the inlet and the outlet flow from the NTP system were compared. Bag samples from inlet and outlet were also separately analysed by an external lab and by two operators using a one-man olfactometer, a modified NasalRanger(TM). These results indicated a significant odour removal efficiency of 70-90% depending on the settings and combinations of abatement equipment. PMID:22907448</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andersen, K B; Feilberg, A; Beukes, J A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994A%26A...289..141B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical study of LMXBs with high temporal resolution: Evidence for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flares from MXB 1735-44</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a search for ultrafast optical variability among some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using the fast photometer Multichannel Analysis of Nanosecond Intensity Alterations (MANIA) complex attached to the 2.15 m telescope of CASLEO, Argentina. Two flares of approximately = 0.25 sec in duration were recorded from the MXB 1735-44 X-ray burster. Brightness of the object increased approximately = 15 - 30 times during these flares with very steep forward fronts (characteristic rising time being approximately = 50 - 60 msec), displaying a fine structure on timescales of approximately = 5 - 6 msec (confidence level greater than or = 95%). Brightness temperatures for different phases of the flares ranged from 5 107 K to 1010 K; this can only be explained by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes, or by a highly unprobable coherent thermal mechanism. These results are also an evidence that, at least, in the case of MXB 1735-44, there should exist some departures from the standard model of accretion onto compact objects. On the other hand we have detected no stochastic variations on timescale from 10-7 to 10 sec for 4U1659-487, 4U1822-371, GX339-4, 4U1636-536 and 2S0921-630.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beskin, G.; Neizvestny, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Popova, M.; Zhuravkov, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.; Feinstein, C.; Mendez, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827866"> <span id="translatedtitle">NO{sub X} REDUCTION BEHAVIOR OF ALUMINA AND ZEOLITE CATALYSTS IN COMBINATION WITH <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lean burn gasoline and diesel engines provide improved fuel economy when compared to engines operating under stoichiometric fuel/air conditions. At the same time, lean burn and diesel engines present a problem for emission control. Because they operate under oxidizing conditions, the conventional three-way catalyst is not effective in NOx reduction [1,2]. In addition, the wide temperature range of automobile exhaust gases present a challenge for catalyst design. The temperature of exhaust gases from a light duty diesel engine can vary from 150 to 500 C, depending on the operating conditions. To date, a catalyst that operates with high NOx conversion efficiency over the entire operating range has not been found. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma assisted catalysis has been shown to be a promising technology for NOx reduction in lean burn and diesel exhaust gases [3,4]. The approach exploited in this paper is to use a plasma in combination with several catalysts, each of which are active over unique temperature ranges. It was reported in the literature, that the one of the essential roles of plasma treatment is to oxidize NO to easier reducible NO2 [7]. In this contribution, the other important function of plasma treatment, namely partial oxidation of propylene, will be demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panov, A.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827748"> <span id="translatedtitle">A COMPACT CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE (CDD{trademark}) FOR <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA GENERATION IN GASOLINE OR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Higher fuel economy targets and hybrid vehicles are increasing the marketability of diesel engines. But in order to implement the growth of diesels to achieve the fuel economy benefits, all emission regulation issues must be met. To do this traps and catalysts are being utilized. One of the main problems is finding a technology that enables the exhaust emission system to not only meet the emission requirements when new, but also to meet them at the regulated intermediate and full life requirements. Work is being done that enables catalysts to remain highly efficient throughout their full life. It is done by using a corona discharge device (CDD{trademark}) that introduces <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma into the exhaust ahead of the converter. This low power device creates radicals that alter the chemistry of the exhaust so as to limit the poisoning of the catalyst. This can be done without so called ''purge'' cycles that lower fuel economy and degrade catalyst long-term durability. This device has been developed, not as a laboratory tool, but as a production ready product and is the first of its kind that is commercially available for testing. It is this product, the Corona Discharge Device, CDD{trademark}, which will be described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nowak,Victor J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20698290"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Removal of NO and Hg0 in flue gas using alkaline absorption enhanced by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) induced by positive corona discharge was utilized to oxidize NO and Hg0 to more water-soluble NO2 and Hg2+ under the conditions of simulated flue gas. The effects of discharge voltage and inlet SO2 and NO concentrations on NO and Hg0 oxidation and their removals by alkaline absorption were investigated. The results show that the oxidation and removal of NO and Hg0 are enhanced with the increase of discharge voltage. The concentrations of NO and NO2 at the outlet of absorption tower are 0 and 69 mg/m3 with an inlet NO concentration of 134 mg/m3 and a discharge voltage of 12. 8 kV while the outlet concentrations of Hg0 and Hg2+ are 22 microg/m3 and 11 microg/m3 with an inlet Hg0 concentration of 110 microg/m3 and a discharge voltage of 13.1 kV. The presence of SO2 slightly improves the oxidation and removal of Hg0 while it has almost no effect on NO oxidation and its removal. The oxidation and removal of Hg0 are significantly inhibited with the increase of inlet NO concentration. In the coexistence of 800 mg/m3 SO2, 134 mg/m3 NO and 110 microg/m3 Hg0, the removal efficiencies are 57% for NO and 31% for Hg0 with an energy input of 77 J/L. PMID:20698290</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luo, Hong-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Le; Wang, Mei-Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0707.3301v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulse Profiles, Spectra and Polarization Characteristics of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emissions from the Crab-Like Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission mechanism of the Crab-like pulsars with both a two-dimensional electrodynamical study and a three-dimensional model. We investigate the emission process in the outer gap accelerator. In the two-dimensional electrodynamical study, we solve the Poisson equation of the accelerating electric field in the outer gap and the equation of motion of the primary particles with the synchrotron and the curvature radiation process and the pair-creation process. We show a solved gap structure which produces a consistent gamma-ray spectrum with EGRET observation. Based on the two-dimensional model, we conduct a three-dimensional emission model to calculate the synchrotron and the inverse-Compton processes of the secondary pairs produced outside the outer gap. We calculate the pulse profiles, the phase-resolved spectra and the polarization characteristics in optical to $\\gamma$-ray bands to compare the observation of the Crab pulsar and PSR B0540-69. For the Crab pulsar, we find that the outer gap geometry extending from near the stellar surface to near the light cylinder produces a complex morphology change of the pulse profiles as a function of the photon energy. This predicted morphology change is quite similar with that of the observations. The calculated phase-resolved spectra are consistent with the data through optical to the $\\gamma$-ray bands. We demonstrate that the 10$\\sim$20 % of the polarization degree in the optical emissions from the Crab pulsar and the Vela pulsar are explained by the synchrotron emissions with the particle gyration motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Takata; H. -K. Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24613643"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of pulsed ultrasound irradiation on the development of disuse muscle atrophy in rat gastrocnemius muscle.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examined the effects of therapeutic pulsed ultrasound (US) on the development of disuse muscle atrophy in rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into control, immobilization (Im), sham US, and US groups. In the Im, sham US and US groups, the bilateral ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for a 4-wk period. The pulsed US (frequency, 1 MHz; intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2); pulsed mode 1:4; 15 min) was irradiated to the gastrocnemius muscle in the US group over a 4-wk immobilization period. The pulsed US irradiation delivered only <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects to the muscle. In conjunction with US irradiation, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected subcutaneously to label the nuclei of proliferating satellite cells 1 h before each pulsed US irradiation. Immobilization resulted in significant decreases in the mean diameters of type I, IIA and IIB muscle fibers of the gastrocnemius muscle in the Im, sham US and US groups compared with the control group. However, the degrees of muscle fiber atrophy for all types were significantly lower in the US group compared with the Im and sham US groups. Although the number of capillaries and the concentrations of insulin-like growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor did not change in the muscle, the number of BrdU-positive nuclei in the muscle was significantly increased by pulsed US irradiation in the US group. The results of this study suggest that pulsed US irradiation inhibits the development of disuse muscle atrophy partly via activation of satellite cells. PMID:24613643</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsumoto, Yoko; Nakano, Jiro; Oga, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hideki; Honda, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4242633"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cellular Attachment and Differentiation on Titania Nanotubes Exposed to Air- or Nitrogen-Based <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric Pressure Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air), to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in cellular activity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that this treatment leads to improved osseointegration in vitro. PMID:25420027</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seo, Hye Yeon; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Choi, Yu-Ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55871067"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher-order growth rate of instability of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén and ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The higher-order growth rate of instability for obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén and ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma have been obtained by the multiple-scale perturbation expansion method developed by Allen and Rowlands (1993). The growth rate of instability is obtained correct to order k2, where k is the wave number of a long-wavelength plane-wave perturbation. The corresponding lowest-order stability</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anup Bandyopadhyay; K. P. Das</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19454589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion-acoustic solitons and double-layers in a plasma consisting of positive and negative ions with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this research paper, the authors have studied the properties of ion-acoustic solitons and double-layers in a plasma consisting of warm positive and negative ions with different concentration of masses, charged states and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons using small amplitude approximation. Reductive perturbation method is used to derive KdV and m-KdV equations. Existence of ion-acoustic solitons and double-layer is explored over a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. S. Gill; P. Bala; H. Kaur; N. S. Saini; S. Bansal; J. Kaur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22133881"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE LOCATION OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Building/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hara, Hirohisa, E-mail: l.harra@ucl.ac.uk [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1103..501V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Energy Harvesters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The well known built-in voltage potential for some select semiconductor p-n junctions and various rectifying devices is proposed to be favorable for generating DC electricity at ``zero bias'' (with no DC bias voltage applied) in the presence of Johnson noise or 1/f noise which originates from the quantum vacuum (Koch et al., 1982). The 1982 Koch discovery that certain solid state devices exhibit measurable quantum noise has also recently been labeled a finding of dark energy in the lab (Beck and Mackey, 2004). Tunnel diodes are a class of rectifiers that are qualified and some have been credited with conducting only because of quantum fluctuations. Microwave diodes are also good choices since many are designed for zero bias operation. A completely passive, unamplified zero bias diode converter/detector for millimeter (GHz) waves was developed by HRL Labs in 2006 under a DARPA contract, utilizing a Sb-based ``backward tunnel diode'' (BTD). It is reported to be a ``true zero-bias diode.'' It was developed for a ``field radiometer'' to ``collect thermally radiated power'' (in other words, `night vision'). The diode array mounting allows a feed from horn antenna, which functions as a passive concentrating amplifier. An important clue is the ``noise equivalent power'' of 1.1 pW per root hertz and the ``noise equivalent temperature difference'' of 10° K, which indicate sensitivity to Johnson noise (Lynch, et al., 2006). There also have been other inventions such as ``single electron transistors'' that also have ``the highest signal to noise ratio'' near zero bias. Furthermore, ``ultrasensitive'' devices that convert radio frequencies have been invented that operate at outer space temperatures (3 degrees above zero point: 3° K). These devices are tiny nanotech devices which are suitable for assembly in parallel circuits (such as a 2-D array) to possibly produce zero point energy direct current electricity with significant power density (Brenning et al., 2006). Photovoltaic p-n junction cells are also considered for possible higher frequency ZPE transduction. Diode arrays of self-assembled molecular rectifiers or preferably, nano-sized cylindrical diodes are shown to reasonably provide for rectification of electron fluctuations from thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ZPE sources to create an alternative energy DC electrical generator in the picowatt per diode range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valone, Thomas F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/831182"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOVEL COMPOSITE HYDROGEN-PERMEABLE MEMBRANES FOR <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA REACTORS FOR THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Experiments involving methane conversion reactions were conducted with a preliminary pulsed corona discharge reactor design in order to test and improve the reactor and membrane designs using a non-toxic reactant. This report details the direct methane conversion experiments to produce hydrogen, acetylene, and higher hydrocarbons utilizing a co-axial cylinder (CAC) corona discharge reactor, pulsed with a thyratron switch. The reactor was designed to accommodate relatively high flow rates (655 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s) representing a pilot scale easily converted to commercial scale. Parameters expected to influence methane conversion including pulse frequency, charge voltage, capacitance, residence time, and electrode material were investigated. Conversion, selectivity and energy consumption were measured or estimated. C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon products were analyzed with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). In order to obtain quantitative results, the complex sample spectra were de-convoluted via a linear least squares method. Methane conversion as high as 51% was achieved. The products are typically 50%-60% acetylene, 20% propane, 10% ethane and ethylene, and 5% propylene. First Law thermodynamic energy efficiencies for the system (electrical and reactor) were estimated to range from 38% to 6%, with the highest efficiencies occurring at short residence time and low power input (low specific energy) where conversion is the lowest (less than 5%). The highest methane conversion of 51% occurred at a residence time of 18.8 s with a flow rate of 39.4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s (5 ft{sup 3}/h) and a specific energy of 13,000 J/l using niobium and platinum coated stainless steel tubes as cathodes. Under these conditions, the First Law efficiency for the system was 8%. Under similar reaction conditions, methane conversions were {approx}50% higher with niobium and platinum coated stainless steel cathodes than with a stainless steel cathode.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Ji-Jun Zhang; Guibing Zhao; Robyn J. Alcanzare; Linna Wang; Ovid A. Plumb</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878291"> <span id="translatedtitle">Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApJ...727..119W"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Lack of Diffuse, <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Hard X-ray Emission in the Coma Cluster: The Swift Burst Alert Telescope's Eye View</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Coma Cluster of galaxies hosts the brightest radio halo known and has therefore been the target of numerous searches for associated inverse Compton (IC) emission, particularly at hard X-ray energies where the IC signal must eventually dominate over thermal emission. The most recent search with the Suzaku Hard X-ray Detector failed to confirm previous IC detections with RXTE and BeppoSAX, instead setting an upper limit 2.5 times below their <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flux. However, this discrepancy can be resolved if the IC emission is very extended, beyond the scale of the cluster radio halo. Using reconstructed sky images from the 58-month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey, the feasibility of such a solution is investigated. Building on Renaud et al., we test and implement a method for extracting the fluxes of extended sources, assuming specified spatial distributions. BAT spectra are jointly fit with an XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum derived from mosaic observations. We find no evidence for large-scale IC emission at the level expected from the previously detected <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> fluxes. For all <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spatial distributions considered, which span the gamut of physically reasonable IC models, we determine upper limits for which the largest (most conservative) limit is lsim4.2 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (20-80 keV), which corresponds to a lower limit on the magnetic field B > 0.2 ? G. A nominal flux upper limit of <2.7 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, with corresponding B > 0.25 ? G, is derived for the most probable IC distribution given the size of the radio halo and likely magnetic field radial profile.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Okajima, Takashi; Tueller, Jack; Clarke, Tracy E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567515"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE LACK OF DIFFUSE, <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN THE COMA CLUSTER: THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE'S EYE VIEW</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Coma Cluster of galaxies hosts the brightest radio halo known and has therefore been the target of numerous searches for associated inverse Compton (IC) emission, particularly at hard X-ray energies where the IC signal must eventually dominate over thermal emission. The most recent search with the Suzaku Hard X-ray Detector failed to confirm previous IC detections with RXTE and BeppoSAX, instead setting an upper limit 2.5 times below their <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flux. However, this discrepancy can be resolved if the IC emission is very extended, beyond the scale of the cluster radio halo. Using reconstructed sky images from the 58-month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey, the feasibility of such a solution is investigated. Building on Renaud et al., we test and implement a method for extracting the fluxes of extended sources, assuming specified spatial distributions. BAT spectra are jointly fit with an XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum derived from mosaic observations. We find no evidence for large-scale IC emission at the level expected from the previously detected <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> fluxes. For all <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spatial distributions considered, which span the gamut of physically reasonable IC models, we determine upper limits for which the largest (most conservative) limit is {approx}<4.2 x 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (20-80 keV), which corresponds to a lower limit on the magnetic field B > 0.2 {mu} G. A nominal flux upper limit of <2.7 x 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, with corresponding B > 0.25 {mu} G, is derived for the most probable IC distribution given the size of the radio halo and likely magnetic field radial profile.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Okajima, Takashi; Tueller, Jack [Astrophysics Science Division, Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, Code 662, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sarazin, Craig L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr., 85748 Garching (Germany); Mushotzky, Richard F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Clarke, Tracy E., E-mail: daniel.r.wik@nasa.gov [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dynamics.org/Altenberg/MED/CELL_PHONES/Leszczynsk.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> activation of the hsp27\\/p38MAPK stress pathway by mobile phone radiation in human endothelial cells: Molecular mechanism for cancer- and blood-brain barrier-related effects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have examined whether <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> exposures of cultures of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone microwave radiation could activate stress response. Results obtained demonstrate that 1-hour <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> exposure of EA.hy926 cells changes the phosphorylation status of numerous, yet largely unidentified, proteins. One of the affected proteins was identified as heat shock protein-27 (hsp27). Mobile</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dariusz Leszczynski; Sakari Joenväärä; Jukka Reivinen; Reetta Kuokka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005A%26A...433.1063A"> <span id="translatedtitle">First detections of the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii in the near to far infrared with ISO and IRAS: Investigating the various possible thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> contributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used ISO to observe the Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable AE Aquarii in the previously unexplored range from 4.8 ?m up to 170 ?m in the framework of a coordinated multi-wavelength campaign from the radio to optical wavelengths. We have obtained for the first time a spectrum between 4.8 and 7.3 ?m with ISOCAM and ISOPHOT-P: the major contribution comes from the secondary star spectrum, with some thermal emission from the accretion stream, and possibly some additional cyclotron radiation from the post-shock accretion material close to the magnetised white dwarf. Having reprocessed ISOPHOT-C data, we confirm AE Aqr detection at 90~?m and we have re-estimated its upper limit at 170 ?m. In addition, having re-processed IRAS data, we have detected AE Aqr at 60 ?m and we have estimated its upper limits at 12, 25, and 100 ?m. The literature shows that the time-averaged spectrum of AE Aqr increases roughly with frequency from the radio wavelengths up to ˜ 761~ ?m; our results indicate that it seems to be approximately flat between ~761 and ˜ 90 ~?m, at the same level as the 3? upper limit at 170 ?m; and it then decreases from ˜ 90~ ?m to ˜ 7~ ?m. Thermal emission from dust grains or from a circum-binary disc seems to be very unlikely in AE Aqr, unless such a disc has properties substantially different from those predicted recently. Since various measurements and the usual assumptions on the source size suggest a brightness temperature below 109 K at ? ? 3.4 mm, we have reconsidered also the possible mechanisms explaining the emission already known from the submillimetre to the radio. The complex average spectrum measured from ˜ 7 ~?m to the radio must be explained by emission from a plasma composed of more than one “pure” <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron energy distribution (usually assumed to be a power-law): either a very large volume (diameter ? 80 times the binary separation) could be the source of thermal bremsstrahlung which would dominate from ˜ 10 ~?m to the ~millimetre, with, inside, a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> source of synchrotron which dominates in radio; or, more probably, an initially small infrared source composed of several distributions (possibly both thermal, and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, mildly relativistic electrons) radiates gyro-synchrotron and expands moderately: it requires to be re-energised in order to lead to the observed, larger, radio source of highly relativistic electrons (in the form of several <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distributions) which produce synchrotron.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abada-Simon, M.; Casares, J.; Evans, A.; Eyres, S.; Fender, R.; Garrington, S.; de Jager, O.; Kuno, N.; Martínez-Pais, I. G.; de Martino, D.; Matsuo, H.; Mouchet, M.; Pooley, G.; Ramsay, G.; Salama, A.; Schulz, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/350825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooper, J.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhL.103t3701K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle L6 cells and insulin secretion in pancreatic hamster-insulinoma-transfected cells by application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Type-II diabetes Mellitus is characterized by defects in insulin action on peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and pancreatic beta cells. Since the skeletal muscle accounts for approximately 75% of insulin-stimulated glucose-uptake in our body, impaired insulin secretion from defected beta cell plays a major role in the afflicted glucose homoeostasis. It was shown that the intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide level was increased by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>-plasma treatment in ambient air. These increased intracellular reactive species may enhance glucose uptake and insulin secretion through the activation of intracellular calcium (Ca+) and cAMP production.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, Naresh; Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22163049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 {+-} 25 K and 340 {+-} 25 K and it increases to 320 {+-} 25 K and 360 {+-} 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. Additionally, the vibrational temperatures range from 2200 {+-} 100 K and 2500 {+-} 100 K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)] [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1073568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO to CO2 on Reduced TiO2(110)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The photooxidation of CO on reduced, rutile TiO2(110) was studied on a millisecond timescale. For a saturation coverage of chemisorbed O2 (0sat) and for half that coverage, the CO2 photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) signal is initially zero, increases to a maximum after several tens of milliseconds, and then decreases at longer times. The CO2 PSD signal increases ~5 times more quickly for 0.50sat. The initial rate of increase of the CO2 PSD signal is proportional to the flux of UV photons. The intermediate species involved in the reactions is stable for at least 100 s at 30 K. These results show that two or more <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> reaction steps are required to photooxidize CO adsorbed on TiO2(110). In contrast, previous models had suggested that CO photooxidation required only one <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> reaction. The likely initial and final charge states of the system suggest that an electron-mediated reaction and a hole-mediated reaction are needed for the complete photooxidation reaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7380E..51I"> <span id="translatedtitle">The new application of photosensitization reaction to atrial fibrillation treatment: mechanism and demonstration of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrical conduction block with porcine heart</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have proposed <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrical conduction block for atrial fibrillation treatment by the photosensitization reaction, in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is less than tenth of that in conventional way. To study the mechanism of photosensitization reaction-induced electrical conduction block, intracellular Ca2+ concentration change in rat myocardial cells was measured by fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4 AM with confocal laser microscopy. Measured rapid increase in the fluorescence intensity and a change in cell morphology indicated that cell membrane damage; that is Ca2+ influx and eventually cell death caused by the photosensitization reaction. To demonstrate myocardial electrical conduction block induced by the photosensitization reaction, surgically exposed porcine heart under deep anesthesia was used. The myocardial tissue was paced with a stimulation electrode. The propagated electrical signals were measured by bipolar electrodes at two different positions. Thirty minutes after the injection of 5-10 mg/kg Porfimer sodium or Talaporfin sodium, the red laser light was irradiated to the tissue point by point crossing the measuring positions by the total energy density of less than 200 J/cm2. The electrical signal conduction between the measuring electrodes in the myocardial tissue was delayed by each irradiation procedure. The electrical conduction delay corresponded to the block line length was obtained. These results demonstrated the possibility of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrical conduction block for atrial fibrillation treatment by the photosensitization reaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ito, Arisa; Matsuo, Hiroki; Suenari, Tsukasa; Kajihara, Takuro; Kimura, Takehiro; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Ogawa, Satoshi; Arai, Tsunenori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1746862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impulsive energy release and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in a confined M4.0 flare triggered by rapidly evolving magnetic structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index ($\\delta$) $\\sim$3. Another <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structure in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and oute...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kushwaha, Upendra; cho, Kyung-suk; Veronig, Astrid; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Mathew, S K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/908311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Method and system for the combination of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0503131v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Chandra Observation of the Shell of Nova Persei 1901 (GK Persei): Detection of localized <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-ray Emission from a Miniature Supernova Remnant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">I present the data of the shell of classical Nova Persei (1901) obtained by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S3 detector on-board \\cha Observatory. The X-ray nebula is affected mostly by the complex interstellar medium around the nova and has not developed a regular shell with bulk of emission coming from the southwestern quadrant. The part of the bright zone that is co-spatial with the brightest <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission region, is found to be a source of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission with a power law photon index of 2.3$^{+1.5}_{-0.9}$ and alpha=0.68^${+0.03}_{-0.15}$ at about a flux of 1.7x10^{-13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. There are strong indications for nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring in the forward shock/transition zone with an upper limit on the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray flux of 1.0\\times 10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}.The total X-ray spectrum of has two components of emission. The component dominant below 2 keV is most likely a non-equilibrium ionization thermal plasma of kT_s=0.1-0.3 keV with an X-ray flux of 1.6x10^{-11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. There is also a higher temperature, kT_s=0.5-2.6 keV, embedded, N_H=(4.0-22.0)x10^{22} cm^{-2}, emission component prominent above 2 keV. The unabsorbed X-ray flux from this component is 1.5x10^{-10} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The X-ray emitting plasma is of solar composition except for enhancement in the elemental abundances (mean abundances over the remnant)of Ne/Ne$_{\\odot}$ and N/N$_{\\odot}$ in a range 13-21 and 1-5, respectively. A distinct emission line of neon, He-like Ne IX, is detected which reveals a distribution of several emission knots/blobs and shows a cone-like structure with wings extending toward NW and SE at expansion velocities about 2600 km s^{-1} in the X-rays.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solen Balman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15001901"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Simulated Diesel Exhaust Gas Composition and Temperature on NOx Reduction of Alumina and Zeolite Catalysts in Combination with <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NOx reduction under simulated lean burn conditions was studied using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in combination with zeolite and alumina catalysts. The influence of temperature and plasma treatment on the catalytic performance was investigated. Zeolite catalyst B showed high activity in the 150-300 degree Celcius temperature region. Alumina Catalyst D was most active at temperatures higher than 250 degrees Celcius. In addition, the alumina catalyst was effective in oxidation of aldehydes formed during plasma treatment of the reaction mixture. When the reaction was carried out over a catalyst bed consisting of separate layers of the zeolite and alumina catalyst, the catalyst temperature range for significant NOx reduction was expanded to 150-500 degrees Celcius.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panov, Alexander G.; Balmer, Mari Lou; Yoon, Ilsop S.; Ebeling, Ana C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445.2484F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulated morphologies of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622 in a turbulent medium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The morphologies of the X-rays from synchrotron radiation and the ?-rays produced via either inverse Compton scattering or proton-proton interaction for the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622 are investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. The simulation is initiated with the supernova ejecta imbedded in the turbulent environment, and the distributions of the density and the magnetic field within the shock wave can be obtained. Assuming that the number of the protons accelerated by the forward shock is proportional to the local density since more protons can be injected into the diffusive shock acceleration process with a higher density, the morphology of the emission produced via the inelastic collisions between the accelerated protons with the ambient matter is achieved. Furthermore, the X-ray map of the synchrotron radiation and the ?-ray image of the inverse Compton scattering can be obtained with the assumption that the relativistic electrons have a similar spatial distribution as the protons. The results show that the shock front is distorted by the turbulent medium, and the morphologies of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from RX J0852.0-4622, which shows a broken shell with bright rims at the shock in the observed images both in the X-ray band and in the TeV ?-ray band, can be generally reproduced using the model. It can be concluded that the observed broken morphologies of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission with bright regions along the shock are the result of the remnant evolving in a turbulent plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fang, Jun; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004A%26A...420.1061D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newton and VLA observation of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitter HD 168112 (O5.5III(f+))</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitter HD 168112 (O5.5III(f+)). The detailed analysis of two quasi-simultaneous XMM-Newto