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Sample records for quasi-periodic pulsatory non-thermal

  1. Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok C.

    2014-09-01

    Here we report our recent discoveries of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in blazars time series data in X-ray and optical electromagnetic bands. Any such detection can give important clue of the location and nature of the processes of emission mechanism. In the case of radio-quiet AGN, the detected QPOs are very likely to be associated with the accretion disk. But in the case of blazars, it may be associated with jets in the high and outburst states, and in the low-state, it is probably associated with the accretion disk. In this brief review, I summarize the recent QPOs detections in blazars. There is one strong evidence of QPO detection in XMM-Newton time series data of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy RE J1034 +396 about which we will also discuss briefly.

  2. Quasi-periodic bifurcations in reversible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanßmann, Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Invariant tori of integrable dynamical systems occur both in the dissipative and in the conservative context, but only in the latter the tori are parameterized by phase space variables. This allows for quasi-periodic bifurcations within a single given system, induced by changes of the normal behavior of the tori. It turns out that in a non-degenerate reversible system all semi-local bifurcations of co-dimension 1 persist, under small non-integrable perturbations, on large Cantor sets.

  3. Quasi periodic oscillations in black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    Fast time variability is the most prominent characteristic of accreting systems and the presence of quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) is a constant in all accreting systems, from cataclysmic variables to AGNs, passing through black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries and through the enigmatic ultra-luminous X-ray sources. In this paper, I will briefly review the current knowledge of QPOs in black hole X-ray binaries, mainly focussing on their observed properties, but also mentioning the most important models that have been proposed to explain the origin of QPOs over the last decades.

  4. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency, can be also described based on the log-logistic parameter s, which is found to increase from regular mafic systems to highly variable silicic systems. These results suggest that the periodicity of explosions, quantified in terms of the distribution of repose times, can give fundamental information about the system dynamics and change regularly across eruptive styles (i.e., Strombolian to Vulcanian), allowing for direct comparison and quantification of different types of pulsatory activity during these eruptions.

  5. Quasi-periodic climate change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Zent, Aaron P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines evidence that the Martian climate undergoes quasi-periodic variations, including the polar layered terrain, differences between the residual polar caps, and the current net southward flow of H2O. The driving functions for these variations are oscillations in the elements of the Martian orbit coupled with precession of the Martian spin axis. These 'astronomic variations' control the distribution of the insolation, which in turn influences the partition of volatiles between atmospheric and surface reservoirs. The major effects anticipated at low obliquity are growth of the polar caps, substantial decrease in surface pressure, cessation of duststorms, release of CO2 from the regolith, and poleward migration of H2O ground ice. At high obliquity, the mass of the perennial polar caps decreases and permanent CO2 frost disappears, CO2 desorbs from the regolith at high latitudes, the surface pressure may increase to several times its current value, and the atmospheric dust load increases.

  6. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Manousakis, Antonios; Kluźniak, Włodzimierz

    2016-05-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of oscillating tori orbiting a non-rotating black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Kluźniak-Lee). Motions of the torus were triggered by adding subsonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured L2 norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of L2 norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. The most prominent modes of oscillation excited in the torus by a quasi-random perturbation are the breathing mode and the radial and vertical epicyclic modes. The radial and the plus modes, as well as the vertical and the breathing modes will have frequencies in an approximate 3:2 ratio if the torus is several Schwarzschild radii away from the innermost stable circular orbit. Results of our simulations may be of interest in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries, as well as in supermassive black holes.

  7. Quasi periodic oscillations in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alston, W.; Fabian, A.; Markevičiutė, J.; Parker, M.; Middleton, M.; Kara, E.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are coherent peaks of variability power observed in the X-ray power spectra (PSDs) of stellar mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). A scale invariance of the accretion process implies they should be present in the active galactic nuclei. The first robust detection was a ∼ 1 h periodicity in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396 from a ∼ 90 ks XMM-Newton observation; however, subsequent observations failed to detect the QPO in the 0.3-10.0 keV band. In this talk we present the recent detection of the ∼ 1 h periodicity in the 1.0-4.0 keV band of 4 further low-flux/spectrally-harder observations of RE J1034+396 (see Alston et al. 2014). We also present recent work on the discovery of a QPO in the Seyfert galaxy, MS 2254.9-3712, which again is only detected in energy bands associated with the primary power-law continuum emission (Alston et al. 2015). We conclude these features are most likely analogous to the high-frequency QPOs observed in XRBs. In both sources, we also see evidence for X-ray reverberation at the QPO frequency, where soft X-ray bands and Iron Kα emission lag the primary X-ray continuum. These time delays may provide another diagnostic for understanding the underlying QPO mechanism observed in accreting black holes.

  8. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Manousakis, Antonios; Klu?niak, W?odzimierz

    2016-02-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of oscillating tori orbiting a non-rotating black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Klu?niak-Lee). Motions of the torus were triggered by adding sub-sonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured L2 norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of L2 norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. The most prominent modes of oscillation excited in the torus by a quasi-random perturbation are the breathing mode and the radial and vertical epicyclic modes. The first two of these will have frequencies in an approximate 3:2 ratio if the torus is several Schwarzschild radii away from the innermost stable circular orbit. Results of our simulations may be of interest in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries, as well as in supermassive black holes.

  9. Resonant Equilibrium Configurations in Quasi-periodic Media: Perturbative Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Llave, Rafael; Su, Xifeng; Zhang, Lei

    2016-03-01

    We consider 1-D quasi-periodic Frenkel-Kontorova models. We study the existence of equilibria whose frequency (i.e. the inverse of the density of deposited material) is resonant with the frequencies of the substratum. We study perturbation theory for small potential. We show that there are perturbative expansions to all orders for the quasi-periodic equilibria with resonant frequencies. Under very general conditions, we show that there are at least two such perturbative expansions for equilibria for small values of the parameter. We also develop a dynamical interpretation of the equilibria in these quasi-periodic media. We show that equilibria are orbits of a dynamical system which has very unusual properties. We obtain results on the Lyapunov exponents of the dynamical systems, i.e. the phonon gap of the resonant quasi-periodic equilibria. We show that the equilibria can be pinned even if the gap is zero.

  10. The Ten-Rotation Quasi-periodicity in Sunspot Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getko, R.

    2014-06-01

    Sunspot-area fluctuations over an epoch of 12 solar cycles (12 - 23) are investigated in detail using wavelets. Getko ( Universal Heliophysical Processes, IAU Symp. 257, 169, 2009) found three significant quasi-periodicities at 10, 17, and 23 solar rotations, but two longer periods could be treated as subharmonics of the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity. Therefore we focused the analysis on the occurrence of this quasi-periodicity during the low- and high-activity periods of each solar cycle. Because of the N - S asymmetry, each solar hemisphere was considered separately. The skewness of each fluctuation-probability distribution suggests that the positive and negative fluctuations could be examined separately. To avoid the problem that occurs when a few strong fluctuations create a wavelet peak, we applied fluctuation transformations for which the amplitudes at the high- and the low-activity periods are almost the same. The wavelet analyses show that the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity is mainly detected during the high-activity periods, but it also exists during a few low-activity periods. The division of each solar hemisphere into 30∘-wide longitude bins and the wavelet calculations for the areas of sunspot clusters belonging to these 30∘ bins enable one to detect longitude zones in which the ten-rotation quasi-periodicity exists. These zones are present during the whole high-activity periods and dominate the integrated spectra.

  11. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  12. Quasi-periodic oscillations of Jupiter's inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Godfrey, Leith; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Radio and X-ray studies of Jupiter have detected quasi-periodic flux variability with timescales of ~20 min and ~45 min at some epochs but not others. Yu-Qing Lou and collaborators have suggested that this is caused by oscillations of the magnetosphere when it is buffeted by fast solar wind. We want to monitor Jupiter in the L-band with the ATCA: (1) to accurately characterise the variability over a wide bandwidth, during fast solar wind phases (v >~ 600 km/s); (2) to search for low-amplitude quasi-periodic variability during slow/intermediate wind phases or put an upper limit to the variability at those epochs; (3) to study the response of the characteristic oscillation timescales to different solar wind conditions. The induced magnetospheric oscillation model can be applied to broader astrophysical contexts, such as the Earth's magnetosphere, and quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting neutron-star and black holes. Jupiter provides a natural lab for our modelling of induced magnetospheric quasi-periodic oscillations.

  13. Quasi-periodicities at Year-like Timescales in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Covino, S.; Dotti, M.; Treves, A.

    2016-03-01

    We searched for quasi-periodicities on year-like timescales in the light curves of six blazars in the optical—near-infrared bands and we made a comparison with the high energy emission. We obtained optical/NIR light curves from Rapid Eye Mounting photometry plus archival Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System data and we accessed the Fermi light curves for the γ-ray data. The periodograms often show strong peaks in the optical and γ-ray bands, which in some cases may be inter-related. The significance of the revealed peaks is then discussed, taking into account that the noise is frequency dependent. Quasi-periodicities on a year-like timescale appear to occur often in blazars. No straightforward model describing these possible periodicities is yet available, but some plausible interpretations for the physical mechanisms causing periodic variabilities of these sources are examined.

  14. Quasi-periodic oscillations in a symmetric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, B. N.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    Observational evidence has been presented for the existence of quasi-periodic fluctuations of the tropical circulation with periods around two weeks and around 40 days. It is expected that an understanding of the mechanisms of these quasi-periodic oscillations in the tropical atmosphere will improve the predictability of the short range climate fluctuations in the tropics. The present study evolved as an outgrowth of an investigation conducted by Goswami et al. (1984). In this investigation remarkable oscillations of the Hadlay circulation for an ocean covered earth were observed. In the current study evidence is presented regarding the episodic behavior of the tropical circulation in general, and the propagation characteristics of these oscillations in the lower atmosphere. Attention is given to the results of six different experiments.

  15. Quasi-periodic states in coupled rings of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoneli, Fernando; Dias, Ana Paula S.; Pinto, Carla M. A.

    2010-04-01

    We study some dynamical features of certain coupled cell networks that consist of two (unidirectional or bidirectional) rings of cells coupled through a 'buffer' cell. Depending on how the rings and the buffer cell are coupled, the full network may have a non-trivial group of symmetries or a non-trivial group of 'interior' symmetries. This group is Zp ×Zq in the unidirectional case and Dp ×Dq in the bidirectional case. We are interested in finding quasi-periodic motion in these networks, motivated by an example presented by Golubitsky, Nicol and Stewart (Some curious phenomena in coupled cell systems, J Nonlinear Sci 2004;14(2):207-36). In the examples considered here, we obtain quasi-periodic states through a sequence of Hopf bifurcations. Interestingly, we observe relaxation oscillation phenomena appearing further away from the last Hopf bifurcation point. We use XPPAUT and MATLAB to compute numerically the relevant states.

  16. Quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays produced by electrochemical synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Miller, A.E.; Yue, D.F.; Banerjee, G.; Ricker, R.E.; Jones, S.; Eastman, J.A.; Baugher, E.; Chandrasekhar, M.

    1994-06-01

    We discuss a ``gentle`` electrochemical technique for fabricating quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays. The technique exploits a self-organizing phenomenon to produce quasi-periodic arrangement of dots and provides excellent control over dot size and interdot spacing. Unlike conventional nanolithography, it does not cause radiation damage to the structures during exposure to pattern delineating beams (e-beam, ion-beam or x-ray). Moreover, it does not require harsh processing steps like reactive ion etching, offers a minimum feature size of {approximately}40 {angstrom}, allows the fabrication of structures on nonplanar surfaces (e.g. spherical or cylindrical substrates), is amenable to mass production (millions of wafers can be processed simultaneously) and is potentially orders of magnitude cheaper than conventional nanofabrication. In this paper, we describe our initial results and show the promise of this technique for low-cost and high-yield nanosynthesis.

  17. Quasi-periodic continuation along a continuous symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone, Matthew David

    Given a system of differential equations which admits a continuous group of symmetries and possesses a periodic solution, we show that under certain nondegeneracy assumptions there always exists a continuous family containing infinitely many periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories. This generalizes the continuation method of Poincaré to orbits which are not necessarily periodic. We apply these results in the setting of the Lagrangian N -body problem of homogeneous potential to characterize an infinite family of rotating nonplanar "hip-hop" orbits in the four-body problem of equal masses, and show how some other trajectories in the N -body theory may be extended to infinite families of periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories.

  18. Explicit quasi-periodic solutions of the Vakhnenko equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yunyun; Geng, Xianguo; He, Guoliang

    2014-05-01

    The trigonal curve associated with the Vakhnenko equation is introduced by using the Lax matrix for the nth stationary positive flow. Based on the theory of the trigonal curve and the properties of the three kinds of Abel differentials, the Riemann theta function representation for the Baker-Akhiezer function is derived, from which the straightening out of flows in the Jacobian variety is exactly given through the Abel maps. We finally arrive at quasi-periodic solutions of the Vakhnenko equation.

  19. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN LASCO CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Moon, Y.-J.; Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S. C.; Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Umapathy, S.; Vrsnak, B. E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.k

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations in the speed profile of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the radial distance range 2-30 solar radii are studied. We considered the height-time data of the 307 CMEs recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) during 2005 January-March. In order to study the speed-distance profile of the CMEs, we have used only 116 events for which there are at least 10 height-time measurements made in the LASCO field of view. The instantaneous CME speed is estimated using a pair of height-time data points, providing the speed-distance profile. We found quasi-periodic patterns in at least 15 speed-distance profiles, where the speed amplitudes are larger than the speed errors. For these events we have determined the speed amplitude and period of oscillations. The periods of quasi-periodic oscillations are found in the range 48-240 minutes, tending to increase with height. The oscillations have similar properties as those reported by Krall et al., who interpreted them in terms of the flux-rope model. The nature of forces responsible for the motion of CMEs and their oscillations are discussed.

  20. Quasi-periodic compressive waves in polar plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Gurman, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The observation of polar plumes in the south polar coronal hole, carried out on 7 March 1996 by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), are analyzed. These polar plumes are cool density structures that arise from morphologically unipolar magnetic footpoints. Data from the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope show quasi-periodic perturbations in the brightness of the Fe IX and X line emissions at 171 A from polar plumes. The perturbations have periods of 10 to 15 min, and repeat for several cycles suggesting that they are compressive waves propagating through the plume at or near the Alfven speed. Possible explanations for the observed phenomenon are proposed.

  1. Overall ultimate yield strength of a quasi-periodic masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sab, Karam

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this Note is the determination of the in-plane homogenized strength domain of a "quasi-periodic" masonry under the assumption of infinitely resistant blocks connected by cohesionless Mohr-Coulomb interfaces. This masonry is obtained by introducing a random perturbation on the horizontal width of the blocks of a periodic running bond masonry. It is found that in some non-trivial cases the strength domain coincides exactly with that of the initial periodic masonry. To cite this article: K. Sab, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  2. Quasi-periodic transformations of nonlocal spatial solitons.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S

    2009-06-01

    We study quasi-periodic transformations between nonlocal spatial solitons of different symmetries triggered by modulational instability and resembling a self-induced mode converter. Transformation dynamics of solitons with zero angular momentum, e.g. the quadrupole-type soliton, reveal the equidistant spectrum of spatial field oscillations typical for the breather-type solutions. In contrast, the transformations of nonlocal solitons carrying orbital angular momentum, such as 2x3 soliton matrix, are accompanied by their spiralling and corresponding spectra of field oscillations show mixing of three characteristic spatial frequencies. PMID:19506609

  3. The quasi-periodicity of the minority game revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Gabriel; Caridi, Inés; Guala, Sebastián; Marenco, Javier

    2013-10-01

    We analyze two well-known related aspects regarding the sequence of minority sides from the Minority Game (MG) in its symmetric phase: period-two dynamics and quasi-periodic behavior. We also study the sequence of minority sides in a general way within a graph-theoretical framework. In order to analyze the outcome dynamics of the MG, it is useful to define the MG, namely an MG with a new choosing rule of the strategy to play, which takes into account both prior preferences and game information. In this way, each time an agent is undecided because two of her best strategies predict different choices while being equally successful so far, she selects her a priori favorite strategy to play, instead of performing a random tie-break as in the MG. This new choosing rule leaves the generic behavior of the model unaffected and simplifies the game analysis. Furthermore, interesting properties arise which are only partially present in the MG, like the quasi-periodic behavior of the sequence of minority sides, which turns out to be periodic for the MG.

  4. Quasi-periodic Solutions of the Kaup-Kupershmidt Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xianguo; Wu, Lihua; He, Guoliang

    2013-08-01

    Based on solving the Lenard recursion equations and the zero-curvature equation, we derive the Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy associated with a 3×3 matrix spectral problem. Resorting to the characteristic polynomial of the Lax matrix for the Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy, we introduce a trigonal curve {K}_{m-1} and present the corresponding Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function on it. The Abel map is introduced to straighten out the Kaup-Kupershmidt flows. With the aid of the properties of the Baker-Akhiezer function and the meromorphic function and their asymptotic expansions, we arrive at their explicit Riemann theta function representations. The Riemann-Jacobi inversion problem is achieved by comparing the asymptotic expansion of the Baker-Akhiezer function and its Riemann theta function representation, from which quasi-periodic solutions of the entire Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy are obtained in terms of the Riemann theta functions.

  5. Quasi-periodic oscillations in GX 17 + 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penninx, W.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Van Der Klis, M.; Van Paradijs, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray observations of GX 17 + 2 were made in March and April, 1988 with the Large Area Counter of the Ginga satellite. The source was observed in the flaring, normal, and horizontal branches. Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were oberved in all three of these branches. The relationship between QPO behavior and the X-ray spectral properties of GX 17 + 2 is examined. Continuous variation of QPO behavior is observed as GX 17 + 2 moves from the normal to flaring branch, indicating that the normal-branch QPO and the flaring-branch QPO are probably one physical phenomenon. This QPO behavior is similar to that observed in Sco X-1. Also, it is found that GX 17 + 2 is an example of the Z-type sources defined by Hasinger et al. (1989).

  6. Quasi-periodic orbits about the translunar libration point.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, R. W.; Kamel, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical solutions for quasi-periodic orbits about the translunar libration point are obtained by using the method of Lindstedt-Poincare and computerized algebraic manipulations. The solutions include the effects of nonlinearities, lunar orbital eccentricity, and the sun's gravitational field. For a small-amplitude orbit, the orbital path as viewed from the earth traces out a Lissajous figure. This is due to a small difference in the fundamental frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane oscillations. However, when the amplitude of the in-plane oscillation is greater than 32,379 km, there is a corresponding value of the out-of-plane amplitude that will produce a path where the fundamental frequencies are equal. This synchronized trajectory describes a 'halo orbit' of the moon.

  7. Quasi-periodic orbits about the translunar libration point.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, R. W.; Kamel, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical solutions for quasi-periodic orbits about the translunar libration point are obtained by using the method of Lindstedt-Poincare and computerized algebraic manipulations. The solutions include the effects of nonlinearities, lunar orbital eccentricity, and the sun's gravitational field. For a small-amplitude orbit, the orbital path as viewed from the earth traces out a Lissajous figure. This is due to a small difference in the fundamental frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane oscillations. However, when the amplitude of the in-plane oscillation is greater than 32,379 km, there is a corresponding value of the out-of-plane amplitude that will produce a path where the fundamental frequencies are equal. This synchronized trajectory describes a 'halo orbit' of the moon.

  8. Quasi periodic oscillations in high magnetic field accretion powered pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Marykutty; Paul, Biswajit; Devasia, Jincy; Indulekha, Kavila

    We will present the discovery of Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in several transient high magnetic field accretion powered pulsars using RXTE/PCA observations of few sources during their outbursts. Remarkably, in two of these sources, the QPOs have been detected only in a few observations near the end of the outbursts when the source intensity had decayed by more than two orders of magnitude from the peak of the outbursts. The QPO features are found to have significant energy and intensity dependence. These low frequency QPOs have so far been observed in 21 high magnetic field pulsars, a number comparable to or larger than any other class of X-ray sources. We investigate if the measurements of the QPO frequency and X-ray luminosity can be used to estimate the magnetic field strength reliably.

  9. Quasi-periodic fluctuations in climate due to sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, R.

    2013-12-01

    A new mechanism behind the occurrence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events is proposed. Paleo-proxy observations suggests that these quasi-periodic fluctuations occurred during the last glacial period, and similar fluctuations are also observed in the present interglacial (Bond events). The persistent occurrence of a quasi-periodic fluctuation under different background climates is explained by the interaction between deep water formation and sea ice in the North Atlantic. A simple ocean circulation model coupled to a thermodynamic sea ice model is shown to exhibit self-sustained oscillations in the overturning circulation strength. The physical mechanism behind the oscillations is the insulating property of sea ice in cutting off ocean-atmosphere heat exchange. During periods of extended sea ice, heat builds up in the top layers of the polar ocean which subsequently contributes to the retreat of sea ice and the loss of heat. The dynamics of the system is such that there is a net loss of heat in each cycle of sea ice advance and retreat. Gradually over several cycles, a convective situation results with the top oceanic layers reaching the same density as the bottom layers, and the system abruptly switches to an enhanced circulation mode for a brief period of time before returning to its preferred state from where the cycle repeats. The periodic relaxation oscillations can be modulated by external freshwater or solar forcing. A pulsed freshwater injection mimicking Heinrich events produces packets of fluctuations with similar characteristics to D-O events. Numerical experiments with the model suggests that the volume of the ocean that comes under sea ice is an important parameter in determining the periodicity of oscillations. In this respect, the geometry of the ocean basin could be the determinant of the natural oscillation time-scale of the sea ice-circulation system. When subjected to freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events, the model produces packets of progressively weaker fluctuations (top). This pattern resembles D-O events between 30 and 50 ky before present (bottom).

  10. Quasi-Periodic Variably Polarizing Undulator at HiSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Miyamoto, A.; Goto, K.; Arita, M.; Okuda, T.; Mitsuyasu, T.; Fujioka, K.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2013-03-01

    A 1.8-m-long 78-mm-period quasi-periodic APLPE-II undulator was installed in the 700-MeV HiSOR storage ring of Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. At the minimum gap, achievable lowest photon energies are 3.1 eV, 6.5 eV, and 4.8 eV for horizontal linear, vertical linear, and circular polarization, respectively. Observed photon energies of fundamental and higher harmonic radiations are in good agreement with those of model calculations using measured magnetic field of undulator and the HiSOR beam parameters. Also, observed flux through a slit and a grating monochromator was more than twice larger than that from previously installed 100-mm-period helical undulator for the whole range of radiation spectra. The feedforward COD correction was done to avoid the intensity fluctuation of photon beam in other beamlines due to the gap and phase motion of undulator. No fatal effect on the stored electron beam by installing the undulator was observed though a slight beam size change was observed at the minimum gap.

  11. Investigation of Quasi-periodic Variations in Hard X-Rays of Solar Flares. II. Further Investigation of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Tomczak, M.

    2012-06-01

    In our recent paper (Jakimiec and Tomczak, Solar Physics 261, 233, 2010) we investigated quasi-periodic oscillations of hard X-rays during the impulsive phase of solar flares. We have come to the conclusion that they are caused by magnetosonic oscillations of magnetic traps within the volume of hard-X-ray (HXR) loop-top sources. In the present paper we investigate four flares that show clear quasi-periodic sequences of the HXR pulses. We also describe our phenomenological model of oscillating magnetic traps to show that it can explain the observed properties of the HXR oscillations. The main results are the following: i) Low-amplitude quasi-periodic oscillations occur before the impulsive phase of some flares. ii) The quasi-periodicity of the oscillations can change in some flares. We interpret this as being due to changes of the length of oscillating magnetic traps. iii) During the impulsive phase a significant part of the energy of accelerated (non-thermal) electrons is deposited within a HXR loop-top source. iv) The quick development of the impulsive phase is due to feedback between the pressure pulses by accelerated electrons and the amplitude of the magnetic-trap oscillation. v) The electron number density and magnetic field strength values obtained for the HXR loop-top sources in several flares fall within the limits of N≈(2 - 15)×1010 cm-3, B≈(45 - 130) gauss. These results show that the HXR quasi-periodic oscillations contain important information about the energy release in solar flares.

  12. Negative permeability and subwavelength focusing of quasi-periodic dendritic cell metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Fu, Quan H; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Xiao P

    2006-08-01

    We present the design for a hexagonal cell made of quasi-periodic dendritic arranged collections of plasmonic metallic wires that may exhibit a resonant magnetic collective response. When such quasi-periodic dendritic cells are etched on a host medium, they may provide metamaterials with negative effective permeability. We also show that a clear point image is observed, as expected, with our left-handed metamaterials (LHMs) lens composed of metallic dendritic cells and wire strips. These prominent characteristics of quasi-periodic dendritic cells potentially enable us to prepare infrared or visible domain LHMs by using a general chemical method. PMID:19529087

  13. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  14. On the persistence of quasi-periodic invariant tori for double Hopf bifurcation of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuemei

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the persistence of quasi-periodic invariant 2- and 3-tori for the double Hopf (Hopf-Hopf) bifurcation by using the KAM method. We prove that in a sufficiently small neighborhood of the bifurcation point, the full system has quasi-periodic 2-tori for most of the parameter sets where its truncated normal form possesses 2-tori. Under appropriate conditions we obtain that the full system also has quasi-periodic 3-tori for most parameters near the Hopf bifurcation curve of its truncated normal form and along the direction of the bifurcation, and these 3-tori bifurcate from invariant 2-tori. We also give concrete formulas on the existence of quasi-periodic invariant 2- and 3-tori, which are based on coefficients of the truncated normal form.

  15. The "Approximate 150 Day Quasi-Periodicity" in Interplanetary and Solar Phenomena During Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    A"quasi-periodicity" of approx. 150 days in various solar and interplanetary phenomena has been reported in earlier solar cycles. We suggest that variations in the occurrence of solar energetic particle events, inter-planetary coronal mass ejections, and geomagnetic storm sudden commenceents during solar cycle 23 show evidence of this quasi-periodicity, which is also present in the sunspot number, in particular in the northern solar hemisphere. It is not, however, prominent in the interplanetary magnetic field strength.

  16. New insights into the quasi-periodic X-ray burster GS 0836-429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranzana, E.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Kuulkers, E.

    2016-02-01

    GS 0836-429 is a neutron star X-ray transient that displays Type-I X-ray bursts. In 2003 and 2004 it experienced two outbursts in X-rays. We present here an analysis of the system's bursting properties during these outbursts. We studied the evolution of the 2003-2004 outbursts in soft X-rays using RXTE (2.5-12 keV; ASM) and in hard X-rays with INTEGRAL (17-80 keV, IBIS/ISGRI). Using data from the JEM-X monitor onboard INTEGRAL, we studied the bursting properties of the source. We detected 61 Type-I X-ray bursts during the 2004 outburst and confirm that the source displayed a quasi-periodic burst recurrence time of about 2.3 h. We improve the characterisation of the fuel composition, as well as the description of the typical burst durations and fluences. We estimate the average value of α to be 49 ± 3, which describes the ratio of the gravitational energy released between bursts to the nuclear energy released in an X-ray burst. Both this value and the observed burst profiles indicate a regime of a mixed He/H runaway triggered by unstable helium ignition. In addition, we report the detection of four series of double bursts, with burst recurrence times of ≤20 min. The secondary bursts are always shorter and less energetic than the primary and typical bursts from the source. The measured recurrence time in double bursts is too short to allow the accretion of enough fresh material, which is needed to trigger a Type-I X-ray burst. This suggests the presence of leftover, unburned material from the preceding burst, which gets ignited on a time scale of minutes. The energies and time scales of the secondary bursts suggest a lower fraction of hydrogen compared to that estimated for the primary bursts. The persistent emission was roughly constant during the period when the Type I X-ray bursts were detected. We derive an average accretion rate during our observations of ṁ ~ 8% ṁEdd. The spectrum of the persistent emission during these observations can be fit with a non-thermal component, indicative for the source to be in a hard state when the INTEGRAL observations were performed.

  17. THE SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC UPFLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION TIMESERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu

    2011-02-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances are frequently observed in coronal intensity image sequences. These disturbances have historically been interpreted as being the signature of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating into the corona. The detailed analysis of Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) timeseries observations of an active region (known to contain propagating disturbances) shows strongly correlated, quasi-periodic, oscillations in intensity, Doppler shift, and line width. No frequency doubling is visible in the latter. The enhancements in the moments of the line profile are generally accompanied by a faint, quasi-periodically occurring, excess emission at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the blue wing of coronal emission lines. The correspondence of quasi-periodic excess wing emission and the moments of the line profile indicates that repetitive high-velocity upflows are responsible for the oscillatory behavior observed. Furthermore, we show that the same quasi-periodic upflows can be directly identified in a simultaneous image sequence obtained by the Hinode X-Ray Telescope. These results are consistent with the recent assertion of De Pontieu and McIntosh that the wave interpretation of the data is not unique. Indeed, given that several instances are seen to propagate along the direction of the EIS slit that clearly shows in-phase, quasi-periodic variations of intensity, velocity, width (without frequency doubling), and blue wing enhanced emission, this data set would appear to provide a compelling example that upflows are more likely to be the main cause of the quasi-periodicities observed here, as such correspondences are hard to reconcile in the wave paradigm.

  18. A variable-coefficient harmonic balance method for the prediction of quasi-periodic response in nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Thouverez, F.; Lenoir, D.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic responses arise from various nonlinear dynamic systems under a single-frequency excitation. A variable-coefficient harmonic balance method is proposed for the prediction of quasi-periodic responses. The key point of this method is that the quasi-periodic response is described as a truncated trigonometric series with time-periodic Fourier coefficients. In other words, quasi-periodic responses are treated in a "cascade" of frequency base. Harmonic terms in the nonlinear system are separated and balanced with respect to each basic frequency. Numerical examples reveal that this method is efficient in predicting such quasi-periodic responses, which contain an unknown frequency component.

  19. Sensitivity of quasi-periodic outer rainband activity of tropical cyclones to the surface entropy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingqing; Duan, Yihong

    2013-10-01

    The influence of outer-core surface entropy fluxes (SEFs) on tropical cyclone (TC) outer rainband activity is investigated in this study with a fully compressible, nonhydrostatic model. A control simulation and two sensitivity experiments with the outer-core SEF artificially increased and decreased by 20% respectively were conducted to examine the quasi-periodic outer rainband behavior. Larger negative horizontal advection due to the greater radial wind and the positive contribution by asymmetric eddies leads to a longer period of outerrainband activity in the SEF-enhanced experiment. The well-developed outer rainbands in the control and SEF-reduced simulations significantly limit the TC intensity, whereas such an intensity suppression influence is not pronounced in the SEF-enhanced experiment. As diabatic heating in outer rainbands strengthens the outer-core tangential wind, the quasi-periodic activity of outer rainbands contributes to the quasi-periodic variations of the inner-core size of the TCs.

  20. A renormalization operator for 1D maps under quasi-periodic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorba, À.; Rabassa, P.; Tatjer, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper concerns the reducibility loss of (periodic) invariant curves of quasi-periodically forced one-dimensional maps and its relationship with the renormalization operator. Let gα be a one-parametric family of one-dimensional maps with a cascade of period doubling bifurcations. Between each of these bifurcations, there exists a parameter value αn such that gα_n has a superstable periodic orbit of period 2n. Consider a quasi-periodic perturbation (with only one frequency) of the one-dimensional family of maps, and let us call ε the perturbing parameter. For ε small enough, the superstable periodic orbits of the unperturbed map become attracting invariant curves (depending on α and ε) of the perturbed system. Under a suitable hypothesis, it is known that there exist two reducibility loss bifurcation curves around each parameter value (αn, 0), which can be locally expressed as (α_n^+(\\varepsilon), \\varepsilon) and (α_n^-(\\varepsilon), \\varepsilon) . We propose an extension of the classic one-dimensional (doubling) renormalization operator to the quasi-periodic case. We show that this extension is well defined and the operator is differentiable. Moreover, we show that the slopes of reducibility loss bifurcation \\frac{d}{d\\varepsilon} α_n^+/-(0) can be written in terms of the tangent map of the new quasi-periodic renormalization operator. In particular, our result applies to the families of quasi-periodic forced perturbations of the Logistic Map typically encountered in the literature. We also present a numerical study that demonstrates that the asymptotic behaviour of \\{\\frac{d}{d\\varepsilon} α_n^+/-(0)\\}n≥ 0 is governed by the dynamics of the proposed quasi-periodic renormalization operator.

  1. Microwave properties of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays patterned with periodic and quasi-periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuxiong; Chen, Zheng; Li, Liangliang

    2015-05-01

    Microwave properties of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays patterned with periodic and quasi-periodic structures were investigated in this study. The periodic and quasi-periodic structures were designed based on Fibonacci sequence and golden ratio. Ni nanowires arrays were electrodeposited in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates with patterned Cu electrodes, and then the AAO templates were attached to the coplanar waveguide lines fabricated on quartz substrate for measurement. The S21 of both periodic and quasi-periodic structure-patterned Ni nanowire arrays showed an extra absorption peak besides the absorption peak due to the ferromagnetic resonance of Ni nanowires. The frequency of the absorption peak caused by the patterned structure could be higher than 40 GHz when the length and arrangement of the structural units were modified. In addition, the frequency of the absorption peak due to the quasi-periodic structure was calculated based on a simple analytical model, and the calculated value was consistent with the measured one. The experimental data showed that it could be a feasible approach to tune the performance of microwave devices by patterning ferromagnetic nanowires.

  2. Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar hard X-ray and microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosugi, Takeo; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1986-01-01

    For more than a decade, various studies have pointed out that hard X-ray and microwave time profiles of some solar flares show quasi-periodic fluctuations or pulsations. Nevertheless, it was not until recently that a flare displaying large amplitude quasi-periodic pulsations in X-rays and microwaves was observed with good spectral coverage and with a sufficient time resolution. The event occurred on June 7, 1980, at approximately 0312 UT, and exhibits seven intense pulses with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 8 seconds in microwaves, hard X-rays, and gamma-ray lines. On May 12, 1983, at approximately 0253 UT, another good example of this type of flare was observed both in hard X-rays and in microwaves. Temporal and spectral characteristics of this flare are compared with the event of June 7, 1980. In order to further explore these observational results and theoretical scenarios, a study of nine additional quasi-periodic events were incorporated with the results from the two flares described. Analysis of these events are briefly summarized.

  3. Dripping handrails and the quasi-periodic oscillations of the AM Herculis objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Young, Karl; Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James N.; Wolff, Michael T.; Wood, Kent S.

    1994-01-01

    AM Her objects exhibit periodic, quasi-periodic, and aperiodic variability on timescales ranging from seconds to years. Here, we investigate a process for the production of aperiodic and quasi-periodic accretion rate fluctuations. We consider the nonlinear dynamical model known as the dripping handrail (DHR). The DHR, basically a model for certain types of spatially extended systems and loosely based on water condensing on and dripping off a handrail, has recently been used as a model for the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. Here, we show that (1) the DHR is a robust QPO generation process in that it leads to QPO production under a wide range of conditions and assumptions; (2) the phenomenology of the DHR is consistent with the observed aperiodic and quasi-periodic varibility of the AM Her QPO source VV Pup over timescales ranging from 16 ms to 20 s; and (3) a single DHR model can produce both broadband QPOs and features with quality Q greater than 20 as observed in several AM Her QPO sources.

  4. Formation and Quasi-Periodic Behavior of Outer Spiral Rainbands in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Wang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The formation and quasi-periodic behavior of outer spiral rainbands in a tropical cyclone simulated in the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model version 4 (TCM4) are analyzed. The outer spiral rainbands in the simulation are preferably initiated near the 60-km radius, or roughly about three times the radius of maximum wind (RMW). After initiation, they generally propagate radially outward with a mean speed of ~5 m s-1. They are reinitiated quasi-periodically with a period between 22 h and 26 h in the simulation. While the inner spiral rainbands, which form within a radius of about three times the RMW, are characterized by the convectively coupled vortex Rossby waves (VRWs), the formation of outer spiral rainbands, namely, rainbands formed outside a radius of about three times the RMW, is much more complicated. It is shown that outer spiral rainbands are triggered by the inner-rainband remnants immediately outside the rapid filamentation zone and inertial instability in the upper troposphere. The preferred radial location of initiation of outer spiral rainbands is understood as a balance between the suppression of deep convection by rapid filamentation and the favorable dynamical and thermodynamic conditions for initiation of deep convection. The quasi-periodic occurrence of outer spiral rainbands is found to be associated with the boundary layer recovery from the effect of convective downdrafts and the consumption of convective available potential energy (CAPE) by convection in the previous outer spiral rainbands. Specifically, once convection is initiated and organized in the form of outer spiral rainbands, it will produce strong downdrafts and consume CAPE. These effects weaken convection near its initiation location. As the rainband propagates outward further, the boundary layer air near the original location of convection initiation takes about 10 h to recover by extracting energy from the underlying ocean. Convection and thus new outer spiral rainbands will be initiated near a radius of about three times the RMW. This will be followed by a similar outward propagation and the subsequent boundary layer recovery, leading to a quasi-periodic occurrence of outer spiral rainbands. In response to the quasi-periodic appearance of outer spiral rainbands, the storm intensity experiences a similar quasi-periodic oscillation with its intensity or intensification rate starting to decrease after about 4 h of the initiation of an outer spiral rainband. The results provide an alternative explanation or one of the mechanisms that are responsible for the quasi-periodic (quasi-diurnal) variation in the intensity and in the area of outflow-layer cloud canopy of observed tropical cyclones.

  5. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission by a plate with quasi-periodic surface ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Ke, Manzhu; Ye, Yangtao; Xu, Shengjun; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an acoustic system with broadband asymmetric transmission is designed and fabricated, which consists of a water-immersed aluminum plate engraved with quasi-periodically-patterned ridges on single surface. It demonstrates that when the acoustic waves are launched into the system from the structured side, they can couple into the Lamb modes in the plate efficiently and attain a high transmission; on the contrary, when the waves are incident from the opposite flat side, the coupling is weak, and the transmission is low. Superior to systems with periodic patterning, this quasi-periodically-patterned system has a broad working frequency range due to the collective contributions from the multiple diffractions specific to the structure.

  6. The re-analysis of quasi-periodic oscillation of the blazar J1359+4011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Su, Yanping

    2016-05-01

    J1359+4011 is a flat spectral radio quasar monitored by the Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 m radio telescope since 2008. The light curve of J1359+4011 in 15 GHz shows a possible quasi-periodic behavior by visual inspection. In order to confirm this quasi-periodic behavior, we utilize two classical methods: structure function method and discrete correlation function method, to investigate the possible time-scale of oscillation in the time series of J1359+4011. The analytical result shows a possible time-scale of oscillation of 120-130 days. The instabilities in the accretion flow could be a possible explanation for the modulation of the light curve; and global p-mode oscillations in a thick disc could be another possible reason for this behavior.

  7. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission by a plate with quasi-periodic surface ridges

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhui; Ke, Manzhu Ye, Yangtao; Xu, Shengjun; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, an acoustic system with broadband asymmetric transmission is designed and fabricated, which consists of a water-immersed aluminum plate engraved with quasi-periodically-patterned ridges on single surface. It demonstrates that when the acoustic waves are launched into the system from the structured side, they can couple into the Lamb modes in the plate efficiently and attain a high transmission; on the contrary, when the waves are incident from the opposite flat side, the coupling is weak, and the transmission is low. Superior to systems with periodic patterning, this quasi-periodically-patterned system has a broad working frequency range due to the collective contributions from the multiple diffractions specific to the structure.

  8. Quasi-periodic oscillations of the magnetopause during northward sheath magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubun, S.; Kawano, H.; Nakamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Matsuoka, A.; Frank, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Geotail satellite quasi-periodically crossed the dawn flank of magnetopause more than ten times during an interval of 1.5 hours on November 4, 1992. Magnetopause crossings were characterized by quasi-periodic pulses of a sawtooth wave form in the magnetic field and the plasma flow components tangential to the magnetopause. The magnetic field strength in the magnetosheath was larger than that in the magnetosphere. The direction of magnetic field outside the magnetopause current layer was northward with antisunward tilt, indicating the draping of magnetic field on the magnetopause. Boundary normals of wavy magnetopause systematically incline sunward on the upstream side, while they tend to incline antisunward with considerable deviation on the downstream side. Comparison with other multiple crossing events suggests that the November 4 event exhibits wavy structure of the dawn flank magnetopause associated with the northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF).

  9. Mid-term quasi-periodicities in the CaII-K plage index of the Sun and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Partha; Gokhale, M. H.; Singh, Jagdev; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-02-01

    We present results of the fast Fourier transform (FFT), the MEM analysis, and the wavelet analysis (WA), of the temporal variation of the monthly disk integrated "CaII-K plage-area and enhanced network (EN) area" hereafter called `plage index' derived by Tlatov et al. (2009), from spectro-heliograms taken in Ca II K line at Kodaikanal Observatory, from February 1907 to April, 1998, In the range {>}3 months and < decade, the Fourier transform power spectra reveal solar cycle periodicity {˜}122 months, its sub-harmonic ˜61 months, two short quasi-periodicities ({>}2 and <4 months), and nine `intermediate-range' quasi-periodicities (≳ 4 mo and <11 yr), in the variation of the plage index. The quasi-periodicities include Rieger, Rieger type and quasi-biennial. The presence of quasi-periodicities and the mean values of the periods are confirmed by the maximum entropy method (MEM). The temporal spans of the quasi-periodicities during different solar cycles are determined from the complex Morlet-wavelet analyses. The Rieger quasi-periodicity (150-160 days) appeared during cycle 21 and cycle 22. Each of the quasi-periodicities in the studied range lies close to one or more planetary periodicities (orbital, or spring tidal, or heliocentric conjunction frequency). We discuss possible interpretations of our results, and those of similar results obtained earlier by other authors, towards understanding the mechanisms of excitation of various quasi-periodicities detected in solar variability parameters.

  10. Quasi-periodic variations in the Doppler shift of HF signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Belenov, A.F.; Ponomarenko, P.V.; Sinitsyn, V.G.; Yampol`skii, Yu.M.

    1994-06-01

    The results of an experimental study of quasi-periodic variations of the Doppler shift (DS) of decimeter-wave signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence are presented. It is suggested that ionospheric MHD waves of natural origin are a possible cause of such variations. The amplitude of the magnetic component of such waves that leads to observable values of DS variations is estimated to be 1{gamma}.

  11. On quasi-periodic solutions for generalized Boussinesq equation with quadratic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanling; Xu, Junxiang; Xu, Xindong

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional generalized Boussinesq equation: utt - uxx + (u2 + uxx)xx = 0 with boundary conditions ux(0, t) = ux(π, t) = uxxx(0, t) = uxxx(π, t) = 0 is considered. It is proved that the equation admits a Whitney smooth family of small-amplitude quasi-periodic solutions with 2-dimensional Diophantine frequencies. The proof is based on an infinite dimensional Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser theorem and Birkhoff normal form.

  12. The quasi-periodicity of the annual-cycle forced ENSO recharge oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wu-Fan; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    The annual-cycle impact on a class of nonlinear ENSO recharge oscillator model is studied by transforming the model equations into the van der Pol-Duffing oscillator with external forcing. The Hopf bifurcation and stable limit cycle are obtained by the multi-scale method. Qualitative analysis and numerical results show that the ENSO system turns into quasi-periodic oscillations as the annual-cycle forcing is increased.

  13. Paleocene sea level movements with a 430,000 year quasi-periodic cyclicity

    SciTech Connect

    Briskin, M. ); Fluegeman, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Sea level movements with quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years are identified in the marine sedimentary units of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain of Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia which represent a 5.8 million year record of strandline displacement during Paleocene time. Principal component analysis of the benthic foraminiferal fauna yielded six assemblages which when combined with two other qualitatively derived assemblages provided paleoecologic information which clearly reflects the influence of paleocirculation and paleoclimatic regime of the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The presence of the planktonic foraminiferal taxa Subbotina trinidadensis and Planorotalites pseudomenardii as well as paleolatitudes ranging from 15{degree} N (for the Campeche Shelf) to 25{degree} N (for the Coastal Plain) emphasizes a paleoclimatic regime which is dominantly tropical. A paleoceanographic model was derived which suggests that normal marine waters were brought into the Gulf of Mexico by two major currents. Strandline displacements are related to transgressive and regressive sea level movements in an ice free Paleocene world. The well delineated 430,000 year quasi-periodic cycle observed in the sea level curve is identified as being astronomical in character. These results support the view that changes in the Earth's orbit may trigger changes in the geometry of the Earth's surface in a way which causes sea level to oscillate with a quasi-periodicity of 430,000 years.

  14. Quasi-periodic fluctuations in ionospheric absorption in relation to planetary activity in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheva, D.; Lastovicka, J.; de La Morena, B. A.

    1991-12-01

    Quasi-periodic fluctuations (2-15 days) in ionospheric absorption along three radio paths in Central and Southern Europe are investigated for three winter periods 1985/86, 1986/87 and 1987/88. The periods of dominant fluctuations in absorption and the time variations of their amplitudes are similar for all radio paths and every winter period. The shorter-period fluctuations are found to be associated with enhancements of planetary wave-two activity in the stratosphere (30 hPa, 60 deg N), while longer period fluctuations appear to be associated with intensification of planetary wave-one activity in the stratosphere.

  15. Analysis of quasi-periodic pore-network structure of centric marine diatom frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohoon, Gregory A.; Alvarez, Christine E.; Meyers, Keith; Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Hildebrand, Mark; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Diatoms are a common type of phytoplankton characterized by their silica exoskeleton known as a frustule. The diatom frustule is composed of two valves and a series of connecting girdle bands. Each diatom species has a unique frustule shape and valves in particular species display an intricate pattern of pores resembling a photonic crystal structure. We used several numerical techniques to analyze the periodic and quasi-periodic valve pore-network structure in diatoms of the Coscinodiscophyceae order. We quantitatively identify defect locations and pore spacing in the valve and use this information to better understand the optical and biological properties of the diatom.

  16. Subarcsecond bright points and quasi-periodic upflows below a quiescent filament observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The new Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission provides high-resolution observations of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJIs). These data have become available for investigating the dynamic features in the transition region (TR) below the on-disk filaments. Aims: The driver of "counter-streaming" flows along the filament spine is still unknown yet. The magnetic structures and the upflows at the footpoints of the filaments and their relations with the filament mainbody have not been well understood. We study the dynamic evolution at the footpoints of filaments in order to find some clues for solving these questions. Methods: Using UV spectra and SJIs from the IRIS, along with coronal images and magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we present the new features in a quiescent filament channel: subarcsecond bright points (BPs) and quasi-periodic upflows. Results: The BPs in the TR have a spatial scale of about 350-580 km and lifetimes of more than several tens of minutes. They are located at stronger magnetic structures in the filament channel with a magnetic flux of about 1017-1018 Mx. Quasi-periodic brightenings and upflows are observed in the BPs, and the period is about 4-5 min. The BP and the associated jet-like upflow comprise a "tadpole-shaped" structure. The upflows move along bright filament threads, and their directions are almost parallel to the spine of the filament. The upflows initiated from the BPs with opposite polarity magnetic fields have opposite directions. The velocity of the upflows in the plane of sky is about 5-50 km s-1. The emission line of Si IV 1402.77 Å at the locations of upflows exhibits obvious blueshifts of about 5-30 km s-1, and the line profile is broadened with the width of more than 20 km s-1. Conclusions: The BPs seem to be the bases of filament threads, and the upflows are able to convey mass for the dynamic balance of the filament. The "counter-streaming" flows in previous observations may be caused by the propagation of bi-directional upflows initiated from opposite polarity magnetic fields. We suggest that quasi-periodic brightenings of BPs and quasi-periodic upflows result from small-scale oscillatory magnetic reconnections, which are modulated by solar p-mode waves.

  17. Study on the transmission properties of periodical and quasi-periodical phononic crystal in elastic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Ze-Kun; Liu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Bao-Liang; Yang, Hong-Wei

    2015-12-01

    The propagation of the elastic wave in phononic crystal is different from the normal uniformity medium. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is irrelevant to structure model and used widely. Moreover, when the numerical stability of FDTD iterations is satisfied, the elastic waves’ transmission property through periodical and quasi-periodical phononic crystal can be achieved. In this paper, the transmission coefficients of elastic wave through two systems are numerically calculated and the results of band gaps are analyzed. The results are helpful to study phononic crystal.

  18. A review of quasi-periodic oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan; Van Der Klis, Michiel

    1988-01-01

    A review of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in the X-ray flux of low-mass X-ray binaries is presented. In Section 1 a general background is given on galactic populations of accretion-driven X-ray sources. Section 2 contains a description of the methods that have been used to analyze these QPO. In Section 3 the QPO observations are described in some detail. Models for the QPO are considered in Section 4. In Section 5 the time lags observed between QPO at different photon energies and their possible implications for X-ray spectral models are discussed. Conclusions are summarized in Section 6.

  19. Quasi-periodic solutions of nonlinear beam equation with prescribed frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jing; Gao, Yixian Li, Yong

    2015-05-15

    Consider the one dimensional nonlinear beam equation u{sub tt} + u{sub xxxx} + mu + u{sup 3} = 0 under Dirichlet boundary conditions. We show that for any m > 0 but a set of small Lebesgue measure, the above equation admits a family of small-amplitude quasi-periodic solutions with n-dimensional Diophantine frequencies. These Diophantine frequencies are the small dilation of a prescribed Diophantine vector. The proofs are based on an infinite dimensional Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser iteration procedure and a partial Birkhoff normal form. .

  20. Sources of Quasi-periodic Propagating Disturbances above a Solar Polar Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Fangran; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Li, Xing; Chandrashekhar, Kalugodu; Mou, Chaozhou; Fu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances (PDs) are ubiquitous in polar coronal holes on the Sun. It remains unclear as to what generates PDs. In this work, we investigate how the PDs are generated in the solar atmosphere by analyzing a four-hour data set taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We find convincing evidence that spicular activities in the solar transition region, as seen in the AIA 304 Å passband, are responsible for PDs in the corona as revealed in the AIA 171 Å images. We conclude that spicules are an important source that triggers coronal PDs.

  1. A Test for Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Fluctuations in Past Climate Change Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, James; Roberts, James

    2015-03-01

    In this work the temperature fluctuations for a number of proxy data sets were analyzed to test for periodic and quasi-periodic fluctuations in climate changes in the past. The data sets analyzed indicate temperature functions which could be modeled using amplitude and frequency modulated sinusoidal waves. Data for the past 2000 years were tested and they show select periods of 11 years, 100 years, 300 years and 600 years. Longer term data (million years) indicate periods of 21000 and 41000 years as predicted by Milankovitch.

  2. A search for quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U/MXB 1735-44

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penninx, Wim; Hasinger, Guenther; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan; Van Der Klis, Michiel

    1989-01-01

    A search for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U/MXB 1735-44 was performed using Exosat observations during which the source was in a horizontal branch of the spectral hardness-intensity diagram for about 8 hr and in a normal branch type of behavior for about 46 hr. No QPOs or low-frequency noise was found in the horizontal branch state. It is suggested that this absence is due to either low luminosity or the fact that the companion in 1735-44 is a main-sequence star.

  3. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, K V

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  4. Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of Type B Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2016-05-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy and apply it to the low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. We show that on the QPO time-scale the spectrum changes not only in normalisation, but also in spectral shape. Using several different spectral models which parameterise the blackbody and power-law components seen in the time-averaged spectrum, we find that both components are required to vary, although the fractional rms amplitude of blackbody emission is small, ˜ 1.4 per cent compared to ˜ 25 per cent for the power-law emission. However the blackbody variation leads the power-law variation by ˜ 0.3 in relative phase (˜ 110 degrees), giving a significant break in the Fourier lag-energy spectrum that our phase-resolved spectral models are able to reproduce. Our results support a geometric interpretation for the QPO variations where the blackbody variation and its phase relation to the power-law are explained by quasi-periodic heating of the approaching and receding sides of the disk by a precessing Comptonising region. The small amplitude of blackbody variations suggests that the Comptonising region producing the QPO has a relatively large scale-height, and may be linked to the base of the jet, as has previously been suggested to explain the binary orbit inclination-dependence of Type B QPO amplitudes.

  5. Bifurcation boundaries of three-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in discrete-time dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, Kyohei; Inaba, Naohiko; Sekikawa, Munehisa; Endo, Tetsuro

    2014-12-01

    This report presents an extensive investigation of bifurcations of quasi-periodic oscillations based on an analysis of a coupled delayed logistic map. This map generates an invariant two-torus (IT>2) that corresponds to a three-torus in vector fields. We illustrate detailed Lyapunov diagrams and, by observing attractors, derive a quasi-periodic saddle-node (QSN) bifurcation boundary with a precision of 10-9. We derive a stable invariant one-torus (IT>1) and a saddle IT>1, which correspond to a stable two-torus and a saddle two-torus in vector fields, respectively. We confirmed that the QSN bifurcation boundary coincides with a saddle-node bifurcation point of a stable IT>1 and a saddle IT>1. Our major concern in this study is whether the qualitative transition from an IT>1 to an IT>2 via QSN bifurcations includes phase-locking. We prove with a precision of 10-9 that there is no resonance at the bifurcation point.

  6. Quasi-periodic events in crystal plasticity and the self-organized avalanche oscillator.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Dimiduk, Dennis M; Choi, Woosong; Sethna, James P; Uchic, Michael D; Woodward, Christopher F; Zapperi, Stefano

    2012-10-25

    When external stresses in a system--physical, social or virtual--are relieved through impulsive events, it is natural to focus on the attributes of these avalanches. However, during the quiescent periods between them, stresses may be relieved through competing processes, such as slowly flowing water between earthquakes or thermally activated dislocation flow between plastic bursts in crystals. Such smooth responses can in turn have marked effects on the avalanche properties. Here we report an experimental investigation of slowly compressed nickel microcrystals, covering three orders of magnitude in nominal strain rate, in which we observe unconventional quasi-periodic avalanche bursts and higher critical exponents as the strain rate is decreased. Our experiments are faithfully reproduced by analytic and computational dislocation avalanche modelling that we have extended to incorporate dislocation relaxation, revealing the emergence of the self-organized avalanche oscillator: a novel critical state exhibiting oscillatory approaches towards a depinning critical point. This theory suggests that whenever avalanches compete with slow relaxation--in settings ranging from crystal microplasticity to earthquakes--dynamical quasi-periodic scale invariance ought to emerge. PMID:23099406

  7. On the self-averaging of dispersion for transport in quasi-periodic random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, J. P.; Suciu, N.; Vamos, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we present a numerical analysis for the self-averaging of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient for transport in heterogeneous media. This is done by investigating the mean-square sample-to-sample fluctuations of the dispersion for finite times and finite numbers of modes for a random field using analytical arguments as well as numerical simulations. We consider transport of point-like injections in a quasi-periodic random field with a Gaussian correlation function. In particular, we focus on the asymptotic and pre-asymptotic behaviour of the fluctuations with the aid of a probability density function for the dispersion, and we verify the logarithmic growth of the sample-to-sample fluctuations as earlier reported in Eberhard (2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 2549-71). We also comment on the choice of the relevant parameters to generate quasi-periodic realizations with respect to the self-averaging of transport in statistically homogeneous Gaussian velocity fields.

  8. Topological incommensurate magnetization plateaus in quasi-periodic quantum spin chains

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Ping; Cheng, Chen; Luo, Hong-Gang; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering topologically nontrivial states in nature is an intriguing and important issue in recent years. While most studies are based on the topological band insulators, the topological state in strongly correlated low-dimensional systems has not been extensively explored due to the failure of direct explanation from the topological band insulator theory on such systems and the origin of the topological property is unclear. Here we report the theoretical discovery of strongly correlated topological states in quasi-periodic Heisenberg spin chain systems corresponding to a series of incommensurate magnetization plateaus under the presence of the magnetic field, which are uniquely determined by the quasi-periodic structure of exchange couplings. The topological features of plateau states are demonstrated by the existence of non-trivial spin-flip edge excitations, which can be well characterized by nonzero topological invariants defined in a two-dimensional parameter space. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the topological invariant of the plateau state can be read out from a generalized Streda formula and the spin-flip excitation spectrum exhibits a similar structure of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum for the two-dimensional quantum Hall system on a lattice. PMID:25678145

  9. Quasi-periodic synchronisation of self-modulation oscillations in a ring chip laser by an external periodic signal

    SciTech Connect

    Aulova, T V; Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N

    2011-06-30

    The synchronisation of periodic self-modulation oscillations in a ring Nd:YAG chip laser under an external periodic signal modulating the pump power has been experimentally investigated. A new quasi-periodic regime of synchronisation of self-modulation oscillations is found. The characteristic features of the behaviour of spectral and temporal structures of synchronised quasi-periodic oscillations with a change in the external signal frequency are studied. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  10. Growth of Sobolev Norms in Linear Schrödinger Equations with Quasi-Periodic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, J.

    In this paper, we consider the following problem. Let iut+Δu+V(x,t)u= 0 be a linear Schrödinger equation ( periodic boundary conditions) where V is a real, bounded, real analytic potential which is periodic in x and quasi periodic in t with diophantine frequency vector λ. Denote S(t) the corresponding flow map. Thus S(t) preserves the L2-norm and our aim is to study its behaviour on Hs(TD), s> 0. Our main result is the growth in time is at most logarithmic; thus if φ∈Hs, then More precisely, (*) is proven in 1D and 2D when V is small. We also exhibit examples showing that a growth of higher Sobolev norms may occur in this context and (*) is thus essentially best possible.

  11. Low-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Iron Line Variability of Discoseismic Corrugation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsky, Iryna; Tsang, D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of iron lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the inner-most regions of accretion discs around black holes. The dependence of the relativistically broadened line profile on the oscillation-phase is studied for discoseismic corrugation modes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as their natural frequency corresponds well to the 0.1-10 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in X-ray binaries. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and QPO-phase stacked Fe-Kalpha line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of LFQPOs.

  12. An evolving MHD vortex street model for quasi-periodic solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation are used to provide a dynamical basis for the 'vortex street' model of the quasi-periodic meridional flow observed by Voyager 2 in the outer heliosphere. Various observations suggest the existence near the current sheet at solar minimum, of a vorticity distribution of two opposite shear layers with an antisymmetric staggered velocity pattern due to structured high-speed wind surrounding low-speed equatorial flow. It is shown that this flow pattern leads to the formation of a highly stable vortex street through the nonlinear interaction of the two shear layers. Spatial profiles of various simulated parameters (velocity, density, meridional flow angle and the location of magnetic sector boundaries) and their relative locations in the quasi-steady vortex street are generally in good agreement with the observations.

  13. Moment constraints on physical models for quasi-periodic oscillations from Galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Shibazaki, N.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Shot-noise models provide a useful mathematical representation for some physical models for the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) recently observed from several bright Galactic bulge and burst X-ray sources. Expressions are calculated for the first three moments for several versions of QPO shot-noise models that have appeared in the literature. It is shown that measurement of the third moment, together with measurement of the mean intensity and the power spectrum, can provide model-dependent constraints on important parameters of QPO shot-noise models, including the fraction of the X-ray intensity in shots and the shot rate. Under certain condtitions, a complete solution for all the shot-model parameters is possible.

  14. Study of possible chaotic, quasi-periodic and periodic structures in quantum dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-11-15

    Existence of chaotic, quasi-periodic, and periodic structures of dust-ion acoustic waves is studied in quantum dusty plasmas through dynamical system approach. A system of coupled differential equations is derived from the fluid model and subsequently, variational matrix is obtained. The characteristic equation is obtained at the equilibrium point, and the behavior of nonlinear waves is studied numerically using Runge-Kutta method. The behavior of the dynamical system changes significantly when any of plasma parameters, such as the dust concentration parameter, temperature ratio, or the quantum diffraction parameter, is varied. The change of the characteristic of solution of the system is extensively studied. It is found that the system changes its behavior from chaotic pattern to limit cycle behavior.

  15. Sequential blind source extraction for quasi-periodic signals with time-varying period.

    PubMed

    Tsalaile, Thato; Sameni, Reza; Sanei, Saeid; Jutten, Christian; Chambers, Jonathon

    2009-03-01

    A novel second-order-statistics-based sequential blind extraction algorithm for blind extraction of quasi-periodic signals, with time-varying period, is introduced in this paper. Source extraction is performed by sequentially converging to a solution that effectively diagonalizes autocorrelation matrices at lags corresponding to the time-varying period, which thereby explicitly exploits a key statistical nonstationary characteristic of the desired source. The algorithm is shown to have fast convergence and yields significant improvement in signal-to-interference ratio as compared to when the algorithm assumes a fixed period. The algorithm is further evaluated on the problem of separation of a heart sound signal from real-world lung sound recordings. Separation results confirm the utility of the introduced approach, and listening tests are employed to further corroborate the results. PMID:19272949

  16. On quasi-periodic variations of low-energy cosmic rays observed near earth.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Karel; Langer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) may partially, especially at high altitudes, contribute to the dosimetric characteristics. Along with irregular CR variations as Forbush decreases and solar particle events are, the quasi-periodic variations may be of some relevance too. A very short review (with references to original papers) of the present knowledge of various types of such variations is presented, namely (i) diurnal wave, (ii) ~27 d variability due to the solar rotation, (iii) Rieger-type periodicity, and (iv) quasi-biennial oscillations as well as waves on longer time scales related to solar activity and to polarity of magnetic field of the Sun. Variability is illustrated in measurements of secondary CR on the ground including the high-altitude observations at Lomnický štít. PMID:25979741

  17. Millihertz quasi-periodic optical oscillations in 4U 0614+091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Hynes, R. I.; Robinson, E. L.

    2012-02-01

    We report the discovery of a 1-mHz optical quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the candidate ultra-compact low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+091. The ultra-low-frequency QPO has no X-ray counterpart in contemporaneous RXTE/PCA data and is likely a signature of structure in the accretion disc. The QPO can be reasonably fitted with a single sine wave but with a phase jump part way through the observation, indicating that it is not coherent. We also identify a 48-min modulation, approximately consistent with the suggested orbital period of O'Brien and Shahbaz et al. If this is indeed orbital, it supports an identification of 4U 0614+091 as an ultra-compact source.

  18. Ginga observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in type II bursts from the Rapid Burster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Kawai, N.

    1990-01-01

    During Ginga observations of the 'Rapid Burster' in August 1988, strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected in its X-ray intensity. The QPOs had centroid frequencies of 5 and 2 Hz during type II X-ray bursts which lasted for 10 and 30 s, respectively. The presence of the QPOs is correlated with the time scale-invariant burst profile. They are very strong during the initial peak in the burst, absent in the second peak, and strong again at the onset of the third peak. From an analysis of the X-ray spectrum as observed during the maxima and minima of the oscillations, it is found that the oscillations can be described by changes of the temperature of a blackbody emitter of constant apparent area.

  19. Ergodic theory and visualization. II. Fourier mesochronic plots visualize (quasi)periodic sets

    SciTech Connect

    Levnajić, Zoran; Mezić, Igor

    2015-05-15

    We present an application and analysis of a visualization method for measure-preserving dynamical systems introduced by I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk [Physica D 197, 101 (2004)], based on frequency analysis and Koopman operator theory. This extends our earlier work on visualization of ergodic partition [Z. Levnajić and I. Mezić, Chaos 20, 033114 (2010)]. Our method employs the concept of Fourier time average [I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk, Physica D 197, 101 (2004)], and is realized as a computational algorithms for visualization of periodic and quasi-periodic sets in the phase space. The complement of periodic phase space partition contains chaotic zone, and we show how to identify it. The range of method's applicability is illustrated using well-known Chirikov standard map, while its potential in illuminating higher-dimensional dynamics is presented by studying the Froeschlé map and the Extended Standard Map.

  20. Delayed feedback control and phase reduction of unstable quasi-periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Natsuhiro; Komuro, Motomasa

    2014-09-01

    The delayed feedback control (DFC) is applied to stabilize unstable quasi-periodic orbits (QPOs) in discrete-time systems. The feedback input is given by the difference between the current state and a time-delayed state in the DFC. However, there is an inevitable time-delay mismatch in QPOs. To evaluate the influence of the time-delay mismatch on the DFC, we propose a phase reduction method for QPOs and construct a phase response curve (PRC) from unstable QPOs directly. Using the PRC, we estimate the rotation number of QPO stabilized by the DFC. We show that the orbit of the DFC is consistent with the unstable QPO perturbed by a small state difference resulting from the time-delay mismatch, implying that the DFC can certainly stabilize the unstable QPO.

  1. QUASI-PERIODICITIES OF THE BL LACERTAE OBJECT PKS 2155–304

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Covino, S.

    2014-09-20

    We have searched for periodicities in our VRIJHK photometry of PKS 2155–304, which covers the years 2005-2012. A peak of the Fourier spectrum with high significance is found at T ∼ 315 days, confirming the recent findings by Zhang et al. The examination of the gamma-ray light curves from the Fermi archives yields a significant signal at ∼2T, which, while nominally significant, involves data spanning only ∼6T. Assuming a black hole mass of 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, the Keplerian distance corresponding to the quasi-period T is ∼10{sup 16} cm, about 50 Schwarzschild radii.

  2. Quasi-periodic solutions for fully nonlinear forced reversible Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feola, Roberto; Procesi, Michela

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we consider a class of fully nonlinear forced and reversible Schrödinger equations and prove existence and stability of quasi-periodic solutions. We use a Nash-Moser algorithm together with a reducibility theorem on the linearized operator in a neighborhood of zero. Due to the presence of the highest order derivatives in the non-linearity the classic KAM-reducibility argument fails and one needs to use a wider class of changes of variables such as diffeomorphisms of the torus and pseudo-differential operators. This procedure automatically produces a change of variables, well defined on the phase space of the equation, which diagonalizes the operator linearized at the solution. This gives the linear stability.

  3. Ergodic theory and visualization. II. Fourier mesochronic plots visualize (quasi)periodic sets.

    PubMed

    Levnajić, Zoran; Mezić, Igor

    2015-05-01

    We present an application and analysis of a visualization method for measure-preserving dynamical systems introduced by I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk [Physica D 197, 101 (2004)], based on frequency analysis and Koopman operator theory. This extends our earlier work on visualization of ergodic partition [Z. Levnajić and I. Mezić, Chaos 20, 033114 (2010)]. Our method employs the concept of Fourier time average [I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk, Physica D 197, 101 (2004)], and is realized as a computational algorithms for visualization of periodic and quasi-periodic sets in the phase space. The complement of periodic phase space partition contains chaotic zone, and we show how to identify it. The range of method's applicability is illustrated using well-known Chirikov standard map, while its potential in illuminating higher-dimensional dynamics is presented by studying the Froeschlé map and the Extended Standard Map. PMID:26026317

  4. Wideband absorption in fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Renxia; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, Haifeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Bian, Borui; Bao, Jie

    2014-12-01

    A heterostructure containing a Fibonacci quasi-periodic layer and a resonant metal back reflector is proposed, which can realize wideband absorption. The Fibonacci layer is composed of graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials and isotropic media to obtain wideband absorption. To enhance absorption, an impedance-matching layer is put on top of the Fibonacci layer. It is shown to absorb roughly 90% of all available electromagnetic waves in an 11 terahertz absorption bandwidth for a transverse magnetic mode at normal angle incidence. The absorption bandwidth is affected by the reflection band gap. Compared with some previous designs, our proposed structure has a larger absorption bandwidth and higher absorption in the mid-infrared range. The results should be valuable in the design of infrared stealth and broadband optoelectronic devices.

  5. Statistical investigation of the VLF quasi-periodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Nemec, František; Santolík, Ondřej; Pasmanik, Dmitry; Parrot, Michel

    2013-04-01

    We present a survey of quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions detected on board the DEMETER satellite (altitude of about 700 km, nearly Sun-synchronous orbit at 10:30/22:30 LT). Five years of data have been visually inspected for the presence of QP emissions. It is found that QP events occur in about 3 percents of daytime half-orbits, while they are basically absent during the night (note that we were likely to miss QP events with the modulation periods lower than about 10 s or the frequency bandwidth lower than about 400 Hz). The events occur predominantly during quiet geomagnetic conditions following the periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity. Their occurrence and properties are systematically analyzed.

  6. A possible imprint of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray spectra of black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varniere, P.; Mignon-Risse, R.; Rodriguez, J.

    2016-02-01

    Context. While nobody would deny the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations in the power density spectrum of black hole binaries nor their importance in the understanding of the mechanisms powering the X-ray emissions, the possible impact on the time-averaged disk energy spectrum from the phenomenon responsible for quasi-periodic oscillations is largely ignored in models of sources emission. Aims: Here we investigate the potential impact of such a structure on the resultant energy spectrum. Methods: Using data from the well-documented outbursts of XTE J1550-564, we looked at possible hints that the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations actually impacts the energy spectrum emitted by the source. In particular, we look at the evolution of the relation between the inner disk radius and the inner disk temperature obtained from fits to the spectral data. We then test this further by developing a simple model to simulate the spectrum of a disk with a structure mimicking quasi-periodic oscillations that are increasing in strength simulated results to those obtained from real data. Results: We detect a similar departure in the inner radius - inner temperature curve coming from the standard fit of our simulated observations as is seen in XTE J1550-564 data. We interpret our results as evidence that the structure at the origin of the quasi-periodic oscillations impacts the energy spectrum. Conclusions: Furthermore, in states with significant disk emission the inaccuracy of the determination of the disk parameters increases with the strength of quasi-periodic oscillations, an increase that then renders the value given by the fit unreliable for strong quasi-periodic oscillations.

  7. The eight-vertex model with quasi-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccoli, G.; Terras, V.

    2016-01-01

    We study the inhomogeneous eight-vertex model (or equivalently the XYZ Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain) with all kinds of integrable quasi-periodic boundary conditions: periodic, {σ }x-twisted, {σ }y-twisted or {σ }z-twisted. We show that in all these cases but the periodic one with an even number of sites {N}, the transfer matrix of the model is related, by the vertex-IRF transformation, to the transfer matrix of the dynamical six-vertex model with antiperiodic boundary conditions, which we have recently solved by means of Sklyanin's separation of variables approach. We show moreover that, in all the twisted cases, the vertex-IRF transformation is bijective. This allows us to completely characterize, from our previous results on the antiperiodic dynamical six-vertex model, the twisted eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum (proving that it is simple) and eigenstates. We also consider the periodic case for {N} odd. In this case we can define two independent vertex-IRF transformations, both not bijective, and by using them we show that the eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum is doubly degenerate, and that it can, as well as the corresponding eigenstates, also be completely characterized in terms of the spectrum and eigenstates of the dynamical six-vertex antiperiodic transfer matrix. In all these cases we can adapt to the eight-vertex case the reformulations of the dynamical six-vertex transfer matrix spectrum and eigenstates that had been obtained by T-Q functional equations, where the Q-functions are elliptic polynomials with twist-dependent quasi-periods. Such reformulations enable one to characterize the eight-vertex transfer matrix spectrum by the solutions of some Bethe-type equations, and to rewrite the corresponding eigenstates as the multiple action of some operators on a pseudo-vacuum state, in a similar way as in the algebraic Bethe ansatz framework.

  8. Wegner-type Bounds for a Two-particle Lattice Model with a Generic ``Rough'' Quasi-periodic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Martin

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a class of two-particle tight-binding Hamiltonians, describing pairs of interacting quantum particles on the lattice ℤ d , d ≥ 1, subject to a common external potential V( x) which we assume quasi-periodic and depending on auxiliary parameters. Such parametric families of ergodic deterministic potentials (“grands ensembles”) have been introduced earlier in Chulaevsky (2007), in the framework of single-particle lattice systems, where it was proved that a non-uniform analog of the Wegner bound holds true for a class of quasi-periodic grands ensembles. Using the approach proposed in Chulaevsky and Suhov (Commun Math Phys 283(2):479-489, 2008), we establish volume-dependent Wegner-type bounds for a class of quasi-periodic two-particle lattice systems with a non-random short-range interaction.

  9. A Model for Backscattering from Quasi Periodic Corn Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Zhao, Q.; O'Neill, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a model for backscattering at L-band from a corn canopy is proposed. The canopy consists of a quasi-periodic distribution of stalks and a random distribution of leaves. The Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) is employed to calculate the single scattered return from the corn field. The new feature of the method is that the coherence of the stalks in the row direction is incorporated in the model in a systematic fashion. Since the wavelength is on the order of the distance between corn stalks in a row, grating lobe behavior is observed at certain azimuth angles of incidence. The results are compared with experimental values measured in Huntsville, Alabama in 1998. The mean field and the effective dielectric constant of the canopy are obtained by using the Foldy approximation. The stalks are placed in the effective medium in a two dimensional lattice to simulate the row structure of a corn field. In order to mimic a real corn field, a quasi-periodic stalk distribution is assumed where the stalks are given small random perturbations about their lattice locations. Corn leaves are also embedded in the effective medium and the backscattered field from the stalks and the leaves is computed. The backscattering coefficient is calculated and averaged over successive stalk position perturbations. It is assumed that soil erosion has smoothed the soil sufficiently so that it can be assumed flat. Corn field backscatter data was collected from cornfields during the Huntsville 98 experimental campaign held at Alabama A&M University Research Station, Huntsville, Alabama in 1998 using the NASA/GW truck mounted radar. Extensive ground truth data was collected. This included soil moisture measurements and corn plant architectural data to be used in the model. In particular, the distances between the stalks in a single row have been measured. The L-band radar backscatter data was collected for both H and V polarizations and for look angles of 15o and 45o over a two week period under varying soil moisture conditions. These measured backscattering values will be compared with the model backscattering values and a discussion of the results will be presented.

  10. GB6 J1058+5628: A NEW QUASI-PERIODIC BL LAC OBJECT FROM THE ASIAGO PLATE ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Nesci, R.

    2010-06-15

    We present the historic photographic light curves of three little known blazars (two BL Lac objects and one FSRQ), GB6 J1058+5628, GB6 J1148+5254, and GB6 J1209+4119, spanning a time interval of about 50 years, mostly built using the Asiago plate archive. All objects show evident long-term variability, over which short-term variations are superposed. One source, GB6 J1058+5628, showed a marked quasi-periodic variability of 1 mag on timescale of about 6.3 years, making it one of the few BL Lac objects with a quasi-periodic behavior.

  11. Effect of a permanent magnetic field on quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillation regimes in solid-state ring lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshin, D A; Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N

    2005-01-31

    Features of nonlinear dynamics of solid-state ring lasers in quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillation regimes in a magnetic field are studied experimentally. Windows of periodic and quasi-periodic regimes within the region of dynamic chaos in a monolithic ring laser with periodically modulated pumping are observed experimentally for the first time. It is shown that an applied magnetic field changes the boundaries of the existence of various nonstationary regimes. It is established that, under certain conditions, lasing regimes can be switched in magnetic fields with strengths of {approx}1 Oe. (active media. lasers)

  12. Twin peak quasi-periodic oscillations as signature of oscillating cusp torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, G.; Goluchová, K.; Horák, J.; Šrámková, E.; Urbanec, M.; Pecháček, T.; Bakala, P.

    2016-03-01

    Serious theoretical effort has been devoted to explain the observed frequencies of twin-peak quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in low-mass X-ray neutron star binaries. Here we propose a new model of HF QPOs. Within its framework we consider an oscillating torus with cusp that changes location r0 of its centre around radii very close to innermost stable circular orbit. The observed variability is assigned to global modes of accreted fluid motion that may give strong modulation of both accretion disc radiation and the accretion rate. For a given space-time geometry, the model predicts that QPO frequencies are function of single parameter r0. We illustrate that the model can provide fits of data comparable to those reached by other models, or even better. In particular, it is compared to relativistic precession model. Moreover, we also illustrate that the model consideration is compatible with consideration of models of a rotating neutron star in the atoll source 4U 1636-53.

  13. SUBMILLIMETER QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN MAGNETICALLY CHOKED ACCRETION FLOW MODELS OF SgrA*

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2013-09-10

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetically choked accretion flows around rapidly rotating black holes (BHs). We perform polarized radiative transfer calculations with the ASTRORAY code to explore the manifestations of these QPOs for SgrA*. We construct a simulation-based model of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and find model parameters by fitting the mean polarized source spectrum. The simulated QPOs have a total submillimeter flux amplitude up to 5% and a linearly polarized flux amplitude up to 2%. The oscillations reach high levels of significance 10{sigma}-30{sigma} and high-quality factors Q Almost-Equal-To 5. The oscillation period T Almost-Equal-To 100 M Almost-Equal-To 35 minutes corresponds to the rotation period of the BH magnetosphere that produces a trailing spiral in resolved disk images. The total flux signal is significant over noise for all tested frequencies 87 GHz, 230 GHz, and 857 GHz and inclination angles 10 Degree-Sign , 37 Degree-Sign , and 80 Degree-Sign . The non-detection in the 230 GHz SubMillimeter Array light curve is consistent with a low signal level and a low sampling rate. The presence of submillimeter QPOs in SgrA* will be better tested with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  14. Detection of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the June 2015 Outburst of V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    In June 2015, the black hole X-ray binary (BHXRB) V404 Cygni went into outburst for the first time in 26 years. The source is not only the closest known BHXRB, it is also known to undergo extreme variations in brightness, allowing us to study the source’s behaviour during flaring with the unprecedented detail afforded by modern space and ground-based instrumentation.Here we present a timing study and a comprehensive search for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) of V404 Cygni during its most recent outburst, utilizing data from six instruments on board five different X-ray missions: Swift/XRT, Fermi/GBM, Chandra/ACIS, INTEGRAL’s IBIS/ISGRI and JEM-X, and NuSTAR.We find four previously unobserved, significant QPOs throughout the outburst. One QPO, at 18 mHz, is detected in simultaneous observations with both Fermi/GBM and Swift/XRT, and is a likely example of a rare, recently discovered class of mHz-QPOs in BHXRBs linked to high-inclination sources. We also find a broad structure in averaged periodograms of several Chandra/ACIS and INTEGRAL/JEM-X observations that contains significant variability, but is too broad to be called a QPO, reminiscent of a feature more commonly observed in Cygnus X-1. We discuss our results in the context of current models for QPO formation.

  15. Probing Neutron Star Physics with Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Neutron stars, the remnants of massive stellar explosions, are prime candidates for studying dense matter physics in conditions not accessible in the laboratory. Among the zoo of neutron star phenomena, magnetars, neutron stars with an extremely high magnetic field, are of particular interest for their spectacular bursting behaviour in X-rays and gamma-rays. They show thousands of recurrent short, bright bursts as well as some of the brightest gamma-ray events, called giant flares, ever observed on earth. The detection of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in giant flares and, more recently, in small recurrent bursts, is generally interpreted as the observable signature of global oscillations of the neutron star following a star quake. This detection has opened up the potential of neutron star seismology: probing the physical conditions in the interior of the star via the information conveyed in star quakes. In this talk, I will give an overview of observational studies of these sources, focusing on recent detections of QPOs in smaller bursts as well as results from the giant flares. I will then tie these observational results to theoretical models of the star quakes that tie observations to the neutron star interior and crust, and I will finish with an outlook of the future of magnetar seismology. DH is supported by the Moore-Sloan Data Science Environment at NYU.

  16. On the development of quasi-periodic oscillations in Bondi-Hoyle accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönmez, O.; Zanotti, O.; Rezzolla, L.

    2011-04-01

    The numerical investigation of the Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a moving black hole has a long history, both in Newtonian and in general-relativistic physics. By performing new two-dimensional and general-relativistic simulations on to a rotating black hole, we point out a novel feature, namely that quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are naturally produced in the shock cone that develops in the downstream part of the flow. Because the shock cone in the downstream part of the flow acts as a cavity trapping pressure perturbations, modes with frequencies in the integer ratios of 2:1 and 3:1 are easily produced. The frequencies of these modes depend on the black hole spin and on the properties of the flow, and scale linearly with the inverse of the black hole mass. Our results may be relevant for explaining the detection of QPOs in Sagittarius A*, once such detection is confirmed by further observations. Finally, we report on the development of the flip-flop instability, which can affect the shock cone under suitable conditions; such an instability has been discussed before in Newtonian simulations but was never found in a relativistic regime.

  17. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer. PMID:26876008

  18. ON THE NATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION PHASE LAGS IN BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov

    2012-06-20

    Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes (BHs). In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provide feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and time-delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its nonlinear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy-dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signals in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes on the nature of the power-law spectral component and its variability.

  19. Correlation between spectral state and quasi-periodic oscillation parameters in GX 5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Klis, M.; Jansen, F.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of seven Exosat observations, the bimodal spectral behavior and the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)/red noise properties of GX 5-1 show a strict correlation. In one of the two spectral states (characterized by a 'horizontal branch' in the hardness-intensity diagram), strong 20-40 Hz QPO and red noise below about 60 Hz were always present. In the other ('normal branch'), no QPO between 6 and 60 Hz or red noise above 1 Hz were detected, but there was an indication for weak QPO near 5 Hz. In both states 'very low frequency noise' (VLFN) is detected below 0.1 Hz which has a power-law shape and and which extends down to the lowest observed frequencies (0.0001 Hz). The VLFN is probably not directly related to the QPO. The results are compared to those on Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2 and it is concluded that, although all three sources show bimodal spectral and QPO/red noise behavior, there is a qualitative difference between GX 5-1 and Cyg X-2 on one hand and Sco X-1 on the other.

  20. Timing Studies of X Persei and the Discovery of Its Transient Quasi-periodic Oscillation Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuner, Z.; Inam,S. C.; Sahiner, S.; Serim, M. M.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a timing analysis of X Persei (X Per) using observations made between 1998 and 2010 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and with the INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager (ISGRI). All pulse arrival times obtained from the RXTE-PCA observations are phase-connected and a timing solution is obtained using these arrival times. We update the long-term pulse frequency history of the source by measuring its pulse frequencies using RXTE-PCA and ISGRI data. From the RXTEPCA data, the relation between the frequency derivative and X-ray flux suggests accretion via the companion's stellar wind. However, the detection of a transient quasi-periodic oscillation feature, peaking at approximately 0.2 Hz, suggests the existence of an accretion disc. We find that doublebreak models fit the average power spectra well, which suggests that the source has at least two different accretion flow components dominating the overall flow. From the power spectrum of frequency derivatives, we measure a power-law index of approximately - 1, which implies that, on short time-scales, disc accretion dominates over noise, while on time-scales longer than the viscous time-scales, the noise dominates. From pulse profiles, we find a correlation between the pulse fraction and the count rate of the source.

  1. Quasi-periodic Wiggles of Microwave Zebra Structures in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A.; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua

    2013-11-01

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s-1. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  2. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer.

  3. Study of deformed quasi-periodic Fibonacci two dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdelaziz, K.; Bouazzi, Y.; Kanzari, M.

    2015-09-01

    Quasi-periodic photonic crystals are not periodic structures. These structures are generally obtained by the arrangement of layers according to a recursive rule. Properties of these structures make more attention the researchers especially in the case when applying defects. So, photonic crystals with defects present localized modes in the band gap leading to many potential applications such light localization. The objective of this work is to study by simulation the effect of the global deformation introduced in 2D quasiperiodic photonic crystals. Deformation was introduced by applying a power law, so that the coordinates y of the deformed object were determined through the coordinates x of the non-deformed structure in accordance with the following rule: y = x1+k. Here k is the coefficient defining the deformation. Therefore, the objective is to study the effect of this deformation on the optical properties of 2D quasiperiodic photonic crystals, constructed by Fibonacci generation. An omnidirectional mirror was obtained for optimization Fibonacci iteration in a part of visible spectra.

  4. QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Foullon, C.; Inglis, A. R.; Myagkova, I. N.

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of gamma-ray emission with a period of about 40 s are found in a single loop X-class solar flare on 2005 January 1 at photon energies up to 2-6 MeV with the SOlar Neutrons and Gamma-rays (SONG) experiment aboard the CORONAS-F mission. The oscillations are also found to be present in the microwave emission detected with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and in the hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray channels of RHESSI. Periodogram and correlation analysis shows that the 40 s QPPs of microwave, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emission are almost synchronous in all observation bands. Analysis of the spatial structure of hard X-ray and low energy (80-225 keV) gamma-ray QPP with RHESSI reveals synchronous while asymmetric QPP at both footpoints of the flaring loop. The difference between the averaged hard X-ray fluxes coming from the two footpoint sources is found to oscillate with a period of about 13 s for five cycles in the highest emission stage of the flare. The proposed mechanism generating the 40 s QPP is a triggering of magnetic reconnection by a kink oscillation in a nearby loop. The 13 s periodicity could be produced by the second harmonics of the sausage mode of the flaring loop.

  5. Quasi-Periodic Stick-Slip of Glaciers and Ice Streams (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, S.; Christianson, K. A.; Zoet, L.; Winberry, J.

    2010-12-01

    Passive source seismology is an excellent tool for studying dynamic glaciological processes. The past decade has seen an explosion in interest in the field, with singing icebergs, galloping glaciers, pulsing ponds, and many other glaciological phenomena radiating seismic energy. Here I present results showing extraordinary regularity in basal seismicity associated with the sliding of glaciers that differ in almost every respect: size, temperature, location, etc. Engabreen Glacier in Norway and David Glacier in Antarctica both exhibit a near-metronomic seismicity associated with the sliding of the glaciers over their bases. These small events occur in one of two modes: either present and very regular (quasi-periodic) or absent (or very rare). The transition from the one state to the other is rapid. The stick-slip behavior of the glacier is analogous to slip on faults, and to the behavior observed on Whillans Ice Stream (though much more frequently occuring). We suggest that either basal sediment concentrations or water pressure fluctuations lead to the transition in behavior.

  6. Possible identifications of newly observed magnetar quasi-periodic oscillations as crustal shear modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) discovered in soft-gamma repeaters (SGRs) are expected to help us to study the properties of matter in neutron stars. In earlier investigations, we identified the QPOs of frequencies below ˜100 Hz observed in giant flares of SGR 1806 -20 and SGR 1900+14 as the crustal torsional oscillations. For this purpose, we calculated the frequencies of the fundamental torsional oscillations with various angular indices ℓ, by changing the stellar mass and radius. In this work, we try to explain the additional QPO frequencies recently reported by Huppenkothen et al. (2014a, 2014b) within the same framework as before except that we newly take into account the effect of electron screening, which acts to decrease the frequencies by a small amount. Those QPOs were discovered in two different SGRs, i.e., SGR 1806 -20 and SGR J1550 -5418. Then, we find that the newly observed QPO frequency in SGR 1806 -20 can be still identified as one of the frequencies of the fundamental torsional oscillations, while those in SGR J1550 -5418 can also be explained in terms of the torsional oscillations although the relevant angular indices are difficult to identify.

  7. On the origin of quasi-periodic radar backscatter from midlatitude sporadic E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.; Fukao, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    1994-01-01

    We describe a newly discovered polarization process that appears to be induced by an atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) when it altitude-modulates a sporadic E (E(sub S)) layer in the nighttime, midlatitude ionosphere. This large-scale polarization process appears capable of accounting for three as yet unexplained features found in radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities in E(sub S) layers: (1) kilometer-scale, wavelike variations in the mean Doppler velocity; (2) mean Doppler velocities much larger than background ionospheric motion; and (3) quasi-periodic patterns in backscatter power when plotted as a function of range and time. We show that the polarization electric field develops as a result of the altitude modulation and that its properties are similar to those of the AGW. The novel feature in this process is the spatial modulation that is produced in the field line-integrated Pedersen conductivity by the variation in the ion-neutral collision frequency associated with the varying altitude of the E(sub S) layer. The resultant electric field together with the altitude-modulated E(sub S) layer then drive the production of secondary plasma waves via the gradient-drift instability. The three puzzling features are shown to be associated with the characteristics of these secondary waves.

  8. Evidence for quasi-periodic modulation in the gamma-ray blazar PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara; Ciprini, Stefano; Larsson, Stefan; Thompson, David John; Stamerra, Antonio; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a gamma-ray and multiwavelength nearly-periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus is reported using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). A quasi-periodicity in the gamma-ray flux (E>100 MeV and E>1 GeV) is observed from the well-known GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113 (Ackermann et al. submitted). The significance of the 2.18 +/- 0.08 year-period gamma-ray modulation, seen in 3.5 oscillation maxima observed, is supported by significant cross-correlated variations observed in radio and optical flux light curves, through data collected in the OVRO, Tuorla, KAIT, and CSS monitoring programs and Swift UVOT. The optical cycle, appearing in about 10 years of data, has a similar period, while the radio-band oscillation observed at 15 GHz is less regular and coherent. The available X-ray flux data obtained by Swift XRT appears also to be linearly correlated with the gamma-ray flux. Further long-term multi-wavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this first evidence of periodicity.

  9. QUASI-PERIODIC WIGGLES OF MICROWAVE ZEBRA STRUCTURES IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sijie; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua; Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A.

    2013-11-10

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s{sup –1}. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  10. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer. PMID:26876008

  11. Statistical Properties of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in White-Light Flares Observed With Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, C. E.; Armstrong, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Broomhall, A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    We embark on a study of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the decay phase of white-light stellar flares observed by Kepler. Out of the 1439 flares on 216 different stars detected in the short-cadence data using an automated search, 56 flares are found to have pronounced QPP-like signatures in the light curve, of which 11 have stable decaying oscillations. No correlation is found between the QPP period and the stellar temperature, radius, rotation period and surface gravity, suggesting that the QPPs are independent of global stellar parameters. Hence they are likely to be the result of processes occurring in the local environment. There is also no significant correlation between the QPP period and flare energy, however there is evidence that the period scales with the QPP decay time for the Gaussian damping scenario, but not to a significant degree for the exponentially damped case. This same scaling has been observed for MHD oscillations on the Sun, suggesting that they could be the cause of the QPPs in those flares. Scaling laws of the flare energy are also investigated, supporting previous reports of a strong correlation between the flare energy and stellar temperature/radius. A negative correlation between the flare energy and stellar surface gravity is also found.

  12. Optical properties of one-dimensional Fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuping; Wu, Zhixin; Cao, Yanyan; Zhang, Huiyun

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel type of one-dimensional photonic crystal called Fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene photonic crystal (FGPC), in which the structure in each dielectric cell follows the Fibonacci sequence and the graphene monolayers are embedded between adjacent dielectric layers. The transmission properties of FGPC are investigated using transfer matrix method in detail. It is shown that both photonic band gap induced by graphene (GIBPG) and the Bragg gap exist in the structure. We study the band gaps of TE and TM waves at different incident angles or chemical potentials. It is found that the band gaps can be tuned via a gate voltage and GIBPG is almost omnidirectional and insensitive to the polarization. In order to investigate difference between the GIPBG and Bragg gap, we plot the electromagnetic field profiles inside FGPC for some critical frequencies. The propagation loss of the structure caused by absorption of graphene is researched in detail. Also, the passing bands of Fibonacci sequences of different orders and their splitting behavior at higher order are investigated.

  13. DISCOVERY OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE RECURRENT BURST EMISSION FROM SGR 1806-20

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mezeini, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Alaa I. E-mail: ai@aucegypt.ed E-mail: ai@space.mit.ed

    2010-10-01

    We present evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the recurrent outburst emission from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20 using NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations. By searching a sample of 30 bursts for timing signals at the frequencies of the QPOs discovered in the 2004 December 27 giant flare from the source, we find three QPOs at 84, 103, and 648 Hz in three different bursts. The first two QPOs lie within {approx}1{sigma} from the 92 Hz QPO detected in the giant flare. The third QPO lies within {approx}9{sigma} from the 625 Hz QPO also detected in the same flare. The detected QPOs are found in bursts with different durations, morphologies, and brightness, and are vindicated by Monte Carlo simulations, which set a lower limit confidence interval {>=}4.3{sigma}. We also find evidence for candidate QPOs at higher frequencies in other bursts with lower statistical significance. The fact that we can find evidence for QPOs in the recurrent bursts at frequencies relatively close to those found in the giant flare is intriguing and can offer insight about the origin of the oscillations. We confront our finding against the available theoretical models and discuss the connection between the QPOs we report and those detected in the giant flares. The implications to the neutron star properties are also discussed.

  14. Existence of quasi-periodic solutions of fast excited van der Pol-Mathieu-Duffing equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Li, Xuemei

    2015-12-01

    The van der Pol-Mathieu-Duffing equation x ̈ + ( Ω0 2 + h 1 cos Ω 1 t + h 2 cos Ω 2 t ) x - ( α - β x 2 ) x ˙ - h 3 x 3 = h 4 Ω3 2 cos x cos Ω 3 t is considered in this paper, where α, β, h1, h2, h3, h4, Ω1, Ω2 are small parameters, α, β > 0, the frequency Ω3 is large compared to Ω1 and Ω2, the above parameters are real. For ∀α, β > 0, we use KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theory to prove that the van der Pol-Mathieu-Duffing equation possesses quasi-periodic solutions for most of the parameters Ω0, Ω1, Ω2, Ω3, it verifies some phenomenon of Fahsi and Belhaq [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. 14, 244-253 (2009)] and can be regarded as a extension of Abouhazim et al. [Nonlinear Dyn. 39, 395-409 (2005)].

  15. On the modulation of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Devraj D.; Motta, Sara; Shanthi, K.; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Belloni, Tomaso

    2015-04-01

    We studied the properties of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a sample of six black hole candidates (XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322, XTE J1859+226, 4U 1630-47, GX 339-4, XTE J1650-500) observed by the Rossi XTE satellite. We analysed the relation between the full width at half-maximum and the frequency of all the narrow peaks detected in power density spectra where a type-C QPO is observed. Our goal was to understand the nature of the modulation of the signal by comparing the properties of different harmonic peaks in the power density spectrum. We find that for the sources in our sample the width of the fundamental and of the first harmonic are compatible with a frequency modulation, while that of the sub-harmonic is independent of frequency, possibly indicating the presence of an additional modulation in amplitude. We compare our results with those obtained earlier from GRS 1915+105 and XTE J1550-564.

  16. Quasi-periodic emissions and related electron precipitation observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Nemec, F.; Pasmanik, D.; Santolik, O.; Demekhov, A. G.; Parrot, M.; Titova, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a survey of quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions detected on board the DEMETER satellite (altitude of about 700 km, nearly Sun-synchronous orbit at 10:30/22:30 LT). Three years of data have been visually inspected for the presence of QP emissions. It is found that QP events occur in about 3 percents of daytime half-orbits, while they are basically absent during the night (note that we were likely to miss QP events with the modulation periods lower than about 10 s or the frequency bandwidth lower than about 400 Hz). The events occur predominantly during quiet geomagnetic conditions following the periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity. Their occurrence and properties are systematically analyzed. Three events with a simultaneous periodic modulation of wave intensity and energetic electron precipitation were analyzed in detail. All events are observed at quiet geomagnetic conditions. Most probably, they are not associated with geomagnetic pulsations. Energetic electron flux data measured by the NOAA-17 satellite are used to supplement DEMETER data in order to determine the spatial and temporal extent of the observed energetic electron precipitation events. Based on the observed correlation between bursts of wave intensity and energetic electron flux we estimate the location and the spatial extent of the source region of QP emissions.

  17. Quasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.; Palmaerts, B.; Kurth, W. S.; Badman, S. V.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic, short-period injections of relativistic electrons have been observed in both Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, but understanding their origin or significance has been challenging, primarily due to the limited number of in-situ observations of such events by past flyby missions. Here we present the first survey of such injections in an outer planetary magnetosphere using almost nine years of energetic charged particle and magnetic field measurements at Saturn. We focus on events with a characteristic period of about 60-70 min (QP60, where QP stands for quasi-periodic). We find that the majority of QP60, which are very common in the outer magnetosphere, map outside Titan's orbit. QP60 are also observed over a very wide range of local times and latitudes. A local time asymmetry in their distribution is the most striking feature, with QP60 at dusk being between 5 and 25 times more frequent than at dawn. Field-line tracing and pitch angle distributions suggest that most events at dusk reside on closed field lines. They are distributed either near the magnetopause, or, in the case of the post-dusk (or pre-midnight) sector, up to about 30 RS inside it, along an area extending parallel to the dawn-dusk direction. QP60 at dawn map either on open field lines and/or near the magnetopause. Both the asymmetries and varying mapping characteristics as a function of local time indicate that generation of QP60 cannot be assigned to a single process. The locations of QP60 seem to trace sites that reconnection is expected to take place. In that respect, the subset of events observed post-dusk and deep inside the magnetopause may be directly or indirectly linked to the Vasyliunas reconnection cycle, while magnetopause reconnection/Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability could be invoked to explain all other events at the duskside. Using similar arguments, injections at the dawnside magnetosphere may result from solar-wind induced storms and/or magnetopause reconnection/KH-instability. Still, we cannot exclude that the apparent collocation of QP60 with expected reconnection sites is coincidental. given also the large uncertainties in field line tracing with the available magnetic field models. The intensity of the QP60 spectrum is strong enough such that if transport processes allow, these injections can be a very important source of energetic electrons for the inner saturnian magnetosphere or the heliosphere. We also observe that electrons in a QP60 can be accelerated at least up to 6 MeV and that the distribution of QP60 appears to trace well the aurora's local time structure, an observation that may have implications about high-latitude electron acceleration and the connection of these events to auroral dynamics. Despite these new findings, it is still unclear what determines the rather well-defined 60 to 70-min period of the electron bursts and how electrons can rapidly reach several MeV.

  18. The Harmonic Structure of High-Frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2004-05-01

    Observations from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer have shown the existence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in the X-ray flux from accreting black hole binary systems. In at least two systems, these HFQPOs come in pairs with a 2:3 frequency commensurability. We employ a simple ``hot spot'' model to explain the position and amplitude of the HFQPO peaks. Using the exact geodesic equations for the Kerr metric, we calculate the trajectories of massive test particles, which are treated as isotropic, monochromatic emitters in their rest frames. Photons are traced from the accretion disk to a distant observer to produce time- and frequency-dependent images of the orbiting hot spot and background disk. The power spectrum of the X-ray light curve consists of multiple peaks at integral combinations of the black hole coordinate frequencies. In particular, if the radial frequency is one-third of the azimuthal frequency (as is the case near the innermost stable circular orbit), beat frequencies appear in the power spectrum at two-thirds and four-thirds of the fundamental azimuthal orbital frequency, in agreement with observations. In addition, we model the effects of shearing the hot spot in the disk, producing an arc of emission that also follows a geodesic orbit, as well as the effects of nonplanar orbits that experience Lens-Thirring precession around the black hole axis. By varying the arc length, we are able to explain the relative amplitudes of the QPOs at either 2ν or 3ν in observations from XTE J1550-564 and GRO J1655-40. In the context of this model, the observed power spectra allow us to infer values for the black hole mass and angular momentum and also constrain the parameters of the model, such as the hot spot size and luminosity.

  19. A Search for Periodic and Quasi-periodic Photometric Behavior in the Cataclysmic Variable TT ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Arai, K.; Chinarova, L. L.; Dorokhov, N. I.; Dorokhova, T. N.; Dumitrescu, A.; Nogami, D.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Lepardo, A.; Mason, P. A.; Matsumoto, K.; Oprescu, G.; Pajdosz, G.; Passuelo, R.; Patkos, L.; Senio, D. S.; Sostero, G.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Tremko, J.; Zhukov, G. V.; Zola, S.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of TT Ari obtained at 11 observatories (campaign TT Ari-94) during 258 hr were carried out to study optical variability on timescales from minutes to weeks. The best-fit primary photometric period determined from 16 nights of data obtained at the Dushak-Eregdag station of the Odessa State University is P=0.133160°+/-0.000004° with a mean amplitude of 0.0513+/-0.0008 mag. This new primary photometric period is larger than that obtained during the TT Ari-88 campaign and is well outside the range of estimates published since 1961. Contrary to previous findings, the ``5-7 hr'' secondary photometric period is not seen. Our observations do show evidence for periods of 2.916° and 0.3040° with amplitudes of 43 and 25 mmag, respectively. The beat period between the spectroscopic and photometric periods is not seen. No coherent oscillations in the range f=10-2500 cycles day^-1 are found. The highest peaks in the power spectrum cover the wide range of 24-139 cycles day^-1. In the mean periodogram, the highest peak corresponds to 21 and 30 minutes for the largest sets of observations, i.e., those obtained at Odessa and Krakow Universities, respectively. In the instrumental B system, variations with an amplitude exceeding 0.011 mag occur 8 times (from 33 runs) at 24 minutes. We conclude that quasi-periodic variations occur at a few preferred timescales rather than at a relatively stable period with a secular decrease. In the frequency range 90-900 cycles day^-1, the power spectrum obeys a power law with a slope ranging from gamma=1.3 to 2.6 for different runs.

  20. The energy dependence of quasi periodic oscillations in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Eijnden, Jakob; Ingram, Adam; Uttley, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Accreting stellar-mass black holes display quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in their X-ray flux with a period that drifts from approximately 0.05 to 10 seconds. Since the oscillatory signal originates from the close proximity of the black hole, QPOs provide a diagnostic of the motion of matter in this region of extreme gravitational curvature. Here I present an analysis of the energy dependence of QPOs in the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. The QPO period in this black hole binary is known to be correlated with the observed energy band. To investigate this further, we extract light curves in two broad energy bands using archival data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and apply a filter that separates the QPO from the coincident noise. The filtered light curves reveal that, in both energy bands, the modulation repeatedly rises and falls in amplitude in an envelope that typically lasts about five to ten QPO cycles. We find that, during each of these so-called coherence timescales, the phase difference between the two QPO light curves increases before resetting at the start of the next coherence time scale. This indicates that the oscillation in one energy band is genuinely faster than that in the other band, and puts interesting constraints on current QPO models. If the QPO originates from vertical general relativistic precession of the inner accretion flow, our result indicates that the inner regions of this flow precess slightly quicker than the outer regions, with the precession phase resetting after five to ten QPO cycles.

  1. SDO/AIA observations of periodic and quasi-periodic phenomenon associated with an EUV jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Richard; Verth, Gary; Erdelyi, Robertus; Srivastava, Abhi

    2013-04-01

    It has long been advocated that explosive magnetic activity is responsible for the mass-balance in the solar atmosphere, supplying the corona and the solar wind with heated plasma. The explosive events are thought to be the result of emerging bi-polar (EB) regions reconnecting with pre-existing, open fields, with the size of the EB's (i.e., granular, super-granular) being related to size of the resulting feature (i.e., spicules, EUV/X-ray jets). Recent evidence has suggested a deeper relationship between spicules and EUV jets (Sterling et al., 2010). We present here observations of a EUV jet observed with SDO/AIA close to a southern coronal hole. The jet can be considered as a 'Blowout jet' (using the terminology of Moore et al., 2010), launching vast amounts of chromospheric plasma into the atmosphere along with hotter material. The hotter part of the jet appears to be composed of multiple, (quasi-)periodic ejections that individually resemble fast moving (>100 km/s) spicules. The multiple ejections appear crucial for distributing the hotter material high into the corona, possibly suggesting that larger EUV/X-ray are composed of many smaller spicule-like events. Although the event is close to the limb, evidence for reconnection at the chromospheric level is provided. Further, evidence for helicity (or torsional motion) and the presence of slow and fast Magnetohydrodynamic waves is given, with the wave mode excitation likely due to the reconnection process. Exploiting the observed wave motion, we also use magneto-seismological techniques to determine local plasma parameters with sub-resolution accuracy along one of the jets unique features.

  2. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  3. Multi-mode quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.; Ratcliffe, H.; Shibasaki, K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) of the electromagnetic radiation emitted in solar and stellar flares are often detected in microwave, white light, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. Mechanisms for QPP are intensively debated in the literature. Previous studies revealed that QPP may manifest non-linear, non-stationary and, perhaps, multi-modal processes operating in flares. Aims: We study QPP of the microwave emission generated in an X3.2-class solar flare on 14 May, 2013, observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), aiming to reveal signatures of the non-linear, non-stationary, and multi-modal processes in the signal. Methods: The NoRH correlation signal obtained at the 17 GHz intensity has a clear QPP pattern. The signal was analysed with the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) that allows one to determine its instant amplitude and frequency, and their time variation. Results: It was established that the QPP consists of at least three well-defined intrinsic modes, with the mean periods of 15, 45, and 100 s. All the modes have quasi-harmonic behaviour with different modulation patterns. The 100 s intrinsic mode is a decaying oscillation, with the decay time of 250 s. The 15 s intrinsic mode shows a similar behaviour, with the decay time of 90 s. The 45 s mode has a wave-train behaviour. Conclusions: Dynamical properties of detected intrinsic modes indicate that the 100 s and 15 s modes are likely to be associated with fundamental kink and sausage modes of the flaring loop, respectively. The 100 s oscillation could also be caused by the fundamental longitudinal mode, while this interpretation requires the plasma temperature of about 30 million K and hence is not likely. The 45 s mode could be the second standing harmonics of the kink mode.

  4. Measuring mass and angular momentum of black holes with high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenbach, B.

    2004-10-01

    For the three microquasars GRO J1655-40, XTE J1550-564 and GRS 1915+105 twin high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) with a ratio of 3:2 and/or 3:1 have been measured. For a test particle orbiting a rotating black hole on a stable circular orbit there exist two different orbits at which the vertical and radial epicyclic oscillations are in either a 3:1 or 3:2 parametric resonance for any choice of the black hole angular momentum a. If the two orbits are required to be frequency commensurable Keplerian orbits there is only one solution for the two orbit radii and a. This model predicts that the microquasars have the same a, and it predicts their black hole masses on the basis of the measured HFQPOs in agreement with the dynamically determined masses. Application of this model to the Galactic Center black hole Sgr A* using the recently measured QPOs (Genzel et al. \\cite{Genzel03}; Aschenbach et al. \\cite{Aschenbach04}) leads to a black hole mass of (3.28 ± 0.13)×106 M⊙, and the same a as for the microquasars. The possibility that all four sources have a=0.99616 suggests that this value is the upper limit of a imposed by general relativity. The same value for the lower orbit radius and the same value for a are also suggested by an analysis of the general relativistic expression for the radial gradient of the orbital velocity, which changes sign in a narrow annular region around the lower orbit when a>0.9953.

  5. A delayed oscillator model for the quasi-periodic multidecadal variability of the NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng; Li, Jianping; Jin, Fei-Fei

    2015-10-01

    Wavelet analysis of the annual North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index back to 1659 reveals a significant frequency band at about 60 years. Recent NAO decadal variations, including the increasing trend during 1960-1990 and decreasing trend since the mid-1990s, can be well explained by the approximate 60-year cycle. This quasi 60-year oscillation of the NAO is realistically reproduced in a long-term control simulation with version 4 of the Community Climate System Model, and the possible mechanisms are further investigated. The positive NAO forces the strengthening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and induces a basin-wide uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming that corresponds to the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO). The SST field exhibits a delayed response to the preceding enhanced AMOC, and shows a pattern similar to the North Atlantic tripole (NAT), with SST warming in the northern North Atlantic and cooling in the southern part. This SST pattern (negative NAT phase) may lead to an atmospheric response that resembles the negative NAO phase, and subsequently the oscillation proceeds, but in the opposite sense. Based on these mechanisms, a simple delayed oscillator model is established to explain the quasi-periodic multidecadal variability of the NAO. The magnitude of the NAO forcing of the AMOC/AMO and the time delay of the AMOC/AMO feedback are two key parameters of the delayed oscillator. For a given set of parameters, the quasi 60-year cycle of the NAO can be well predicted. This delayed oscillator model is useful for understanding of the oscillatory mechanism of the NAO, which has significant potential for decadal predictions as well as the interpretation of proxy data records.

  6. ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erkut, M. Hakan

    2011-12-10

    We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency {kappa} to the orbital frequency {Omega} the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches {Omega} + {kappa} and {Omega} to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio ({Omega} + {kappa})/({Omega}) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

  7. MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATION WITH MILLISECOND BURSTS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 AUGUST 9

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin; Tan Chengming

    2012-04-10

    A peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) accompanying a hard X-ray (HXR) QPP of about 20 s duration occurred just before the maximum of an X6.9 solar flare on 2011 August 9. The most interesting aspect is that the microwave QPP consists of millisecond timescale superfine structures. Each microwave QPP pulse is made up of clusters of millisecond spike bursts or narrowband type III bursts. There are three different frequency drift rates: the global frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse group, the frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse, and the frequency drift rate of individual millisecond spikes or type III bursts. The physical analysis indicates that the energetic electrons accelerating from a large-scale highly dynamic magnetic reconnecting current sheet above the flaring loop propagate downward, impact the flaring plasma loop, and produce HXR bursts. The tearing-mode (TM) oscillations in the current sheet modulate HXR emission and generate HXR QPP; the energetic electrons propagating downward produce Langmuir turbulence and plasma waves, resulting in plasma emission. The modulation of TM oscillation on the plasma emission in the current-carrying plasma loop may generate microwave QPP. The TM instability produces magnetic islands in the loop. Each X-point will be a small reconnection site and will accelerate the ambient electrons. These accelerated electrons impact the ambient plasma and trigger the millisecond spike clusters or the group of type III bursts. Possibly, each millisecond spike burst or type III burst is one of the elementary bursts (EBs). A large number of such EB clusters form an intense flaring microwave burst.

  8. MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cumming, A.; Keek, L.

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

  9. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and broad iron line from LMC X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Shah; Dewangan, G. C.; Belloni, T.; Mukherjee, D.; Jhingan, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the temporal and energy spectral characteristics of the persistent black hole X-ray binary LMC X-1 using two XMM-Newton and a Suzaku observation. We report the discovery of low-frequency (˜26-29 m Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We also report the variability of the broad iron Kα line studied earlier with Suzaku. The QPOs are found to be weak with fractional rms amplitude in the ˜1-2 per cent range and quality factor Q ˜ 2-10. They are accompanied by weak red noise or zero-centred Lorentzian components with rms variability at the ˜1-3 per cent level. The energy spectra consist of three varying components - multicolour disc blackbody (kTin ˜ 0.7-0.9 keV), high-energy power-law tail (Γ ˜ 2.4-3.3) and a broad iron line at 6.4-6.9 keV. The broad iron line, the QPO and the strong power-law component are not always present. The QPOs and the broad iron line appear to be clearly detected in the presence of a strong power-law component. The broad iron line is found to be weaker when the disc is likely truncated and absent when the power-law component almost vanished. These results suggest that the QPO and the broad iron line together can be used to probe the dynamics of the accretion disc and the corona.

  10. IS COMPTON COOLING SUFFICIENT TO EXPLAIN EVOLUTION OF OBSERVED QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN OUTBURST SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak E-mail: chakraba@bose.res.in

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  11. Effects of Resonance in Quasi-Periodic Oscillators of Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Using a large quantity of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data presented in the literature, I offer a detailed investigation into the accuracy of the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency determination. The QPO phenomenon seen in X-ray binaries is possibly a result of the resonance of the intrinsic (eigen) oscillations and harmonic driving forces of the system. I show that the resonances, in the presence of the damping of oscillations, occur at frequencies that are systematically and randomly shifted with respect to the eigenfrequencies of the system. The shift value strongly depends on the damping rate that is measured by the half-width of the QPO feature. Taking into account this effect, I analyze the QPO data for four Z sources, Scorpius X-I, GX 340+0, GX 5-1, and GX 17+2, and two atoll sources, 4U 1728-34 and 4U 0614+09. The transition-layer model (TLM) predicts the existence of the invariant quantity delta, an inclination angle of the magnetospheric axis with respect to the normal to the disk. I calculate delta and the error bars of delta using the resonance shift, and I find that the inferred delta-values are consistent with constants for these four Z sources, in which horizontal-branch oscillation and kilohertz frequencies have been detected and correctly identified. It is shown that the inferred delta are in the range between 5.5 deg and 6.5 deg. I conclude that the TLM seems to be compatible with the data.

  12. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  13. Sources of Quasi-periodic Pulses in the Flare of 18 August 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, A.; Meshalkina, N.; Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Palshin, V.; Lesovoi, S.

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed spatial and spectral characteristics of quasi-periodic pulses (QPP) for the limb flare on 18 August 2012, using new data from a complex of spectral and imaging instruments developed by the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope team and the Wind/Konus γ-ray spectrometer. A sequence of broadband pulses with periods of approximately ten seconds were observed in X-rays at energies between 25 keV and 300 keV, and in microwaves at frequencies from a few GHz up to 34 GHz during an interval of one minute. The QPP X-ray source was located slightly above the limb where the southern legs of large and small EUV loop systems were close to each other. Before the QPPs occurred, the soft X-ray emission and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager signal from the energy channels below 25 keV were gradually arising for several minutes at the same location. It was found that each X-ray pulse showed a soft-hard-soft behavior. The 17 and 34 GHz microwave sources were at the footpoints of the small loop system, the source emitting in the 4.2 - 7.4 GHz band in the large system. The QPPs were probably generated by modulated acceleration processes in the energy-release site. We determined the plasma parameters in the radio sources by analyzing the spectra. The microwave pulses might be explained by relatively weak variations of the spectral hardness of the emitting electrons.

  14. Is Compton Cooling Sufficient to Explain Evolution of Observed Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Outburst Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  15. QUASI-PERIODIC PROPAGATING SIGNALS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: THE SIGNATURE OF MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OR HIGH-VELOCITY UPFLOWS?

    SciTech Connect

    De Pontieu, Bart; McIntosh, Scott W. E-mail: mscott@ucar.ed

    2010-10-20

    Since the discovery of quasi-periodic propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed quasi-periodicities. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discovered as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed quasi-periodic oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a quasi-periodically varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission quasi-periodically modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the quasi-periodicities observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.

  16. Quasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.; Kurth, W. S.; Badman, S.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-04-01

    Quasi-periodic, short-period injections of relativistic electrons have been observed in both Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, but understanding their origin or signifcance has been challenging, primarily due to the limited number of in-situ observations of such events by past flyby missions. Here we present the first survey of such injections in an outer planetary magnetosphere using almost nine years of energetic charged particle and magnetic field measurements at Saturn. We focus on events with a characteristic period of about 60-minutes (QP60), which we find to be very common in the outer magnetosphere (mapping outside Titan's orbit). QP60 are present over a very wide range of local times and latitudes and their distribution is asymmetric. The local time asymmetry is the most striking feature, with higher frequency of QP60 observations at dusk compared to dawn. The events at dusk reside on closed field lines and are distributed over a wide range of distances from the magnetopause. The ones at dawn map either on open field lines or along the magnetopause boundary. Those asymmetries indicate that the origin of QP60 is not unique. We suggest that a subset of the injections at the postdusk sector may be signatures of the Vasiliunas reconnection cycle, while magnetopause reconnection or KH-instability may be invoked to explain all other events around dusk. Injections at the dawnside magnetosphere, which occur preferentially at the southern hemisphere, may result from solar-wind induced storms. We also observe that electrons in a QP60 can be accelerated at least up to 6 MeV, suggesting that these injections can be an efficient source process of energetic electrons for the saturnian magnetosphere. The distribution of QP60 appears also to trace well the aurora's local time structure, an observation that could have implications about high-latitude electron acceleration. Despite these new findings, it is still unclear what determines the rather well-defined 60 minute period of the electron bursts and how electrons can reach rapidly up to energies of several MeV.

  17. Quasi-Periodic Long-Term Quadrature Light Variability in Early Type Interacting Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine Joan

    2015-08-01

    Four years of Kepler observations have revealed a class of Algol-type binaries in which the relative brightness of the quadrature light varies from > 1 to <1 on a time scale of about 100-400 days. The behavior pattern is quasi-periodic. We call these systems L/T (leading hemisphere/ trailing hemisphere) variables. Although L/T inequality in eclipsing binaries has been noted from ground-based photometry by several observers since the early 1950s, the regular or quasi-regular switching between maxima is new. Twenty L/T systems have so far been found in the Kepler database and at least three classes of L/T behavior have been identified. In this presentation I will give an update on the L/T phenomenon gleaned from the Kepler and K2 databases. The Kepler and K2 light curves are being analyzed with the 2015 version of the Wilson-Devinney (WD) program that includes major improvements in modeling star spots (i.e. spot motions due to drift and stellar rotation and spot growth and decay). The prototype L/T variable is WX Draconis (A8V + K0IV, P=1.80 d) which shows L/ T light variations of 2-3%. The primary is a delta Scuti star with a dominant pulsation period of 41 m. Preliminary analysis of the WX Dra data suggests that the L/T variability can be fit with either an accretion hot spot on the primary (T = 2.3 Tphot) that jumps in longitude or a magnetic cool spotted region on the secondary. If the latter model is correct the dark region must occupy at least 20% of the surface of the facing hemisphere of the secondary if it is completely black, or a larger area if not completely black. In both hot and cool spot scenarios magnetic fields must play a role in the activity. Support from NASA grants NNX11AC78G and NNX12AE44G and USC’s Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  18. Quasi-periodic processes in the flare loop generated by sudden temperature enhancements at loop footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: During the impulsive flare phase, the plasma at the flare loop footpoints is rapidly heated by particle beams. In the present paper, we study processes that occur after this sudden heating in a two-dimensional magnetic loop. Methods: We adopt a 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solve a full set of the ideal time-dependent MHD equations by means of the FLASH code, using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Periods in the processes are estimated by the wavelet analysis technique. Results: We consider a model of the solar atmosphere with a symmetric magnetic loop. The length of this loop in the corona is approximately 21.5 Mm. At both loop footpoints, at the transition region, we initiate the Gaussian temperature (pressure) perturbation with the maximum temperature 14, 7, or 3.5 times higher than the unperturbed temperature. In the corona, the perturbations produce supersonic blast shocks with the Mach number of about 1.1, but well below Alfvén velocities. We consider cases with the same perturbations at both footpoints (symmetric case) and one with different perturbations (asymmetric case). In the symmetric case, the shocks move along both loop legs upwards to the top of the loop, where they interact and form a transient compressed region. Then they continue in their motion to the transition region at the opposite side of the loop, where they are reflected upwards, and so on. At the top of the loop, the shock appears periodically with the period of about 170 s. In the loop legs during this period, a double peak of the plasma parameters, which is connected with two arrivals of shocks, is detected: firstly, when the shock moves up and then when the shock, propagating from the opposite loop leg, moves down. Increasing the distance of the detection point in the loop leg from the top of the loop, the time interval between these shock arrivals increases. Thus, at these detection points, the processes with shorter periods can be detected. After ~500 s the process with the periodically interacting shocks slowly changes to slow mode magnetosonic free oscillation. Furthermore, we detected quasi-periodic processes, even in the chromosphere under the location of the pressure perturbation. These processes can be observed in intensities and Doppler shifts of optical chromospheric lines. In the case with the asymmetric perturbations, we found that the processes are even more complex.

  19. Extracting multipole moments of neutron stars from quasi-periodic oscillations in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge; Muccino, Marco

    2015-06-01

    We consider the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations of low-mass X-ray binaries within the Hartle-Thorne spacetime. We show that the interpretation of the epicyclic frequencies of this spacetime with the observed kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations, within the Relativistic Precession Model, allows us to extract the total mass M, angular momentum J, and quadrupole moment Q of the compact object in a low-mass X-ray binary. We exemplify this fact by analyzing the data of the Z-source GX 5-1. We show that the extracted multipole structure of the compact component of this source deviates from the one expected from a Kerr black hole and instead it points to a neutron star explanation.

  20. Forbidden gaps in finite periodic and quasi-periodic cantor-like dielectric multilayers at normal incidence.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, E

    2001-12-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic Cantor-like bandgap structures that bordered upon a medium of refractive index n(0) are analyzed. An immersion model is used with the assumption that each layer is embedded between two identical regions of refractive index n(0) and thickness d(0), where d(0) is set equal to zero. Transmittance and group velocity are determined. Their dependence on n(0) is emphasized. Relations for the midgap value of the normalized group velocity are given. By use of these relations, diagrams are completed at different values of n(0), showing the pairs of quarter-wave-layer refractive indices at which there is an apparent superluminal tunneling through the finite periodic and quasi-periodic Cantor-like bandgap structures. PMID:18364939

  1. Multiwavelength Evidence for Quasi-periodic Modulation in the Gamma-Ray Blazar PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Do´nguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Perkins, J. S.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Berdyugin, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Hovatta, T.; Lindfors, E.; Nilsson, K.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Stamerra, A.; Takalo, L. O.; Valtonen, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18 ± 0.08 year period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Tuorla, Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, and Catalina Sky Survey monitoring programs and Swift-UVOT. The optical cycle appearing in ˜10 years of data has a similar period, while the 15 GHz oscillation is less regular than seen in the other bands. Further long-term multiwavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.

  2. Phase-rectified signal averaging for the detection of quasi-periodicities and the prediction of cardiovascular risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Bauer, Axel; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Barthel, Petra; Schneider, Raphael; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg

    2007-03-01

    We present the phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA) method as an efficient technique for the study of quasi-periodic oscillations in noisy, nonstationary signals. It allows the assessment of system dynamics despite phase resetting and noise and in relation with either increases or decreases of the considered signal. We employ the method to study the quasi-periodicities of the human heart rate based on long-term ECG recordings. The center deflection of the PRSA curve characterizes the average capacity of the heart to decelerate (or accelerate) the cardiac rhythm. It can be measured by a central wavelet coefficient which we denote as deceleration capacity (DC). We find that decreased DC is a more precise predictor of mortality in survivors of heart attack than left ventricular ejection fraction, the current "gold standard" risk predictor. In addition, we discuss the dependence of the DC parameter on age and on diabetes.

  3. Quasi-periodic bifurcations and amplitude death in low-dimensional ensemble of van der Pol oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianova, Yu. P.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Turukina, L. V.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the four dissipatively coupled van der Pol oscillators is considered. Lyapunov chart is presented in the parameter plane. Its arrangement is discussed. We discuss the bifurcations of tori in the system at large frequency detuning of the oscillators. Here are quasi-periodic saddle-node, Hopf and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations. The effect of increase of the threshold for the amplitude death regime and the possibilities of complete and partial broadband synchronization are revealed.

  4. Quantum corrections to quasi-periodic solution of Sine-Gordon model and periodic solution of phi4 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, G.; Leble, S.

    2014-03-01

    Analytical form of quantum corrections to quasi-periodic solution of Sine-Gordon model and periodic solution of phi4 model is obtained through zeta function regularisation with account of all rest variables of a d-dimensional theory. Qualitative dependence of quantum corrections on parameters of the classical systems is also evaluated for a much broader class of potentials u(x) = b2f(bx) + C with b and C as arbitrary real constants.

  5. Orbital evolution of X-ray binaries and quasi-periodic oscillations in X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit; Raichur, H.; Jain, C.; James, M.; Devasia, J.; Naik, S.

    We have measured the orbital period derivatives in several high mass and low mass X-ray binaries. Mechanisms that could be responsible for the observed orbital evolution in these sources are briefly mentioned. We also describe studies of quasi-periodic oscillations in several X-ray pulsars and their relation with long term evolution of these systems and also the neutron star magnetic field strength.

  6. On the existence of a new type of periodic and quasi-periodic orbits for twist maps of the torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addas-Zanata, Salvador

    2002-09-01

    We prove that for a large and important class of C1 twist maps of the torus periodic and quasi-periodic orbits of a new type exist, provided that there are no rotational invariant circles (RICs). These orbits have a non-zero `vertical rotation number' (VRN), in contrast to what happens to Birkhoff periodic orbits and Aubry Mather sets. The VRN is rational for a periodic orbit and irrational for a quasi-periodic. We also prove that the existence of an orbit with a VRN = a>0, implies the existence of orbits with VRN = b, for all 0quasi-periodic orbits a twist map of the torus can have. As a consequence of the previous results we obtain that a twist map of the torus with no RICs has positive topological entropy, which is a very classical result. At the end of the paper we present some examples, like the standard map, such that our results apply.

  7. TESTING THE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH OBSERVATIONS IN THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. III. QUASI-PERIODIC VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Tim; Psaltis, Dimitrios E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu

    2011-01-01

    According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An observational test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study quasi-periodic variability observed in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of QPOs can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI observations of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging observations and the detection of quasi-periodic variability.

  8. Quasi-periodical variations of pulsars spin as mimicry of differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I.; Gusev, A.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT Observation of pulsars is a powerful source of information for studying the dynamics and internal structure of neutron stars. Known about quasi-periodical fluctuations of the time-of-arrival of radiation(TOA) for some pulsars, which we explain as Chandler wobble, Free core nutation, Free inner core nutation and Inner core wobble in case three layer model. Using hamilton approximation to theory rotation of multilayer celestial bodies we estimate dynamical flattening for different layers for PSR B1828-11. It is known that an innate feature of pulsar radiation is high stability of the time-of-arrival (TOA) of pulses, and therefore the analysis of TOA fluctuations can reflect subtle effects of neutron stars dynamics. TOA variations of pulsars can be interpreted by three reasons: gravitational perturbation of pulsar by planetary bodies, peculiarities of a pulsar interior like Tkachenko oscillations and free precession motion, when axis of rotation do not coincide with vectors of the angular moment of solid crust, liquid outer core and crystal core. The radial velocity of a star is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the Doppler effect in its spectrum. Stars showing a small amplitude variation of the radial velocity can be interpreted as systems having planetary companions. Assuming that the pulsar PSR B1257+12 has a mass of 1:35M¯, the Keplerian orbital radii are 0.9, 1.4 and 2.1 AU and with masses are 3:1M©=sin(i), 10:2M©=sin(i), 4:6M©=sin(i), where i is the orbital inclination [7]. In 2000, Stairs, Lyne and Shemar reported about their discovery of long-term, highly-periodic and correlated variations of pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of the pulsar PSR B182811 with period variations approximately 1000, 500, 250 and 167 days, which may be a result of the spin axis caused by an asymmetry in the shape of the pulsar. The long-periodic precession phenomenon was also detected for a few pulsars: PSR 2217+47, PSR 0531+21, PSR B083345, PSR B182811, PSR B164203 [2,3,6,]. The rotation of the terrestrial planets having rigid mantle, outer liquid and inner solid cores is characterized by Chandler wobble, Inner core wobble, Free Core Nutation, Free Inner Core Nutation. Like the Earth, a neutron star can undergo a free precession [4]. The period of precession is defined by deformation of a pulsar and tension in crust and mantle. If the crust and the core of pulsar have differential rotation then axis of a pulsar rotation will be precess, because axis of deformation will not coincide with axis of rotation. The three-layer model is more complicated than the previous case therefore classical methods fail. Escapa, Getino and Ferrandiz [1] developed a canonical formulation for an three-layer Earth model. We research model of pulsar, which includes three layers (fig. 1): an axis symmetrical rigid mantle, a fluid outer core (FOC) and a solid inner core (SIC). Flattened of the pulsar, it's FOC and SIC are Here A;C;Af ;Cf ;As;Cs;Ac;Cc are moments of inertia of the pulsar, FOC, SIC and total core accordingly; e, ef , ec are the flattening of total pulsar, FOC, core and SIC accordingly. In case rotation of a three-layer neutron star we have variations of next types: the Chandler Wobble (CW) is a motion of the pulsar rotation axis around its dynamical figure due to the bulges of the pulsar (it is the only global rotational mode for completely solid pulsar); the Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a differential rotation of the liquid core relatively the crust rotation; This mode does exist only if the core is liquid; the Free Inner Core Nutation (FICN) is a mode related to the differential rotation of the inner core with respect to the other layers of the pulsar. The mode exists only if the pulsar has two-layer core contains outer liquid and inner solid components; the Inner Core Wobble (ICW) is a differential rotation of the figure axis of the pulsar core with respect to the rotation axis of the pulsar and is due to the flattened of the inner core, having an excess of density with respect to the liquid core. This mode does exist only if there is an ellipsoidal solid inner core inside a liquid core in the pulsar. We propose the explanation for four harmonics of TOA pulses variations as precession of a neutron star owing to differential rotation of crust, outer liquid core and inner crystal core of the pulsar PSR B1828-11. In the frame of the three-layer model we investigate the free rotation of dynamically-symmetrical PSR B1828-11 by Hamilton methods proposed Getino [1]. The model explains generation of four modes in the rotation of the pulsar: two modes of Chandler wobbles (CW, ICW) and two modes connecting with free core nutation (FCN, FICN). The neutron star has rigid the crust, the fluid outer core and the solid inner core. We consider four models of an internal structure of pulsars (tabl. 1) in the frame of three-layer approximation. We are used three models of pulsar (tabl. 1, M1 - M3) for modeling of inner, outer cores flattening and total pulsar. The periods of variations can be described in next way where ± is a small parameter has the analytical expression [6] here Cb f and Ab f are the principal inertia moments corresponding to a spherical layer in the FOC with radius equal to the major semiaxia of the SIC which encloses the solid inner core [1]. The observation of PSR B1828-11 has revealed the existence of four periodic variations TOA pulses. In the frame of the three-layer model we proposed the explanation for all pulse fluctuations by differential rotation crust, outer core and inner core of the neutron star. We received estimations of dynamical flattening of the inner and outer cores for pulsar. We have offered the realistic model of the dynamical pulsar structure and two explanations of the feature of flattened of the crust, the outer core and the inner core of the pulsar. (Kitiashvili and Gusev, 2008) References [1] Escapa, A. et al. (2001), J.Geoph.Res., 106, B6, 11387. [2] Kitiashvili, I. (2004) PhD thesis, Moscow University. [3] Kitiashvili, I.N. and Gusev, A.V. (2008) Astronomy Reports, 52(1), 61. [4] Pines, D. and Shaham J. (1974), Nature, 248, 483. [5] Stairs, I.H. et al. (2000), Nature, 406, 484. [6] Suleymanova, S.A. and Shitov, Y.P. (1994), ApJ.Lett., 422, 17. [7] Wolszczan A. (1997), Celest. & Dyn. Astr., 68, 13.

  9. Extraordinary optical properties of Fibonacci quasi-periodic 1D superconducting photonic crystals in near-zero-permittivity operation range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji-jiang; Gao, Jin-xia

    2013-07-01

    In near-zero-permittivity operation range, the position-dependent extraordinary optical properties of a one dimensional (1D) Fibonacci quasi-periodic superconducting photonic crystal (PC), which consists of alternating superconductor and dielectric layers, are theoretically investigated by using the transfer matrix method. Based on the calculated reflectance spectrum, it is shown that the extraordinary optical properties depend on the relative positions of the threshold wavelength and the photonic band gaps (PBGs). By suitably choosing the thickness of the superconducting or dielectric layer, a transmission narrow band filter or resonator can be designed without introducing any physical defect in this structure.

  10. Spectral broadening and compression of high-intensity laser pulses in quasi-periodic systems with Kerr nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, Sergei N; Koposova, E V; Yashin, V E

    2012-11-30

    We report the results of theoretical studies and numerical simulations of optical high-power pulse compression systems based on the spectral broadening in a Kerr nonlinear medium with subsequent pulse compression in a dispersive delay line. It is shown that the effective spectral broadening requires suppressing a smallscale instability arising due to self-focusing, which is possible in quasi-periodic systems consisting of a nonlinear medium and optical relay telescopes transmitting images of the laser beam through the system. The numerical calculations have shown the possibility of broadening the spectrum, followed by 15-fold pulse compression until the instability is excited. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  11. Observation of a high-quality quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wave train using SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, G.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-09-01

    Context. We present a new event of quasi-periodic wave trains observed in EUV wavebands that rapidly propagate away from an active region after a flare. Aims: We measured the parameters of a wave train observed on 7 December 2013 after an M1.2 flare, such as the phase speeds, periods and wavelengths, in relationship to the local coronal environment and the energy sources. Methods: We compared our observations with a numerical simulation of fast magnetoacoustic waves that undergo dispersive evolution and leakage in a coronal loop embedded in a potential magnetic field. Results: The wave train is observed to propagate as several arc-shaped intensity disturbances for almost half an hour, with a speed greater than 1000 km s-1 and a period of about 1 min. The wave train followed two different patterns of propagation, in accordance with the magnetic structure of the active region. The oscillatory signal is found to be of high-quality, i.e. there is a large number (10 or more) of subsequent wave fronts observed. The observations are found to be consistent with the numerical simulation of a fast wave train generated by a localised impulsive energy release. Conclusions: Transverse structuring in the corona can efficiently create and guide high-quality quasi-periodic propagating fast wave trains. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. High performance hybrid rGO/Ag quasi-periodic mesh transparent electrodes for flexible electrochromic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. S.; Ivanchenko, F. S.; Simunin, M. M.; Shiverskiy, A. V.; Aleksandrovsky, A. S.; Nemtsev, I. V.; Fadeev, Y. V.; Karpova, D. V.; Khartov, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    A possibility of creating a stable hybrid coating based on the hybrid of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/Ag quasi-periodic mesh (q-mesh) coating has been demonstrated. The main advantages of the suggested method are the low cost of the processes and the technology scalability. The Ag q-mesh coating is formed by means of the magnetron sputtering of silver on the original template obtained as a result of quasi-periodic cracking of a silica film. The protective rGO film is formed by low temperature reduction of a graphene oxide (GO) film, applied by the spray-deposition in the solution of NaBH4. The coatings have low sheet resistance (12.3 Ω/sq) and high optical transparency (82.2%). The hybrid coatings are characterized by high chemical stability, as well as they show high stability to deformation impacts. High performance of the hybrid coatings as electrodes in the sandwich-system «electrode-electrochromic composition-electrode» has been demonstrated. The hybrid electrodes allow the electrochromic sandwich to function without any visible degradation for a long time, while an unprotected mesh electrode does not allow performing even a single switching cycle.

  13. Omnidirectional photonic band gaps enlarged by Fibonacci quasi-periodic one-dimensional ternary superconductor photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun; Bian, Bo-Rui; Dai, Yi

    2012-12-01

    First two omnidirectional photonic band gaps (OBGs) realized by one-dimensional (1D) Fibonacci quasi-periodic structure which is composed of superconductor and two kinds of isotropic dielectric are theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method (TMM). From the numerical results, it has been shown that such OBGs are insensitive to the incident angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave (EM wave), and the frequency ranges and central frequencies of OBGs cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order, but vary with the ambient temperature of system and the thickness of the superconductor, respectively. The bandwidths of OBGs can be notably enlarged. The damping coefficient of superconductor layers has no effect on the frequency ranges of OBGs. Those OBGs originate from a Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n˜ gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap. It has been proved that Fibonacci quasi-periodic 1D ternary superconductor dielectric photonic crystals (SDPCs) have a superior feature in the enhancement of OBGs frequency ranges compared with the conventional binary dielectric photonic crystals (DPCs).

  14. Resonance condition and low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations of the outbursting source H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak

    2015-10-01

    It has long been proposed that low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in stellar-mass black holes or their equivalents in supermassive black holes are the result of resonances between infall and cooling timescales. We explicitly compute these two timescales in a generic situation to show that resonances are easily achieved. During an outburst of a transient black hole candidate, the accretion rate of the Keplerian disc as well as the geometry of the Comptonizing cloud change very rapidly. During some period, a resonance condition between the cooling timescale (predominantly by Comptonization) and the infall timescale of the Comptonizing cloud is roughly satisfied. This leads to low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) of the Compton cloud and the consequent oscillation of hard X-rays. In this paper, we explicitly follow black hole candidate H1743-322 during its 2010 outburst. We compute the Compton cooling time and infall time over several days and show that QPOs take place when these two roughly agree within ˜50 per cent, i.e., the resonance condition is generally satisfied. We also confirm that for the sharper LFQPOs (i.e. higher Q-factors) the ratio of the two timescales is very close to 1.

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas are very efficient in the deactivation of bacteria. A relatively new area is the use of these plasmas in biomedical and dental applications. In this work, application of a novel device in dentistry is investigated, the plasma needle. The plasma needle is used to generate a non-thermal atmospheric micro-plasma. A promising application of this micro-plasma is the treatment of dental cavities, to stop caries without causing pain and removing too much healthy tissue. Various bacterial model systems are used to test the bactericidal efficiency of the plasma needle: bacteria in droplets, thin films and (multi-species) biofilms. The effects of plasma needle treatment on bacterial viability, growth and composition are discussed. The results indicate that plasma can become a useful tool for dental treatment.

  16. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  17. Anomalous magnetic response of a quasi-periodic mesoscopic ring in presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Moumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the properties of persistent charge current driven by magnetic flux in a quasi-periodic mesoscopic Fibonacci ring with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. Within a tight-binding framework we work out individual state currents together with net current based on second-quantized approach. A significant enhancement of current is observed in presence of spin-orbit coupling and sometimes it becomes orders of magnitude higher compared to the spin-orbit interaction free Fibonacci ring. We also establish a scaling relation of persistent current with ring size, associated with the Fibonacci generation, from which one can directly estimate current for any arbitrary flux, even in presence of spin-orbit interaction, without doing numerical simulation. The present analysis indeed gives a unique opportunity of determining persistent current and has not been discussed so far.

  18. Semi-global analysis of periodic and quasi-periodic normal-internal k : 1 and k : 2 resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, K.; Wagener, FOO

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates a family of nonlinear oscillators at Hopf bifurcation, driven by a small quasi-periodic forcing. In particular, we are interested in the situation that at bifurcation and for vanishing forcing strength, the driving frequency and the normal frequency are in k : 1 or k : 2 resonance. For small but non-vanishing forcing strength, a semi-global normal form system is found by averaging and applying a van der Pol transformation. The bifurcation diagram is organized by a codimension 3 singularity of nilpotent-elliptic type. A fairly complete analysis of local bifurcations is given; moreover, all the non-local bifurcation curves predicted by Dumortier et al (1991 Bifurcations of Planar Vector Fields (Lecture Notes in Mathematics vol 1480) (Berlin: Springer)), excepting boundary bifurcations, are found numerically.

  19. Quasi-periodic fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains within coronal waveguides associated with flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Broder, Brittany; Karlický, Marian; Downs, Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-periodic, fast-mode, propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon recently discovered in the solar corona by the Solar Dynamics Observatory with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations. They originate from flares and propagate at speeds up to ˜2000 km s-1 within funnel-shaped waveguides in the wakes of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). QFPs can carry suffcient energy fluxes required for coronal heating during their occurr ences. They can provide new diagnostics for the solar corona and their associated flares. We present recent observations of QFPs focusing on their spatio-temporal properties, temperature dependence, and statistical correlation with flares and CMEs. Of particular interest is the 2010-Aug-01 C3.2 flare with correlated QFPs and drifting zebra and fiber radio bursts, which might be different manifestations of the same fast-mode wave trains. We also discuss the potential roles of QFPs in accelerating and/or modulating the solar wind.

  20. A 200-second quasi-periodicity after the tidal disruption of a star by a dormant black hole.

    PubMed

    Reis, R C; Miller, J M; Reynolds, M T; Gültekin, K; Maitra, D; King, A L; Strohmayer, T E

    2012-08-24

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs; mass is greater than or approximately 10(5) times that of the Sun) are known to exist at the center of most galaxies with sufficient stellar mass. In the local universe, it is possible to infer their properties from the surrounding stars or gas. However, at high redshifts we require active, continuous accretion to infer the presence of the SMBHs, which often comes in the form of long-term accretion in active galactic nuclei. SMBHs can also capture and tidally disrupt stars orbiting nearby, resulting in bright flares from otherwise quiescent black holes. Here, we report on a ~200-second x-ray quasi-periodicity around a previously dormant SMBH located in the center of a galaxy at redshift z = 0.3534. This result may open the possibility of probing general relativity beyond our local universe. PMID:22859817

  1. The buildup to the deep solar minimum of cycle 23: Quasi-periodic changes of the solar photospheric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Bisoi, Susanta; Janardhan, P.; Chakrabarty, D.; Ananthakrishnan, S.

    We have witnessed a belated cycle 24, after a long and unusual solar minimum, characterized by almost complete absence of sunspots and very weak polar fields, at the end of cycle 23. Employing a special harmonic analysis along with a wavelet method, the periodicities in the solar photospheric fields are deduced using NSO/Kitt peak ground-based synoptic magnetograms spanning over solar cycles 21, 22 and 23. We find a clear north-south asymmetry in the Fourier power distribution in the quasi-periodic changes when the data are grouped into fields prior to and after 1996. In this presentation, I will discuss that this north-south asymmetry, when coupled with both the declined solar magnetic fields and the turbulence levels in the inner heliosphere that began around the mid-nineties (˜1995-1996), initiated the build-up to this deep solar minimum.

  2. High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Black Hole X-Ray Transient XTE J1650-500

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Jeroen; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Rossi, Sabrina; Miller, Jon M.; Wijnands, Rudy; Belloni, Tomaso; VanDerKlis, Michiel; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the detection of high-frequency variability in the black hole X-ray transient XTE 51650-500. A quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) was found at 250 Hz during a transition from the hard to the soft state. We also detected less coherent variability around 50 Hz that disappeared when the 250 Hz QPO showed up. There are indications that when the energy spectrum hardened the QPO frequency increased from approx. 110 to approx. 270 Hz, although the observed frequencies are also consistent with being 1 : 2 : 3 harmonics of each other. Interpreting the 250 Hz as the orbital frequency at the innermost stable orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole leads to a mass estimate of 8.2 solar mass. The spectral results by Miller et al., which suggest considerable black hole spin, would imply a higher mass.

  3. Quasi-periodic structures in the large-scale galaxy distribution and three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeuchi, Satoru; Turner, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that the void and wall structure associated with the large-scale galaxy distribution might be qualitatively, or perhaps even physically, modeled by a Voronoi tessellation, and that such structure might account for the surprisingly regular, sharp peaks in the galaxy redshift distributions obtained from 'pencil beam' surveys. Taking cell wall crossings by random line segments to correspond to such redshift peaks, an exact expression is derived for the distribution of spacings of these intersections in a three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. This result verifies that the spacings are nonrandom and quasi-periodic, qualitatively resembling the observed pattern, even though the cell wall structure is generated from randomly placed seeds. Finally, moments of the spacing distribution are used to show that apparently periodic samples, similar to those recently reported, represent only one to two sigma fluctuations in a Voronoi tesselation.

  4. The quasi-periodic oscillations and very low frequency noise of Scorpius X-1 as transient chaos - A dripping handrail?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas; Young, Karl; Donoho, David L.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) characteristic of many accretion sources are different aspects of the same physical process. We analyzed a long, high time resolution EXOSAT observation of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Sco X-1. The X-ray luminosity varies stochastically on time scales from milliseconds to hours. The nature of this variability - as quantified with both power spectrum analysis and a new wavelet technique, the scalegram - agrees well with the dripping handrail accretion model, a simple dynamical system which exhibits transient chaos. In this model both the QPO and VLFN are produced by radiation from blobs with a wide size distribution, resulting from accretion and subsequent diffusion of hot gas, the density of which is limited by an unspecified instability to lie below a threshold.

  5. A 200-Second Quasi-Periodicity After the Tidal Disruption of a Star by a Dormant Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, R. C.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Gueltkinm K.; Maitra, D.; King, A. L.; Strohmayer, T.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are known to exist at the center of most galaxies with sufficient stellar mass, In the local Universe, it is possible to infer their properties from the surrounding stars or gas. However, at high redshifts we require active, continuous accretion to infer the presence of the SMBHs, often coming in the form of long term accretion in active galactic nuclei. SMBHs can also capture and tidally disrupt stars orbiting nearby, resulting in bright flares from otherwise quiescent black holes. Here, we report on a approx.200-s X-ray quasi-periodicity around a previously dormant SMBH located in the center of a galaxy at redshift z = 0.3534. This result may open the possibility of probing general relativity beyond our local Universe.

  6. Multi-Resonance Orbital Model Applied to High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations Observed in Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlová, A.; Stuchlík, Z.; Török, G.

    2013-06-01

    The multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) enables precise determination of the black hole dimensionless spin a if observed set of oscillations demonstrates three (or more) commensurable frequencies. The black hole spin a is related to the frequency ratio only, while its mass M is related to the frequency magnitude. The model is applied to the triple frequency set of HF QPOs observed in Sgr A* source with frequency ratio 3:2:1. Acceptable versions of the multi-resonance model are determined by the restrictions on the Sgr A* supermassive black hole mass. The version of strong resonances related to the black hole "magic" spin a=0.983 is acceptable but the version demonstrating the best agreement with the mass restrictions predicts spin a=0.980.

  7. Coupled orbital angular momentum conversions in a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xinyuan; Yang, Guang; Wei, Dunzhao; Wei, Dan; Ni, Rui; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xiaopeng; Hu, Wei; Lu, Y Q; Zhu, S N; Xiao, Min

    2016-03-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the orbital angular momentum (OAM) conversion by the coupled nonlinear optical processes in a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal. In such a crystal, third-harmonic generation (THG) is realized by the coupled second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) processes, i.e., SHG is dependent on SFG and vice versa. The OAMs of the interacting waves are proved to be conserved in such coupled nonlinear optical processes. As we increase the input OAM in the experiment, the conversion efficiency decreases because of the reduced fundamental power density. Our results provide better understanding for the OAM conversions, which can be used to efficiently produce an optical OAM state at a short wavelength. PMID:26977661

  8. Coupled orbital angular momentum conversions in a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO_3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xinyuan; Yang, Guang; Wei, Dunzhao; Wei, Dan; Ni, Rui; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xiaopeng; Hu, Wei; Lu, Y. Q.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the orbital angular momentum (OAM) conversion by the coupled nonlinear optical processes in a quasi-periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal. In such crystal, third-harmonic generation (THG) is realized by the coupled second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) processes, i.e., SHG is dependent on SFG and vice versa. The OAMs of the interacting waves are proved to be conserved in such coupled nonlinear optical processes. As increasing the input OAM in the experiment, the conversion efficiency decreases because of the reduced fundamental power intensity. Our results provide better understanding for the OAM conversions, which can be used to efficiently produce an optical OAM state at a short wavelength.

  9. Compton cooling and the signature of Quasi Periodic Oscillations for the transient black hole candidate H 1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Debnath, D.; Jana, A.; Molla, A. A.

    In black hole accretion cooling of the Compton cloud has an enormous effect on the dynamics of post-shock flow. We demonstrate that the Compton cooling is highly responsible for the origin of Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) during the outburst time of the galactic black hole candidates (BHCs). Our study shows that the disk oscillation will take place when infall time from the shock roughly agrees with cooling time in the post-shock region i.e., the resonance condition. We believe that this oscillation is responsible for the origin of QPOs and will occur only when a particular disk condition (disk rate, halo rate and shock strength) satisfies. We also confirm that shock moves with an average velocity of a few meters/sec for the transient BHC H1743-322 due to the presence of Compton cooling.

  10. Quasi-periodic pulsations of hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the 2003 May 29 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimovets, Ivan

    Growing quasi-periodic pulsations with a period of about 1 minute of hard X-ray (the anticoincidence system of spectrometer onboard INTEGRAL and the RHESSI) and microwave emissions (the NoRP) are clearly observed during the X1.2 solar flare on 2003 May 29. Ultraviolet images (the TRACE) show the sigmoid-to-arcade evolution of flaring active region consisted of the complex quadruple magnetic structure (the MDI/SOHO). This scenario is confirmed by the RHESSI hard X-ray images (30-100 keV): the sigmoid-to-arcade evolution occurred during the first pulsation in the course of magnetic reconnection. During the next pulsations hard X-ray mainly emitted by practically motionless point-like east source and multiple and non-stationary west ones which are along flare west ribbon. Summary distance between the magnetic inversion line and the both hard X-ray sources reveal its growth in the course of the flare development according to the standard model of eruptive flares. But we don't find clear correlations between that distance and hard X-ray emission intensity. Peak intensities of the both sources reveal the same quasi-periodic pulsations. We interpret the observed pulsations in term of modulation of charged particle acceleration process (say current sheet dynamical resizing) by MHD oscillations of eruptive flux rope. Although estimated (the MDI/SOHO) photospheric longitudinal magnetic field in hard X-ray sources is about 5 times greater than the necessary one for the Alfven wave period of about 1 minute in the active region we think that coronal magnetic field may satisfy the observed period.

  11. Quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting magnetic white dwarfs. II. The asset of numerical modelling for interpreting observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschaert, C.; Falize, É.; Michaut, C.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Magnetic cataclysmic variables are close binary systems containing a strongly magnetized white dwarf that accretes matter coming from an M-dwarf companion. The high magnetic field strength leads to the formation of an accretion column instead of an accretion disk. High-energy radiation coming from those objects is emitted from the column close to the white dwarf photosphere at the impact region. Its properties depend on the characteristics of the white dwarf and an accurate accretion column model allows the properties of the binary system to be inferred, such as the white dwarf mass, its magnetic field, and the accretion rate. Aims: We study the temporal and spectral behaviour of the accretion region and use the tools we developed to accurately connect the simulation results to the X-ray and optical astronomical observations. Methods: The radiation hydrodynamics code Hades was adapted to simulate this specific accretion phenomena. Classical approaches were used to model the radiative losses of the two main radiative processes: bremsstrahlung and cyclotron. Synthetic light curves and X-ray spectra were extracted from numerical simulations. A fast Fourier analysis was performed on the simulated light curves. The oscillation frequencies and amplitudes in the X-ray and optical domains are studied to compare those numerical results to observational ones. Different dimensional formulae were developed to complete the numerical evaluations. Results: The complete characterization of the emitting region is described for the two main radiative regimes: when only the bremsstrahlung losses and when both cyclotron and bremsstrahlung losses are considered. The effect of the non-linear cooling instability regime on the accretion column behaviour is analysed. Variation in luminosity on short timescales (~1 s quasi-periodic oscillations) is an expected consequence of this specific dynamic. The importance of secondary shock instability on the quasi-periodic oscillation phenomenon is discussed. The stabilization effect of the cyclotron process is confirmed by our numerical simulations, as well as the power distribution in the various modes of oscillation.

  12. Low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries and galactic black hole candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xingming; Taam, Ronald E.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the inner regions of accretion disks surrounding black holes and neutron stars and investigate the nonlinear time-dependent evolution of thermal-viscous instabilities. The viscous stress is assumed to be proportional to the gas pressure with the viscosity parameter formulated as alpha = min alpha (sub zero) (h/r) (exp n), alpha(sub max), where h is the local scale height, r is the distance from the central compact object, and n, alpha(sub zero) and alpha(sub max) are constants. It is found that the disk is unstable for alpha sufficiently sensitive to h (n greater than or equal to 1.2). The instabilities are globally coherent in the entire unstable region of the disk, and, depeding on the viscosity parameters, the time variability of the mass accretion rates are manifested as periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. We show that, the low-frequency (approximately 0.04 Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) discovered recently in some of the black hole candidates (Cyg X-1 and GRO J0422+32) and a low-mass X-ray binary (Rapid Burster MXB 1730-335) may be explicable by the thermal-viscous instabilities in accretion disks. The observations of QPOs place constraints on the viscosity parameters and suggest that (n, alpha(sub zero) approximately (1.6, 30) for the Rapid Burster with a 1.4 solar mass neutron star. In the case of black hole candidates, the dependence of alpha on h/r is less steep corresponding to n approximately 1.2-1.3 for black holes less than 10 solar mass.

  13. Driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora: Role of cold electron flux and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Kadokura, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pulsating auroras are common phenomena, which are observed universally during the recovery phase of substorm in the auroral and subauroral zones. But, even today, generation mechanism of fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora, such as, their periodicity and shapes are still open to discussion. Simultaneous observations onboard satellites and on the ground are important method to examine such fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora. In this study we examined some selected pulsating auroral events, which obtained onboard THEMIS spacecraft and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky camera network. THEMIS satellites were located in the post midnight sector near the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere. We found following signatures of particle, field and wave in the magnetosphere at the onset and during pulsating aurora; 1) All pulsating aurora associate with high-energy(>5 keV) electron flux enhancement, 2) There is no evidence to identify a quasi-periodic(QP) modulation of high-energy electron flux, which may be directly corresponding to pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 3) QP modulation of cold electron flux(<10 eV) and electric field often show one-to-one correspondence to QP modulation of ELF wave intensity, both type of electromagnetic lower-band chorus wave and electrostatic ECH(electron cyclotron harmonic) wave, which may be closely relating to visible pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 4) Not all pulsating aurora associate with ELF wave enhancement, 5) Pitch angle distribution of QP modulated cold electrons show field-aligned to ambient magnetic field. In this study we focus on the characteristics of QP modulation of cold electron flux and electric field, which may play the driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora.

  14. Non-thermal WIMPs as dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2014-06-24

    It has been thought that only light species could behave as radiation and account for the dark radiation observed recently by Planck, WMAP9, South Pole and ATACAMA telescopes. In this work we will show GeV scale WIMPs can plausibly account for the dark radiation as well. Heavy WIMPs might mimic the effect of a half neutrino species if some fraction of them are produced non-thermally after their thermal freeze-out. In addition, we will show how BBN, CMB and Structure Formation bounds might be circumvented.

  15. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Yates, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 h in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low-Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. The one-year extension of the data and a different method of detection of the injections do not lead to a discrepancy with the results of the previous survey, indicating an absence of a long-term temporal evolution of this phenomenon. We identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of the pulsed events properties. The morphology of the pulsations shows a weak local time dependence which could imply a high-latitude acceleration source. We provide some clues that the electron population associated with this pulsed phenomenon is distinct from the field-aligned electron beams previously observed in Saturn's magnetosphere, but both populations can be mixed. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG). Correlated pulsed signatures are observed in the plasma wave emissions, especially in the auroral hiss, for 12% of the electron injections identified in the LEMMS data. Additionally, in about 20% of the events, such coincident pulsed signatures have been also observed in the magnetic field measurements, some of them being indicative of field-aligned currents. This analysis combined with the multi-instrument approach sets constraints on the origin and significance of the pulsed events. Hence, our results suggest that the acceleration process providing the quasi-periodic relativistic electrons takes place at high-latitudes.

  16. Quasi-periodic radar echoes from midlatitude sporadic E and role of the 5-day planetary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Hocke, Klemens; Fukao, Shoichiro

    Using measurements of magnetic-aspect-sensitive radar echoes from midlatitude sporadic E collected over a two-month period from Tanegashima, Japan, we show that while their occurrence duration from night to night did not exhibit any systematic variation, that of the so-called quasi-periodic (QP) echoes varied sinusoidally with a period of 5 days. We have interpreted this behavior in terms of effects produced by a planetary wave and identified its presence through neutral-wind measurements made with a partial-reflection drift radar located nearby at Yamagawa. We propose that the occurrence of QP echoes is affected both by a contribution of the wind to the dynamo electric field and by the direction of the neutral wind. We argue that because the wind vector of the planetary wave is elliptically polarized at midlatitudes, a preferred wind direction conducive to the generation of QP echoes occurs once every 5 days. On the other hand, this wave is linearly polarized and directed zonally over the geographic equator. The fact that QP echoes are most fully developed at midlatitudes and less so at lower latitudes suggests that zonal flow is not particularly favorable for QP echo production.

  17. Imaging observation of quasi-periodic disturbances' amplitudes increasing with height in the polar region of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Priya, T. G.; Liu, Y.; Shen, Y. D.

    2014-08-01

    At present, there have been few extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations of spatial variations of the density perturbations due to the slow magnetoacoustic waves (SMWs) propagating along the solar coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, we present such observations taken from the polar region of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and investigate the amplitude of quasi-periodic propagating disturbances that increase with height in the lower corona (0-9 Mm over the solar limb). We statistically determined the following parameters associated with the disturbances: pressure scale height, period, and wavelength in AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å channels. The scale height and wavelength are dependent of temperature, while the period is independent of temperature. The acoustic velocities inferred from the scale height highly correlate with the ratios of wavelength to period, i.e., phase speeds. They provide evidence that the propagating disturbances in the lower corona are likely SMWs and the spatial variations in EUV intensity in the polar region likely reflects the density compressional effect by the propagating SMWs.

  18. Spike-Interval Triggered Averaging Reveals a Quasi-Periodic Spiking Alternative for Stochastic Resonance in Catfish Electroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lankheet, Martin J. M.; Klink, P. Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G.; Noest, André J.

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  19. Quasi-periodic transverse plasma flow associated with an evolving MHD vortex street in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1993-01-01

    We study a transverse plasma flow induced by the evolution of a Karman vortex street using a Chebyshev-Fourier spectral algorithm to solve both the compressible Navier-Stokes and MHD equations. The evolving vortex street is formed by the nonlinear interaction of two vortex sheets initially in equilibrium. We study spatial profiles of the total plasma velocity, the density, the meridional flow angle and the location of sector boundaries and find generally good agreement with Voyager 2 measurements of quasi-periodic transverse flow in the outer heliosphere. The pressure pulses associated with the meridional flows in the simulation are too small, although they are correctly located, and this may be due to the lack of any 'warp' in the current sheet in this model. A strong, flow-aligned magnetic field, such as would occur in the inner heliosphere, is shown to lead to weak effects that would be masked by the background interplanetary turbulence. We also study the plasma and magnetic transport resulting from the meridional flow and find that deficits of magnetic quantities do occur near the ecliptic. While the effect is relatively small, it is in general agreement with the most recent analysis of 'flux deficit' in the outer heliosphere.

  20. The magnetohydrodynamical model of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-10

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  1. Energy dependence of normal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Guy S.; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the approximately 6 Hz quasi-periodic X-ray intensity oscillations observed in the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 when it is on the normal spectral branch are shown to be consistent with a model in which photons from a central source with a fixed spectrum are Comptonized by an oscillating radial inflow. As the electron scattering optical depth of the flow varies, the spectrum of the escaping X-rays appears to rotate about a pivot energy that depends mainly on the electron temperature in the flow. The temperature derived from the observed energy dependence of the Cyg X-2 normal branch oscillations is approximately 1 keV, in good agreement with the estimated Compton temperature of its X-ray spectrum. The mean optical depth tau of the Comptonizing flow is inferred to be about 10, while the change in tau over an oscillation is estimated to be about 1; both values are in good agreement with radiation hydrodcode simulations of the radial flow.

  2. A composite study of the quasi-periodic subtropical wind maxima over the South Pacific during November 1984-April 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Ken-Chung; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1995-01-01

    A composite of 10 cases of zonal wind maxima at 200 hPa over the subtropical region stretching from Australia to the central Pacific is examined for the six-month period, November 1984-April 1985. This region is unique in that distinct westerly jets frequently form and propagate eastward at latitudes between 20 deg and 35 deg S in the summer season. Some statistical tests were applied and suggest that the flow patterns are quasi periodic, consisting of a tendency for new jet streaks to develop over the eastern Australian region approximately every one to two weeks. These jets then take about 10 days to propagate across the western Pacific before dissipating or, perhaps, moving toward higher latitudes. Their average propagation speed is approximately 4 m/s. An examination of the case-to-case variability of the jets provides additional evidence that they are significant features. A diagnosis of the trough/ridge systems at 200 and 850 hPa, together with calculations of the vertically integrated mean and shear kinetic energies suggests that baroclinic processes dominate in the entrance and center regions of the jet, whereas barotropic processes dominate in the exit and downstream regions.

  3. Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the Soft Gamma Repeater J1550-5418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, D.; D'Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; van der Klis, M.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Baring, M. G.; Göğüş, E.; Granot, J.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L.; von Kienlin, A.; Younes, G.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ~93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  4. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of the soft gamma repeater J1550–5418

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, D.; D'Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; Van der Klis, M.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Baring, M. G.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Granot, J.; Lin, L.; Von Kienlin, A.; Younes, G.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550–5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ∼93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  5. Quasi-periodic Fibonacci and periodic one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals of porous silicon: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Gazi N. Goller, Bernhard

    2014-09-07

    A one-dimensional Fibonacci phononic crystal and a distributed Bragg reflector were constructed from porous silicon. The structures had the same number of layers and similar acoustic impedance mismatch, and were electrochemically etched in highly boron doped silicon wafers. The thickness of the individual layers in the stacks was approximately 2 μm. Both types of hypersonic band gap structure were studied by direct measurement of the transmittance of longitudinal acoustic waves in the 0.1–2.6 GHz range. Acoustic band gaps deeper than 50 dB were detected in both structures. The experimental results were compared with model calculations employing the transfer matrix method. The acoustic properties of periodic and quasi-periodic structures in which half-wave retarding bi-layers do not consist of two quarter-wave retarding layers are discussed. The strong correlation between width and depth of gaps in the transmission spectra is demonstrated. The dominant mechanisms of acoustic losses in porous multilayer structures are discussed. The elastic constants remain proportional over our range of porosity, and hence, the Grüneisen parameter is constant. This simplifies the expression for the porosity dependence of the Akhiezer damping.

  6. Models of quasi-periodic oscillations related to mass and spin of the GRO J1655-40 black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Kološ, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Frequencies of the three quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) modes observed simultaneously in the accreting black hole GRO J1655-40 are compared with the predictions of models. Models in which all three QPO signals are produced at the same radius are considered: these include different versions of relativistic precession, epicyclic resonance, tidal disruption, and warped disc models. Models that were originally proposed to interpret only the twin high-frequency QPOs are generalized here to interpret also the low-frequency QPO in terms of relativistic nodal precession. Inferred values of the black hole mass and spin from each QPO model are compared with the mass measured from optical observations and the spin inferred from X-ray spectroscopy techniques. We find that along with the relativistic precession model predicting M = (5.3 ± 0.1) M⊙,a = 0.286 ± 0.004, the so-called total precession model (M = (5.5 ± 0.1) M⊙,a = 0.276 ± 0.003), and the resonance epicyclic model with beat frequency (M = (5.1 ± 0.1) M⊙,a = 0.274 ± 0.003) also satisfy the optical mass test.

  7. Energy dependence of normal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Guy S.; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-04-01

    The properties of the approximately 6 Hz quasi-periodic X-ray intensity oscillations observed in the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 when it is on the normal spectral branch are shown to be consistent with a model in which photons from a central source with a fixed spectrum are Comptonized by an oscillating radial inflow. As the electron scattering optical depth of the flow varies, the spectrum of the escaping X-rays appears to rotate about a pivot energy that depends mainly on the electron temperature in the flow. The temperature derived from the observed energy dependence of the Cyg X-2 normal branch oscillations is approximately 1 keV, in good agreement with the estimated Compton temperature of its X-ray spectrum. The mean optical depth tau of the Comptonizing flow is inferred to be about 10, while the change in tau over an oscillation is estimated to be about 1; both values are in good agreement with radiation hydrodcode simulations of the radial flow.

  8. Phase-resolved spectroscopy of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-02-01

    X-ray radiation from black hole binary (BHB) systems regularly displays quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). In principle, a number of suggested physical mechanisms can reproduce their power spectral properties, thus more powerful diagnostics which preserve phase are required to discern between different models. In this paper, we first find for two Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the BHB GRS 1915+105 that the QPO has a well-defined average waveform. That is, the phase difference and amplitude ratios between the first two harmonics vary tightly around a well-defined mean. This enables us to reconstruct QPO waveforms in each energy channel, in order to constrain QPO phase-resolved spectra. We fit these phase-resolved spectra across 16 phases with a model including Comptonization and reflection (Gaussian and smeared edge components) to find strong spectral pivoting and a modulation in the iron line equivalent width. The latter indicates the observed reflection fraction is changing throughout the QPO cycle. This points to a geometric QPO origin, although we note that the data presented here do not entirely rule out an alternative interpretation of variable disc ionization state. We also see tentative hints of modulations in the iron line centroid and width which, although not statistically significant, could result from a non-azimuthally symmetric QPO mechanism.

  9. LOW-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FROM THE 11 Hz ACCRETING PULSAR IN TERZAN 5: NOT FRAME DRAGGING

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Wijnands, R.; Ingram, A.; Linares, M.; Homan, J.

    2012-11-01

    We report on six RXTE observations taken during the 2010 outburst of the 11 Hz accreting pulsar IGR J17480-2446 located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. During these observations we find power spectra which resemble those seen in Z-type high-luminosity neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, with a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the 35-50 Hz range simultaneous with a kHz QPO and broadband noise. Using well-known frequency-frequency correlations, we identify the 35-50 Hz QPOs as the horizontal branch oscillations, which were previously suggested to be due to Lense-Thirring (LT) precession. As IGR J17480-2446 spins more than an order of magnitude more slowly than any of the other neutron stars where these QPOs were found, this QPO cannot be explained by frame dragging. By extension, this casts doubt on the LT precession model for other low-frequency QPOs in neutron stars and perhaps even black hole systems.

  10. Robust fast direct integral equation solver for quasi-periodic scattering problems with a large number of layers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Hyung; Barnett, Alex H

    2015-01-26

    We present a new boundary integral formulation for time-harmonic wave diffraction from two-dimensional structures with many layers of arbitrary periodic shape, such as multilayer dielectric gratings in TM polarization. Our scheme is robust at all scattering parameters, unlike the conventional quasi-periodic Green's function method which fails whenever any of the layers approaches a Wood anomaly. We achieve this by a decomposition into near- and far-field contributions. The former uses the free-space Green's function in a second-kind integral equation on one period of the material interfaces and their immediate left and right neighbors; the latter uses proxy point sources and small least-squares solves (Schur complements) to represent the remaining contribution from distant copies. By using high-order discretization on interfaces (including those with corners), the number of unknowns per layer is kept small. We achieve overall linear complexity in the number of layers, by direct solution of the resulting block tridiagonal system. For device characterization we present an efficient method to sweep over multiple incident angles, and show a 25 speedup over solving each angle independently. We solve the scattering from a 1000-layer structure with 3 105 unknowns to 9-digit accuracy in 2.5 minutes on a desktop workstation. PMID:25835933

  11. Photometry of the 1991 Superoutburst of EF Pegasi: Super-Quasi-Periodic Oscillations with Rapidly Decaying Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Taichi

    2002-02-01

    We observed the 1991 October outburst of EF Peg. Prominent superhumps with a period of 0.08705(1)d were observed, qualifying EF Peg as being a long-period SU UMa-type dwarf nova. The superhump period showed a monotonic decrease during the superoutburst, which makes a contrast to the virtually zero period change observed during the 1997 superoutburst of the same object. Large-amplitude and highly coherent quasi-periodic oscillations (super-QPOs) were observed on October 18, when superhumps were still growing in amplitude. Most strikingly, the QPOs showed a rapid decrease in the period from 18min to 6.8min within the 3.2-hr observing run. Such a rapid change in the period has not been observed in any class of QPOs in cataclysmic variables. We propose a hypothesis that the rapid decrease of the QPO period reflects a rapid removal of the angular momentum from an orbiting blob in the accretion disk, via viscosity in a turbulent disk. A brief comparison is given with the QPOs in X-ray binaries, some of which are known to show a similar rapid decrease in the periods.

  12. Cluster observations of quasi-periodic impulsive signatures in the dayside northern lobe: High-latitude flux transfer events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kistler, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of quasi-periodic reversals in GSM B(sub Z) observed by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern dayside lobe poleward of the cusp on 23 February 2001. During an interval of about 35 min, multiple reversals (negative to positive) in B(sub Z) of approximately 1-min duration with an approximate 8-min recurrence time were observed. The individual structures do not resemble low-latitude flux transfer events (FTE) [Russell and Elphic, 1979] but the 8-min recurrence frequency suggests that intermittent reconnection may be occurring .Measurements (appropriately lagged) of the solar wind at ACE show that the IMF was southward-oriented with a strong B(sub X) and that a modest dynamic pressure increased as the events started. The multi-point observations afforded by the Cluster spacecraft were used to infer the motion (direction and speed) of the observed magnetic field reversals. The associated currents were also calculated and they are consistent with the spatial confinement of the observed magnetic field reversals. We propose that the observed reversals are due to flux tubes reconnecting with closed field lines on the dayside. Ancillary data from the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments were used to develop a physical picture of the reversals.

  13. Simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic ELF/VLF wave emissions and electron precipitation by DEMETER satellite: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Pasmanik, D. L.; Demekhov, A. G.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Titova, E. E.

    2013-07-01

    We present results of case studies of quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF hiss emissions detected onboard the DEMETER satellite. Three events with simultaneous periodic modulation in VLF wave intensity and energetic electron precipitation are found. In each event we observe exact coincidence of one or two busts of VLF wave intensity with energetic electron precipitation peaks. To our knowledge, such observations made onboard satellites have not been reported earlier. All events are observed at fairly quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp <3). The dynamic spectrum of the VLF waves in these QP events was characterized by a regular frequency increase in each burst, and the repetition period was less than or about 20 s. These features allow us to suggest that the observed events belong to the QP2-class, i.e., events which are not associated with geomagnetic pulsations. We also analyze energetic electron data from NOAA-17 spacecraft which has helio-synchronous circular orbit similar to DEMETER spacecraft and measured in the same region of the magnetosphere within 30 min for the analyzed events. NOAA-17 data confirm that the QP emissions were detected by DEMETER in the region of isotropization of energetic electrons, which is typically associated with the development of the cyclotron instability. Modulation of electron flux with a period close to the QP emission period is observed in two events. Based on the observed correlation between bursts of wave intensity and energetic particle flux, we estimate the location and spatial extent of the source region for QP emissions.

  14. The quasi-periodical VLF/ELF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER spacecraft: statistical and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Demekhov, Andrei; Santolík, Ondřej; Nemec, František; Parrot, Michel

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of the quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft. Events with modulation period larger than 10 s and frequency bandwidth more than 200 Hz were visually selected among the six year of measurements. Selected QP-emissions events occur mostly at frequencies from about 750 Hz to 2 kHz, but they may be observed at frequencies as low as 500 Hz and as high as 8 kHz. The statistical analysis clearly shows that QP events with larger modulation periods have lower frequency drift and smaller wave amplitude. Intense QP events have higher frequency drifts and larger values of the frequency bandwiths. Numerical simulation of the QP emissions based on the theoretical model of the flow cyclotron maser is performed. Calculations were made for wide range of plasma parameters (i.e. cold plasma density, L-shell, energetic electron flux and etc.) The numerical results are in good agreement with the observed relationship between different parameters of the QP emissions. The comparison between theoretical results and observations allow us to estimate the typical properties of the source of the QP emissions observed by the DEMETER satellite.

  15. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  16. TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect

    Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Schmutz, W.; Zender, J.

    2012-04-10

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

  17. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  18. Fractional Amplitude of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillation from 4U 1728-34: Evidence of Decline at Higher Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Arunava; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-09-01

    A kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) is an observationally robust high-frequency timing feature detected from neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). This feature can be very useful to probe the superdense core matter of neutron stars and the strong gravity regime. Although many models exist in the literature, the physical origin of kHz QPO is not known, and hence this feature cannot be used as a tool yet. The energy dependence of kHz QPO fractional rms amplitude is an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to understand the physical origin of this timing feature. It is known that the fractional rms amplitude increases with energy at lower energies. At higher energies, the amplitude is usually believed to saturate, although this is not established. We combine tens of lower kHz QPOs from a neutron star LMXB 4U 1728-34 in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Consequently, we, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, find a significant and systematic decrease of the fractional rms amplitude with energy at higher photon energies. Assuming an energy spectrum model, blackbody+powerlaw, we explore if the sinusoidal variation of a single spectral parameter can reproduce the above-mentioned fractional rms amplitude behavior. Our analysis suggests that the oscillation of any single blackbody parameter is favored over the oscillation of any single power-law parameter, in order to explain the measured amplitude behavior. We also find that the quality factor of a lower kHz QPO does not plausibly depend on photon energy.

  19. Detection of the first infra-red quasi periodic oscillation in a black hole X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkar, M.; Casella, P.; Uttley, P.; O'Brien, K.; Russell, D.; Maccarone, T.; van der Klis, M.; Vincentelli, F.

    2016-05-01

    We present analysis of fast variability of Very Large Telescope/ISAAC (infra-red), XMM-Newton/OM (optical) and EPIC-pn (X-ray), and RXTE/PCA (X-ray) observations of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 in a rising hard state of its outburst in 2010. We report the first detection of a Quasi Periodic Oscillation (QPO) in the infra-red band (IR) of a black hole X-ray binary. The QPO is detected at 0.08 Hz in the IR as well as two optical bands (U and V). Interestingly, these QPOs are at half the X-ray QPO frequency at 0.16 Hz, which is classified as the type-C QPO; a weak sub-harmonic close to the IR and optical QPO frequency is also detected in X-rays. The band-limited sub-second time scale variability is strongly correlated in IR/X-ray bands, with X-rays leading the IR by over 120 ms. This short time delay, shape of the cross correlation function and spectral energy distribution strongly indicate that this band-limited variable IR emission is the synchrotron emission from the jet. A jet origin for the IR QPO is strongly favoured, but cannot be definitively established with the current data. The spectral energy distribution indicates a thermal disc origin for the bulk of the optical emission, but the origin of the optical QPO is unclear. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  20. FRACTIONAL AMPLITUDE OF KILOHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FROM 4U 1728-34: EVIDENCE OF DECLINE AT HIGHER ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Arunava; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2012-09-01

    A kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) is an observationally robust high-frequency timing feature detected from neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). This feature can be very useful to probe the superdense core matter of neutron stars and the strong gravity regime. Although many models exist in the literature, the physical origin of kHz QPO is not known, and hence this feature cannot be used as a tool yet. The energy dependence of kHz QPO fractional rms amplitude is an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to understand the physical origin of this timing feature. It is known that the fractional rms amplitude increases with energy at lower energies. At higher energies, the amplitude is usually believed to saturate, although this is not established. We combine tens of lower kHz QPOs from a neutron star LMXB 4U 1728-34 in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Consequently, we, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, find a significant and systematic decrease of the fractional rms amplitude with energy at higher photon energies. Assuming an energy spectrum model, blackbody+powerlaw, we explore if the sinusoidal variation of a single spectral parameter can reproduce the above-mentioned fractional rms amplitude behavior. Our analysis suggests that the oscillation of any single blackbody parameter is favored over the oscillation of any single power-law parameter, in order to explain the measured amplitude behavior. We also find that the quality factor of a lower kHz QPO does not plausibly depend on photon energy.

  1. MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN MULTI-TIMESCALES ASSOCIATED WITH A SOLAR FLARE/CME EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin; Zhang Yin; Tan Chengming; Liu Yuying

    2010-11-01

    Microwave observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in multi-timescales at the Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer in Huairou (SBRS/Huairou) on 2006 December 13 are confirmed to be associated with an X3.4 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) event. It is most remarkable that the timescales of QPPs are distributed in a broad range from hectoseconds (very long period pulsation, VLP, P>100 s), decaseconds (long period pulsation, LPP, 10 < P < 100 s), a few seconds (short period pulsation, SPP, 1 < P < 10 s), deciseconds (slow very short period pulsation, slow-VSP, 0.1 < P < 1.0 s), to centiseconds (fast very short period pulsation, fast-VSP, P < 0.1 s), and form a broad hierarchy. The statistical distribution of QPPs in logarithmic period-duration space indicates that all the QPPs can be classified into two groups: group I includes VLP, LPP, SPP, and some slow-VSPs distributed approximately around a line; group II includes fast-VSP and most of the slow-VSPs dispersively distributed away from the above line. This feature implies that the generation mechanism of group I is different from group II. Group I is possibly related to some MHD oscillations in magnetized plasma loops in the active region; e.g., VLPs may be generated by standing slow sausage mode coupling, resonating with the underlying photospheric 5 minute oscillation, with the modulation amplified and forming the main framework of the whole flare/CME process; LPPs, SPPs, and some slow-VSPs are most likely to be caused by standing fast modes or LRC-circuit resonance in current-carrying plasma loops. Group II is possibly generated by modulations of resistive tearing-mode oscillations in electric current-carrying flaring loops.

  2. Characterizing Intermittency of 4-Hz Quasi-periodic Oscillation in XTE J1550-564 Using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Hao; Chou, Yi; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We present time-frequency analysis results based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for the evolution of a 4-Hz low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) around the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550-564. The origin of LFQPOs is still debated. To understand the cause of the peak broadening, we utilized a recently developed time-frequency analysis, HHT, for tracking the evolution of the 4-Hz LFQPO from XTE J1550-564. By adaptively decomposing the ˜4-Hz oscillatory component from the light curve and acquiring its instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert spectrum illustrates that the LFQPO is composed of a series of intermittent oscillations appearing occasionally between 3 and 5 Hz. We further characterized this intermittency by computing the confidence limits of the instantaneous amplitudes of the intermittent oscillations, and constructed both the distributions of the QPO’s high- and low-amplitude durations, which are the time intervals with and without significant ˜4-Hz oscillations, respectively. The mean high-amplitude duration is 1.45 s and 90% of the oscillation segments have lifetimes below 3.1 s. The mean low-amplitude duration is 0.42 s and 90% of these segments are shorter than 0.73 s. In addition, these intermittent oscillations exhibit a correlation between the oscillation’s rms amplitude and mean count rate. This correlation could be analogous to the linear rms-flux relation found in the 4-Hz LFQPO through Fourier analysis. We conclude that the LFQPO peak in the power spectrum is broadened owing to intermittent oscillations with varying frequencies, which could be explained by using the Lense-Thirring precession model.

  3. Investigating the Connection between Quasi Periodic Oscillations and Spectral Components with NuSTAR Data of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Jassal, Anjali; Vadawale, Santosh V.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are commonly observed during the hard states of black hole binaries. Several studies have established various observational/empirical correlations between spectral parameters and QPO properties, indicating a close link between the two. However, the exact mechanism of generation of QPOs is not yet well understood. In this paper, we present our attempts to comprehend the connection between the spectral components and the low-frequency QPO (LFQPO) observed in GRS 1915+105 using the data from NuSTAR. Detailed spectral modeling as well as the presence of the LFQPO and its energy dependence during this observation have been reported by Miller et al. and Zhang et al., respectively. We investigate the compatibility of the spectral model and the energy dependence of the QPO by simulating light curves in various energy bands for small variation of the spectral parameters. The basic concept here is to establish the connection, if any, between the QPO and the variation of either a spectral component or a specific parameter, which in turn can shed some light on the origin of the QPO. We begin with the best-fit spectral model of Miller et al. and simulate the light curve by varying the spectral parameters at frequencies close to the observed QPO frequency in order to generate the simulated QPO. Furthermore we simulate similar light curves in various energy bands in order to reproduce the observed energy dependence of the rms amplitude of the QPO. We find that the observed trend of increasing rms amplitude with energy can be reproduced qualitatively if the spectral index is assumed to be varying with the phases of the QPO. Variation of any other spectral parameter does not reproduce the observed energy dependence.

  4. Discovery of a Second High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Microquasar GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery in archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of a approx. 40 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation QPO) in the hard X-ray flux from the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105. The QPO is detected only in the hard X-ray band above approx. 13 keV and was discovered in observations in which the previously known 67 Hz QPO is present. The 40 Hz QPO has a typical rms amplitude of approx. 2% in the 13-27 keV band and a width of approx. 5.5 Hz (FWHM). We show that the 67 and 40 Hz QPOs are detected in the same observations in 1997 July and November. However, the QPO is not detected in observations from 1996 April, May, and June in which the 67 Hz QPO was first discovered. The frequency of the 67 Hz QPO is significantly higher in the 1997 observations by about 5% compared with the 1996 data. The identification of the 40 Hz QPO makes GRS 1915 + 105 the second black hole binary to show a pair of simultaneous high-frequency QPOs (the other being GRO J1655-40). The similarities between the properties of the 67 Hz QPO in GRS 1915+105 and the recently discovered 450 Hz QPO in GRO J1655-40 suggest that the pairs of frequencies in these systems may be produced by the same physical mechanism, with the frequency differences between the two being likely due to different black hole masses in the two systems. We discuss the implications of our result for the mass and spin of GRS 1915+105 as well as for models of X-ray variability in black holes and neutron stars.

  5. Quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting magnetic white dwarfs. I. Observational constraints in X-ray and optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.; Mouchet, M.; Busschaert, C.; Falize, E.; Michaut, C.

    2015-07-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are observed in the optical flux of some polars with typical periods of 1 to 3 s but none have been observed yet in X-rays where a significant part of the accreting energy is released. QPOs are expected and predicted from shock oscillations. Most of the polars have been observed by the XMM-Newton satellite. We made use of the homogeneous set of observations of the polars by XMM-Newton to search for the presence of QPOs in the (0.5-10 keV) energy range and to set significant upper limits for the brightest X-ray polars. We extracted high time-resolution X-ray light curves by taking advantage of the 0.07 s resolution of the EPIC-PN camera. Among the 65 polars observed with XMM-Newton from 1998 to 2012, a sample of 24 sources was selected on the basis of their counting rate in the PN instrument to secure significant limits. We searched for QPOs using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) methods and defined limits of detection using statistical tools. Among the sample surveyed, none shows QPOs at a significant level. Upper limits to the fractional flux in QPOs range from 7% to 71%. These negative results are compared to the detailed theoretical predictions of numerical simulations based on a 2D hydrodynamical code presented in Paper II. Cooling instabilities in the accretion column are expected to produce shock quasi-oscillations with a maximum amplitude reaching ~40% in the bremsstrahlung (0.5-10 keV) X-ray emission and ~20% in the optical cyclotron emission. The absence of X-ray QPOs imposes an upper limit of ~(5-10) g cm-2 s-1 on the specific accretion rate but this condition is found inconsistent with the value required to account for the amplitudes and frequencies of the observed optical QPOs. This contradiction outlines probable shortcomings with the shock instability model. Figures 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. The role of upstream ULF waves in the generation of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, K.; Freeman, M. P.

    1995-11-01

    Recent work suggests that the quasi-periodic (QP) modulation ~10-50 s of naturally occurring ELF-VLF radio emissions (~0.5-5 kHz) is produced by the compressional action of Pc3 magnetic pulsations on the source of the emissions. Whilst it is generally accepted that these magnetic pulsations have an exogenic source, it is not clear what the mechanism of their generation is. A study of QP emissions observed during 1988 at Halley, Antarctica, in conjunction with IMP-8 satellite solar wind data, shows that the occurrence and modulation frequency of the emissions are strongly dependent upon the direction and strength of the IMF, respectively. The observed relationships are very similar to those previously reported for Pc3 pulsations associated with upstream ion-cyclotron resonance, involving proton beams reflected at the bowshock. In comparing the observed QP modulation frequencies with upstream wave theory, agreement was found by considering wave excitation exclusively associated with a proton beam reflected from a position on the bowshock at which the shock normal is parallel to the ambient IMF direction. Other geometries were found to be either impropitious or uncertain. The work indicates the useful diagnostic role QP emissions could play in the study of compressional ULF waves in the upstream solar wind and in monitoring the IMF conditions responsible for their generation. Acknowledgements. We want to express our gratitude to Alain Weill, who manages the SOFIA program, and to all colleagues who contributed to the experiment. We are very grateful to people from the "Institut Géographique National", the "Division Technique de l'Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (INSU)" and the "Centre d'Aviation Météorologique de Météo-France" who operated the aircraft and processed the data. Frédérique Saïd provided us with very helpful comments on the manuscript. This work was financially supported by the "Programme Atmosphère et Océan à Moyenne Echelle de l'INSU". Topical Editor G. Komen thanks K. B. Katsaros and another referee for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: P. Durand-->

  7. Twin peak high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations as a spectral imprint of dual oscillation modes of accretion tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakala, P.; Goluchová, K.; Török, G.; Šrámková, E.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Vincent, F. H.; Mazur, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    Context. High-frequency (millisecond) quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) are observed in the X-ray power-density spectra of several microquasars and low-mass X-ray binaries. Two distinct QPO peaks, so-called twin peak QPOs, are often detected simultaneously exhibiting their frequency ratio close or equal to 3:2. A widely discussed class of proposed QPOs models is based on oscillations of accretion toroidal structures orbiting in the close vicinity of black holes or neutron stars. Aims: Following the analytic theory and previous studies of observable spectral signatures, we aim to model the twin peak QPOs as a spectral imprint of specific dual oscillation regime defined by a combination of the lowest radial and vertical oscillation mode of slender tori. We consider the model of an optically thick slender accretion torus with constant specific angular momentum. We examined power spectra and fluorescent Kα iron line profiles for two different simulation setups with the mode frequency relations corresponding to the epicyclic resonance HF QPOs model and modified relativistic precession QPOs model. Methods: We used relativistic ray-tracing implemented in the parallel simulation code LSDplus. In the background of the Kerr spacetime geometry, we analyzed the influence of the distant observer inclination and the spin of the central compact object. Relativistic optical projection of the oscillating slender torus is illustrated by images in false colours related to the frequency shift. Results: We show that performed simulations yield power spectra with the pair of dominant peaks that correspond to the frequencies of radial and vertical oscillation modes and with the peak frequency ratio equal to the proper value 3:2 on a wide range of inclinations and spin values. We also discuss exceptional cases of a very low and very high inclination, as well as unstable high spin relativistic precession-like configurations that predict a constant frequency ratio equal to 1:2. We demonstrate a significant dependency of broadened Kα iron line profiles on the inclination of the distant observer. Conclusions: This study presents a further step towards the proper model of oscillating accretion tori producing HF QPOs. More realistic future simulations should be based on incorporating the resonant coupling of oscillation modes, the influence of torus opacity, and the pressure effects on the mode frequencies and the torus shape.

  8. Statistical properties of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. H.; Chen, L.; Zhang, C. M.; Lei, Y. J.; Qu, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    We collect the data of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) published before 2012 from 26 neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) sources, then we analyze the centroid frequency (ν) distribution of twin kHz QPOs (lower frequency ν_1 and upper frequency ν_2) both for Atoll and Z sources. For the data without shift-and-add, we find that Atoll and Z sources show different distributions of ν_1, ν_2 and ν_2/ν_1, but the same distribution of Δν (difference of twin kHz QPOs), which indicates that twin kHz QPOs may share the common properties of LXMBs and have the same physical origins. The distribution of Δν is quite different from a constant value, so is ν_2/ν_1 from a constant ratio. The weighted mean values and maxima of ν_1 and ν_2 in Atoll sources are slightly higher than those in Z sources. We also find that shift-and-add technique can reconstruct the distributions of ν_1 and Δν. The K-S test results of ν_1 and Δν between Atoll and Z sources from data with shift-and-add are quite different from those without it, and we think that this may be caused by the selection biases of the sample. We also study the properties of the quality factor (Q) and the root-mean-squared (rms) amplitude of 4U 0614+09 with data from the two observational methods, but the errors are too big to make a robust conclusion. The NS spin frequency (ν_s) distribution of 28 NS-LMXBs show a bigger mean value (˜ 408 Hz) than that (˜ 281 Hz) of the radio binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs), which may be due to the lack of the spin detections from Z sources (systematically lower than 281 Hz). Furthermore, on the relations between the kHz QPOs and NS spin frequency ν_s, we find the approximate correlations of the mean values of Δν with NS spin and its half, respectively.

  9. Statistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, B.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emissions brightness. The Low- Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System detector of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini regularly detects 1-hour quasi-periodic enhancements in the intensities of electrons with an energy range from a hundred keV to several MeV. We extend an earlier survey of these relativistic electron injections, using 10 years of LEMMS observations in addition to context measurements by several other Cassini magnetospheric experiments. During this period, we identified 720 pulsed events in the outer magnetosphere over a wide range of latitudes and local times, revealing that this phenomenon is common and frequent in Saturn's magnetosphere. However, the distribution of the injection events presents a strong local time asymmetry with ten times more events in the duskside than in the dawnside. In addition to the study of their topology, we present a first statistical analysis of these pulsed events to investigate their properties. This analysis reveals that the mean interpulse period is 68 ± 10 minutes and that the events are made up of less than 9 pulses in general, but they can include up to 19 pulses. The most common shape of these pulses is a fast rise followed by a slow decay. Moreover, the ratio between the rise rate and the decay rate increases with the energy. We have also investigated the signatures of each electron injection event in the observations acquired by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG). Correlated pulsed signatures are observed in the plasma wave emissions, especially in the auroral hiss, for 12% of the electron injections identified in the LEMMS data. Additionally, in about 20% of the events, such coincident pulsed signatures have been also observed in the magnetic field measurements, some of them being indicative of field-aligned currents. This multiinstrument approach sets constraints on the origin and significance of the pulsed events.

  10. Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.E.

    2000-08-20

    Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

  11. Non-thermal renormalization shielding on the electron-atom collision in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian non-thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Dae; Hong, Woo-Pyo; Hong

    2013-10-01

    The non-thermal renormalization shielding effects on the elastic electron-atom collision process are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian non-thermal plasmas. The eikonal analysis for the Hamilton-Jacobi solution and impact parameter method are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the collision energy, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the Lorentzian plasma. It is found that the non-thermal renormalization shielding effect enhances the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the eikonal collision cross section, especially for small impact parameter domains. It is also found that the non-thermal renormalization shielding effect on the eikonal scattering phase shift decreases with an increase of the impact parameter. In addition, it is found that the maximum position of the eikonal collision cross section has receded from the collision center with an increase of the non-thermal character of the plasma.

  12. An Abstract Nash-Moser Theorem and Quasi-Periodic Solutions for NLW and NLS on Compact Lie Groups and Homogeneous Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Massimiliano; Corsi, Livia; Procesi, Michela

    2015-03-01

    We prove an abstract implicit function theorem with parameters for smooth operators defined on scales of sequence spaces, modeled for the search of quasi-periodic solutions of PDEs. The tame estimates required for the inverse linearised operators at each step of the iterative scheme are deduced via a multiscale inductive argument. The Cantor-like set of parameters where the solution exists is defined in a non inductive way. This formulation completely decouples the iterative scheme from the measure theoretical analysis of the parameters where the small divisors non-resonance conditions are verified. As an application, we deduce the existence of quasi-periodic solutions for forced NLW and NLS equations on any compact Lie group or manifold which is homogeneous with respect to a compact Lie group, extending previous results valid only for tori. A basic tool of harmonic analysis is the highest weight theory for the irreducible representations of compact Lie groups.

  13. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS OF {approx}15 MINUTES IN THE OPTICAL LIGHT CURVE OF THE BL LAC S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Bindu; Gupta, Alok C.; Joshi, U. C.; Ganesh, S.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2010-08-20

    Over the course of 3 hr on 2008 December 27, we obtained optical (R band) observations of the blazar S5 0716+714 at a very fast cadence of 10 s. Using several different techniques, we find fluctuations with an approximately 15 minute quasi-period to be present in the first portion of these data at a >3{sigma} confidence level. This is the fastest quasi-periodic oscillation that has been claimed to be observed in any blazar at any wavelength. While these data are insufficient to strongly constrain models for such fluctuations, the presence of such a short timescale when the source is not in a very low state seems to favor the action of turbulence behind a shock in the blazar's relativistic jet.

  14. Quasi-periodic Variations in X-Ray Emission and Long-term Radio Observations: Evidence for a Two-component Jet in Sw J1644+57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He; Huang, Chang-Yin

    2014-06-01

    The continued observations of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-periodic variations: a 200 s quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-periodic variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we suggest that the ~200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the observer line-of-sight periodically, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ~100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γj ~ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1052 erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γj ~ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1053 erg.

  15. Quasi-periodic variations in x-ray emission and long-term radio observations: Evidence for a two-component jet in Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-06-10

    The continued observations of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-periodic variations: a 200 s quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-periodic variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we suggest that the ∼200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the observer line-of-sight periodically, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ∼100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E {sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 52} erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E{sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 53} erg.

  16. Detection of quasi-periodic processes in repeated measurements: New approach for the fitting and clusterization of different data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatullin, R.; Rakhmatullin, R.

    2014-12-01

    Many experimentalists were accustomed to think that any independent measurement forms a non-correlated measurement that depends weakly from others. We are trying to reconsider this conventional point of view and prove that similar measurements form a strongly-correlated sequence of random functions with memory. In other words, successive measurements "remember" each other at least their nearest neighbors. This observation and justification on real data help to fit the wide set of data based on the Prony's function. The Prony's decomposition follows from the quasi-periodic (QP) properties of the measured functions and includes the Fourier transform as a partial case. New type of decomposition helps to obtain a specific amplitude-frequency response (AFR) of the measured (random) functions analyzed and each random function contains less number of the fitting parameters in comparison with its number of initial data points. Actually, the calculated AFR can be considered as the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS), which will be extremely useful in cases where the simple model pretending on description of the measured data is absent but vital necessity of their quantitative description is remained. These possibilities open a new way for clusterization of the initial data and new information that is contained in these data gives a chance for their detailed analysis. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements realized for empty resonator (pure noise data) and resonator containing a sample (CeO2 in our case) confirmed the existence of the QP processes in reality. But we think that the detection of the QP processes is a common feature of many repeated measurements and this new property of successive measurements can attract an attention of many experimentalists. To formulate some general conditions that help to identify and then detect the presence of some QP process in the repeated experimental measurements. To find a functional equation and its solution that yields the description of the identified QP process. To suggest some computing algorithm for fitting of the QP data to the analytical function that follows from the solution of the corresponding functional equation. The content of this paper is organized as follows. In the Section 2 we will try to find the answers on the problem posed in this introductory section. It contains also the mathematical description of the QP process and interpretation of the meaning of the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS). The GPS includes the conventional Fourier decomposition as a partial case. Section 3 contains the experimental details associated with receiving of the desired data. Section 4 includes some important details explaining specific features of application of general algorithm to concrete data. In Section 5 we summarize the results and outline the perspectives of this approach for quantitative description of time-dependent random data that are registered in different complex systems and experimental devices. Here we should notice that under the complex system we imply a system when a conventional model is absent[6]. Under simplicity of the acceptable model we imply the proper hypothesis ("best fit" model) containing minimal number of the fitting parameters that describes the behavior of the system considered quantitatively. The different approaches that exist in nowadays for description of these systems are collected in the recent review [7].

  17. UNIVERSAL SCALING OF THE 3:2 TWIN-PEAK QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FREQUENCIES WITH BLACK HOLE MASS AND SPIN REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin-Lin; Yuan, Weimin; Pan, Hai-Wu; Liu, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    We discuss further observational support of an idea formulated a decade ago by Abramowicz, Kluźniak, McClintock and Remillard. They demonstrated that the 3:2 pairs of frequencies of the twin-peak black hole (BH) high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) scale inversely with the BH masses and that the scaling covers the entire range from stellar to supermassive BHs. For this reason, they believed that the QPOs may be used for accurate measurements of masses and spins of BHs.

  18. Effects of Non-Thermal Plasma on Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal M.; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Torabi, Behzad; Alekseev, Oleg; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living tissues is required. Using mammalian cells in culture, it is shown here that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects that range from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis. It is also shown that these effects are primarily due to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have utilized γ-H2AX to detect DNA damage induced by non-thermal plasma and found that it is initiated by production of active neutral species that most likely induce formation of organic peroxides in cell medium. Phosphorylation of H2AX following non-thermal plasma treatment is ATR dependent and ATM independent, suggesting that plasma treatment may lead to replication arrest or formation of single-stranded DNA breaks; however, plasma does not lead to formation of bulky adducts/thymine dimers. PMID:21283714

  19. Tracking the energetics of the non-thermal disc-corona-jet in the very high state GX 339 - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, A.; Done, C.

    2016-06-01

    The dramatic hard-soft spectral transition in black hole binaries is important as it is associated with the collapse of the jet and with the strongest low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). These transition spectra (intermediate and very high state: VHS) are complex, with soft but distinctly non-thermal Comptonization which merges smoothly into the disc emission. Here we develop a physical model for the accretion flow which can accommodate all these features, with an outer standard disc, which can make a transition to an energetically coupled disc-corona region, and make a further transition to a hot inner flow which can be radiatively inefficient if required. The code explicitly uses fully relativistic emissivity (Novikov-Thorne), and all Comptonization is calculated with a hybrid (thermal and non-thermal) electron distribution. We fit this to a VHS spectrum from GX 339 - 4. We show that the complex continuum curvature produced by a hybrid electron distribution is enough to remove the strong constraint on black hole spin derived from reflection using simpler Comptonization models. More fundamentally, we show that the VHS cannot be fit with the same Novikov-Thorne emissivity which can fit the disc-dominated spectrum but instead requires that the inner flow is somewhat radiatively inefficient. This is consistent with an accretion powered jet, but simultaneous radio data show that the jet has already collapsed at the time of our data. Instead, it could point to truncation of the inner flow at radii larger than the innermost stable circular orbit, as predicted by the Lense-Thirring QPO models.

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis Au-Bi2Te3 Nanocomposite Thermoelectric Film with a Hierarchical Sub-Micron Antireflection Quasi-Periodic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Yuan; Xue, Ruiyang; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film with a hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure was synthesized via a low-temperature chemical route using Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) as the biomimetic template. This method combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques, without the requirement of expensive equipment and energy intensive processes. The microstructure and the morphology of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning-electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coupled the plasmon resonances of the Au nanoparticles with the hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure, the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film possesses an effective infrared absorption and infrared photothermal conversion performance. Based on the finite difference time domain method and the Joule effect, the heat generation and the heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film were studied. The heterogeneity of heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film opens up a novel promising technique for generating thermoelectric power under illumination. PMID:26047340

  1. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted combustion, and gas dynamic flow control. Many of these applications have been developed with low-pressure plasma. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma technologies possess such advantages as simplicity of operation and relatively low cost of equipments. A variety of available discharge techniques provides non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in various gases with parameters covering a wide range in power densities, reduced electric field strengths and current densities. Requirements to non-thermal plasma parameters and sorts of gas for various applications vary widely, too. For any specific application the most appropriate discharge type can be found. The spectrum of discharge devices already existing is surprisingly broad. The problem of a successful choice of a discharge type for a specific application will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be placed on the problem of plasma removal of toxic and harmful species from the gas flow.

  2. Electromagnetic field occupational exposure: non-thermal vs. thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Israel, M; Zaryabova, V; Ivanova, M

    2013-06-01

    There are a variety of definitions for "non-thermal effects" included in different international standards. They start by the simple description that they are "effects of electromagnetic energy on a body that are not heat-related effects", passing through the very general definition related to low-level effects: "biological effects ascribed to exposure to low-level electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields, i.e. at or below the corresponding dosimetric reference levels in the frequency range covered in this standard (0Hz-300GHz)", and going to the concrete definition of "the stimulation of muscles, nerves, or sensory organs, vertigo or phosfenes". Here, we discuss what kind of effect does the non-thermal one has on human body and give data of measurements in different occupations with low-frequency sources of electromagnetic field such as electric power distribution systems, transformers, MRI systems and : video display units (VDUs), whereas thermal effects should not be expected. In some of these workplaces, values above the exposure limits could be found, nevertheless that they are in the term "non-thermal effects" on human body. Examples are workplaces in MRI, also in some power plants. Here, we will not comment on non-thermal effects as a result of RF or microwave exposure because there are not proven evidence about the existance of such effects and mechanisms for them are not clear. PMID:23675617

  3. Application of a non-thermal plasma to combustion enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L. A.; Kim, Y.; Stange, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    As a primary objective, researchers in Los Alamos National Laboratory's P-24 Plasma Physics group are aiming to minimize U.S. energy dependency on foreign resources through experiments incorporating a plasma assisted combustion unit. Under this broad category, researchers seek to increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in IC-engines, gas-turbine engines, and burner units. To date, the existing lean burn operations, consisting of higher air to fuel ratio, have successfully operated in a regime where reduced NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} emissions are expected and have also shown increased combustion efficiency (less unburned hydrocarbon) for propane. By incorporating a lean burn operation assisted by a non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor, the fracturing of hydrocarbons can occur with increased power (combustion, efficiency, and stability). Non-thermal plasma units produce energetic electrons, but avoid the high gas and ion temperatures involved in thermal plasmas. One non-thermal plasma method, known as silent discharge, allows free radicals to act in propagating combustion reactions, as well as intermediaries in hydrocarbon fracturing. Using non-thermal plasma units, researchers have developed a fuel activation/conversion system capable of decreasing pollutants while increasing fuel efficiency, providing a path toward future U.S. energy independence.

  4. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR HYBRID NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for DoD air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile o...

  5. Effect of Non-Thermal Processing on Peanut Allergens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergy is on the rise, and the reason is still unclear. Previously, roasting by thermal method has been shown to increase the allergenic potency of peanuts. In this study, we determined if non-thermal methods, such as, pulsed electric fields (PEF) and pulsed UV lights (PUV) affect peanut all...

  6. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF HIGH FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Changsheng; Li Xiangdong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.c

    2010-05-10

    We suggest a possible explanation for the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries. By solving the perturbation general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations, we find two stable modes of the Alfven wave in the accretion disks with toroidal magnetic fields. We suggest that these two modes may lead to the double high frequency QPOs if they are produced in the transition region between the inner advection-dominated accretion flow and the outer thin disk. This model naturally accounts for the 3:2 relation for the upper and lower frequencies of the QPOs, and the relation between the BH mass and QPO frequency.

  7. STUDYING FREQUENCY RELATIONSHIPS OF KILOHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FOR 4U 1636-53 AND Sco X-1: OBSERVATIONS CONFRONT THEORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yongfeng; Boutelier, Martin; Barret, Didier; Zhang Shuangnan

    2011-01-10

    By fitting the frequencies of simultaneous lower and upper kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in two prototype neutron star (NS) QPO sources (4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1), we test the predictive power of all currently proposed QPO models. Models predict a linear, power law, or other relationship between the two frequencies. We found that for plausible NS parameters (mass and angular momentum), no model can satisfactorily reproduce the data, leading to very large chi-square values in our fittings. For both 4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1, this is largely due to the fact that the data significantly differ from a linear relationship. Some models perform relatively better but still have their own problems. Such a detailed comparison of data from models enables identification of routes for improving those models further.

  8. The energy dependence of the three types of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in the black hole candidate H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Zhang, S.; Qu, J. L.; Gao, H. Q.; Zhao, H. H.; Huang, C. P.; Song, L. M.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the properties of the centroid frequency of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LF QPOs, 0.1-30 Hz) during the 2003 outburst of H1743-322, by using the observational data of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the frequency shows different energy dependences for each of the sub-classes of LF QPOs: the QPO frequency is proportional to photon energy for the type C QPOs while it is ambiguous for the type A and B QPOs. For type C QPOs, the slope of the frequency-energy relation versus frequency plot can be well described by a power law with frequency till ˜7.5 Hz. Beyond ˜7.5 Hz the slope goes down. The LF QPO amplitude decreases monotonically with the frequency for the type C but increases for the other two types. These properties provide a joint diagnostic for discriminating the different types of LF QPO.

  9. The 2:3:6 quasi-periodic oscillation structure in GRS 1915+105 and cubic subharmonics in the context of relativistic discoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Rodríguez, M.; Solís-Sánchez, H.; López-Barquero, V.; Matamoros-Alvarado, B.; Venegas-Li, A.

    2014-06-01

    We propose a simple toy model to explain the 2:3:6 quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) structure in GRS 1915+105 and, more generally, the 2:3 QPO structure in XTE J1550-564, GRO J1655-40 and H1743-322. The model exploits the onset of subharmonics in the context of discoseismology. We suggest that the observed frequencies may be the consequence of a resonance between a fundamental g mode and an unobservable p wave. The results include the prediction that, as better data become available, a QPO with a frequency of twice the higher twin frequency and a large quality factor will be observed in twin peak sources, as it might already have been observed in the especially active GRS 1915+105.

  10. Relation between the quasi-periodic oscillations and the low-frequency noise of GX 5-1 in the horizontal branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Dotani, Tadayasu; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Vaughan, Brian; Norris, Jay P.

    1991-01-01

    Ginga observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the low-frequency noise (LFN) from GX 5-1 in its horizontal-branch spectral state are presented. Power spectral fits were attempted using model functions based on simple oscillating shot models. A clear second-harmonic peak of QPO was detected. Variations in the powers of QPO and LFN on timescales of 8-256 s were also studied. These variations were significant for all of the timescales studied, and were uncorrelated with each other on timescales shorter than a few tens of seconds, and correlated on longer timescales. From simulations based on a simple shot model, it was found that the variation amplitude and the lack of correlation on short timescales are not inconsistent with the oscillating shot models. A more complex model is necessary to fully explain the observed properties.

  11. How are the VLF quasi-periodic emissions controlled by harmonics of field line oscillations? - The results of a comparison between ground and GEOS satellites measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixier, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    1986-06-01

    Data on VLF and UHF waves observed in situ for the first time by the GEOS 1 and 2 satellites close to the equatorial plane are compared with ground-based measurements. The results permit a more complete explanation of quasi-periodic (QP) modulation. The data are described, and a general ground-satellite comparison of occurrence and spectra of simultaneous emission is given. A detailed study of some selected events shows that, when the GEOS data are taken into account, it is sometimes difficult to classify QP emissions as either type I or type II. It is suggested that QPs may be due to the same mechanism involving compressional harmonics of a standing fundamental ULF wave.

  12. Late Holocene shoreline behavior in embayments of Lake Michigan: Influence of quasi-periodic lake-level variations and sediment supply

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J. . Indiana Geological Survey)

    1994-04-01

    Lake Michigan contains numerous former embayments into glacial deposits or bedrock. Many of the embayments contain dunes, spits, and captured lakes, but others contain arcuate strandplains of beach ridges. The strandplains are a geologic record of shoreline behavior and lake-level variation throughout the late Holocene. The larger strandplains show similar long-term patterns of beach-ridge development. The similar patterns are expected because variations in lake level are a primary control on shoreline behavior, and all embayments would have experienced relatively the same lake-level changes. Some variations in the long-term pattern of shoreline development do occur between strandplains. These dissimilarities are primarily a function of different rates of sediment supply to the shoreline of each embayment. Beach-ridge development within embayments can be represented on a rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply diagram (Curray diagram) as three superimposed ovals on the positive rate of sediment supply side of the diagram. The three stacked ovals represent the three quasi-periodic lake-level variations defined by Thompson (1992) and show the position of the shoreline for a given time within the Curray diagram fields. For shorelines with a high rate of sediment supply, only the 30-year quasi-periodic variation would reach the aggradation line. For shorelines having significantly less sediment supply, rising lake level on the 150- and 600-year variations would force the 30-year oval across the aggradation line and well into the depositional and possibly the erosional transgression fields. Under these conditions erosion would occur that may remove, stack, or at least prevent one or more beach ridges from being developed.

  13. Thomson scattering on non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hbner, Simon; Santos Sousa, Joao; van der Mullen, Joost; Graham, William G.

    2015-10-01

    To characterize non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas experimentally, a large variety of methods and techniques is available, each having its own specific possibilities and limitations. A rewarding method to investigate these plasma sources is laser Thomson scattering. However, that is challenging. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (gas temperatures close to room temperature and electron temperatures of a few eV) have usually small dimensions (below 1?mm) and a low degree of ionization (below 10?4). Here an overview is presented of how Thomson scattering can be applied to such plasmas and used to measure directly spatially and temporally resolved the electron density and energy distribution. A general description of the scattering of photons and the guidelines for an experimental setup of this active diagnostic are provided. Special attention is given to the design concepts required to achieve the maximum signal photon flux with a minimum of unwanted signals. Recent results from the literature are also presented and discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic Fluctuations in Electron Non-thermal Plasmas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Navarro, R.; Araneda, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Observed electron velocity distributions in the solar wind exhibit a variety of non-thermal features which deviate from thermal equilibrium, for example, in the form of temperature anisotropies, suprathermal tails, and field aligned beams. The state close to thermal equilibrium and its departure from it provides a source for spontaneous emissions of electromagnetic fluctuations as for example the whistler cyclotron waves. Here we present a comparative analysis of these fluctuations based upon anisotropic plasma modeled with Maxwellian and Tsalis kappa-like particle distributions. Dispersion analysis and stability thresholds are derived for these non-thermal distributions and compared with similar results obtained from PIC simulations using plasma and field parameters relevant to the solar wind environments.

  15. Non-thermal plasmas in fusion tokamak edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    Nonthermal plasma is an important part of the tokamak edge physics, if not dominant, and makes the fluid or thermal equilibrium physics to be limited. The non-thermal plasma in the edge region is generated by plasma loss along open magnetic field lines, wall-recycled neutral particles, sputtered impurity particles, orbit loss cone in the velocity space and strong plasma turbulence. They affect the edge plasma confinement through modification of electric field, parallel heat loss, plasma flow, and turbulence transport. Various generation mechanisms of the non-thermal plasmas, their dynamics, and their effect on the plasma transport will be discussed in detail using simulation results from the plasma kinetic code XGC in realistic diverted edge geometry.

  16. Non-thermal plasma for exhaust gases treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva R., Elvia; Pacheco P., Marquidia; Gómez B., Fernando; Pacheco P., Joel; Colín C., Arturo; Sánchez-Mendieta, Víctor; Valdivia B., Ricardo; Santana D., Alfredo; Huertas C., José; Frías P., Hilda

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a study on a non-thermal plasma device to treat exhaust gases in an internal combustion engine. Several tests using a plasma device to treat exhaust gases are conducted on a Honda GX200-196 cm3 engine at different rotational speeds. A plasma reactor could be efficient in degrading nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Monoxide and carbon dioxide treatment is minimal. However, achieving 1%-3% degradation may be interesting to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases.

  17. Corona: Coordinated research on non-thermal processes in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems in astrophysics are examined where departures from purely thermal behavior are expected to produce effects which are detectable by a variety of NASA satellites. The problems identified as worthy of study include coronal heating in stars, deposition of non-thermal particle energy in stars from external sources, and turbulence in atmospheres and winds of stars. The progress in solving these problems is summarized.

  18. Identification of the Infrared Non-thermal Emission in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Ajello, M.; Grindlay, J. E.; Smith, Howard A.

    2011-10-01

    Blazars constitute the most interesting and enigmatic class of extragalactic γ-ray sources dominated by non-thermal emission. In this Letter, we show how the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) infrared data make it possible to identify a distinct region of the [3.4]-[4.6]-[12] μm color-color diagram where the sources dominated by the thermal radiation are separated from those dominated by non-thermal emission, in particular the blazar population. This infrared non-thermal region, which we indicate as the WISE blazar strip (WBS), will constitute a new powerful diagnostic tool when the full WISE survey data are released. The WBS can be used to extract new blazar candidates, to identify those of uncertain type and also to search for the counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources. We show one example of the value of the use of the WBS identifying the TeV source VER J0648+152, recently discovered by VERITAS.

  19. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  20. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF THE INFRARED NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Smith, Howard A.

    2011-10-20

    Blazars constitute the most interesting and enigmatic class of extragalactic {gamma}-ray sources dominated by non-thermal emission. In this Letter, we show how the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) infrared data make it possible to identify a distinct region of the [3.4]-[4.6]-[12] {mu}m color-color diagram where the sources dominated by the thermal radiation are separated from those dominated by non-thermal emission, in particular the blazar population. This infrared non-thermal region, which we indicate as the WISE blazar strip (WBS), will constitute a new powerful diagnostic tool when the full WISE survey data are released. The WBS can be used to extract new blazar candidates, to identify those of uncertain type and also to search for the counterparts of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources. We show one example of the value of the use of the WBS identifying the TeV source VER J0648+152, recently discovered by VERITAS.

  2. Characterizing the non-thermal emission of Cas A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helder, Eveline

    We present results of our research on the non-thermal continuum emission of Cassiopeia A. Chandra discovered in 2001 thin non-thermal rims at a distance of 150" to the center of Cas A. These rims can be associated with the forward shock and contain a surprisingly high magnetic field of 0.1 - 0.5 mG. This feeds the thought that forward shocks of young shell-type supernova remnants are able to accelerate cosmic rays at least up to the knee, at 1015 eV. In addition, the Chandra image shows thin, non-thermal filaments at the inside of the remnant. A natural question is whether these filaments are due to the forward shock projected onto the interior of the remnant, or whether the filaments have another origin. We investigated this issue by employing a deprojection technique. Assuming spherical symmetry, we deproject the surface brightness into the intrinsic emissivity as a function of the radius. A result of this deprojection is that we see the reverse shock coming up in the (deprojected) continuum emissivity. A spectral analysis of the continuum emission shows that in the Western half of the remnant, this emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation. This is rather surprising as it requires a high reverse shock velocity (in the frame of the ejecta), at odds with simple hydrodynamic models for a supernova remnant evolving in a stellar wind.

  3. Non-thermal plasma for inactivated-vaccine preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Zhu, Ruihao; Yang, Licong; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Qian; Su, Xia; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines are of great importance in controlling the spread of infectious diseases in poultry farming. The safety and efficacy of vaccines are also essential. To explore the feasibility of a novel technology (non-thermal plasma) in inactivated vaccine preparation, an alternating current atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) jet with Ar/O2/N2 as the operating gas was used to inactivate a Newcastle disease virus (NDV, LaSota) strain and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV, A/Chicken/Hebei/WD/98) for vaccine preparation. The results showed that complete inactivation could be achieved with 2min of NTP treatment for both NDV and AIV. Moreover, a proper NTP treatment time is needed for inactivation of a virus without destruction of the antigenic determinants. Compared to traditional formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine, the vaccine made from NDV treated by NTP for 2min (NTP-2min-NDV-vaccine) could induce a higher NDV-specific antibody titer in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, and the results of a chicken challenge experiment showed that NTP-2min-NDV-vaccine could protect SPF chickens from a lethal NDV challenge. Vaccines made from AIV treated by NTP for 2min (NTP-2min-AIV-vaccine) also showed a similar AIV-specific antibody titer compared with traditional AIV vaccines prepared using formaldehyde inactivation. Studies of the morphological changes of the virus, chemical analysis of NDV allantoic fluid and optical emission spectrum analysis of NTP suggested that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by NTP played an important role in the virus inactivation process. All of these results demonstrated that it could be feasible to use non-thermal NTP as an alternative strategy to prepare inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease and avian influenza. PMID:26529075

  4. Non-thermal plasma: An emerging technology for VOCs control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.M.; Chang, M.B.

    1998-12-31

    The effectiveness of applying non-thermal plasma for destroying VOCs from gas streams is experimentally investigated in this study. p-Xylene, designated as air toxics in the 1990 US Clean Air Act Amendment, is selected as target pollutants due to its wide use in industrial processes. Exposure to fairly low levels of p-xylene (a few ppm) can cause irritation to nose, skin and eyes. In addition, it is odor-causing VOCs which has received much public concern especially in Taiwan due to its high population density. Various technologies have been developed for removing VOCs, e.g., condensation, activated carbon adsorption, thermal decomposition, heterogeneous catalysis and biofiltration. However, there are some limitations with these technologies. Recently, non-thermal plasma technologies have been proposed as an innovative way for VOCs control. Non-thermal plasma can be generated via various methods including dielectric barrier discharge, corona discharge, DC discharge, packed-bed discharge and RF discharge. The sinks of xylene in atmosphere are primarily involved with the reactions with O and OH atoms. Interestingly, O and OH atoms can be effectively generated via nonthermal plasma processes. A laboratory-scale reactor is designed and constructed for evaluating the effectiveness of nonthermal plasma for destroying p-xylene molecules. The nonthermal plasma is generated with dielectric barrier discharge operating at atmospheric pressure. Operating parameters investigated in this study include applied voltage, temperature and composition of the gas stream. Results indicate that as high as 100% p-xylene removal efficiencies can be achieved.

  5. Non-thermal plasma potentialities for microwave device reconfigurability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Jrme; Pascal, Olivier; Callegari, Thierry; Pascaud, Romain; Pizarro, Francisco; Liard, Laurent; Lo, Juslan; Kallel, Asma

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of results achieved from cooperative works with microwave and plasma research groups in Toulouse (France) are presented in this paper. They are focused on the use of few non-thermal plasmas to make a microwave device reconfigurable. The relative permittivity of such a plasma medium can be tuned from unity to negative values. This special feature appears to be very attractive, although the electromagnetic losses are significant. The use of plasmas with planar waveguides and within metamaterials is discussed. In addition, the basic principles of a scanning antenna built with a leaky wave in a plasma layer are presented.

  6. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  7. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  8. Frequency Variation of the Kilohertz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and the Flux of the Band-Limited Noise in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Wenfei

    2009-01-01

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) and the band-limited noise (BLN) in the 0.5-16 Hz range observed simultaneously on the horizontal branch (HB) and on the upper normal branch (NB) of the brightest neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 with observations performed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. We find that the twin kHz QPO frequencies are positively correlated with the flux variations taking place on the BLN timescales on the HB, in contrast to the anticorrelation held on the timescale of the normal-branch oscillation (NBO) on the NB reported previously, suggesting that although they occur in sequence along the color-color tracks, the BLN and the NBO are of different origin. We also present evidence that the frequency separation between the twin kHz QPOs decreases with the flux by 2-3 Hz on the BLN timescales, which is consistent with the trend on the longer timescale that the Z source traces on the HB. This further suggests that the flux variation associated with the BLN originates from the mass accretion rate variation in the disk accretion flow. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the BLN.

  9. Quasi-periodic patterns (QPP): large-scale dynamics in resting state fMRI that correlate with local infraslow electrical activity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Garth John; Pan, Wen-Ju; Magnuson, Matthew Evan; Jaeger, Dieter; Keilholz, Shella Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectivity measurements from resting state blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are proving a powerful tool to probe both normal brain function and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the neural mechanisms that coordinate these large networks are poorly understood, particularly in the context of the growing interest in network dynamics. Recent work in anesthetized rats has shown that the spontaneous BOLD fluctuations are tightly linked to infraslow local field potentials (LFPs) that are seldom recorded but comparable in frequency to the slow BOLD fluctuations. These findings support the hypothesis that long-range coordination involves low frequency neural oscillations and establishes infraslow LFPs as an excellent candidate for probing the neural underpinnings of the BOLD spatiotemporal patterns observed in both rats and humans. To further examine the link between large-scale network dynamics and infraslow LFPs, simultaneous fMRI and microelectrode recording were performed in anesthetized rats. Using an optimized filter to isolate shared components of the signals, we found that time-lagged correlation between infraslow LFPs and BOLD is comparable in spatial extent and timing to a quasi-periodic pattern (QPP) found from BOLD alone, suggesting that fMRI-measured QPPs and the infraslow LFPs share a common mechanism. As fMRI allows spatial resolution and whole brain coverage not available with electroencephalography, QPPs can be used to better understand the role of infraslow oscillations in normal brain function and neurological or psychiatric disorders. PMID:24071524

  10. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of magnetars SGR 1806–20 and SGR 1900+14 observed with RXTE

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, D.; Heil, L. M.; Watts, A. L.; Göğüş, E.

    2014-11-10

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been observed. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806–20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO observed from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and strong variability on short timescales. In this regime, standard Fourier methodology and more sophisticated Fourier analyses fail in equal parts by yielding an unacceptably large number of false-positive detections. This problem is not straightforward to solve in the Fourier domain. Instead, we show how simulations of light curves can offer a viable solution for QPO searches in these light curves.

  11. Time delay effect between long quasi-periodic oscillations of 37 GHz radio sources and the magnetic field of the nearest sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V. V.; Riehokainen, A.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Kallunki, J.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements and the interpretation of the time delay effect between long quasi-periodic oscillations of sunspot magnetic fields and nearby millimeter radio sources observed at 37 GHz were the main goals of this work. Ground-based radio telescope operated by Metsähovi Radio Observatory, Aalto University, Finland was used to obtain time series variations of radio intensity at 37 GHz frequency, as well as, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft was used to obtain the magnetic field time series variations. Lags (time delays) in the interval of 15-35 minutes were obtained by cross-correlation analysis of time series and by direct geometrical measurements of distances between the radio sources and nearby sunspots. These distances were in the interval of 11-24 Mm. Corresponding time delays were defined as the relation of these distances to the sound speed. Time delays obtained by two different independent methods turned to be very close. This fact confirms the interpretation of the phenomenon under the study as a process of propagation of disturbances from the slowly oscillating sunspot to the radio source with the sound speed.

  12. Discovery of correlated optical/X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole binary SWIFT J1753.5-0127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veledina, Alexandra; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Durant, Martin; Gandhi, Poshak; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of the correlated optical/X-ray low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole binary SWIFT J1753.5-0127. The phase lag between two light curves at the QPO frequency is close to zero. This result puts strong constraints on the nature of the optical emission in this object and on the origin of the QPOs in general. We demonstrate that the QPO signal and the broad-band variability can be explained in terms of the hot accretion flow radiating in both optical and X-ray bands. In this model, the QPO appears due to the Lense-Thirring precession of entire flow, while the broad-band variability in the optical is produced by two components: the hot flow and the irradiated disc. Using the phase-lag spectra, we put a lower limit on the orbital inclination i ≳ 50°, which can be used to constrain the mass of the compact object.

  13. Discovery of a low-frequency broad quasi-periodic oscillation peak in the power density spectrum of Cygnus X-1 with Granat/SIGMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Churazov, E.; Gilfanov, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Dyachkov, A.; Khavenson, N.; Kremnev, R.; Sukhanov, K.; Ballet, J.; Laurent, P.; Salotti, L.; Claret, A.; Olive, J. F.; Denis, M.; Mandrou, P.; Roques, J. P.

    1994-03-01

    A transient broad (delta(f)/f = 0.8 approximately 1) very low frequency (approximately 0.04-0.07 Hz) and strong (fractional rms variations are at the level of approximately 10-15% of total source intensity) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) feature was discovered by the SIGMA telescope onboard the Granat observatory in the power density spectra of Cygnus X-1; the source was during all the observations carried out in 1990-1992 in its standard (low or hard) spectral state (Sunyaev & Truemper 1979) with average 40-150 keV flux, corresponding appproximately to the 'nominal' gamma2 level of the source (Ling et al. 1979). The power density spectra, obtained in the 4 x 10-4-10 Hz frequency range, typically exhibit strong very low frequency noise below a few millihertz increasing toward lower frequencies, a nearly flat region from a few millihertz up to a break frequency fbr = 0.04 approximately 0.1 Hz and a power-law spectrum as f-1 above the break frequency. The QPO feature, when observed, was centered below or near the break frequency fbr.

  14. A unified lense-thirring precession model for optical and X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Veledina, Alexandra; Poutanen, Juri; Ingram, Adam E-mail: juri.poutanen@oulu.fi

    2013-12-01

    Recent observations of accreting black holes reveal the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) in the optical power density spectra. The corresponding oscillation periods match those found in X-rays, implying a common origin. Among the numerous suggested X-ray QPO mechanisms, some may also work in the optical. However, their relevance to the broadband—optical through X-ray—spectral properties have not been investigated. For the first time, we discuss the QPO mechanism in the context of the self-consistent spectral model. We propose that the QPOs are produced by Lense-Thirring precession of the hot accretion flow, whose outer parts radiate in optical wavelengths. At the same time, its innermost parts are emitting X-rays, which explains the observed connection of QPO periods. We predict that the X-ray and optical QPOs should be either in phase or shifted by half a period, depending on the observer position. We investigate the QPO harmonic content and find that the variability amplitudes at the fundamental frequency are larger in the optical, while the X-rays are expected to have strong harmonics. We then discuss the QPO spectral dependence and compare the expectations to the existing data.

  15. Interaction between ELF-VLF emission and magnetic pulsations: quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions associated with Pc 3--4 magnetic pulsations and their geomagnetic conjugacy

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, N.; Kokubun, S.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of quasi-periodic (QP) ELF-VLF emissions with periods of 10--150 s and their relationships to magnetic pulsations are studied by using data obtained from Syowa and Mizuho Stations in Antarctica and at Husafell in Iceland, which is located near the geomagnetic conjugate point of Syowa. From the coherency analysis between QP emissions and Pc 3--4 magnetic pulsations it is found that the coherency between the D component of magnetic pulsations and the intensity fluctuations of QP's is much higher than that between the H component of magnetic pulsations and QP's. It is also found that the propagation time of magnetic pulsations (HM waves) from the interaction region between magnetic pulsations and QP's in the magnetosphere to the ground is 20--30 s. These properties are observed at conjugate-pair stations with good conjugacy. The results strongly suggest that QP emissions are modulated by compressional mode Pc 3--4 magnetic pulsations near the equatorial plane in the outer magnetosphere.

  16. Flares, broadening of the pulse-frequency peak and quasi-periodic oscillations in the transient X-ray pulsar 4U 1901+03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Marykutty; Paul, Biswajit; Devasia, Jincy; Indulekha, Kavila

    2011-01-01

    After a long quiescence of three decades, the transient X-ray pulsar 4U 1901+03 became highly active in 2003 February. From the analysis of a large number of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA) observations of this source, we report here the detection of X-ray flares, a broadening of the pulse-frequency feature and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The X-ray flares showed spectral changes, had a duration of 100-300 s, and were more frequent and stronger during the peak of the outburst. In most of the observations during the outburst we also detected a broadening of the pulse-frequency peak. We have also found intensity-dependent changes in the pulse profile at very short time-scales. This reveals a coupling between the periodic and the low-frequency aperiodic variabilities. In addition, near the end of the outburst we have detected a strong QPO feature centred at 0.135 Hz. The QPO feature is broad with a quality factor of 3.3 and with an rms value of 18.5 3.1 per cent. Using the QPO frequency and the X-ray luminosity during the QPO detection period we estimated the magnetic field strength of the neutron star as 0.31 1012 G which is consistent with the value inferred earlier under the assumption of spin equilibrium.

  17. Mechanism of NO reduction with non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yu, Qi; Jiang, Yan-Long; Zeng, Ke-Si; Gu, Fan

    2005-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been proved to be an effective and competitive technology for removing NO in flue gas since 1970. In this paper, the NO reduction mechanism of the non-thermal plasma reaction in NO/N2/O2 system was investigated using the method of spectral analysis and quantum chemistry. By the establishment of NO reduction and gas discharge plasma emission spectrum measuring system, the NO reduction results, gas discharge emission spectra of NO/N2/O2 and pure N2 were obtained, and then the model of molecular orbit of N2 either in ground state or its excited state was worked out using the method of molecular orbit Ab initio in Self-Consistent Field (SCF). It was found that NO reduction in NO/N2 gas discharge plasma was achieved mainly through a series of fast elementary reactions and the N(E6) at excited state was the base for NO reduction. PMID:16083121

  18. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  19. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  20. Discovery of a Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7 Second Quasi-periodic Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnam, S. Ç.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.

    2004-11-01

    XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on 2003 January 6, while the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) was also monitoring the source. Using the RXTE Proportional Counter Array data set between 2002 December 3 and 2003 January 29, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4+/-0.9)×10-13 Hz s-1, respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC PN light curve, we found quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude of ~6.6%. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power-law component with high-energy cutoff and the ~6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with blackbody emission with kT~1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius of ~0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star surface as the source of the blackbody emission. The flux of the iron emission line at ~6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.

  1. DISCOVERY OF A 7 mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: richard@astro.umd.edu

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an Almost-Equal-To 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33{sigma} confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q {identical_to} {nu}/{Delta}{nu}, of Almost-Equal-To 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of Almost-Equal-To - 2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies {approx}>0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the 'heartbeat' mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz 'dipper QPOs' of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  2. QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR AND STELLAR FLARES: RE-EVALUATING THEIR NATURE IN THE CONTEXT OF POWER-LAW FLARE FOURIER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.

    2015-01-10

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ≈ 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.

  3. A SPECTRAL STUDY OF THE RAPID TRANSITIONS OF TYPE-B QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE BLACK HOLE TRANSIENT XTE J1859+226

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2013-09-20

    The fast transitions of type-B and type-A quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are rarely found, and they are observed at the peak of the outburst in black hole transient (BHT) sources. The associated spectral variations during such events are crucial to understand the origin and location of such QPOs in the accretion disk. During the 1999 outburst of XTE J1859+226, on four occasions a rapid transition of type-B/A QPOs was noted. We performed broadband spectral analysis on these four observations to unveil the responsible spectral parameter causing the rapid transitions. After invoking simple spectral models, it was observed that disk parameters were consistently varying along with disk and power-law fluxes, and almost no change was noted in the power-law index parameter. Though using a complex physical model showed consistent results, the spectral parameter variations across the transitions were not significant. It was observed that the type-B QPO was always associated with an inner disk front which is closer to the BH. In one observation, a type-A QPO appeared as the source count rate suddenly dropped, and the power-law index as well as disk normalization parameter considerably changed during this transition. The spectral changes in this particular observation were similar to the changes observed in XTE J1817-330, indicating a common underlying mechanism. We have also examined a similar observation of BHT source GX 339-4, where a sudden transition of a type-A/B QPO was noted. Similar spectral study again revealed that the disk parameters were changing. We discuss the results in the framework of a truncated disk model and conclude that the movement of the coupled inner disk-corona region is responsible for such rapid transitions of type-B QPOs.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-PERIODIC X-RAY DIPS FROM AN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BINARY MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We report results from long-term ( Almost-Equal-To 1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 {+-} 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 {+-} 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination {approx}>70 Degree-Sign . We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  5. Probing the origin of quasi-periodic oscillations: the short-time-scale evolution of phase lags in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Eijnden, Jakob; Ingram, Adam; Uttley, Phil

    2016-06-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of the short-time-scale energy dependence of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray flux of GRS 1915+105. The QPO frequency in this source has previously been observed to depend on photon energy, with the frequency increasing with energy for observations with a high (≳2 Hz) QPO frequency, and decreasing with energy for observations with a low (≲2 Hz) QPO frequency. As this observed energy dependence is currently unexplained, we investigate if it is intrinsic to the QPO mechanism by tracking phase lags on (sub)second time-scales. We find that the phase lag between two broad energy bands systematically increases for 5-10 QPO cycles, after which the QPO becomes decoherent, the phase lag resets and the pattern repeats. This shows that the band with the higher QPO frequency is running away from the other band on short time-scales, providing strong evidence that the energy dependence of the QPO frequency is intrinsic. We also find that the faster the QPO decoheres, the faster the phase lag increases, suggesting that the intrinsic frequency difference contributes to the decoherence of the QPO. We interpret our results within a simple geometric QPO model, where different radii in the inner accretion flow experience Lense-Thirring precession at different frequencies, causing the decoherence of the oscillation. By varying the spectral shape of the inner accretion flow as a function of radius, we are able to qualitatively explain the energy-dependent behaviour of both QPO frequency and phase lag.

  6. Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  7. Evidence from Quasi-Periodic Oscillations for a Millisecond Pulsar in the Low Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E.; Kaaret, P.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) near 1 kHz from the low mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 in observations with RXTE. The observations span several months and sample the source over a large range of X-ray luminosity. In every interval QPOs are present above 400 Hz with fractional RMS amplitudes from 3 to 12% over the full PCA band. At high count rates, two high frequency QPOs are detected simultaneously. The difference of their frequency centroids is consistent with a constant value of 323 Hz in all observations. During one interval a third signal is detected at 328 +/- 2 Hz. This suggests the system has a stable 'clock' which is most likely the neutron star with spin period 3.1 msec. Thus, our observations of 4U 0614+091 and those of 4U 1728-34 provide the first evidence for millisecond pulsars within low-mass X-ray binary systems and reveal the 'missing-link' between millisecond radiopulsars and the late stages of binary evolution in low mass X-ray binaries. The constant difference of the high frequency QPOs sug,,ests a beat-frequency interpretation. In this model, the high frequency QPO is associated with the Keplerian frequency of the inner accretion disk and the lower frequency QPO is a 'beat' between the differential rotation frequency of the inner disk and the spinning neutron star. Assuming the high frequency QPO is a Keplerian orbital frequency for the accretion disk, we find a maximum mass of 1.9 solar mass and a maximum radius of 17 km for the neutron star.

  8. Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares: Re-evaluating their Nature in the Context of Power-law Flare Fourier Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ≈ 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.

  9. LOW-FREQUENCY (11 mHz) OSCILLATIONS IN H1743-322: A NEW CLASS OF BLACK HOLE QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, D.; Strohmayer, T.

    2012-08-01

    We report the discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at {approx}11 mHz in two RXTE and one Chandra observations of the black hole candidate H1743-322. The QPO is observed only at the beginning of the 2010 and 2011 outbursts at similar hard color and intensity, suggestive of an accretion state dependence for the QPO. Although its frequency appears to be correlated with X-ray intensity on timescales of a day, in successive outbursts eight months apart, we measure a QPO frequency that differs by less than Almost-Equal-To 2.2 mHz while the intensity had changed significantly. We show that this {approx}11 mHz QPO is different from the so-called Type C QPOs seen in black holes and that the mechanisms that produce the two flavors of variability are most probably independent. After comparing this QPO with other variability phenomena seen in accreting black holes and neutron stars, we conclude that it best resembles the so-called 1 Hz QPOs seen in dipping neutron star systems, although having a significantly lower (1-2 orders of magnitude) frequency. If confirmed, H1743-322 is the first black hole showing this type of variability. Given the unusual characteristics and the hard-state dependence of the {approx}11 mHz QPO, we also speculate whether these oscillations could instead be related to the radio jets observed in H1743-322. A systematic search for this type of low-frequency QPOs in similar systems is needed to test this speculation. In any case, it remains unexplained why these QPOs have only been seen in the last two outbursts of H1743-322.

  10. Probing the origin of quasi-periodic oscillations: the short-timescale evolution of phase lags in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijnden, Jakob van den; Ingram, Adam; Uttley, Phil

    2016-03-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of the short-timescale energy dependence of low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray flux of GRS 1915+105. The QPO frequency in this source has previously been observed to depend on photon energy, with the frequency increasing with energy for observations with a high (≳ 2 Hz) QPO frequency, and decreasing with energy for observations with a low (≲ 2 Hz) QPO frequency. As this observed energy dependence is currently unexplained, we investigate if it is intrinsic to the QPO mechanism by tracking phase lags on (sub)second timescales. We find that the phase lag between two broad energy bands systematically increases for 5 - 10 QPO cycles, after which the QPO becomes decoherent, the phase lag resets and the pattern repeats. This shows that the band with the higher QPO frequency is running away from the other band on short timescales, providing strong evidence that the energy dependence of the QPO frequency is intrinsic. We also find that the faster the QPO decoheres, the faster the phase lag increases, suggesting that the intrinsic frequency difference contributes to the decoherence of the QPO. We interpret our results within a simple geometric QPO model, where different radii in the inner accretion flow experience Lense-Thirring precession at different frequencies, causing the decoherence of the oscillation. By varying the spectral shape of the inner accretion flow as a function of radius, we are able to qualitatively explain the energy-dependent behaviour of both QPO frequency and phase lag.

  11. Construction of invariant whiskered tori by a parameterization method. Part II: Quasi-periodic and almost periodic breathers in coupled map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontich, Ernest; de la Llave, Rafael; Sire, Yannick

    2015-09-01

    We construct quasi-periodic and almost periodic solutions for coupled Hamiltonian systems on an infinite lattice which is translation invariant. The couplings can be long range, provided that they decay moderately fast with respect to the distance. For the solutions we construct, most of the sites are moving in a neighborhood of a hyperbolic fixed point, but there are oscillating sites clustered around a sequence of nodes. The amplitude of these oscillations does not need to tend to zero. In particular, the almost periodic solutions do not decay at infinity. The main result is an a posteriori theorem. We formulate an invariance equation. Solutions of this equation are embeddings of an invariant torus on which the motion is conjugate to a rotation. We show that, if there is an approximate solution of the invariance equation that satisfies some non-degeneracy conditions, there is a true solution close by. This does not require that the system is close to integrable, hence it can be used to validate numerical calculations or formal expansions. The proof of this a posteriori theorem is based on a Nash-Moser iteration, which does not use transformation theory. Simpler versions of the scheme were developed in [28]. One technical tool, important for our purposes, is the use of weighted spaces that capture the idea that the maps under consideration are local interactions. Using these weighted spaces, the estimates of iterative steps are similar to those in finite dimensional spaces. In particular, the estimates are independent of the number of nodes that get excited. Using these techniques, given two breathers, we can place them apart and obtain an approximate solution, which leads to a true solution nearby. By repeating the process infinitely often, we can get solutions with infinitely many frequencies which do not tend to zero at infinity.

  12. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  13. Discovery of Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7s Quasi Periodic Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inam, S. C.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on January 6, 2003, while RXTE was monitoring the source. Using RXTE-PCA dataset between December 3, 2002 and January 29, 2003, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -13) Hz/s respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC-PN lightcurve, we found quasi periodic oscillations around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude approx. 6.6 %. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power law component with high energy cutoff and approx. 6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with a blackbody emission with kT approx. 1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius approx. 0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star approx. 6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.

  14. Evidence for Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips from an ULX: Implications for the Binary Motion and the Orbital Inclination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2012-01-01

    We report results from long-term X-ray (0.3-8.0 keY) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of quasi-periodic dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy-dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days the amplitude of which decreases during the second half of the light curve and (3) energy spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data, possibly due to a change in the ionization state of the circumbinary material. We interpret the X-ray modulations in the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination low-mass X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk (similar to the phenomenon of dipping LMXBs), this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination approx > 60 deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  15. Quasi-periodic Fast-mode Wave Trains Within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO-AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances greater than approximately solar radius/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 kilometers per second decelerating to approximately 650 kilometers per second. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by approximately 50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  16. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  17. Detection of a Possible X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillation in the Active Galactic Nucleus 1H 0707-495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hai-Wu; Yuan, Weimin; Yao, Su; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Liu, Bifang; Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-03-01

    The quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) detected in the X-ray radiation of black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) is thought to originate from dynamical processes in close vicinity of black holes (BHs), and thus carries important physical information therein. Such a feature is extremely rare in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with supermassive BHs. Here we report on the detection of a possible X-ray QPO signal with a period of 3800 s at a confidence level >99.99% in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) 1H 0707-495 in one data set in 0.2-10 keV taken with XMM-Newton. The statistical significance is higher than that of most previously reported QPOs in AGNs. The QPO is highly coherent (quality factor Q=ν /{{Δ }}ν ≥slant 15) with a high rms fractional variability (˜15%). A comprehensive analysis of the optical spectra of this AGN is also performed, yielding a central BH mass of 5.2 × 106 M⊙ from the broad emission lines based on the scaling relation. The QPO follows the known frequency-BH mass relation closely, which spans from stellar-mass to supermassive BHs. The absence of QPOs in other observations of the object suggests that it is a transient phenomenon. We suggest that the (high-frequency) QPOs tend to occur in highly accreting BH systems, from BHXBs to supermassive BHs. Future precise estimation of the BH mass may be used to infer the BH spin from the QPO frequency.

  18. A detailed study of the 5-Hz quasi-periodic oscillations in the bright X-ray transient and black hole candidate GRS 1739-278

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Méndez, Mariano; Miller, Jon M.; Homan, Jeroen

    2001-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the 5-Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) recently discovered in the bright X-ray transient and black hole candidate (BHC) GRS 1739-278 (Borozdin & Trudolyubov) during a Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observation taken on 1996 March 31. In total 6.6ksec of on-source data were obtained, divided in two data sets of 3.4 and 3.2ksec which were separated by ~2.6ksec. The 5-Hz QPO was only present during the second data set. The QPO increased in strength from below 2 per cent rms amplitude for photon energies below 4keV to ~5 per cent rms amplitude for energies above 10keV. The soft QPO photons (below 5keV) lagged the hard ones (above 10keV) by almost 1.5rad. Besides the QPO fundamental, its first overtone was detected. The strength of the overtone increased with photon energy (from <2 per cent rms below 5keV to ~8 per cent rms above 10keV). Although limited statistics did not allow for an accurate determination of the lags of the first overtone, indications are that also for this QPO the soft photons lagged the hard ones. When the 5-Hz QPO was not detected (i.e., during the first part of the observation), a broad noise component was found for photon energies below 10keV but it became almost a true QPO (with a Q value of ~1.9) above that energy, with a frequency of ~3Hz. Its hard photons preceded the soft ones in a way reminiscent of the 5-Hz QPO, strongly suggesting that both features are physically related. We discuss our finding in the framework of low-frequency QPOs and their properties in BHCs.

  19. Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, J.; Engebretson, M.; Arnoldy, R.; Inan, U.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

  20. The origin of the most probable 3:2 twin-peak quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) frequency ratio in the micro-quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Soumen; Choi, C. S.

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, we notice that within a few gravitational radii, where the X-ray emission originates, the perturbations in the accretion disk may excite high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The vertical and the radial disk oscillations frequencies due to the perturbation exhibit a 3:2 twin-peak ratio which is most commonly detected in the X-ray fluxes in many Galactic micro-quasars. The high frequency QPOs happen most likely if the oscillations occur very close to the center. We further notice that the perturbations originate in the neighborhood of the shock transition or from a discontinuity in the disk, and could be the possible mechanism to excite the high frequency QPOs. The shocks are more probable in the X-ray emission region and may form very close to the horizon particularly, when the black hole spin is very high. Studying the shock locations as a function of the black hole spin in a fully general relativistic inviscid transonic accretion flows, we calculate the disk oscillation frequencies and their ratios in that perturbed orbit. Further, from the spin dependence, we estimate the 'most probable spin interval' in the micro-quasars by considering the 1/M scaling hypothesis in high frequency QPOs. Finally, we find the spin (a) interval which lies for XTE 1550-564, at a ˜ (0.89-0.99), for the GRO 1655-40, at a ˜ (0.96-0.99) and for the GRS 1915+105, at a ˜ (0.74-0.999). The uncertainty in the mass analysis corresponds to the above spin intervals.

  1. Photodissociation and the Non-Thermal Process in Primordial Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, K.

    2001-09-01

    In this talk, we present the recent progress on the primordial nucleosynthesis due to the photo-dissociation of light elements caused by the decay of a massive particle after the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch. Especially, very recently it was reported by the other group that the non-thermal production of 6Li constrains the number density of the parent massive particles most severely. Here we show that the theoretical prediction of 6Li abundance is uncertain due to lack of the experimental data of the cross sections, and the observational value has large errors. Therefore we find 3He overproduction due to 4He photodissociation still gives the strongest constraint. Then compared to the observational light element abundances, we can constrain the model of the inflation scenario and particle physics.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  3. RELATIVISTIC RECONNECTION: AN EFFICIENT SOURCE OF NON-THERMAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-03-01

    In magnetized astrophysical outflows, the dissipation of field energy into particle energy via magnetic reconnection is often invoked to explain the observed non-thermal signatures. By means of two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate anti-parallel reconnection in magnetically dominated electron-positron plasmas. Our simulations extend to unprecedentedly long temporal and spatial scales, so we can capture the asymptotic state of the system beyond the initial transients, and without any artificial limitation by the boundary conditions. At late times, the reconnection layer is organized into a chain of large magnetic islands connected by thin X-lines. The plasmoid instability further fragments each X-line into a series of smaller islands, separated by X-points. At the X-points, the particles become unmagnetized and they get accelerated along the reconnection electric field. We provide definitive evidence that the late-time particle spectrum integrated over the whole reconnection region is a power law whose slope is harder than 2 for magnetizations ? ? 10. Efficient particle acceleration to non-thermal energies is a generic by-product of the long-term evolution of relativistic reconnection in both two and three dimensions. In three dimensions, the drift-kink mode corrugates the reconnection layer at early times, but the long-term evolution is controlled by the plasmoid instability which facilitates efficient particle acceleration, analogous to the two-dimensional physics. Our findings have important implications for the generation of hard photon spectra in pulsar winds and relativistic astrophysical jets.

  4. Coupling Between Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer - A Mechanism for Quasi-Periodic Variations in CO2 Discharges from Deep Underground Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruess, K.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of CO2 from underground sources is of interest in connection with volcanic hazards assessment, and with the integrity and safety of geologic disposal reservoirs for CO2 that have been proposed as a means for mitigating global warming from atmospheric emissions. Underground accumulations of CO2, whether naturally occurring or man-made, store vast amounts of compressional energy. At subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, CO2 is always buoyant relative to aqueous fluids, and its upward migration may conceivably give rise to a self-enhancing runaway release due to decompression and the much lower viscosity as compared to water. Natural occurrences of CO2 have been implicated in hydrothermal eruptions, and may be capable of causing "pneumatic" eruptions that are not powered by thermal energy. We have performed numerical simulations of CO2 release through fracture zones and faults in order to determine under what conditions, if any, a self-enhancing, eruptive release may be possible. Our simulations include coupling between multiphase fluid flow and associated heat transfer effects, and accurately represent the thermophysical properties of CO2 in sub-critical (liquid or gaseous) and supercritical conditions, as well as transitions between different phase compositions, and phase partitioning between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. The behavior of rising CO2 plumes is found to be strongly affected by heat transfer effects. As supercritical CO2 migrates upward it cools due to expansion. Much stronger cooling may arise from boiling of liquid CO2 that may occur after temperatures and pressures drop below critical values (Tcrit = 31.04 deg-C, Pcrit = 73.82 bar). Our simulations of CO2 migration up a fault zone produce quasi-periodic cycling of thermodynamic conditions and substantial variations of CO2 fluxes discharged at the land surface on a time scale of order 1 year. This behavior is explained in terms of an interplay between multiphase flow in the fault zone and conductive heat exchange with surrounding country rock of low permeability. CO2 upflow rates are reduced by heat transfer limitations, which give rise to substantial increase in fluid density as temperatures decline. A better understanding of natural hydrothermal and pneumatic eruptions is necessary in order that the effectiveness and safety of geologic disposal systems for CO2 may be evaluated. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  5. Discovery of a 450 Hz Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Microquasar GRO J1655-40 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer of a 450 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the hard X-ray flux from the Galactic microquasar GRO J1655-40. This is the highest frequency QPO modulation seen to date from a black hole. The QPO is detected only in the hard X-ray band above approx. 13 keV. It is both strong and narrow, with a typical rms (root mean square) amplitude of 4.5% in the 13-27 keV range and a width of approx. 40 Hz (FWHM). For two observations in which we detect the 450 Hz QPO, a previously known approx. 300 Hz QPO is also observed in the 2-13 keV band. We show that these two QPOs sometimes appear simultaneously, thus demonstrating the first detection of a pair of high-frequency QPOs in a black hole system. Prior to this, pairs of high-frequency QPOs have been detected only in neutron star systems. GRO J1655-40 is one of only a handful of black hole systems with a good dynamical mass constraint. For a nonrotating black hole with mass between 5.5 and 7.9 solar masses, the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) ranges from 45 to 70 km. For any mass in this range the radius at which the orbital frequency reaches 450 Hz is less than the ISCO radius, indicating that, if the modulation is caused by Kepler motion, the black hole must have appreciable spin. If the QPO frequency is set by the orbital frequency of matter at the ISCO, then for this mass range the dimensionless angular momentum lies in the range 0.15 < j < 0.5. Moreover, if the modulation is caused by oscillation modes in the disk or Lense-Thirring precession, then this would also require a rapidly rotating hole. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for models of X-ray variability in black holes and neutron stars.

  6. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-02-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in astrophysical non-thermal Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed.

  7. Non thermal plasma jets interacting with targets and gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric; Darny, T.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Pouvesle, J.-M.

    2014-10-01

    Non thermal plasma jets at atmospheric pressure have been recently used in an impressive number of works including plasma diagnostics, biomedical treatments and material processing. While the plasma source setups are very simple, it has been evidenced that many parameters may significantly influence the plasma characteristics offering at the same time a large versatility for plasma delivery but also requiring a special attention to match the plasma features for any specific application. In this work, emphasis will be given on two critical topics involved in any plasma jet biomedical applications. The first consists in the influence of the target over which plasma jet impinges. It has been shown that depending on the conductivity of the target, secondary plasma generation occurs, leading to a critical modification of the reactive species generation. The second main issue concerns the strong interplay between the rare gas flow and the plasma species generated during plasma jet ionization wave propagation. Drastic modification of the rare gas flow features have been recently characterized through Schlieren visualization and ICCD imaging. Work supported by APR ``PLASMED'' and ANR BLANC ``PAMPA'' 093003.

  8. Feasibility analysis report for hybrid non-thermal plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1998-01-15

    The purpose of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Examples of NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel-engine powered electrical generators. Examples of VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint-stripping, and parts cleaning. Because pollutant-containing air-emission streams within the Department of Defense (DoD) frequently span a broad range of pollutant concentrations, flow rates, and gas conditions (e.g., temperature, humidity), a single type of NTP reactor is not expected to fit all types of emissions streams. Additionally, stand-alone NTP reactors may provide neither an adequate means of pollutant removal nor an acceptable economic solution. Therefore, hybrid systems (combinations of different NTP reactor types or architectures), which employ adsorbents and/or catalytic media are being examined by researchers in this field. This report is intended to provide a preliminary summary analysis of a few representative hybrid systems as a means of introducing the hybrid or staged-system concept.

  9. Non-thermal discharge processing of gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.; Penetrante, B.; Wallman, H.

    1993-08-27

    The electrical discharge techniques, called non-thermal, utilize high voltage breakdown of gases using short pulses of one to a few hundred nanoseconds. These short pulses between metal electrodes generate energetic electrons without appreciable thermal heating of the gas. The energetic electrons collide with gas molecules to form radicals. The radicals then react with pollutants to form harmless compounds. Our experimental device uses a wire in a pipe geometry. The wire is driven by a 40 kilovolt pulse 100 nanoseconds long. Gas is circulated in a loop through the pipe geometry in a closed system. This system permits the introduction of various gas combinations prior to testing. The recirculated gas can be heated to determine the effect on the electrical discharge, and chemical reactions. The efficiency of pollutant removal is the key to applications. We have been able to significantly improve the efficiency of NO removal by the addition of hydrocarbons. Nitric oxide has been removed with an energy cost of 15 ev per NO molecule. We believe the hydrocarbon additive serves by recycling the hydroxyl radicals during the oxidation and reduction of NO. The implementation of this process will depend largely on how much additives, electrical power consumption, and final NO{sub x} concentration are acceptable for a particular application.

  10. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma approximates 2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a converging flow into the BH). In the TL model for the corona, the QPO frequency V(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency V(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and v(sub low) is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency v(sub MA) . The observed correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also suggest a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.

  11. Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, M. Lou ); Tonkyn, Russell ); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana; Barlow, Stephen; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M.; Hoard, John Wm.; Howden, Ken

    2000-04-01

    There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

  12. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic emissions in the solar wind plasma with non-thermal electron distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilpour, H.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamics of fundamental and second harmonic electromagnetic emissions are simulated in the solar wind plasma in the presence of non-thermal electron distribution function in which primary Langmuir waves are driven by an electron beam. The electron velocity distribution function is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons (Maxwellian) and the suprathermal electrons (non-thermal electrons). The effects of the non-thermal electrons on the generation of primary Langmuir waves, emission rates of the fundamental (F) and harmonic waves (H) and their distributions are investigated. The both of the F and H emissions are sensitive to the characterizes of the non-thermal electrons. It is found that in the presence of non-thermal electrons the production of the Langmuir waves decreases and consequently the levels of fundamental and second harmonic waves are reduced. The emission rate of the fundamental transverse waves decreases and its peak moves slightly toward smaller wave-numbers.

  13. Non-thermal shielding effects on the Compton scattering power in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Soo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-10-01

    The non-thermal shielding effects on the inverse Compton scattering are investigated in astrophysical non-thermal Lorentzian plasmas. The inverse Compton power is obtained by the modified Compton scattering cross section in Lorentzian plasmas with the blackbody photon distribution. The total Compton power is also obtained by the Lorentzan distribution of plasmas. It is found that the influence of non-thermal character of the plasma suppresses the inverse Compton power in astrophysical Lorentzian plasmas. It is also found that the non-thermal effect on the inverse Compton power decreases with an increase of the temperature. In addition, the non-thermal effect on the total Compton power with Lorentzan plasmas increases in low-temperature photons and, however, decreases in intermediate-temperature photons with increasing Debye length. The variation of the total Compton power is also discussed.

  14. Modeling of non-thermal plasma in flammable gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.

    2008-07-01

    An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and non-thermal plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations for charged particles (electrons, positive and negative ions), and with the electric circuit equation. The electric circuit comprises power supply, ballast resistor connected in series with the discharge and capacity. Rate coefficients for electron-assisted reactions were calculated from solving the two-term spherical harmonic expansion of the Boltzmann equation. Such an approach allows us to describe influence of thermal chemistry reactions (burning) on the discharge characteristics. Results of comparison between the discharge and thermal ignition effects for mixtures of hydrogen or ethylene with dry air will be reported. Effects of acceleration of ignition by discharge plasma will be analyzed. In particular, the role of singlet oxygen produced effectively in the discharge in ignition speeding up will be discussed.

  15. Effects of Non-thermal Electrons from ECCD on ECE Temperature Measurements for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, P. V.; Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Kumar, Ravinder; Vasu, P.

    2012-09-01

    In tokamaks, the radial temperature profile measured using Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostics are affected by many phenomena like harmonics overlap, relativistic down shifting, presence of non-thermals etc. In this paper we have estimated effects of a small non-thermal electron population on measured temperature profile for ITER-Scenario 2. For ITER like plasma, radial temperature profiles can be obtained from the second harmonic ECE spectrum. It is possible that, higher harmonics produced from the non-thermals can be relativistically downshifted to second harmonics and introduce error in the measured temperature profile. Generally Non-thermals are produced from Electron Cyclotron Resonance heating (ECRH), Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) etc. In the present study the non-thermals are assumed to be produced from proposed ECCD, which is being considered for suppressing Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTM). We have ignored any other source of non-thermals in the present study. All the numerical calculations reported in this paper is performed using NOTEC computer code which is capable of handling non-thermal populations. The locations and spatial extents of non-thermals are taken from previous report on optimization study of the ITER ECRH top launcher. The non-thermals are assumed to be centered around safety points q=1, q=1.5 and q=2, where the ECCD is expected to be used for suppressing the NTMs. The main results of the present study are summarized below. In the first part of the paper we present the results for temperature measurement with out non-thermal populations for the purpose of validation. Secondly the rage of higher harmonic frequencies (due to nonthermals) which possibly reach antenna and induce error in the temperature measurement are identified and the corresponding energies of non-thermal populations are calculated analytically. This calculations are further checked by simulations using NOTEC code. Finally non-thermal populations are seeded in the plasma with fraction and energies of non-thermals are varied in a parametric form. The parametric range of energies are initially bracketed by the analytical calculations explained above. The resultant temperature profiles and error in the measured temperatures will be presented.

  16. Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous plasma with non-thermal distribution of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    In the Earth's magnetosphere, the boundary layer regions are the sources for inhomogeneous plasmas and are natural laboratories to study wave phenomena. In these regions, particles distributions also differ from Maxwellian and are found to be non-thermal. Therefore, amplitude of the waves propagating through these regions can vary differently compared to the homogeneous plasmas. In this study, propagation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in an inhomogeneous, warm electron-ion plasma is examined. The electrons are considered to be having non-thermal Cairn's type distribution and ions follow the fluid dynamical equations. Further, inhomogeneity is assumed in equilibrium density of the electrons and ions. The evolution of the nonlinear IAWs is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with variable coefficients. Analytical solution of the KdV equation shows that for a cold ion plasma and non-thermal electrons, the amplitude and the width of the nonlinear IAWs decreases and increases, respectively with the inclusion of the non-thermal distribution of electrons. It is interesting to note that nonlinear IAWs in this model can not propagate for whole range of non-thermal parameter, ?. The novel result of this study is that for nonlinear IAWs to propagate in the inhomogeneous two component plasma with ions and non-thermal electrons, the non-thermal parameter, ? <= 0.155. Results from our study may have impact on the propagation of the IAWs in the boundary layer regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where density inhomogeneities are appreciable.

  17. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  18. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  19. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chnov, Elika; Sykov, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinov, rka

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications.

  20. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications. PMID:25410636

  1. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  2. Dust-ion-acoustic solitary structure with opposite polarity ions and non-thermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized plasmas containing opposite polarity ions, opposite polarity dusts and non-thermal electrons has been studied. The fluid equations in the system are reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries equation in the limit of small amplitude perturbation. The effect of non-thermal electrons and the opposite polarity of ions and dusts in the solitary waves are presented graphically and numerically.

  3. Hydrodynamic simulation of non-thermal pressure profiles of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2014-09-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find that the non-thermal pressure fraction profile is universal across redshift when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe instead of the commonly used critical density. We also find that the non-thermal pressure is predominantly radial, and the gas velocity anisotropy profile exhibits strong universality when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe. However, we find that the non-thermal pressure fraction is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate of the galaxy cluster. We provide fitting formulae for the universal non-thermal pressure fraction and velocity anisotropy profiles of gas in galaxy clusters, which should be useful in modeling astrophysical uncertainties pertinent to using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  4. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - II. Comparison with cosmological hydrodynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent gas motion inside galaxy clusters provides a non-negligible non-thermal pressure support to the intracluster gas. If not corrected, it leads to a systematic bias in the estimation of cluster masses from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and affects interpretation of measurements of the SZ power spectrum and observations of cluster outskirts from ongoing and upcoming large cluster surveys. Recently, Shi & Komatsu developed an analytical model for predicting the radius, mass, and redshift dependence of the non-thermal pressure contributed by the kinetic random motions of intracluster gas sourced by the cluster mass growth. In this paper, we compare the predictions of this analytical model to a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamics simulation. As different mass growth histories result in different non-thermal pressure, we perform the comparison on 65 simulated galaxy clusters on a cluster-by-cluster basis. We find an excellent agreement between the modelled and simulated non-thermal pressure profiles. Our results open up the possibility of using the analytical model to correct the systematic bias in the mass estimation of galaxy clusters. We also discuss tests of the physical picture underlying the evolution of intracluster non-thermal gas motions, as well as a way to further improve the analytical modelling, which may help achieve a unified understanding of non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters.

  5. Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Renno, Nilton O.; Kok, Jasper F.; Bandelier, Etienne; Sander, Michael J.; Gross, Steven; Skjerve, Lyle; Cantor, Bruce

    2009-07-01

    We report evidence for the emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a deep Martian dust storm. The observations were made using an innovative detector that can discriminate between radiation of thermal and non-thermal origin by measuring the high order moments of its electric field strength. Measurements with this detector, installed in a 34 m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN), were made for about 5 hours a day over a dozen days between 22 May and 16 June 2006. Non-thermal radiation was detected for a few hours only when a 35 km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope on 8 June 2006. The spectrum of the non-thermal radiation has significant peaks around predicted values of the lowest three modes of the Martian Schumann Resonance (SR). The SR results from electromagnetic standing waves formed in the concentric spherical cavity between the Martian surface and its ionosphere and forced by large-scale electric discharge. Thus, the non-thermal radiation was probably caused by electric discharge in the Martian dust storm.

  6. Anisotropic Transport of Electrons in a Novel FET Channel with Chains of InGaAs Nano-Islands Embedded along Quasi-Periodic Multi-Atomic Steps on Vicinal (111)B GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Y.; Kawazu, T.; Noda, T.; Sakaki, H.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied electron transport in n-AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction FET channels, in which chains of InGaAs nano-islands are embedded along quasi-periodic steps. By using two samples, conductance Gpara(Vg) parallel to the steps and Gperp(Vg) perpendicular to them were measured at 80 K as functions of gate voltage Vg. At sufficiently high Vg, Gpara at 80 K is several times as high as Gperp, which manifests the anisotropic two-dimensional transport of electrons. When Vg is reduced to -0.7 V, Gperp almost vanishes, while Gpara stays sizable unless Vg is set below -0.8 V. These results indicate that "inter-chain" barriers play stronger roles than "intra-chain" barriers.

  7. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  8. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - III. Removing the hydrostatic mass bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters leads to underestimation of the mass of galaxy clusters based on hydrostatic equilibrium with thermal gas pressure. This occurs even for dynamically relaxed clusters that are used for calibrating the mass-observable scaling relations. We show that the analytical model for non-thermal pressure developed in Shi & Komatsu can correct for this so-called `hydrostatic mass bias', if most of the non-thermal pressure comes from bulk and turbulent motions of gas in the intracluster medium. Our correction works for the sample average irrespective of the mass estimation method, or the dynamical state of the clusters. This makes it possible to correct for the bias in the hydrostatic mass estimates from X-ray surface brightness and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations that will be available for clusters in a wide range of redshifts and dynamical states.

  9. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  10. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a magnetized non-thermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.; Mamun

    2014-08-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the basic properties of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves propagating in a magnetized non-thermal dusty plasma (containing cold viscous dust fluid, non-thermal ions, and non-thermal electrons). The reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. It is found that the basic properties of DA shock waves are significantly modified by the combined effects of dust fluid viscosity, external magnetic field, and obliqueness (angle between external magnetic field and DA wave propagation direction). It is shown that the dust fluid viscosity acts as a source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of DA shock structures in the dusty plasma system under consideration. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory plasma situations are briefly discussed.

  11. The Advantages of Non-Thermal Plasma for Detonation Initiation Compared with Spark Plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dianfeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of detonation combustion ignited by AC-driven non-thermal plasma and spark plug in air/acetylene mixture have been compared in a double-tube experiment system. The two tubes had the same structure, and their closed ends were installed with a plasma generator and a spark plug, respectively. The propagation characteristics of the flame were measured by pressure sensors and ion probes. The experiment results show that, compared with a spark plug, the non-thermal plasma obviously broadened the range of equivalence ratio when the detonation wave could develop successfully, it also heightened the pressure value of detonation wave. Meanwhile, the detonation wave development time and the entire flame propagation time were reduced by half. All of these advantages benefited from the larger ignition volume when a non-thermal plasma was applied. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176001)

  12. Localized coherent nonlinear wave structures in dusty plasma with non-thermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Tarsem Singh; Bedi, Chanchal; Saini, Nareshpal Singh; Kaur, Harvinder

    2007-12-01

    In the present research paper, the characteristics of dust-acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) and double layers (DLs) are studied. Ions are treated as non-thermal and variable dust charge is considered. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived using a reductive perturbation method. It is noticed that compressive solitons are obtained up to a certain range of relative density δ (=ni0/ne0) beyond which rarefactive solitons are observed. The study is further extended to investigate the possibility of DLs. Only compressive DLs are permissible. Both DASWs and DLs are sensitive to variation of the non-thermal parameter.

  13. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NO(x) control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penetrante, B. M.

    1993-08-01

    The physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO(x) control in internal combustion engines are discussed. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO(x) removal mechanisms, and by-product formation. Can non-thermal deNO(x) operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? These fundamental issues are addressed based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics.

  14. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma-generated reactive species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than conventional thermochemical reactions, leading to non-equilibrium product distribution or creating unconventional reaction pathways. When non-thermal plasma is combined with catalysts, a synergistic effect is frequently observed. Such unique properties of non-thermal plasma are expected to contribute excellent control over process parameters that meet the need for energy saving, environment protection, and material preservation. This special issue consists of eleven peer-reviewed papers including two invited publications. Professors Alexander Fridman and Alexander Rabinovich from Drexel University, and Dr Gutsol from the Chevron Energy Technology Company present a critical review of various industry-oriented practical plasma fuel conversion processes. Professor Richard Mallinson from University of Oklahoma describes his recent project on E85 (85%-ethanol/15%-gasoline) upgrading using non-thermal plasma and catalyst hybrid reactor, and highlights the synergistic effect on fuel conversion processes. Other papers focus on plasma/catalyst hybrid reactions for methane dry (CO2) reforming, plasma synthesis of carbon suboxide polymer from CO, the gas-to-liquid (GTL) process using a non-thermal plasma-combined micro-chemical reactor, and molecular beam characterization of plasma-generated reactive species. Much research regarding plasma catalysis is ongoing worldwide, but there is plenty of room for further development of plasma fuel processing, which could eventually provide a viable and flexible solution in future energy and material use. Finally, we would like to thank all symposium participants for their active discussion. We appreciate the sponsorship of the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. We express special thanks to the program chair of the Fuel Chemistry Division, Professor Chang-jun Liu at Tianjin University, for his dedication to the success of the symposium. We particularly express our appreciation to the Editorial Board of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics for publication of the special issue.

  15. Cold plasma - a non-thermal processing technology to inactivate human pathogens on foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel non-thermal food processing technology, suitable for application to fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. Reductions of 3-5 logs have been achieved against human pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 on fresh produce and against phytopathogens and spoilage orga...

  16. The role of non-thermal factors in the control of skin blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, B.

    1986-01-01

    Arguments in favor of the importance of non-thermal factors in the control of skin circulation are presented. Such factors include exercise, posture, water and electrolyte balance, state of training, and acclimatization. The first three factors probably elicit their effects via high- and low-pressure baroreceptors, while the mechanisms involved for the remainder are unknown. PMID:3529655

  17. FIRST REPORT ON NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTOR SCALING CRITERIA AND OPTIMIZATION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for DoD air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile o...

  18. EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD STUDIES OF NON-THERMAL PLASMAS FOR NOX CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-thermal plasmas (NTPs) represent a promising technology for the destruction of various toxic gases entrained in air streams. One challenging example of the need for hazardous gas control is the jet engine test cell (JETC) facility where very large amounts of NO(x)s are emitte...

  19. Mediation of the solar wind termination shock by non-thermal ions.

    PubMed

    Decker, R B; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Hill, M E; Armstrong, T P; Gloeckler, G; Hamilton, D C; Lanzerotti, L J

    2008-07-01

    Broad regions on both sides of the solar wind termination shock are populated by high intensities of non-thermal ions and electrons. The pre-shock particles in the solar wind have been measured by the spacecraft Voyager 1 (refs 1-5) and Voyager 2 (refs 3, 6). The post-shock particles in the heliosheath have also been measured by Voyager 1 (refs 3-5). It was not clear, however, what effect these particles might have on the physics of the shock transition until Voyager 2 crossed the shock on 31 August-1 September 2007 (refs 7-9). Unlike Voyager 1, Voyager 2 is making plasma measurements. Data from the plasma and magnetic field instruments on Voyager 2 indicate that non-thermal ion distributions probably have key roles in mediating dynamical processes at the termination shock and in the heliosheath. Here we report that intensities of low-energy ions measured by Voyager 2 produce non-thermal partial ion pressures in the heliosheath that are comparable to (or exceed) both the thermal plasma pressures and the scalar magnetic field pressures. We conclude that these ions are the >0.028 MeV portion of the non-thermal ion distribution that determines the termination shock structure and the acceleration of which extracts a large fraction of bulk-flow kinetic energy from the incident solar wind. PMID:18596801

  20. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  1. Non-thermal plasma activates human keratinocytes by stimulation of antioxidant and phase II pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-03-13

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  2. Non-thermal plasmas as gas-phase advanced oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1997-08-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are useful for generating reactive species (free radicals) in a gas stream. Because radical attack reaction rate constants are very large for many chemical species, entrained pollutants are readily decomposed by radicals. Such plasmas can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals; therefore, they show promise for treating a wide variety of pollutants.

  3. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  4. The effects of non-thermal plasmas on selected mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Mathieu

    Non-thermal plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. Non-thermal plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, non-thermal plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, non-thermal plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of non-thermal plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a non-thermal plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of non-thermal plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply non-thermal plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we built a simple transfection device consisting of a straight glass capillary tube and a plastic support. Using three different gases and five different capillary diameters, we were able to relate the transfection efficiency to the dynamic pressure of the gas exiting the capillary tube. Finally, even though transfection of cells seem to depend more on the mechanical forces exerted by the gas flow than on the effects of the plasma, other applications of non-thermal plasma in the field of medicine are in development. However, published studies have focused on only the positive effects of non-thermal plasmas, neglecting the potentially induced adverse effects. Therefore, we studied if damage could be caused in cells following an indirect (APGD-t) or a direct (parallel electrodes DBD) plasma treatment. We found that a low power direct plasma treatment caused oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Both plasma sources were shown to produce DNA double-strand breaks but no lipid peroxidation. Also, the sequencing of plasma-treated naked plasmid DNA introduced in electrocompetent bacteria showed no evidence of mutations.

  5. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J. M.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210°C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10°C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters.

  7. Wakefield Dynamics in Quasi Periodical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, Alexandre; Mosnier, Alban

    1997-05-01

    The behavior of longitudinal wake fields of very short bunches, excited in in multicell accelerating structures, that are proposed for projects of Linear Colliders (TESLA, SBLC and NLC) has been studied. Computations were performed for bunch lengths down to 50 micrometers. The loss factor, which gives the global energy loss of the bunch and the profile of the wake function, which is of major interest for bunch energy spread calculations, has been carefully studied. A strong modification of wake fields along the finite train of multicell cavities was clearly found for short bunchlengths. In particular, the wakes induced by the bunch, as it proceeds down the successive cavities, decrease in amplitude and become more linear around the bunch center, with a profile very close to the integral of charge density. The loss factor, decreasing also with the number of cavities, becomes independent of bunchlength for very short bunches and tends asymptotically to a finite value. However, any periodicity (or multi-periodicity) break will spoil the wake distribution and increase the wakefield amplitude.

  8. Oscillating Magnetic Trap and Non-Thermal Emission from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yuri; Kopylova, Yulia; Goldvarg, Tatiana; Stepanov, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of the fine time structure of microwave and hard X-ray emissions from the flare event on 1992 November 5 is given. Based on wavelet analysis, quasi-periodic pulsations with a fundamental period of 6 s in both wave bands have been revealed. The anticorrelation of time profiles of microwave and hard X-ray emissions as well as time delays between the emission peaks in different wave bands are explained by the excitation of sausage oscillations of a flare loop modelling by a magnetic trap. It has been shown that the intermediate pitch angle diffusion regime of trapped electrons into the loss-cone should be realized in flare loops. The relation between time delays of emission peaks at different wave bands and the pulse duration has been investigated.

  9. Intermittency and lifetime of the 625 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation in the 2004 hyperflare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 as evidence for magnetic coupling between the crust and the core

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Levin, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ∼100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ∼625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ∼0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.

  10. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C

    2004-02-05

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060.

  11. Study of non-thermal plasma jet with dielectric barrier configuration in nitrogen and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, C. Y.; Chin, O. H.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is advantageous in generating non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure, as it avoids transition to thermal arc and dispenses with costly vacuum system. It has found useful applications in treating heat-sensitive materials such as plastics and living tissue. In this work, the discharge formed between the Pyrex glass layer and the ground electrode is extruded through a nozzle to form the non-thermal plasma jet. The DBD characteristics were investigated in terms of charge transferred and mean power dissipated per cycle when operated in nitrogen and argon at various flow rates and applied voltages. These characteristics were then correlated to the dimension of the plasma jet. The mean power dissipated in the DBD was below 7 W giving an efficiency of 17 %. The length of the plasma jet was greatly limited to below 1 cm due to the configuration of the DBD system and nozzle.

  12. Gravity as main driver of non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Smith, R.; Billot, N.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Peretto, N.; Molinari, S.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-05-01

    The origin of the observed non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions is still unclear. These motions can originate from local turbulence or from self-gravity and the two scenarios lead to two different star formation mechanisms. The recent findings of Heyer et al. ([5]) have supported self-gravity as main driver of the non-thermal motions, although without a clear interpretation of the results. In this contribution we introduce a new formalism to describe the relation between gravity and kinetic motion in massive star formation. We show that the Heyer findings are a particular result of this description and have a direct physical interpretation. We applied this formalism to different surveys of massive star forming regions covering all spatial scales from giant molecular clouds down to massive cores, including new data from massive candidate starless clumps. The results presented in this contribution strongly support a chaotic, gravitationally driven global collapse scenario as massive star formation mechanism.

  13. Non-thermal leptogenesis in a simple 5D SO(10) GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi; Okada, Nobuchika

    2010-09-01

    We discuss non-thermal leptogenesis in the scheme of 5D orbifold SO(10) GUT with the smooth hybrid inflation. With unambiguously determined Dirac Yukawa couplings and an assumption for the neutrino mixing matrix of the tri-bimaximal from, we analyze baryon asymmetry of the universe via non-thermal leptogenesis in two typical cases for the light neutrino mass spectrum, the normal and inverted hierarchical cases. The resultant baryon asymmetry is obtained as a function of the lightest mass eigenvalue of the light neutrinos, and we find that a suitable amount of baryon asymmetry of the universe can be produced in the normal hierarchical case, while in the inverted hierarchical case the baryon asymmetry is too small to be consistent with the observation.

  14. Effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, Non-thermal plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.

  15. Dust Acoustic Shock Waves with Non-Thermal and Vortex-Like Ions in Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apul, N. Dev; Jnanjyoti, Sarma; Manoj, K. Deka; Nirab, C. Adhikary

    2015-04-01

    A rigorous investigation is presented on the propagation characteristics of non-linear dust acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing non-thermal and vortex-like ions and Maxwellian electrons under the effect of a fluctuating charged dust fluid. The three-dimensional (3D) Burgers' equation and a new form of a lower degree modified 3D Burgers' equation with their analytical solutions are derived to study the features of shock waves in such plasmas. The effect of the population of non-thermal ions, the vortex-like ion parameter as well as the temperature ratios of ions and electrons on the evolution of shock waves in the presence of dust charge fluctuation is presented. This theoretical investigation might be effectively utilized to unveil the nature of many astrophysical plasma environments (Saturn's spokes etc.) where such plasmas are reported to have existed.

  16. SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

  17. Determination of Non-Thermal Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result fro m many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km/s in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find thai velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  18. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-02-15

    Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

  19. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  20. The Swift BAT Perspective on Non-Thermal Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wik, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for non-thermal excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and non-thermal spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative non-thermal signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature

  1. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  2. Non-Thermal Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Possible Application in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414

  3. Hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles from a non-thermal plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Devin; Lopez, Thomas; Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles via a two-step process involving the non-thermal plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles, followed by their in-flight carbonization, also initiated by a non-thermal plasma. Simple geometric considerations associated with the expansion of the silicon lattice upon carbonization, in combination of the spherical geometry of the system, explain the formation of hollow nanostructures. This is in contrast with previous reports that justify the formation of hollow particles by means of out-diffusion of the core element, i.e., by the Kirkendall nanoscale effect. A theoretical analysis of the diffusion kinetics indicates that interaction with the ionized gas induces significant nanoparticle heating, allowing for the fast transport of carbon into the silicon particle and for the subsequent nucleation of the beta-silicon carbide phase. This work confirms the potential of non-thermal plasma processes for the synthesis of nanostructures composed of high-melting point materials, and suggests that such processes can be tuned to achieve morphological control.

  4. NON-THERMAL EMISSIONS FROM COOL CORES HEATED BY COSMIC RAYS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-02-10

    We study non-thermal emissions from cool cores in galaxy clusters. We adopted a recent model in which cosmic rays (CRs) prevail in the cores and stably heat them through CR streaming. The non-thermal emissions come from the interaction between CR protons and intracluster medium (ICM). Comparison between the theoretical predictions and radio observations shows that the overall CR spectra must be steep, and most of the CRs in the cores are low-energy CRs. Assuming that the CRs are injected through active galactic nucleus activities, we study the nature of the shocks that are responsible for the CR acceleration. The steep CR spectra are likely to reflect the fact that the shocks travel in hot ICM with fairly small Mach numbers. We also study the dependence on the CR streaming velocity. The results indicate that synchrotron emissions from secondary electrons should be observed as radio mini-halos in the cores. In particular, low-frequency observations (e.g., LOFAR) are promising. However, the steepness of the spectra makes it difficult to detect non-thermal X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from the cores. The low-energy CRs may be heating optical filaments observed in the cores.

  5. Measurements of Non-thermal Line Widths in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral line widths are often observed to be larger than can be accounted for by thermal and instrumental broadening alone. This excess broadening is a key observational constraint for both nanoflare and wave dissipation models of coronal heating. Here we present a survey of non-thermal velocities measured in the high temperature loops (1-4 MK) often found in the cores of solar active regions. This survey of Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations covers 15 non-flaring active regions that span a wide range of solar conditions. We find relatively small non-thermal velocities, with a mean value of 17.6 ± 5.3 km s-1, and no significant trend with temperature or active region magnetic flux. These measurements appear to be inconsistent with those expected from reconnection jets in the corona, chromospheric evaporation induced by coronal nanoflares, and Alfvén wave turbulence models. Furthermore, because the observed non-thermal widths are generally small, such measurements are difficult and susceptible to systematic effects.

  6. The Response of Chromosphere Lines Heated by Different Periodic Impulsive Non-thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Ding, Mingde

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares involve in radiations in very broad wavelengths. Spectra can supply us abundant information about local plasma, such as temperature, density, mass motion and so on. Strong chromosphere lines, like the most studied Hα and Ca II 8542 Å are formed under conditions of non-local thermal equilibrium which represent the response of the lower atmosphere to flare heating. Understanding the line formation is very useful for us to correctly interpret the observations and evolution of line intensities and profiles. Numerical simulation is a very important way to interpret observational data and understand the flare mechanisms. In this paper, we try to figure out the response of chromospheric lines heated by different periodic impulsive non-thermal electrons. Our results are based on radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We vary the non-thermal heating periods from 1.25s to 20s. Different non-thermal electron fluxes are also considered in our simulations. We compare the response times for different heating parameters. Line centers and line wings also show different signatures. Possible explanations are discussed in the paper.This work is supported by NSFC under grants 11303073 ,11373023 and 11103008. This research is also supported by the open project of Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. An experimental burn wound-healing study of non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma jet arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Khang, Gilson; Sun, Peter P; Rivera, Jose; Cho, Jin Hoon; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J Gary; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    In contrast with a thermal plasma surgical instrument based on coagulative and ablative properties, low-temperature (non-thermal) non-equilibrium plasmas are known for novel medicinal effects on exposed tissue while minimizing undesirable tissue damage. In this study we demonstrated that arrays of non-thermal microplasma jet devices fabricated from a transparent polymer can efficiently inactivate fungi (Candida albicans) as well as bacteria (Escherichia coli), both in vitro and in vivo, and that this leads to a significant wound-healing effect. Microplasma jet arrays offer several advantages over conventional single-jet devices, including superior packing density, inherent scalability for larger treatment areas, unprecedented material flexibility in a plasma jet device, and the selective generation of medically relevant reactive species at higher plasma densities. The therapeutic effects of our multi-jet device were verified on second-degree burns in animal rat models. Reduction of the wound area and the histology of the wound after treatment have been investigated, and expression of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and -10 was verified to evaluate the healing effects. The consistent effectiveness of non-thermal plasma treatment has been observed especially in decreasing wound size and promoting re-epithelialization through collagen arrangement and the regulation of expression of inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26227832

  8. Search for non-thermal radio emission from Eta Carina's outer blast wave with ATCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohm, Stefan; Urquhart, James; Skilton, Joanna Lucy; Hinton, Jim; Domainko, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the direction of Eta Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE and Fermi satellites. This emission can be either interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars or in the very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 "Great Eruption". The detection of a radio shell at the location of the shock would support the latter scenario and confirm Eta Carina as prime example of a new source type, namely, an LBV star whose massive ejecta accelerates electrons to non-thermal energies. While Fermi and INTEGRAL do not provide sufficient angular resolution to resolve the blast wave, high resolution radio observations using ATCA will be able to test non-thermal radio emission from this acceleration site. The current sensitivity of ATCA is such that a relatively modest observation time of 12 hours will be sufficient to image the synchrotron emission from the blast region down to magnetic field strengths well below typical ISM values and hence prove or reject our blast-wave hypothesis for the high energy emission.

  9. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Jäger, Ales; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-03-01

    Direct interactions of plasma matter with living cells and tissues can dramatically affect their functionality, initiating many important effects from cancer elimination to bacteria deactivation. However, the physical mechanisms and biochemical pathways underlying the effects of non-thermal plasma on bacteria and cell fate have still not been fully explored. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms of non-thermal plasma-induced bacteria inactivation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. We demonstrate that depending on the exposure time plasma induces either direct physical destruction of bacteria or triggers programmed cell death (PCD) that exhibits characteristic features of apoptosis. The interplay between physical disruption and PCD is on the one hand driven by physical plasma parameters, and on the other hand by biological and physical properties of bacteria. The explored possibilities of the tuneable bacteria deactivation provide a basis for the development of advanced plasma-based therapies. To a great extent, our study opens new possibilities for controlled non-thermal plasma interactions with living systems. PMID:26761777

  10. High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE) for non-thermal ablation without muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the non-thermal mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE). A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design non-thermal protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of non-thermal IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for non-thermal tissue ablation that eliminates muscle contractions seen in IRE treatments performed with unipolar electric pulses. Therefore, it has the potential to be performed clinically without the administration of paralytic agents. PMID:22104372

  11. Mid-Term Quasi-Periodicities and Solar Cycle Variation of the White-Light Corona from 18.5 Years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of LASCO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlyaeva, T.; Lamy, P.; Llebaria, A.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the analysis of the temporal evolution of the solar corona based on 18.5 years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of white-light observations with the SOHO/LASCO-C2 coronagraph. This evolution is quantified by generating spatially integrated values of the K-corona radiance, first globally, then in latitudinal sectors. The analysis considers time series of monthly values and 13-month running means of the radiance as well as several indices and proxies of solar activity. We study correlation, wavelet time-frequency spectra, and cross-coherence and phase spectra between these quantities. Our results give a detailed insight on how the corona responds to solar activity over timescales ranging from mid-term quasi-periodicities (also known as quasi-biennial oscillations or QBOs) to the long-term 11 year solar cycle. The amplitude of the variation between successive solar maxima and minima (modulation factor) very much depends upon the strength of the cycle and upon the heliographic latitude. An asymmetry is observed during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24, prominently in the royal and polar sectors, with north leading. Most prominent QBOs are a quasi-annual period during the maximum phase of Solar Cycle 23 and a shorter period, seven to eight months, in the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24. They share the same properties as the solar QBOs: variable periodicity, intermittency, asymmetric development in the northern and southern solar hemispheres, and largest amplitudes during the maximum phase of solar cycles. The strongest correlation of the temporal variations of the coronal radiance - and consequently the coronal electron density - is found with the total magnetic flux. Considering that the morphology of the solar corona is also directly controlled by the topology of the magnetic field, this correlation reinforces the view that they are intimately connected, including their variability at all timescales.

  12. Probing the gaseous halo of galaxies through non-thermal emission from AGN-driven outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiawei; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-10-01

    Feedback from outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can affect the distribution and properties of the gaseous haloes of galaxies. We study the hydrodynamics and non-thermal emission from the forward outflow shock produced by an AGN-driven outflow. We consider a few possible profiles for the halo gas density, self-consistently constrained by the halo mass, redshift and the disc baryonic concentration of the galaxy. We show that the outflow velocity levels off at ˜ 103 km s- 1 within the scale of the galaxy disc. Typically, the outflow can reach the virial radius around the time when the AGN shuts off. We show that the outflows are energy-driven, consistent with observations and recent theoretical findings. The outflow shock lights up the haloes of massive galaxies across a broad wavelength range. For Milky Way mass haloes, radio observations by the Jansky Very Large Array and the Square Kilometre Array and infrared/optical observations by the James Webb Space Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope can detect the emission signal of angular size ˜8 arcsec from galaxies out to redshift z ˜ 5. Millimetre observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array are sensitive to non-thermal emission of angular size ˜18 arcsec from galaxies at redshift z ≲ 1, while X-ray observations by Chandra, XMM-Newton and the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics are limited to local galaxies (z ≲ 0.1) with an emission angular size of ˜2 arcmin. Overall, the extended non-thermal emission provides a new way of probing the gaseous haloes of galaxies at high redshifts.

  13. Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2012-01-01

    Vascularization plays a key role in processes such as wound healing and tissue engineering. Non-thermal plasma, which primarily produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), has recently emerged as an efficient tool in medical applications including blood coagulation, sterilization and malignant cell apoptosis. Liquids and porcine aortic endothelial cells were treated with a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in vitro. Plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and serum-free medium increased ROS concentration in a dose-dependent manner, with a higher concentration observed in serum-free medium compared with PBS. Species concentration inside cells peaked 1 h after treatment, followed by a decrease 3 h post treatment. Endothelial cells treated with a plasma dose of 4.2 J cm–2 had 1.7 times more cells than untreated samples 5 days after plasma treatment. The 4.2 J cm–2 plasma dose increased two-dimensional migration distance by 40 per cent compared with untreated control, while the number of cells that migrated through a three-dimensional collagen gel increased by 15 per cent. Tube formation was also enhanced by plasma treatment, with tube lengths in plasma-treated samples measuring 2.6 times longer than control samples. A fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) neutralizing antibody and ROS scavengers abrogated these angiogenic effects. These data indicate that plasma enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation is due to FGF-2 release induced by plasma-produced ROS. Non-thermal plasma may be used as a potential tool for applying ROS in precise doses to enhance vascularization. PMID:21653568

  14. Thermal and non-thermal seed populations and their contribution to coronal shock acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; Laitinen, Timo

    Charged particle acceleration in coronal and interplanetary CME-driven shocks is currently considered the primary source of large solar energetic particle (SEP) intensities. In large SEP events, the particles accelerated at the shock generate Alfvénic turbulence in the ambient medium, which facilitates particle trapping and repeated shock crossings, thus bootstrapping the acceleration process. In order to study this process, we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation method, where particles are traced in prescribed large-scale electromagnetic fields utilizing the guiding center approximation. In our simulations, particles are scattered in the turbulence according to quasilinear theory, with the scattering amplitude directly proportional to the intensity of Alfvén waves at gyro-resonant wavenumbers. The Alfvén waves are traced simultaneously with the particles, so that the wave field is propagated outwards from the Sun using WKB propagation supplemented with a phenomenological wavenumber diffusion term and a growth rate computed from the net flux of the accelerated particles. In this work, we study how the thermal and the non-thermal portions of the acceleration seed population participate in the acceleration process. We model the seed particle population by using a kappa distribution, in order to mimic a thermal bulk plasma supplemented by a non-thermal high-energy tail. We will study the contribution of the thermal and non-thermal populations to the wave generation, and their participation in the accelerated particle populations, in different phases of the evolution of the SEP event. With this model, we can estimate the requirements for the source population to produce observed solar events.

  15. Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, Anthony N.; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (~2 mm thick, ~10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to <5°, which was close to a value for super hydrophilic surfaces. XPS analysis indicated that the percent of elements associated with mineral in dentin/enamel or fillers in the composites increased. In addition, the percent of carbon (%C) decreased while %O increased for all four substrates. As a result, the O/C ratio increased dramatically, suggesting that new oxygen-containing polar moieties were formed on the surfaces after plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested. PMID:23755823

  16. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  17. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  18. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W.; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Autoclaves and UV sterilizers have been commonly used to prevent cross-infections between dental patients and dental instruments or materials contaminated by saliva and blood. To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS After inoculating E. coli and B. subtilis the diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were sterilized by exposing them to the plasma for different lengths of time (30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and, 240 seconds). The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were immersed in PBS solutions, cultured on agar plates and quantified by counting the colony forming units. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and significance was assessed by the LSD post hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The device was effective in killing E. coli contained in the plasma device compared with the UV sterilizer. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device contributed greatly to the sterilization of diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli and B. subtilis. Diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli was effective after 60 and 90 seconds. The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with B. subtilis was effective after 120 and 180 seconds. CONCLUSION The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was effective in killing both E. coli and B. subtilis, and was more effective in killing E. coli than the UV sterilizer. PMID:23508991

  19. ICRF Wave Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Dumont; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2002-06-18

    Some results obtained with the one dimensional, all orders, full wave code METS, which has been successfully employed in the past to describe a number of experiments, are reported. By using massively parallel computers, this code has been extended to handle non-thermal populations. Various physical situations, in which non-Maxwellian species are expected to be encountered, are studied, such as simultaneous neutral beam injection and high harmonic fast wave electron heating or ion cyclotron resonance heating in the presence of fusion products.

  20. Non-thermal optical excitation of terahertz-spin precession in a magneto-optical insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchenko, Sergii; Satoh, Takuya; Yoshimine, Isao; Stobiecki, Feliks; Maziewski, Andrzej; Stupakiewicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate non-thermal ultrafast laser excitation of spin precession with THz frequency in Gd-Bi-substituted iron garnet via the inverse Faraday effect. The modulation of THz precession by about 60 GHz below the compensation temperature of magnetic moment was observed. The THz frequency precession was caused by the exchange resonance between the Gd and Fe sublattices; we attributed the low-frequency modulation to dielectric resonance mode with a magnetic contribution. We demonstrate the possibility of polarization-sensitive control of spin precession under THz generation by laser pulses, helping to develop high-speed magneto-optical devices.

  1. RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.

  2. Stabilization of a lean premixed flame using non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Daisuke; Shinjo, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Toshiya; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) on the stabilization of a lean premixed methane/air flame. The equivalence ratio of the methane/air mixture for the lean blowout limit (?CH4?0.81) decreases to 0.79 when the fuel is strongly exposed to NTP. Both the flame temperature and the luminescence intensity of C2, CH, and OH radicals increase with increasing applied voltage, resulting in an increase in flame intensity. This allows the lean blowout limit of the methane/air mixture to be extended.

  3. Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.; Ferreri, Vincent; Kim, Yongho

    2009-04-21

    The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

  4. Lean NOx Reduction in Two Stages: Non-thermal Plasma Followed by Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Yoon, Ilsop S.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Panov, Alexander G.; Kolwaite, A; Balmer, Mari LOU.

    2000-10-16

    We present data in this paper showing that non-thermal plasma in combination with heterogeneous catalysis is a promising technique for the treatment of NOx in diesel exhaust. Using a commonly available zeolite catalyst, sodium Y, to treat synthetic diesel exhaust we report approximately 50% chemical reduction of NOx over a broad, representative temperature range. We have measured the overall efficiency as a function of the temperature and hydrocarbon concentration. The direct detection of N2 and N2O when the background gas is replaced by helium confirms that true chemical reduction is occurring.

  5. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

  6. Thermal and non-thermal charmed meson production in heavy ions collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhtin, I. P.; Belyaev, A. V.; Eyyubova, G. Kh; Ponimatkin, G.; Pronina, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenological analysis of the LHC data on PT-spectrum and elliptic flow of J/? and D mesons in PbPb collisions at ?snn = 2.76 TeV is presented. The charmed meson production pattern in PbPb collisions may be reproduced by two-component model HYDJET++ including thermal and non-thermal components. The significant part of D-mesons is found to be in a kinetic equilibrium with the created medium, while J/? -mesons are not.

  7. ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-07-10

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  8. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  9. Preradiation studies for non-thermal Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B.; Mock, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing non-thermal radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of non-thermal radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.

  10. IRIS diagnostics of non-thermal particles in coronal loops heated by nanoflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, P.; De Pontieu, B.; Allred, J. C.; Carlsson, M.; Reale, F.; Daw, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    The variability of emission of the "moss", i.e., the upper transition region (TR) layer of high pressure loops in active regions, provides stringent constraints on the characteristics of heating events. We will discuss the new coronal heating diagnostics provided by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) together with SDO/AIA. IRIS provides imaging and spectral observations of the solar chromosphere and transition region, at high spatial (0.166 arcsec/pix) and temporal (down to ~1s) resolution at FUV and NUV wavelengths. We discuss how simultaneous IRIS and AIA observations, together with loop modeling (with the RADYN code) including chromosphere, transition region and corona, allow us to study impulsive heating events (nanoflares) and the energy transport mechanism between the corona and the lower atmospheric layers (thermal conduction vs. beams of non-thermal particles). We will show how the modeling of rapid moss brightenings provides diagnostics for the presence and properties of non-thermal particles in nanoflares, which are below the detectability threshold of hard X-ray observations.

  11. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  12. Non-thermal CMSSM with a 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Bhaskar; Krippendorf, Sven; Maharana, Anshuman; Muia, Francesco; Quevedo, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    We study the phenomenology of the CMSSM/mSUGRA with non-thermal neutralino dark matter. Besides the standard parameters of the CMSSM we include the reheating temperature as an extra parameter. Imposing radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a Higgs mass around 125 GeV and no dark matter overproduction, we contrast the scenario with different experimental bounds from colliders (LEP, LHC), cosmic microwave background (Planck), direct (LUX, XENON100, CDMS, IceCube) and indirect (Fermi) dark matter searches. The allowed parameter space is characterised by a Higgsino-like LSP with a mass around 300 GeV. The observed dark matter abundance can be saturated for reheating temperatures around 2GeV while larger temperatures require extra non-neutralino dark matter candidates and extend the allowed parameter space. Sfermion and gluino masses are in the few TeV region. These scenarios can be achieved in string models of sequestered supersymmetry breaking which avoid cosmological moduli problems and are compatible with gauge coupling unification. Astrophysics and particle physics experiments will fully investigate this non-thermal scenario in the near future.

  13. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  14. Non-thermal plasma as preparative technique to evaluate olive oil adulteration.

    PubMed

    Van Durme, Jim; Vandamme, Jeroen

    2016-10-01

    In recent years adulteration of pure extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) with other types of vegetable oils has become an important issue. In this study, non-thermal plasma (NTP) is investigated as an innovative preparative analytical technique enabling classification of adulterated olive oil from an ascertained authentic batch of olive oil in a more sensitive manner. Non-thermal plasma discharges are a source of highly oxidative species such as singlet oxygen, and atomic oxygen. It was assumed that NTP-induced oxidation triggers unique lipid oxidation mechanisms depending on the specific composition of the oil matrix and minor constituents. In this work EVOO samples were adulterated with sunflower oil (1-3%) and submitted to NTP treatment. Results showed that while untreated samples could not be classified from the authentic olive oil reference, NTP treatments of 60min (Ar/O2 0.1%) on the oil batches resulted in the formation of a unique set of secondary volatile lipid oxidation products enabling classification of adulterated oil samples. PMID:27132839

  15. Effective group index of refraction in non-thermal plasma photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Sadegzadeh, S.

    2015-11-01

    Plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are periodic arrays that consist of alternate layers of micro-plasma and dielectric. These structures are used to control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. This paper presents a survey of research on the effect of non-thermal plasma with bi-Maxwellian distribution function on one dimensional PPC. A plasma with temperature anisotropy is not in thermodynamic equilibrium and can be described by the bi-Maxwellian distribution function. By using Kronig-Penny's model, the dispersion relation of electromagnetic modes in one dimensional non-thermal PPC (NPPC) is derived. The band structure, group velocity vg, and effective group index of refraction neff(g) of such NPPC structure with TeO2 as the material of dielectric layers have been studied. The concept of negative group velocity and negative neff(g), which indicates an anomalous behaviour of the PPCs, are also observed in the NPPC structures. Our numerical results provide confirmatory evidence that unlike PPCs there are finite group velocity and non-zero effective group indexes of refraction in photonic band gaps (PBGs) that lie in certain ranges of normalized frequency. In other words, inside the PBGs of NPPCs, neff(g) becomes non-zero and photons travel with a finite group velocity. In this special case, this velocity varies alternately between 20c and negative values of the order 103c (c is the speed of light in vacuum).

  16. Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Non-thermal plasma is a key component in gas lasers, microelectronics, medical applications, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and others. A specific feature of non-thermal plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). This sensitivity is due to complex deformations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape induced by variations in electric field strength, electron and ion number densities and gas excitation degree. Particular attention in this article is paid to mechanisms of instabilities based on non-linearity of plasma properties for specific conditions: gas composition, steady-state and decaying plasma produced by the electron beam, or by an electric current pulse. The following effects are analyzed: the negative differential electron conductivity; the absolute negative electron mobility; the stepwise changes of plasma properties induced by the EEDF bi-stability; thermo-current instability and the constriction of the glow discharge column in rare gases. Some of these effects were observed experimentally and some of them were theoretically predicted and still wait for experimental confirmation.

  17. Non-thermal Plasma Causes p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tuhvatulin, A.I.; Sysolyatina, E.V.; Scheblyakov, D.V.; Logunov, D.Yu.; Vasiliev, M.M.; Yurova, M.A.; Danilova, M.A.; Petrov, O.F.; Naroditsky, B.S.; Morfill, G.E.; Grigoriev, A.I.; Fortov, V.E.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Ermolaeva, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) consists of a huge amount of biologically active particles, whereas its temperature is close to ambient. This combination allows one to use NTP as a perspective tool for solving different biomedical tasks, including antitumor therapy. The treatment of tumor cells with NTP caused dose-dependent effects, such as growth arrest and apoptosis. However, while the outcome of NTP treatment has been established, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between NTP and eukaryotic cells have not been thoroughly studied thus far. In this work, the mechanisms and the type of death of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells upon application of non-thermal argon plasma were studied. The effect of NTP on the major stress-activated protein p53 was investigated. The results demonstrate that the viability of HCT116 cells upon plasma treatment is dependent on the functional p53 protein. NTP treatment caused an increase in the intracellular concentration of p53 and the induction of the p53-controlled regulon. The p53-dependent accumulation of active proapoptotic caspase-3 was shown in NTP-treated cells. The study was the first to demonstrate that treatment of human colon carcinoma cells with NTP results in p53-dependent apoptosis. The results obtained contribute to our understanding of the applicability of NTP in antitumor therapy. PMID:23150806

  18. A parametric study of non-thermal plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles from a chlorinated precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Yamada, Riku; Gresback, Ryan; Zhou, Shu; Pi, Xiaodong; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2014-12-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) synthesized in non-thermal plasma with silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) are anticipated as a non-toxic and inexpensive Si source for important applications. This study examines the crystallinity, yield, and size distribution of Si NPs in terms of specific energy input (SEI) for 2.5-65?J?cm?3 and the H2/SiCl4 ratio (1-10). The particle growth mechanism is discussed comprehensively. Atomic hydrogen (H) production using non-thermal plasma is the primary important step for SiCl4 dechlorination at low temperatures. The Si NP yield increases with SEI (plasma power divided by total gas flow) because SiCl4 conversion increases with energy fed into the unit volume of the feed gas. At low SEI, Si NPs were mostly in amorphous material because of insufficient plasma heating. A maximum yield of 50?wt% was obtained when SEI = 10?J?cm?3 (H2/SiCl4 = 10) with a crystal fraction of about 1%. Increased SEI is necessary to improve crystal fraction, but excessive SEI decreases the NP yield remarkably. The NP yield losses correspond to increasing NP-free thin film growth on the reactor wall. Mass spectrometry shows that SiCl4 is highly decomposed with greater SEI. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) increases as a by-product. At higher SEI, particle nucleation and subsequent growth are suppressed.

  19. Non-thermal fluctuations in living cells reveal nonlinear mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Vavylonis, Dimitris; Jedlicka, Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    Living cells are a non-equilibrium mechanical system, largely because intracellular molecular motors consume chemical energy to generate forces that reorganize and maintain cytoskeletal functions. Persistently under tension, the network of cytoskeletal proteins exhibits a nonlinear mechanical behavior where the network stiffness increases with intracellular tension. We examined the nonlinear mechanical properties of living cells by characterizing the differential stiffness of the cytoskeletal network for HeLa cells under different intracellular tensions. Combining active and passive microrheology methods, we measured non-thermal fluctuating forces and found them to be much larger than the thermal fluctuating force. From the variations of differential stiffness caused by the fluctuating non-thermal force for cells under different tension, we obtained a master curve describing the differential stiffness as a function of the intracellular tension. Varying the intracellular tension by treating cells with drugs that alter motor protein activities we found the differential stiffness follows the same master curve that describes intracellular stiffness as a function of intracellular tension. This observation suggests that cells can regulate their mechanical properties by adjusting intracellular tension. NSF DMR 0923299.

  20. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-06-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. The authors discuss in detail their work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO{sub x} in diesel engine exhaust. The results suggest that their plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kW and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1,200 liters per minute.

  1. [Optimizing remediation conditions of non-thermal plasma for DDTs heavily contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Hong; Luo, Yong-Ming; Teng, Ying; Liu, Wu-Xing; Pan, Cheng; Li, Zhen-Gao; Huang, Yu-Juan

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in a non-thermal reactor to remove DDTs in heavily contaminated soil by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The study aims to investigate the effects of soil properties (including soil particle size and soil water content) and equipment working parameters (e. g. the plasma power, the processing time and discharge atmosphere) on the removal of DDTs from soil. The results showed that DDTs in soil were significantly degraded by the non-thermal plasma produced by dielectric barrier discharge. Removal rate of DDTs increased with increasing processing time. The removal efficiency of DDTs ranged from 95.3% to 99.9% in 20 minutes. The optimum conditions were as follows: 1 kW of the plasma power, 20 minutes of processing time in air discharge atmosphere, 0-0.9 mm soil particle size and 4.5% -10.5% of soil moisture content. The results also showed that o,p'-DDE might be the intermediate dechlorination and dehydrogenation product of the o,p'-DDT after the oxidization. PMID:23487955

  2. Non-thermal production of Wino dark matter via the decay of long-lived particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroi, Takeo; Nagai, Minoru; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    We consider supersymmetric models in which the neutral Wino is the lightest superparticle (LSP), and study the possibility that non-thermally produced Wino plays the role of dark matter. The thermal relic density of Wino is smaller than the present mass density of dark matter if {m_{{widetilde{W}}}} ≲ 2.9 TeV; however, even with smaller Wino mass, the Wino can be the dominant component of dark matter if it is non-thermally produced by the decay of a long-lived particle. In order to study such a possibility in detail, we perform a precise calculation of the present mass density of Wino produced by the decay of a long- lived particle, taking account of the following effects: (i) coannihilation among charged and neutral Winos, and (ii) Sommerfeld effect on the pair annihilation cross section of Winos. We consider several well-motivated cases where the long-lived particle corresponds to cosmological moduli fields, gravitino, or axino, and discuss the implication of the Wino LSP for these cases.

  3. Clumping Effects on Non-Thermal Particle Spectra in Massive Star Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-09

    Observational evidence exists that winds of massive stars are clumped. Many massive star systems are known as non-thermal particle production sites, as indicated by their synchrotron emission in the radio band. As a consequence they are also considered as candidate sites for non-thermal high-energy photon production up to gamma-ray energies. The present work considers the effects of wind clumpiness expected on the emitting relativistic particle spectrum in colliding wind systems, built up from the pool of thermal wind particles through diffusive particle acceleration, and taking into account inverse Compton and synchrotron losses. In comparison to a homogeneous wind, a clumpy wind causes flux variations of the emitting particle spectrum when the clump enters the wind collision region. It is found that the spectral features associated with this variability moves temporally from low to high energy bands with the time shift between any two spectral bands being dependent on clump size, filling factor, and the energy-dependence of particle energy gains and losses.

  4. Time-variable Non-thermal Emission in the Planetary Nebula IRAS 15103-5754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surez, Olga; Gmez, Jos F.; Bendjoya, Philippe; Miranda, Luis F.; Guerrero, Martn A.; Uscanga, Lucero; Green, James A.; Rizzo, J. Ricardo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    The beginning of photoionization marks the transition between the post-AGB and planetary nebula (PN) phases of stars with masses ? 8 M ? . This critical phase is difficult to observe, as it lasts only a few decades. The combination of jets and magnetic fields, the key agents of PN shaping, could give rise to synchrotron emission, but this has never been observed before in any PNe, since free-free emission from the ionized gas is expected to dominate its radio spectrum. In this paper we report radio continuum observations taken with the ATCA between 1 and 46 GHz of the young PN IRAS 15103-5754. Our observations in 2010-2011 show non-thermal emission compatible with synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated at a shock with spectral index ? ? -0.54. However, in 2012, the spectral index ? ? -0.28 is no longer compatible with synchrotron emission in these types of processes. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain this change. The more plausible ones are related to the presence of the newly photoionized region in this young PN: either energy loss of electrons due to Coulomb collisions with the plasma, or selective suppression of synchrotron radiation due to the Razin effect. We postulate that the observed flattening of non-thermal radio spectra could be a hallmark identifying the beginning of the PN phase.

  5. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti?, M.; Mojsilovi?, S.; Oki? ?or?evi?, I.; Maleti?, D.; Pua?, N.; Lazovi?, S.; Malovi?, G.; Milenkovi?, P.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj; Bugarski, D.

    2013-08-01

    Here we investigate the influences of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a non-thermal plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications.

  6. Effects of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma treatments on aflatoxigenic fungi and its host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    This experiment tests the ability of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma treatments in the prevention of fungi infection. There are charged particles, electric field, radicals and UV light inside plasmas and these elements might trigger different physical or chemical effects during non-thermal plasma treatments. In this experiment, the experimental samples received indirect plasma treatments with different time duration and gas compositions which mean only the remote effects caused by plasma treatments could be seen. In this work, plasmas were produced by dielectric barrier discharge method. The operation gases were air and a mixed gas of 97% He and 3%O2. After plasma treatments, fungi growth rate was observed by taking pictures and the existence of aflatoxin was qualitatively detected by black light method. The final results show that the radicals in both He/O2 and air plasma might facilitate fungi growth rate which means peanuts received indirect plasma treatments grew fungi faster than control group. The outcomes of aflatoxin detection also shows that the fungi grown on all the sample are aflatoxigenic fungi.

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

  8. Harnessing the immunomodulatory effect of thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianpillai, Christopher; Petrides, Neophytos; Shah, Taimur; Guillaumier, Stephanie; Ahmed, Hashim U; Arya, Manit

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive interventional therapies are evolving rapidly and their use for the treatment of solid tumours is becoming more extensive. The in situ destruction of solid tumours by such therapies is thought to release antigens that can prime an antitumour immune response. In this review, we offer an overview of the current evidence for immune response activation associated with the utilisation of the main thermal and non-thermal ablation therapies currently in use today. This is followed by an assessment of the hypothesised mechanisms behind this immune response priming and by a discussion of potential methods of harnessing this specific response, which may subsequently be applicable in the treatment of cancer patients. References were identified through searches of PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane databases to identify peer-reviewed original articles, meta-analyses and reviews. Papers were searched from 1850 until October 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors' files. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Thermal and non-thermal therapies have the potential to stimulate antitumour immunity although the current body of evidence is based mostly on murine trials or small-scale phase 1 human trials. The evidence for this immune-modulatory response is currently the strongest in relation to cryotherapy and radiotherapy, although data is accumulating for related ablative treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation. This effect may be greatly enhanced by combining these therapies with other immunostimulatory interventions. Evidence is emerging into the immunomodulatory effect associated with thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies used in cancer treatment in addition to the mechanism behind this effect and how it may be harnessed for therapeutic use. A potential exists for treatment approaches that combine ablation of the primary tumour with control and possible eradication of persistent, locally recurrent and metastatic disease. However, more work is needed into each of these modalities, initially in further animal studies and then subsequently in large-scale prospective human studies. PMID:26423402

  9. Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-01-17

    Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed, increasing the time available for experiments. For example, near Tg, on a typical laboratory time scale (e.g. {approx}1000 s), a water molecule moves less than a molecular distance. For this reason, nanoscale films help to probe the behavior and reactions of supercooled liquid at these low temperatures. ASW films can be used for investigating the non-thermal reactions relevant to radiolysis. In this account we will present a survey of our research on the thermal and non thermal properties of ASW using this approach.

  10. Abatement of mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Karuppiah, J; Reddy, E Linga; Reddy, P Manoj Kumar; Ramaraju, B; Karvembu, R; Subrahmanyam, Ch

    2012-10-30

    Total oxidation of mixture of dilute volatile organic compounds was carried out in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor with various transition metal oxide catalysts integrated in-plasma. The experimental results indicated the best removal efficiencies in the presence of metal oxide catalysts, especially MnO(x), whose activity was further improved with AgO(x) deposition. It was confirmed water vapor improves the efficiency of the plasma reactor, probably due to the formation of hydroxyl species, whereas, in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface may lead to nascent oxygen. It may be concluded that non-thermal plasma approach is beneficial for the removal of mixture of volatile organic compounds than individual VOCs, probably due to the formation of reactive intermediates like aldehydes, peroxides, etc. PMID:22975253

  11. Decomposition of trifluoromethane in a dielectric barrier discharge non-thermal plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, M Sanjeeva; Mok, Y S

    2012-01-01

    The decomposition of trifluoromethane (CHF3) was carried out using non-thermal plasma generated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The effects of reactor temperature, electric power, initial concentration and oxygen content were examined. The DBD reactor was able to completely destroy CHF3 with alumina beads as a packing material. The decomposition efficiency increased with increasing electric power and reactor temperature. The destruction of CHF3 gradually increased with the addition of O2 up to 2%, but further increase in the oxygen content led to a decrease in the decomposition efficiency. The degradation pathways were explained with the identified by-products. The main by-products from CHF3 were found to be COF2, CF4, CO2 and CO although the COF2 and CF4 disappeared when the plasma were combined with alumina catalyst. PMID:23513444

  12. Variable susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to non-thermal plasma-activated medium

    PubMed Central

    UTSUMI, FUMI; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; NAKAMURA, KAE; TANAKA, HIROMASA; MIZUNO, MASAAKI; TOYOKUNI, SHINNYA; HORI, MASARU; KIKKAWA, FUMITAKA

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been widely studied in recent years in many fields, including cancer treatment. However, its efficiency for inducing apoptosis sometimes varies depending on the cell species and experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate what causes these differences in responses to plasma treatment. Using four ovarian cancer cell lines, the cell density had a markedly negative impact on the proliferation inhibition rate (PIR) and it was more obvious in OVCAR-3 and NOS2 cells. Furthermore, TOV21G and ES-2 cells were drastically sensitive to plasma-activated medium (PAM) compared with the other two cell lines. We demonstrated that the proportion of reactive oxygen species and cell number had a marked impact on the effect of PAM against ovarian cancer cells. Additionally it was suggested that the morphological features of cells were also closely related PMID:27035127

  13. Steady State Transportation Cooling in Porous Media Under Local, Non-Thermal Equilibrium Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Alvaro Che

    2002-01-01

    An analytical solution to the steady-state fluid temperature for 1-D (one dimensional) transpiration cooling has been derived. Transpiration cooling has potential use in the aerospace industry for protection against high heating environments for re-entry vehicles. Literature for analytical treatments of transpiration cooling has been largely confined to the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the porous matrix and fluid. In the present analysis, the fundamental fluid and matrix equations are coupled through a volumetric heat transfer coefficient and investigated in non-thermal equilibrium. The effects of varying the thermal conductivity of the solid matrix and the heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results are also compared to existing experimental data.

  14. Variable susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to non-thermal plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinnya; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-06-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been widely studied in recent years in many fields, including cancer treatment. However, its efficiency for inducing apoptosis sometimes varies depending on the cell species and experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate what causes these differences in responses to plasma treatment. Using four ovarian cancer cell lines, the cell density had a markedly negative impact on the proliferation inhibition rate (PIR) and it was more obvious in OVCAR-3 and NOS2 cells. Furthermore, TOV21G and ES-2 cells were drastically sensitive to plasma‑activated medium (PAM) compared with the other two cell lines. We demonstrated that the proportion of reactive oxygen species and cell number had a marked impact on the effect of PAM against ovarian cancer cells. Additionally it was suggested that the morphological features of cells were also closely related to the sensitivity of cancer cells to the plasma treatment. PMID:27035127

  15. Effects of non-thermal plasma on the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Young; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Tae Soo; Lim, Jaekwan; Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal plasma is used here for membrane oxidation and permeabilization in which the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane are investigated after treatments. The zeta potential as measured by electrophoresis shows the increased negativity of the membrane surface potential (Ψs). The secondary electron emission coefficient ( γ) measured by a focused ion beam shows a decrease in the dipole potential (Ψd) of lipid molecules. The voltage-sensitive fluorescent intensity as measured by flow cytometry shows a decrease in the trans-membrane potential (ΔΨ) through the lipid bilayer membrane. These results allow us to take a step forward to unveil the complex events occurring in plasma-treated cells.

  16. Non-thermal fixed points and solitons in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Erne, Sebastian; Nowak, Boris; Sexty, Dénes; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Single-particle momentum spectra for a dynamically evolving one-dimensional Bose gas are analysed in the semi-classical wave limit. Representing one of the simplest correlation functions, these provide information on a possible universal scaling behaviour. Motivated by the previously discovered connection between (quasi-) topological field configurations, strong wave turbulence and non-thermal fixed points of quantum field dynamics, soliton formation is studied with respect to the appearance of transient power-law spectra. A random-soliton model is developed for describing the spectra analytically, and the analogies and differences between the emerging power laws and those found in a field theory approach to strong wave turbulence are discussed. The results open a new perspective on solitary wave dynamics from the point of view of critical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium and the possibility of studying this dynamics by experiment without the need for detecting solitons in situ.

  17. Sterilization of Staphylococcus Aureus by an Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu; Hong, Feng; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2013-05-01

    An atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet was developed for sterilizing the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The plasma jet was generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), which was characterized by electrical and optical diagnostics. The survival curves of the bacteria showed that the plasma jet could effectively inactivate 106 cells of S. aureus within 120 seconds and the sterilizing efficiency depended critically on the discharge parameter of the applied voltage. It was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that the cell morphology was seriously damaged by the plasma treatment. The plasma sterilization mechanism of S. aureus was attributed to the active species of OH, N2+ and O, which were generated abundantly in the plasma jet and characterized by OES. Our findings suggest a convenient and low-cost way for sterilization and inactivation of bacteria.

  18. Non-thermal enhancement of electron-positron pair creation in burning thermonuclear laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We estimate the number of electron-positron pairs which will be produced during the burning of a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasma in conditions that are anticipated will be achieved at the National Ignition Facility. In particular we consider, for the first time, the effect of including the gamma photons produced in a low probability channel of the DT reaction. It is found that non-thermal effects driven by the fusion products are the dominant method of pair production, and lead to a number density of positrons within the capsule in excess of 3 1017 cm-3. The positrons are predominately produced by the Bethe-Heitler process and destroyed by two photon annihilation.

  19. Silicon nanocrystals synthesized using very high frequency non-thermal plasma and their application in photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Gresback, Ryan; Zhou, Shu; Pi, Xiaodong; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) with average size of 6?nm were synthesized using very high frequency non-thermal plasma. After surface chemical treatment, they were applied in Si NC/PTB7 hybrid solar cells as the acceptor material. According to the performance of devices with different Si NC/PTB7 weight ratios, results show that surface-treated Si NCs have good electrical properties with few trapping centres. Furthermore, Si NCs promote exciton dissociation, carrier transport processes and contribute to light absorption, especially in the near-UV region. Finally, devices with efficiency as high as 3.0% have been achieved with optimized Si NC/PTB7 weight ratio, which is competitive in same type devices using different nanocrystals.

  20. Ab initio investigation of photoinduced non-thermal phase transition in β-cristobalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Quan, Feng; Hua-Ping, Zang; Yong-Qiang, Wang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Jin-Sheng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Using the linear-response method, we investigate the phonon properties of β-cristobalite crystal under electronic excitation effect. We find that the transverse-acoustic phonon frequency becomes imaginary as the electron temperature is increased, which means that the lattice of β-cristobalite becomes unstable under intense laser irradiation. In addition, for the optic phonon mode, the LO(H)–TO(H) splitting disappears when the electronic temperature reaches a certain value, corresponding to the whole transverse-acoustic phonon branches becoming negative. It means that the electronic excitation destroys the macroscopic electric field of β-cristobalite. Based on the calculated phonon band structures, some thermodynamic properties are calculated as a function of temperature at different electronic temperatures. These investigations provide evidence that non-thermal melting takes place during a femtosecond pulse laser interaction with β-cristobalite. Project support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374217 and 11547158).

  1. The Effect of Blood Flow on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non Thermal Irreversible Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjouj, Mohammad; Lavee, Jacob; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Sharabi, Shirley; Rubinsky, Boris; Mardor, Yael

    2013-10-01

    To generate an understanding of the physiological significance of MR images of Non-Thermal Irreversible Electroporation (NTIRE) we compared the following MR imaging sequences: T1W, T2W, PD, GE, and T2 SPAIR acquired after NTIRE treatment in a rodent liver model. The parameters that were studied included the presence or absence of a Gd-based contrast agent, and in vivo and ex-vivo NTIRE treatments in the same liver. NTIRE is a new minimally invasive tissue ablation modality in which pulsed electric fields cause molecularly selective cell death while, the extracellular matrix and large blood vessels remain patent. This attribute of NTIRE is of major clinical importance as it allows treatment of undesirable tissues near critical blood vessels. The presented study results suggest that MR images acquired following NTIRE treatment are all directly related to the unique pattern of blood flow after NTIRE treatment and are not produced in the absence of blood flow.

  2. Dust-acoustic shock formation in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-01-15

    In this study, the nonlinear Burgers equation in the presence of the dust charge fluctuation is derived and the shock-like solution is determined. It is well known that in order to have a monotonic or oscillatory shock wave, a source of dissipation is needed. By using the experimental data reported in the laboratory observation of self-excited dust-acoustic shock waves [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 115002 (2009)], it is shown that dust charge fluctuation can be considered as a candidate for the source of dissipation needed for the dust-acoustic shock formation. By examining the effects of non-thermal ions on dust-acoustic shock's characteristics, a possible theoretical explanation for the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment is proposed.

  3. Disinfection of Staphylococcus Aureus by pulsed non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Shahgoli, Farhad

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of low-temperature atmospheric plasma jet on non-pathogenic bacteria's colonies. In this regard, Germicidal effect of time and distance of ICP He and He/N2 plasma jet on Staphylococcus Aureus were reported. The gas discharges were generated by a 40 KHz high voltage power supply which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The results showed that He/N2 enhance the sterilization time in comparison of He plasma. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study which has compared the effect of sterilization of ICP Helium and Helium-Nitrogen plasma in listed conditions. Also, the distance dependence showed that the germicidal effect was not linear the distance of electrode and sample. The protein leakage test and SEM of bacteria morphology confirmed the sterilization effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  4. Atmospheric-Pressure Non-thermal Plasma-JET effects on PS and PE surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, J.; Asenjo, J.; Vargas, I.; Solis, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma (APNTP) has become a topic of a great interest for a wide spectrum of applications in different industry branches, including the surface of treatment processes. In this work we evaluate the effect of an argon APNTP exposure to determine changes suffered by a polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene (PE) polymer surface through RAMAN spectroscopy and SEM. It was determined that the hydrophilic change in energetic terms, i.e. surface activation in the PS and PE polymers is addition of oxygen by surface activation when the samples with jet plasma are exposed with the inert argon gas. It was possible to characterize the hydrophilic shift based on the change in intensity of the spectra.

  5. Quasilinear evolution of non-thermal distributions in ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Harvey, R. W.; Lynch, V. E.; Ershov, N.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Tang, V.; Moore, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    The AORSA global-wave solver is combined with the CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code to simulate the quasilinear evolution of non-thermal distributions in ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas. A novel re-formulation of the quasilinear operator enables calculation of the velocity space diffusion coefficients directly from the global wave fields. To obtain self-consistency between the wave fields and particle distribution function, AORSA and CQL3D have been iteratively coupled using Python. The combined selfconsistent model is applied to minority ion heating in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Results show the formation of a 70 keV ion tail near the minority ion cyclotron resonance layer in approximate agreement with measurements from charge exchange neutral particle analyzers.

  6. Non-thermal effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitt, Brittany J.

    Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the non-thermal effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.

  7. Challenges in Computing Thermal and Non-thermal Emission from Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimica, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Cuesta-Martínez, C.; Aloy, C.

    2014-09-01

    Multi-wavelength emission from relativistic outflows (e.g., jets and blast waves) provides us with valuable information about the physical conditions of the emitting plasma, its fluid dynamics and about the process which generates the outflows (i.e., the central engine). We use the relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) code MRGENESIS coupled to a radiative transfer code SPEV to simulate the dynamics and emission of relativistic jets in two astrophysical scenarios, one involving non-thermal synchrotron emission in radio, and the other where thermal emission in optical is predominant. We give an overview of the structure of two codes and explain how they are coupled to compute the time-dependent emission from the evolving relativistic fluid. A considerable attention is given to the computational challenges that we face when applying SPEV to compute the light curves and spectra of relativistic jets.

  8. Compton and synchrotron processes in spherically-symmetric non-thermal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A framework is developed for the accurate calculation of Compton and synchrotron processes in a special class of spherically-symmetric sources. The models considered take a distribution in magnetic field values and high-energy electron density that varies smoothly from central values to values at the outer boundary of the source. Further, the assumption is made that the magnetic field has local disorder (isotropy) and the high-energy electron distribution has local isotropy. Then, in terms of parameters of the source, the synchrotron brightness distribution, total synchrotron flux, Compton-synchrotron flux, and synchrotron self-absorption turnover are all computed accurately. Results are given with a view toward application to the analysis of compact non-thermal sources.

  9. Surface modification of Raw and Frit glazes by non-thermal helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, M.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Mirzanejhad, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was utilized to improve the adhesion of Raw and Frit glazes. These glazes are widely used in industry to make chinaware, decorative dishes and tiles applied at wall and floor. As they should be painted before use, increasing their adhesive properties leads to a better paint durability. Electrical and optical characteristics of the plasma jet are investigated to optimize for efficient treatment. Contact angle measurement and surface energy calculation demonstrate a drastic increase after the plasma treatment indicating wettability and paintability enhancement. Moreover, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were performed on the specimens to explore the influence of helium plasma jet on the physical and chemical properties of the glazes, microscopically. AFM analysis reveals surface etching resulted from the bombardment of the solid surfaces by the APPJ using helium fed gas. The process aims to enhance adhesive properties of glaze surfaces.

  10. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested. PMID:25685416

  11. Non-thermal plasma technology for the development of antimicrobial surfaces: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, Anton; Deng, Xiaolong; Xiong, Qing; Cvelbar, U.; DeGeyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial coatings are in high demand in many fields including the biomaterials and healthcare sectors. Within recent progress in nanoscience and engineering at the nanoscale, preparation of nanocomposite films containing metal nanoparticles (such as silver nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanoparticles) is becoming an important step in manufacturing biomaterials with high antimicrobial activity. Controlled release of antibiotic agents and eliminating free nanoparticles are of equal importance for engineering antimicrobial nanocomposite materials. Compared to traditional chemical ‘wet’ methods, plasma deposition and plasma polymerization are promising approaches for the fabrication of nanocomposite films with the advantages of gas phase dry processes, effective use of chemicals and applicability to various substrates. In this article, we present a short overview of state-of-the-art engineering of antimicrobial materials based on the use of non-thermal plasmas at low and atmospheric pressure.

  12. Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon

    2012-10-01

    Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.

  13. Non-thermal emission in astrophysical environments: From pulsars to supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomiashvili, David

    The study of electromagnetic radiation from distant astrophysical objects provides essential data in understanding physics of these sources. In particular, non-thermal radiation provides great insight into the properties of local environments, particle populations, and emission mechanisms, knowledge which otherwise would remain untapped. Throughout the projects conducted for this dissertation, we modeled certain aspects of observed non-thermal emission from three classes of sources: radio pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. Orbital variation in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B can be used to probe the details of the magnetospheric structure of pulsar B. Strongly magnetized wind from pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B in a way similar to the solar wind's distortion of the Earth's magnetosphere. Using the two complimentary models of pulsar B's magnetosphere, adapted from the Earth's magnetosphere models by Dungey and Tsyganenko, we determine the precise location of the coherent radio emission generation region in pulsar B's magnetosphere. This analysis is complemented by modeling the observed evolution of the pulse profiles of B due to geodetic precession. The emission region is located at about 3750 stellar radii and has a horseshoe-like shape centered on the polar magnetic field lines. The best fit angular parameters of the emission region indicate that radio emission is generated on the field lines which, according to the theoretical models, originate close to the poles and carry the maximum current. When considered together, not only do the results of the two models converge, they can explain why the modulation of B's radio emission at A's period is observed only within a certain orbital phase region. We discuss the implications of these results for pulsar magnetospheric models and mechanisms of coherent radio emission generation. We also developed a spatially-resolved, analytic model for the high-energy non-thermal emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Theoretically, synchrotron cooling should cause a gradual change in particle spectrum downstream. This effect is indeed observed in the X-ray spectra of The Crab Nebula , 3C 58, and G21.5.0.9. However, current theoretical models of PWNe that only account for the bulk motion in the pulsar outflow overestimate the steepening of the resulted emission spectrum. This implies that there is an additional mechanism of particle transport which would supply energetic particles to the outer layers of the PWN. Our model solves the lack of high-energy electrons in the outer regions of the nebula by taking the diffusion of particles into account. The resulting multi-wavelength spectra exhibits multiple breaks, which is in agreement with observations. Thin non-thermal X-ray filaments are often seen near shock fronts in young supernova remnants (SNRs), often spatially coincident with the high energy gamma-ray emission. The formation of such discrete features is likely influenced by the combined effects of radiative cooling, advection, and diffusion. Spatially-resolved spectral studies of the filaments may, therefore, provide significant insights into the relative importance of main physical processes involved in young SNRs. Using 1 Ms Chandra observation of Cassiopeia A, we perform advection-diffusion modeling of synchrotron emission of filaments to measure the magnetic field, shock obliquity, the diffusion strength and the plasma turbulence level.

  14. ION TEMPERATURE AND NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION: USING EMISSION LINES OF DIFFERENT ATOMIC SPECIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.

    2009-11-10

    We have studied the characteristics of the ion thermal temperature and non-thermal velocity in an active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer onboard Hinode. We used two emission lines of different atomic species (Fe XVI 262.98 A and S XIII 256.69 A) to distinguish the ion thermal velocity from the observed full width at half-maximum. We assumed that the sources of the two emission lines are the same thermal temperature. We also assumed that they have the same non-thermal velocity. With these assumptions, we could obtain the ion thermal temperature, after noting that M{sub sulfur} approx 0.6M{sub iron}. We have carried out the ion thermal temperature analysis in the active region where the photon counts are sufficient (>4500). What we found is as follows: (1) the common ion thermal temperatures obtained by Fe XVI and S XIII are approx2.5 MK, (2) the typical non-thermal velocities are approx13 km s{sup -1}, (3) the highest non-thermal velocities (>20 km s{sup -1}) are preferentially observed between the bright points in Fe XVI, while (4) the hottest material (>3 MK) is observed relatively inside the bright points compared with the highest non-thermal velocity region.

  15. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  16. Evidence of Non-thermal X-ray Emission from Radio Lobes of Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Isobe, N.; Kino, M.; Asada, K.; Nagai, H.; Koyama, S.; Kusunose, M.

    2010-05-01

    Using deep Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observation data for Cygnus A, we report evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from radio lobes surrounded by a rich intracluster medium (ICM). The diffuse X-ray emission, which is associated with the eastern and western radio lobes, was observed in a 0.7-7 keV Chandra ACIS image. The lobe spectra are reproduced with not only a single-temperature Mekal model, such as that of the surrounding ICM component, but also an additional power-law (PL) model. The X-ray flux densities of PL components for the eastern and western lobes at 1 keV are derived as 77.7+28.9 -31.9 nJy and 52.4+42.9 -42.4 nJy, respectively, and the photon indices are 1.69+0.07 -0.13 and 1.84+2.90 -0.12, respectively. The non-thermal component is considered to be produced via the inverse Compton (IC) process, as is often seen in the X-ray emission from radio lobes. From a re-analysis of radio observation data, the multiwavelength spectra strongly suggest that the seed photon source of the IC X-rays includes both cosmic microwave background radiation and synchrotron radiation from the lobes. The derived parameters indicate significant dominance of the electron energy density over the magnetic field energy density in the Cygnus A lobes under the rich ICM environment.

  17. Effective group index of refraction in non-thermal plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, A.; Sadegzadeh, S.

    2015-11-15

    Plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are periodic arrays that consist of alternate layers of micro-plasma and dielectric. These structures are used to control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. This paper presents a survey of research on the effect of non-thermal plasma with bi-Maxwellian distribution function on one dimensional PPC. A plasma with temperature anisotropy is not in thermodynamic equilibrium and can be described by the bi-Maxwellian distribution function. By using Kronig-Penny's model, the dispersion relation of electromagnetic modes in one dimensional non-thermal PPC (NPPC) is derived. The band structure, group velocity v{sub g}, and effective group index of refraction n{sub eff}(g) of such NPPC structure with TeO{sub 2} as the material of dielectric layers have been studied. The concept of negative group velocity and negative n{sub eff}(g), which indicates an anomalous behaviour of the PPCs, are also observed in the NPPC structures. Our numerical results provide confirmatory evidence that unlike PPCs there are finite group velocity and non-zero effective group indexes of refraction in photonic band gaps (PBGs) that lie in certain ranges of normalized frequency. In other words, inside the PBGs of NPPCs, n{sub eff}(g) becomes non-zero and photons travel with a finite group velocity. In this special case, this velocity varies alternately between 20c and negative values of the order 10{sup 3}c (c is the speed of light in vacuum)

  18. Miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet—characterization of self-organized regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2009-12-01

    The study reports for the first time on self-organization effects in a radio frequency (RF) plasma generated with a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The source is configured as a capacitively coupled RF jet (27.2 MHz) with two outer ring electrodes around a quartz capillary (d = 4.0 mm) between which a gas mixture flows at typical rates of 0.05—5 slm. The application background of this source is the deposition of thin films with a PECVD process. Therefore, thin film producing agents can be added in small quantities downstream the active discharge region. Commonly, the time-resolved observation of the discharge development reveals that the discharge consists of distinct discharge filaments that appear stochastically and evolve alongside the wall of the capillary. This stochastic mode can be easily found under most situations. However, under special conditions, a quasi-laminar flow is established and a controlled number of equidistant filaments develop which form fixed discrete rotating patterns (locked mode). In this paper, a systematic study is performed using Ar as process gas to define the range of existence of the locked mode. The temporal discharge behaviour is studied by performing a low frequency analysis on the optical emission of the plasma. RF power, gas flow rate and electrode distance are interpreted as scaling parameters that are responsible for the self-organization in the non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The appearance of the different discharge regimes is described on a phenomenological basis and the collective behavior of the discharge filaments is explained based on the thermal interference of the discharge channels with the gas flow inside the capillary.

  19. Non-Thermal Emission from the massive stellar association Cygnus OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Danielle Marie; Prinja, Raman; Morford, Jack

    2015-08-01

    The Cygnus OB2 association is located in the Galactic Cygnus X region at a distance of 1.4 kpc, making it one of the closest young massive stellar clusters. Cyg OB2 is not only very rich in stellar density but also in its diversity. It is known to contain a rich population of massive stars including almost 2600 OB stars, a large number of binaries (including a collection of some of the most interesting radio emitting colliding-wind binaries), and a considerable number of pre-main sequence stars.We report here on the first results from The Cyg OB2 Radio Survey (COBRaS), which is a UCL-led e-MERLIN legacy project to provide a deep-field radio mapping of the Cygnus OB2 association. The project has been awarded a total allocation of 252 hours at C-band (5GHz) and 42 hours at L-band (1.6GHz) to image the core of the cluster.We discuss in particular the presence of non-thermal radio emission at 20 cm (L-band), and its potential as a highly efficient way to identify binaries via single-epoch observations, particularly for colliding-wind binaries. COBRaS data will provide a powerful tool for establishing binary incidence in Cyg~OB2, specifically in the difficult intermediate-period range (1--100~yr). Knowing the binary frequency over the whole period range is important for population synthesis.Additionally, Weak-lined T Tauri (WTT) stars in Cyg OB2 also emit non-thermal radiation from magnetically active regions. Hence these observations will be used to detect the considerable population of younger stars.Ultimately, we aim to assemble a substantial and uniquely sensitive radio dataset, which will be exploited to address several fundamentally important areas of stellar astrophysics, including mass-loss, binary frequency, stellar cluster dynamics, and triggered star-formation.

  20. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating mechanism is responsible for heating the plasma, its turbulisation, and expansion/evaporation.

  1. INTEGRAL discovery of non-thermal hard X-ray emission from the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Produit, N.; Paltani, S.; Neronov, A.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of deep observations of the Ophiuchus cluster of galaxies with INTEGRAL in the 3-80 keV band. We analyse 3 Ms of INTEGRAL data on the Ophiuchus cluster with the IBIS/ISGRI hard X-ray imager and the JEM-X X-ray monitor. In the X-ray band using JEM-X, we show that the source is extended, and that the morphology is compatible with the results found by previous missions. Above 20 keV, we show that the size of the source is slightly larger than the PSF of the instrument, and is consistent with the soft X-ray morphology found with JEM-X and ASCA. Thanks to the constraints on the temperature provided by JEM-X, we show that the spectrum of the cluster is not well fitted by a single-temperature thermal Bremsstrahlung model, and that another spectral component is needed to explain the high energy data. We detect the high energy tail with a higher detection significance (6.4σ) than the BeppoSAX claim (2σ). Because of the imaging capabilities of JEM-X and ISGRI, we are able to exclude the possibility that the excess emission comes from very hot regions or absorbed AGN, which proves that the excess emission is indeed of non-thermal origin. Using the available radio data together with the non-thermal hard X-ray flux, we estimate a magnetic field B˜0.1{-}0.2 μ G.

  2. Non-Thermal Signatures in Low State Spectra of Black Hole X-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, A. A.; Tomsick, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    Many transient and persistent Black Hole X-ray Binaries (BHXBs) show characteristic state transitions between low/hard and high/soft spectral states. A typical low/hard state X-ray spectrum, as seen for example in Cyg X-1 and GRO J0422+32, is a power-law with a photon index of order 1.4-1.6 and an exponential cutoff with a characteristic e-folding energy ~ 100 keV. These spectra are generally interpreted as emission from hot thermal plasma modeled either as an accretion disk corona, or as a hot accretion flow inside a truncated thin disk. We show that low state spectra of three transient BHXBs, XTE J1118+480, XTE J1550-564, and 4U1630-47, do not show the characteristic hard X-ray turnover. The absence of the turnover is difficult to understand in the context of the thermal Comptonization models, and argues for the presence of non-thermal emission in these systems. We propose that a typical hard power-law spectrum can be produced both in the (thermal) accretion flow or in the (non-thermal) jet (as suggested by Fender et al. 2000). The strength of the jet emission relative to that from the accretion flow (and therefore whether we observe the thermal cutoff in the spectrum or not) can depend on several parameters, e.g. inclination of the jet with respect to the binary and the observer, mass accretion rate, accretion flow configuration. This work was supported by Chandra Postdoctoral Fellowship grant #PF8-10002 awarded by the Chandra X-Ray Center, which is operated by the SAO for NASA under contract NAS8-39073, and by a CASS Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  3. SUZAKU/WAM AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF NON-THERMAL ELECTRONS IN SOLAR MICROFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Krucker, Saem; Lin, Robert P.; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-03-10

    We report on hard X-ray spectroscopy of solar microflares observed by the Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM), on board the Suzaku satellite, and by RHESSI. WAM transient data provide wide energy band (50 keV-5 MeV) spectra over a large field of view ({approx}2{pi} sr) with a time resolution of 1 s. WAM is attractive as a hard X-ray solar flare monitor due to its large effective area ({approx}800 cm{sup 2} at 100 keV, {approx}13 times larger than that of RHESSI). In particular, this makes it possible to search for high energy emission in microflares that is well below the RHESSI background. The WAM solar flare list contains six GOES B-class microflares that were simultaneously observed by RHESSI between the launch of Suzaku in 2005 July and 2010 March. At 100 keV, the detected WAM fluxes are more than {approx}20 times below the typical RHESSI instrumental background count rates. The RHESSI and WAM non-thermal spectra are in good agreement with a single power law with photon spectral indices between 3.3 and 4.5. In a second step, we also searched the RHESSI microflare list for events that should be detectable by WAM, assuming that the non-thermal power-law emission seen by RHESSI extends to >50 keV. From the 12 detectable events between 2005 July and 2007 February, 11 were indeed seen by WAM. This shows that microflares, similar to regular flares, can accelerate electrons to energies up to at least 100 keV.

  4. Gamma-Ray Spectral Characteristics of Thermal and Non-Thermal Emission from Three Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, James C.; Wheaton, William A.

    2005-06-01

    Cygnus X-1 and the gamma-ray transients GRO J0422+32 and GRO J1719-24 displayed similar spectral properties when they underwent transitions between the high and low gamma-ray (30 keV to few MeV) intensity states. When these sources were in the high γ-ray intensity state (γ2(, for Cygnus X-1), their spectra featured two components: a Comptonized shape below 200-300 keV with a soft power-law tail (photon index >3) that extended to ˜1 MeV or beyond. When the sources were in the low-intensity state (γ0, for Cygnus X-1), the Comptonized spectral shape below 200 keV typically vanished and the entire spectrum from 30 keV to ˜1 MeV can be characterized by a single power law with a relatively harder photon index ˜2-2.7. Consequently the high- and low-intensity gamma-ray spectra intersect, generally in the ˜400 keV - ˜1 MeV range, in contrast to the spectral pivoting seen previously at lower (˜10 keV) energies. The presence of the power-law component in both the high- and low-intensity gamma-ray spectra strongly suggests that the non-thermal process is likely to be at work in both the high and the low-intensity situations. We have suggested a possible scenario (Ling & Wheaton, 2003), by combining the ADAF model of Esin et al. (1998) with a separate jet region that produces the non-thermal gamma-ray emission, and which explains the state transitions. Such a scenario will be discussed in the context of the observational evidence, summarized above, from the database produced by EBOP, JPL's BATSE earth occultation analysis system.

  5. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: improved resin adhesive penetration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentin. Methods Prepared dentin surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentin, adhesive/dentin interface, and adhesive layer at 1∼micron spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentin interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentin interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentin interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentin has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and restorative materials. PMID:24859333

  6. Killing of adherent oral microbes by a non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Rupf, Stefan; Lehmann, Antje; Hannig, Matthias; Schäfer, Barbara; Schubert, Andreas; Feldmann, Uwe; Schindler, Axel

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric plasma jets are being intensively studied with respect to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study was to test a microwave-powered non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet for its antimicrobial efficacy against adherent oral micro-organisms. Agar plates and dentin slices were inoculated with 6 log(10) c.f.u. cm(-2) of Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans, with Escherichia coli as a control. Areas of 1 cm(2) on the agar plates or the complete dentin slices were irradiated with a helium plasma jet for 0.3, 0.6 or 0.9 s mm(-2), respectively. The agar plates were incubated at 37 degrees C, and dentin slices were vortexed in liquid media and suspensions were placed on agar plates. The killing efficacy of the plasma jet was assessed by counting the number of c.f.u. on the irradiated areas of the agar plates, as well as by determination of the number of c.f.u. recovered from dentin slices. A microbe-killing effect was found on the irradiated parts of the agar plates for L. casei, S. mutans, C. albicans and E. coli. The plasma-jet treatment reduced the c.f.u. by 3-4 log(10) intervals on the dentin slices in comparison to recovery rates from untreated controls. The microbe-killing effect was correlated with increasing irradiation times. Thus, non-thermal atmospheric plasma jets could be used for the disinfection of dental surfaces. PMID:19910483

  7. In quest of non-thermal signatures in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Casares, Jorge; Marcote, Benito; Paredes-Fortuny, Xavier; Ribó, Marc; Paredes, Josep M.; Núñez, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    A reduced fraction of luminous, early-type stars in binaries has provided some of the most interesting sources in modern high-energy astrophysics. A fingerprint of the capability of these systems to accelerate particles up to TeV energies is the associated detection of non-thermal, synchrotron emission often in the radio domain. Here we aim to identify new early-type, luminous stars where energetic, non-thermal processes are at work to enable future comparative studies based on an extended sample. Moreover, these objects also appear as very interesting targets for future gamma-ray observatories such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array. We have designed a methodology to search for new examples of these interesting sources in order to enlarge the extremely reduced population currently known. Our search procedure is described in this paper, together with a practical application using public databases and catalogues currently available (Luminous Stars in the Northern Milky Way, NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and Westerbork Northern Sky Survey). Optical and radio interferometric follow-up observations of selected candidate stars were conducted to better assess their properties. Although no new discoveries of this kind have been achieved yet, the observational data analyzed in this work does provide some interesting side results, such as characterizing the spectroscopic and photometric properties of two early-type stars originally selected as candidates to be explored, namely TYC4051-1277-1 and TYC3594-2269-1. Unexpectedly, this last one was also found to be a new DAO-type white dwarf star instead of a non-degenerate star. In addition, both stars seem to display different optical periods based on our photometric monitoring.

  8. Eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y.; Algwari, Qais Th.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; O'Connell, Deborah; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria exist, in most environments, as complex, organised communities of sessile cells embedded within a matrix of self-produced, hydrated extracellular polymeric substances known as biofilms. Bacterial biofilms represent a ubiquitous and predominant cause of both chronic infections and infections associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and prostheses. Such infections typically exhibit significantly enhanced tolerance to antimicrobial, biocidal and immunological challenge. This renders them difficult, sometimes impossible, to treat using conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Effective alternative approaches for prevention and eradication of biofilm associated chronic and device-associated infections are therefore urgently required. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas are gaining increasing attention as a potential approach for the eradication and control of bacterial infection and contamination. To date, however, the majority of studies have been conducted with reference to planktonic bacteria and rather less attention has been directed towards bacteria in the biofilm mode of growth. In this study, the activity of a kilohertz-driven atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operated in a helium oxygen mixture, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro biofilms was evaluated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exhibit marked susceptibility to exposure of the plasma jet effluent, following even relatively short (∼10′s s) exposure times. Manipulation of plasma operating conditions, for example, plasma operating frequency, had a significant effect on the bacterial inactivation rate. Survival curves exhibit a rapid decline in the number of surviving cells in the first 60 seconds followed by slower rate of cell number reduction. Excellent anti-biofilm activity of the plasma jet was also demonstrated by both confocal scanning laser microscopy and metabolism of the tetrazolium salt, XTT, a measure of bactericidal activity. PMID:22952948

  9. Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with non-thermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Berbri, Abderrezak

    2008-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear dynamics of dust ion-acoustic waves (DIAWs) are investigated in a dusty plasma consisting of hot ion fluid, variable charge stationary dust grains and non-thermally distributed electrons. The Korteweg-de Vries equation, as well as the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation, are derived on the basis of the well-known reductive perturbation theory. It is shown that, due to electron non-thermality and finite ion temperature, the present dusty plasma model can support compressive as well as rarefactive DIA solitary waves. Furthermore, there may exist collisionless DIA shock-like waves which have either monotonic or oscillatory behavior, the properties of which depend sensitively on the number of fast non-thermal electrons. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem (Mamun, A. A. and Shukla, P. K. 2002 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 30, 720).

  10. Non-thermal influences on the control of skin blood flow have minimal effects on heat transfer during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    During exercise, circulatory reflexes ensure that the cardiac output is sufficiently elevated to meet the oxygen delivery requirements of the contracting skeletal muscles and the heat delivery requirements of the body to the skin. The latter requirements are met by increasing skin blood flow. These increases are largely driven by elevations in the body temperatures, although non-thermal effects on the control of skin blood flow occur in certain conditions. These effects are largely the consequence of high and/or low baroreflex stimulation. Even in the face of such non-thermal effects, which occur during exercise in the heat, the body's requirements for heat transfer from core to skin are largely met by the increased skin blood flow. Thus, non-thermal effects on the control of skin blood flow are relatively unimportant in the body's overall regulatory response to exercise. PMID:3751137

  11. Non-thermal Motions in and above Flare Loop Tops Measured by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma volume above the soft X-ray emitting loop tops is of particular interest for studying the formation of flare loops. We present observations of non-thermal motions (turbulence) determined from spectral line profiles Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV ions. We compare the non-thermal motions at temperatures near 10 MK with the motions along the same lines-of-sight determined from lines of coronal ions such as Fe XII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV formed at 1-2 MK. We discuss the results in terms of predictions of the effects of magnetic reconnection and non-thermal motion results obtained in flares from earlier X-ray Yohkoh observations of line profiles of Fe XXV and Ca XIX. Fe XXV is formed at significantly higher temperatures than any strong flare EUV spectral line observed by EIS or by imaging telescopes such as AIA or TRACE. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  12. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  13. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  14. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Esmaeil Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-15

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio σ, non-thermal parameters β and γ, electron to ion density ratio μ, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  15. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Esmaeil; Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-01

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, non-thermal parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  16. Nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves in electron-beam plasma system with non-thermal hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwakil, S. A.; El-hanbaly, A. M.; Elgarayh, A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Kassem, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves have been investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless four-component plasma system consisting of a cold electron fluid, non-thermal hot electrons obeying a non-thermal distribution, an electron beam and stationary ions. It is found that the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The dependence of rogue wave profiles on the electron beam and energetic population parameter are discussed. The results of the present investigation may be applicable in auroral zone plasma.

  17. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

    2003-08-24

    The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

  18. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-08-19

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO{sub x} control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO{sub x} removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO{sub x} operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics.

  19. Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Pillay, S. R.

    2011-11-29

    The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

  20. Non-Thermal Hard X-Ray Emission in Galaxy Clusters Observed with the BeppoSAX PDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevalainen, Jukka H.; Oosterbroeck, T.; Bonamente, Max; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the X-ray emission in a sample of clusters using the BeppoSAX PDS instrument in the 20 -- 80 keV energy band. We estimated the non-thermal cluster emission (HXR) by modeling the thermal contribution from the cluster gas and the non-thermal contamination from the AGN in the field, and propagating the corresponding uncertainties. We also evaluated and propagated the systematic uncertainties due to the background fluctuations. The resulting non-thermal component is detected at a sigma level in approx. 50 % of the non-significantly AGN-contaminated clusters, i.e. in clusters A2142, A2256, A3376, Coma, Ophiuchus and Virgo. Furthermore, Virgo is detected at a 4 sigma level. All the clusters detected at a 2 sigma level exhibit some degree of merger signatures, i.e. deviations from the azimuthally symmetric brightness and temperature distributions, while the relaxed clusters are detected at a lower confidence. The data are consistent with a scenario whereby relaxed clusters have no non-thermal hard X-ray component, whereas merger clusters do, with a 20 -- 80 keV luminosity of approx. 10(exp 42-44)((h(sub 50))(exp -2))(erg/s). Consistent with merger boosting of cluster temperatures, the non-thermal luminosity increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude between the average cluster temperatures 2 and 10 keV, as L(sub NTE) is proportional to T(sup j) with j = 2.4+/-0.3. These results corroborate the assumption which is the essential element in most non-thermal hard X-ray emission models. The co-added spectrum of all non-significantly AGN-contaminated clusters indicates a power-law spectrum for the non-thermal component with a photon index of 1.5+/-0.25 at 1 sigma confidence level. Unless there is a high energy cut-off in the electron velocity distribution, the total spectrum implies that Inverse Compton scatter of Cosmic Microwave Background photons from electron population dominates over the non-thermal bremsstrahlung in producing hard X-rays in clusters on the merger shock acceleration of electrons in clusters.

  1. Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D.

    2008-07-01

    Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

  2. The Impact of Non-Thermal Processes in the Intracluster Medium on Cosmological Cluster Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Nicholas Ambrose

    In this thesis we describe the generation and analysis of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters and their intracluster medium (ICM), using large cosmological boxes to generate large samples, in conjunction with individual cluster computations. The main focus is the exploration of the non-thermal processes in the ICM and the effect they have on the interpretation of observations used for cosmological constraints. We provide an introduction to the cosmological structure formation framework for our computations and an overview of the numerical simulations and observations of galaxy clusters. We explore the cluster magnetic field observables through radio relics, extended entities in the ICM characterized by their of diffuse radio emission. We show that statistical quantities such as radio relic luminosity functions and rotation measure power spectra are sensitive to magnetic field models. The spectral index of the radio relic emission provides information on structure formation shocks, e.g., on their Mach number. We develop a coarse grained stochastic model of active galaxy nucleus (AGN) feed-back in clusters and show the impact of such inhomogeneous feedback on the thermal pressure profile. We explore variations in the pressure profile as a function of cluster mass, redshift, and radius and provide a constrained fitting function for this profile. We measure the degree of the non-thermal pressure in the gas from internal cluster bulk motions and show it has an impact on the slope and scatter of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) scaling relation. We also find that the gross shape of the ICM, as characterized by scaled moment of inertia tensors, affects the SZ scaling relation. We demonstrate that the shape and the amplitude of the SZ angular power spectrum is sensitive to AGN feedback, and this affects the cosmological parameters determined from high resolution ACT and SPT cosmic microwave background data. We compare analytic, semi-analytic, and simulation-based methods for calculating the SZ power spectrum, and characterize their differences. All the methods must rely, one way or another, on high resolution large-scale hydrodynamical simulations with varying assumptions for modelling the gas of the sort presented here. We show how our results can be used to interpret the latest ACT and SPT power spectrum results. We provide an outlook for the future, describing follow-up work we are undertaking to further advance the theory of cluster science.

  3. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore, NTAAPPJ for gingival tissue healing is a promising method for health and aesthetic outcomes.

  4. Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.

  5. INTERIM GUIDELINES FOR THE DISPOSAL/DESTRUCTION OF PCBS AND PCB ITEMS BY NON-THERMAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an interim resource and guideline document to help EPA regional offices implement the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) regulations (40 CFR 761) for using non-thermal methods of destroying/disposing of PCBs. The report describes and evaluates various alternative chemic...

  6. The Relationship between Extreme Ultraviolet Non-thermal Line Broadening and High-energy Particles during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  7. Non-thermal processes during the 'build-up' phase of solar flares and in absence of flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Hard X-ray and radio observations indicate production of non-thermal electrons as a common phenomenon of the active sun. A preliminary analysis of three hard X-ray bursts observed with the OGO-5 satellite and radio observations indicate that non-thermal particles are present in the flare region prior to the impulsive (flash) phase and also during the gradual rise and fall (GRF) bursts which are usually explained in terms of purely 'thermal' radiation. The principal difference between the non-thermal electrons observed before the flash phase and during the flash phase appears to be in their total number rather than in the hardness of their energy spectrum. Basic characteristics of the two acceleration processes are probably similar although the total energy converted into non-thermal electrons is considerably larger in the flash phase. Transient absorbing H-alpha features and filament activations are discussed in terms of their ability to produce energetic particle events and magnetic energy release.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  9. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Roberston, John L; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  10. The HST view of FR I radio galaxies: evidence for non-thermal nuclear sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, M.; Capetti, A.; Celotti, A.

    1999-09-01

    Unresolved nuclear sources are detected by the Hubble Space Telescope in the great majority of a complete sample of 33 FR I radio galaxies belonging to the 3CR catalogue. The optical flux of these Central Compact Cores (CCC) shows a striking linear correlation with the radio core one over four decades, arguing for a non-thermal synchrotron origin of the CCC radiation. We also find evidence that this emission is anisotropic, which leads us to identify CCCs with the misoriented relativistic jet component which dominates in BL Lac objects. This interpretation is also supported by the similarity in the radio-to-optical and optical spectral indices. The high rate of CCC detection (85%) suggests that a ``standard'' pc scale, geometrically thick torus is not present in low luminosity radio-galaxies. Thus the lack of broad lines in FR I cannot be attributed to obscuration. CCC fluxes also represent upper limits to any thermal/disc emission. For a 10(9) M_⊙ black hole, typical of FR I sources, these limits translate into a fraction as small as <~ 10^{-7}-10^{-5} of the Eddington luminosity. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 and by STScI grant GO-3594.01-91A

  11. Genesis of folia in a non-thermal epigenic cave (Matanzas, Cuba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angeli, Ilenia Maria; De Waele, Jo; Melendres, Osmany Ceballo; Tisato, Nicola; Sauro, Francesco; Gonzales, Esteban Ruben Grau; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Torriani, Stefano; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Folia are an unusual speleothem type resembling inverted cups or bracket fungi. The mechanism of folia formation is not fully understood and is the subject of an ongoing debate. This study focuses on an occurrence of folia present in Santa Catalina Cave, a non-thermal epigenic cave located close to Matanzas (Cuba). The sedimentology, morphology, petrology, permeability and geochemistry of these folia have been studied to gain new insight on the processes leading to their development. It is concluded that folia in Santa Catalina Cave formed at the top of a fluctuating water body, through CO2-degassing or evaporation, which may have been enhanced by the proximity to cave entrances. Two observations strongly support our conclusions. (1) When compared to other subaqueous speleothems (e.g. cave clouds) present in the same rooms, folia occur exclusively within a limited vertical interval that likely represents an ancient water level. Folia occur together with calcite rafts and tower cones that developed, respectively, on top of and below the water level. This suggests that a fluctuating interface is required for folia formation. (2) The measured permeability of the folia is too high to trap gas bubbles. Thus, in contrast to what has been proposed in other studies, trapped bubbles of CO2 cannot be invoked as the key factor determining the genesis and morphology of folia in this subaqueous environment.

  12. Bactericidal efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) against the ESKAPE pathogens.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Padrig B; Higginbotham, Sarah; Alshraiedeh, Nid'a H; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens within the clinical environment is presenting a mounting problem in hospitals worldwide. The 'ESKAPE' pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp.) have been highlighted as a group of causative organisms in a majority of nosocomial infections, presenting a serious health risk due to widespread antimicrobial resistance. The stagnating pipeline of new antibiotics requires alternative approaches to the control and treatment of nosocomial infections. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) is attracting growing interest as an alternative infection control approach within the clinical setting. This study presents a comprehensive bactericidal assessment of an in-house-designed APNTP jet both against biofilms and planktonic bacteria of the ESKAPE pathogens. Standard plate counts and the XTT metabolic assay were used to evaluate the antibacterial effect of APNTP, with both methods demonstrating comparable eradication times. APNTP exhibited rapid antimicrobial activity against all of the ESKAPE pathogens in the planktonic mode of growth and provided efficient and complete eradication of ESKAPE pathogens in the biofilm mode of growth within 360s, with the exception of A. baumannii where a >4log reduction in biofilm viability was observed. This demonstrates its effectiveness as a bactericidal treatment against these pathogens and further highlights its potential application in the clinical environment for the control of highly antimicrobial-resistant pathogens. PMID:25963338

  13. Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism. PMID:24139886

  14. Surface characterization of Ti and Y-TZP following non-thermal plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G; Valverde, Guilherme B; Becker, Kurt; Ihrke, Roland; Quade, Antje; Thompson, Van P

    2011-10-01

    Novel non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology has the potential to address the bonding issues of Y-TZP and Ti surfaces. This study aims to chemically characterize and evaluate the surface energy (SE) of Y-TZP and Ti surfaces after NTP application. Y-TZP and Ti discs were treated with a hand-held NTP device followed by SE evaluation. Spectra of Y-TZP 3d and Ti 2p regions, survey scans, and quantification of the elements were performed via X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) prior and after NTP. Separate Y-TZP and Ti discs were NTP treated for contact angle readings using (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogenphosphate) MDP primer. Significant augmentation of SE values was observed in all NTP treated groups. XPS detected a large increase in the O element fraction on both Y-TZP and Ti surfaces. Reduction of contact angle reading was obtained when the MDP primer was placed on NTP treated Y-TZP. Ti surface showed high SE before and after NTP application on Ti surfaces. NTP decreased C and increased O on both surfaces independently of application protocol. Wettability of MDP primer on Y-TZP was significantly increased after NTP. The high polarity obtained on Y-TZP and Ti surfaces after NTP applications appear promising to enhance bonds. PMID:21714084

  15. Collisionless Shocks in Partly Ionized Plasma with Cosmic Rays: Microphysics of Non-thermal Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Malkov, M. A.; Raymond, J. C.; Krassilchtchikov, A. M.; Vladimirov, A. E.

    2013-10-01

    In this review we discuss some observational aspects and theoretical models of astrophysical collisionless shocks in partly ionized plasma with the presence of non-thermal components. A specific feature of fast strong collisionless shocks is their ability to accelerate energetic particles that can modify the shock upstream flow and form the shock precursors. We discuss the effects of energetic particle acceleration and associated magnetic field amplification and decay in the extended shock precursors on the line and continuum multi-wavelength emission spectra of the shocks. Both Balmer-type and radiative astrophysical shocks are discussed in connection to supernova remnants interacting with partially neutral clouds. Quantitative models described in the review predict a number of observable line-like emission features that can be used to reveal the physical state of the matter in the shock precursors and the character of nonthermal processes in the shocks. Implications of recent progress of gamma-ray observations of supernova remnants in molecular clouds are highlighted.

  16. Collisionless Shocks in Partly Ionized Plasma with Cosmic Rays: Microphysics of Non-thermal Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Malkov, M. A.; Raymond, J. C.; Krassilchtchikov, A. M.; Vladimirov, A. E.

    In this review we discuss some observational aspects and theoretical models of astrophysical collisionless shocks in partly ionized plasma with the presence of non-thermal components. A specific feature of fast strong collisionless shocks is their ability to accelerate energetic particles that can modify the shock upstream flow and form the shock precursors. We discuss the effects of energetic particle acceleration and associated magnetic field amplification and decay in the extended shock precursors on the line and continuum multi-wavelength emission spectra of the shocks. Both Balmer-type and radiative astrophysical shocks are discussed in connection to supernova remnants interacting with partially neutral clouds. Quantitative models described in the review predict a number of observable line-like emission features that can be used to reveal the physical state of the matter in the shock precursors and the character of nonthermal processes in the shocks. Implications of recent progress of gamma-ray observations of supernova remnants in molecular clouds are highlighted.

  17. Time dependent evolution of RF-generated non-thermal particle distributions in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bader, A.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lee, J.-P.; Schmidt, A.; D'Azevedo, E.; Faust, I.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.

    2014-04-01

    We describe fully self-consistent time-dependent simulations of radio frequency (RF) generated ion distributions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and RF-generated electron distributions in the lower hybrid range of frequencies using combined Fokker-Planck and full wave electromagnetic field solvers. In each regime, the non-thermal particle distributions have been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to compare with diagnostic measurements from experiment, thus providing validation of the simulation capability. The computational intensive simulations require multiple full wave code runs that iterate with a Fokker-Planck code. We will discuss advanced algorithms that have been implemented to accelerate both the massively parallel full wave simulations as well as the iteration with the distribution code. A vector extrapolation method (Sidi A 2008 Comput. Math. Appl. 56) that permits Jacobian-free acceleration of the traditional fixed point iteration technique is used to reduce the number of iterations needed between the distribution and wave codes to converge to self-consistency. The computational burden of the parallel full wave codes has been reduced by using a more efficient two level parallel decomposition that improves the strong scaling of the codes and reduces the communication overhead.

  18. Single-step non-thermal plasma synthesis of 3C-SiC nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; de Peuter, Koen; Ghodes, Jacob A.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan; Stradins, Paul; Agarwal, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    We present a scalable, single-step, non-thermal plasma synthesis technique for the growth of sub-5 nm, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) coated 3C-SiC nanoparticles (NPs). In a tubular flow reactor, we first nucleate and grow c-Si NPs upstream in a SiH4/Ar plasma. These c-Si NPs are then transported by gas flow to a downstream C2H2/Ar plasma, and carburized in-flight by carbon-containing radicals and ions to 3C-SiC NPs. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicate an NP size of 4 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms that the c-Si NPs are completely carburized to 3C-SiC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows that the surface of the 3C-SiC NPs is coated with a-C:H with some alkenyl termination, which can facilitate further solution-based surface functionalization for biomedical applications.

  19. Non-Thermal Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Glow-Like Discharge Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Yao, Congwei; Zhang, Guanjun

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications, and the uniform APPJ is more favored. Glow discharge is one of the most effective methods to obtain the uniform discharge. Compared with the glow dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure, pure helium APPJ shows partial characteristics of both the glow discharge and the streamer. In this paper, considering the influence of the Penning effect, the electrical and optical properties of He APPJ and Ar/NH3 APPJ were researched. A word “Glow-like APPJ” is used to characterize the uniformity of APPJ, and it was obtained that the basic characteristics of the glow-like APPJ are driven by the kHz AC high voltage. The results can provide a support for generating uniform APPJ, and lay a foundation for its applications. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307133, 51125029, 51221005) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. xjj2012132, xkjc2013004)

  20. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, A.; Laufer, S.; Rabinowitch, H. D.; Rubinsky, B.

    2011-02-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 °C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  1. The impact of non-thermal electrons on resolved black hole accretion disk images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shengkai; Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in radio astronomy (in particular, the Event Horizon Telescope) allow us for the first time to resolve length scales around the Milky Way's Sgr A* comparable to the event horizon radius. These observations are opening up new opportunities to study strong gravity and accretion physics in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole. However, the processes governing black hole accretion are not well understood. In particular, the electron thermodynamics in black hole accretion disks remain mysterious, and current models vary significantly from each other. The impact of these differences between current electron thermodynamics models on results obtained from EHT images is not well understood. Thus, in this work, we explore the effects of non-thermal electrons on black hole images and radio spectra in the context of both semi-analytic and numerical models of accretion flows. Using general relativistic ray-tracing and radiative transfer code, we simulate images of the accretion disk around Sgr A* and compare our simulations to observed radio data. We estimate the range of electron energy distribution functions permissible by the data. In so doing, we also explore the range and variety of black hole images obtained by varying the distribution function.

  2. Non-thermal Nanoelectroablation of UV-induced Murine Melanomas Stimulates an Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Lui, Kaying; Huynh, Joanne; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; De Fabo, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Non-thermal nanoelectroablation therapy completely ablates UV-induced murine melanomas. C57/BL6-HGF/SF transgenic mice were exposed to UV radiation as pups and began to develop visible melanomas 5–6 months later. We have treated 27 of these melanomas in 14 mice with nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) therapy delivering 2000 electric pulses each 100 ns long and 30 kV/cm at a rate of 5–7 pulses per second. All nanoelectroablated melanoma tumors began to shrink within a day after treatment and gradually disappeared over a period of 12–29 days. Pyknosis of nuclei was evident within 1 h of nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected by TUNEL staining was evident by 6 h after nsPEF treatment. In a melanoma allograft system, nsPEF treatment was superior to tumor excision at accelerating secondary tumor rejection in immune-competent mice, suggesting enhanced stimulation of a protective immune response by nsPEF-treated melanomas. This is supported by the presence of CD4+-T cells within treated tumors as well as within untreated tumors located in mice with other melanomas that had been treated with nanoelectroablation at least 19 days earlier. PMID:22686288

  3. INTEGRAL Observations Of Galaxy Clusters: The Search For Non-thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    The presence of relativistic electrons in some clusters of galaxies has been established for a long time through the detection of synchrotron emission in the radio domain. However, the inverse-Compton component which is predicted in the hard X-ray domain has been elusive for a long time. The detection of the hard X-ray component is important to measure the typical magnetic field in clusters, to understand the particle acceleration history of clusters, and to constrain the particle acceleration models which lead to the presence of relativistic electrons (primary, secondary electrons, dark matter annihilation, ...). In this presentation, I will present the results of observations of the Coma, Ophiuchus, Perseus and Virgo clusters of galaxies with the IBIS/ISGRI and JEM-X instruments on board INTEGRAL. I will emphasize on the results obtained from observations of the Ophiuchus cluster, which led to the first statistically significant detection of non-thermal emission from a cluster of galaxies, and on the influence of these results on particle acceleration scenarios.

  4. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  5. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    PubMed

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  6. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor.

    PubMed

    Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito; Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon; Geremias, Reginaldo; de Souza, Ivan Gonçalvez; Debacher, Nito Angelo

    2012-10-30

    In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N(2), Ar, and O(2). The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N(2)

  7. Non-thermal nanoelectroablation of UV-induced murine melanomas stimulates an immune response.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Lui, Kaying; Huynh, Joanne; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; De Fabo, Edward C

    2012-09-01

    Non-thermal nanoelectroablation therapy completely ablates UV-induced murine melanomas. C57/BL6-HGF/SF transgenic mice were exposed to UV radiation as pups and began to develop visible melanomas 5-6 months later. We have treated 27 of these melanomas in 14 mice with nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) therapy delivering 2000 electric pulses each 100 ns long and 30 kV/cm at a rate of 5-7 pulses per second. All nanoelectroablated melanoma tumors began to shrink within a day after treatment and gradually disappeared over a period of 12-29 days. Pyknosis of nuclei was evident within 1 h of nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected by TUNEL staining was evident by 6 h after nsPEF treatment. In a melanoma allograft system, nsPEF treatment was superior to tumor excision at accelerating secondary tumor rejection in immune-competent mice, suggesting enhanced stimulation of a protective immune response by nsPEF-treated melanomas. This is supported by the presence of CD4(+) -T cells within treated tumors as well as within untreated tumors located in mice with other melanomas that had been treated with nanoelectroablation at least 19 days earlier. PMID:22686288

  8. Antitumor action of non thermal plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    The presentation deals with the assessment on two non thermal plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.

  9. Theory of cylindrical Langmuir probes in weakly ionized, non-thermal, stationary and moderately collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. M.

    2009-02-01

    A finite length cylindrical Langmuir probe is modelled as an ellipsoid of revolution with spheroidal equipotential surfaces and confocal orthogonal hyperboloidal electric field lines. The theory is applicable in the transition regime of probe operation between the collisionless and fully collisional limits. The plasma is assumed to be weakly ionized, non-thermal and stationary, being characterized by frozen reactions and constant temperatures. It is further assumed that in an isotropic plasma the cold ions follow the field lines, as a result of ion-neutral collisions, in the presheath and sheath regions with collisionless Maxwellian electrons. The governing system of equations is derived and solved numerically with the results presented of the presheath and sheath solutions in collisionless and collisional regimes. These show convergence to the respective collisionless and collisional radial motion limits for spherical and cylindrical probes. Analytical approximations are also obtained for the sheath width (defined as the point where the ions reach the Bohm speed) and the Bohm potential over a wide range of collisionality. The collisional presheath drop according to the perturbation theory of Shih and Levi, as applied to cylindrical probes, is shown to significantly underestimate the numerical results. These are in better agreement with the collisional presheath drop for spheres even for long probes. Application of the theory to experimentally derived probe characteristics is also discussed.

  10. Direct chemical oxidation: a non-thermal technology for the destruction of organic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, G.B.; Cooper, J. F.; Lewis, P. R.; Adamson, M. G.

    1998-02-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment and chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992, and is applicable to the destruction of virtually all solid or liquid organics, including: chlorosolvents, oils and greases, detergents, organic-contaminated soils or sludges, explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and PCB's. [1-15] The process normally operates at 80-100 C, a heating requirement which increases the difficulty of surface decontamination of large objects or, for example, treatment of a wide area contaminated soil site. The driver for DCO work in FY98 was thus to investigate the use of catalysts to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technology for organics destruction at temperatures closer to ambient. In addition, DCO is at a sufficiently mature stage of development that technology transfer to a commercial entity was a logical next step, and was thus included in FY98 tasks.

  11. Non-thermal electrons at quasi-perpendicular shocks observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Hasegawa, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Shimada, N.; Schwartz, S.; Lucek, E. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Reme, H.

    ISEE1 and 2 found suprathermal electrons up to 20 keV in the downstream of Earth s quasi-perpendicular bow shocks but the acceleration process by which such high energy suprathermal electrons are created is still uncertain We have studied their statistical properties based on the GEOTAIL data by restricting the events to quasi-perpendicular shocks Theta Bn 80 Consequently we found that the emergence of suprathermal electrons is controlled by such parameters as Ma Alfven Mach number and magnetic disturbance delta B vert B vert As Ma or Magnetic disturbance increases the energy spectra become harder However we could not understand the dominant controlling factor and the physical mechanism for electron acceleration at the shock transition layer since GEOTAIL is a single spacecraft and does not have enough time resolution to investigate the shock transition layer We have found events in which non-thermal electrons are observed with Cluster in the bow shock The multi-point measurement enables us to more accuracy estimate parameters associated with the shock thus we carry out detailed event analyses of Cluster bow shock crossings on the basis of the results obtained by GEOTAIL One event is characterized by high Ma and moderate magnetic disturbance while another is characterized by low Ma and high magnetic disturbance For these events therefore relation between electron acceleration and key parameters Ma delta B vert B vert can be clarified We will also discuss effects of other factors such as two- or

  12. Revisiting the non-thermal radiation from the Crab nebula: requiring two distinct electron components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bo-Tao; Fang, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We revisit the non-thermal radiation from the Crab nebula in the framework of a one-dimensional time-dependent model. In this model, two electron components are considered: a low-energy electron component, which has a power-law form, and a high-energy electron component, which has a power-law form or a relativistic Maxwellian plus a high-energy power-law tail. After fitting the observed multiband data of the Crab nebula using the Levenberg-Marquardt method of the ?2-minimization procedure, we show the following. (i) Electron injection with a relativistic Maxwellian plus a power-law tail (i.e. one electron population) cannot account for the observed multiband emission of the Crab nebula. (ii) Two distinct electron populations are required, although their origins are still under debate, and moreover there would be a low-energy electron component having a power-law form with a slope of 1.6 for the Crab nebula and Crab-like pulsar wind nebulae.

  13. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry; Acero, Fabio; Li Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl

    2012-09-10

    A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  14. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trung Q.; Zhu, Xinli; Lobban, Lance L.; Mallinson, Richard G.

    2011-07-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C2Hx side products. H2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C2Hx products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H2 only.

  15. Disinfection effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for foodborne bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Mohammad Rasel; Inomata, Takanori; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kakikawa, Makiko; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasunori; Yano, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shoji; Noguchi, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) exposure can be a suitable alternative for bacteria inactivation in food processing industry. Specimen placed in the enclosure are exposed to various reactive radicals produced within the discharge chamber. It is also exposed to the periodic variation of the electric field strength in the chamber. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced by high voltage pulse (Vpp = 18 kV, pulse width 20 μs, repetition frequency 10 kHz) in a polypropylene box (volume = 350 cm3) using helium as main feed gas. Inactivation efficiency of NAPP depends on the duration of NAPP exposure, applied voltage pulse strength and type, pulse duration, electrode separation and feed gas composition. In this study we have investigated inactivation of Bacillus lichenformis spore as an example of food borne bacteria. Keeping applied voltage, electrode configuration and total gas flow rate constant, spores are exposed to direct NAPP for different time duration while O2 concentration in the feed gas composition is varied. 10 minutes NAPP exposure resulted in ~ 3 log reduction of Bacillus lichenformis spores for 1% O2concentration (initial concentration ~ 106 / specimen). This work is supported by research and development promotion grant provided by the Hokuriku Industrial Advancement Center.

  16. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    SciTech Connect

    López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  17. Physics and applications of atmospheric non-thermal air plasma with reference to environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marode, E.; Djermoune, D.; Dessante, P.; Deniset, C.; Ségur, P.; Bastien, F.; Bourdon, A.; Laux, C.

    2009-12-01

    Since air is a natural part of our environment, special attention is given to the study of plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure and their applications. This fact promoted the study of electrical conduction in air-like mixtures, i.e. mixtures containing an electronegative gas component. If the ionization growth is not limited its temporal evolution leads to spark formation, i.e. a thermal plasma of several thousand kelvins in a quasi-local thermodynamic equilibrium state. But before reaching such a thermal state, a plasma sets up where the electrons increase their energy characterized by an electron temperature Te much higher than that of heavy species T or T+ for the ions. Since the plasma is no longer characterized by only one temperature T, it is said to be in a non-thermal plasma (NTP) state. Practical ways are listed to prevent electron ionization from going beyond the NTP states. Much understanding of such NTP may be gathered from the study of the simple paradigmatic case of a discharge induced between a sharp positively stressed point electrode facing a grounded negative plane electrode. Some physical properties will be gathered from such configurations and links underlined between these properties and some associated applications, mostly environmental. Aerosol filtration and electrostatic precipitators, pollution control by removal of hazardous species contained in flue gas exhaust, sterilization applications for medical purposes and triggering fuel combustion in vehicle motors are among such applications nowadays.

  18. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among yellow monkeyflower populations from thermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Lekberg, Ylva; Roskilly, Beth; Hendrick, Margaret F; Zabinski, Catherine A; Barr, Camille M; Fishman, Lila

    2012-09-01

    In flowering plants, soil heterogeneity can generate divergent natural selection over fine spatial scales, and thus promote local adaptation in the absence of geographic barriers to gene flow. Here, we investigate phenotypic and genetic differentiation in one of the few flowering plants that thrives in both geothermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus guttatus) growing at two geothermal ("thermal") sites in YNP were distinct in growth form and phenology from paired populations growing nearby (<500 m distant) in non-thermal soils. In simulated thermal and non-thermal environments, thermal plants remained significantly divergent from non-thermal plants in vegetative, floral, mating system, and phenological traits. Plants from both thermal populations flowered closer to the ground, allocated relatively more to sexual reproduction, were more likely to initiate flowering under short daylengths, and made smaller flowers that could efficiently self-fertilize without pollinators. These shared differences are consistent with local adaptation to life in the ephemeral window for growth and reproduction created by winter and spring snowmelt on hot soils. In contrast, habitat type (thermal vs. non-thermal) explained little of the genetic variation at neutral markers. Instead, we found that one thermal population (Agrostis Headquarters; AHQ-T) was strongly differentiated from all other populations (all F (ST) > 0.34), which were only weakly differentiated from each other (all F (ST) < 0.07). Phenotypic differentiation of thermal M. guttatus, but little population genetic evidence of long-term ecotypic divergence, encourages further investigations of the potential for fine-scale adaptation and reproductive isolation across the geothermal gradient in Yellowstone. PMID:22437908

  19. The non-thermal origin of the tokamak low-density stability limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; La Haye, R. J.; Shiraki, D.; Buttery, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Boom, J. E.; Chapman, I. T.; Contributors, JET

    2016-05-01

    DIII-D plasmas at very low density exhibit the onset of n  =  1 error field (EF) penetration (the ‘low-density locked mode’) not at a critical density or EF, but instead at a critical level of runaway electron (RE) intensity. Raising the density during a discharge does not avoid EF penetration, so long as RE growth proceeds to the critical level. Penetration is preceded by non-thermalization of the electron cyclotron emission, anisotropization of the total pressure, synchrotron emission shape changes, as well as decreases in the loop voltage and bulk thermal electron temperature. The same phenomena occur despite various types of optimal EF correction, and in some cases modes are born rotating. Similar phenomena are also found at the low-density limit in JET. These results stand in contrast to the conventional interpretation of the low-density stability limit as being due to residual EFs and demonstrate a new pathway to EF penetration instability due to REs. Existing scaling laws for penetration project to increasing EF sensitivity as bulk temperatures decrease, though other possible mechanisms include classical tearing instability, thermo-resistive instability, and pressure-anisotropy driven instability. Regardless of the first-principles mechanism, known scaling laws for Ohmic energy confinement combined with theoretical RE production rates allow rough extrapolation of the RE criticality condition, and thus the low-density limit, to other tokamaks. The extrapolated low-density limit by this pathway decreases with increasing machine size and is considerably below expected operating conditions for ITER. While likely unimportant for ITER, this effect can explain the low-density limit of existing tokamaks operating with small residual EFs.

  20. EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas for processing and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massines, Françoise

    2005-02-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for surface treatment, thin film coating, sterilization, decontamination, etc. Many interesting questions have arisen that are related to both fundamental and applied research in this field. Many concern the generation of a large volume discharge which remains stable and uniform at atmospheric pressure. At this pressure, depending on the experimental conditions, either streamer or Townsend breakdown may occur. They respectively lead to micro-discharges or to one large radius discharge, Townsend or glow. However, the complexity arises from the formation of large radius streamers due to avalanche coupling and from the constriction of the glow discharge due to too low a current. Another difficulty is to visually distinguish many micro-discharges from one large radius discharge. Other questions relate to key chemical reactions in the plasma and at the surface. Experimental characterization and modelling also need to be developed to answer these questions. This cluster collects up-to-date research results related to the understanding of different discharges working at atmospheric pressure and the application to polymer surface activation and thin film coating. It presents different solutions for generating and sustaining diffuse discharges at atmospheric pressure. DC, low-frequency and radio-frequency excitations are considered in noble gases, nitrogen or air. Two specific methods developed to understand the transition from Townsend to streamer breakdown are also presented. They are based on the cross-correlation spectroscopy and an electrical model.

  1. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  2. Non-thermal plasma treatment is associated with changes in transcriptome of human epithelial skin cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anke; Wende, Kristian; Bekeschus, Sander; Bundscherer, Lena; Barton, Annemarie; Ottmüller, Katja; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Masur, Kai

    2013-08-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has recently gained attention in the field of biomedical and clinical applications. In the area of plasma medicine research, one promising approach is to promote wound healing by stimulation of cells involved. To understand basic molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered by plasma treatment, we investigated biological effects of an argon plasma jet kinpen on human epithelial skin cells. For assessment of transcriptome changes cell culture medium was plasma treated and applied to the HaCaT keratinocyte cell culture (indirect treatment). Consequently, whole-genome microarrays were used to analyze this interaction in detail and identified a statistically significant modification of 3,274 genes including 1,828 up- and 1,446 downregulated genes. Particularly, cells after indirect plasma treatment are characterized by differential expression of a considerable number of genes involved in the response to stress. In this regard, we found a plasma-dependent regulation of oxidative stress answer and increased expression of enzymes of the antioxidative defense system (e.g. 91 oxidoreductases). Our results demonstrate that plasma not only induces cell reactions of stress-sensing but also of proliferative nature. Consistent with gene expression changes as well as Ingenuity Pathway Analysis prediction, we propose that stimulating doses of plasma may protect epithelial skin cells in wound healing by promoting proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, gene expression profiling may become an important tool in identifying plasma-related changes of gene expression. Our results underline the enormous clinical potential of plasma as a biomedical tool for stimulation of epithelial skin cells. PMID:23668811

  3. Observing the Non-Thermal Universe with the Highest Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingus, Brenda L.; HAWC, VERITAS, CTA

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical sources of relativistic particles radiate gamma rays to such high energies that they can be detected from the ground. The existence of high energy gamma rays implies that even higher energy particles are being accelerated placing strong constraints on these non-thermal accelerators. Within our galaxy, TeV gamma rays have been detected from supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula, x-ray binaries and some yet to be identified sources in the Galactic plane. In addition, these gamma rays have sufficient energy to be attenuated by the interaction with infrared photons producing an electron-positron pair. Thus the spectrum of gamma rays can also constrain the infrared photon density, which for distant extragalactic sources is a direct probe of cosmology. The known extragalactic TeV sources are primarily the blazer class of active galactic nuclei. And TeV gamma rays might even be produced by annihilating dark matter.The US currently supports two ground-based gamma-ray observatories—HAWC and VERITAS—and NSF is developing a prototype for the international Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory just began operation of the full detector in March 2015 and with its wide field of view scans ~2/3 of the sky each day for TeV sources. VERITAS (Very EneRgetic Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that follows individual sources to produce lightcurves and spectra from 85 GeV to > 30 TeV. The combination of both a survey and pointed observatory is very complementary with a broad scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. I will present the current view of the TeV sky and the latest results from HAWC and VERITAS as well as plans for CTA.

  4. Synchronous droplets as a test bed for pulsatory active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Collective behavior in many-body systems has been studied extensively focusing on a wide range of interacting entities including: flocking animals, sedimenting particles and microfluidic droplets among others. Here, we propose an experimental platform to explore an oscillatory active fluid with synchronous ferrofluid droplets immersed in an immiscible carrier fluid in a Hele-Shaw configuration. The droplets are organized and actuated on a 2-D uniform grid through application of a precessive magnetic field. The state of our system is dependent on three parameters: the grid occupancy with fluid droplets, the grid geometry and the magnetic field. We study the long range orientational order of our system over a range of those parameters by tracking the motion of the droplets and analyzing the PIV data of the carrier fluid flow. Numerical simulations are juxtaposed with experimental data for prediction of the system's behavior.

  5. Artificial vesicles as an animal cell model for the study of biological application of non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, S. H.; Park, J. K.; Sung, C.; Lee, C. B.; Uhm, H.; Choi, E. H.; Baik, K. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Artificial cell-like model systems can provide information which is hard to obtain with real biological cells. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) containing intra-membrane DNA or OH radical-binding molecules are used to visualize the cytolytic activity of OH radicals. Changes in the GUV membrane are observed by microscopy or flow cytometry as performed for animal cells after non-thermal plasma treatment. The experimental data shows that OH radicals can be detected inside the membrane, although the biological effects are not as significant as for H2O2. This artificial model system can provide a systemic means to elucidate the complex interactions between biological materials and non-thermal plasma.

  6. Comment on "Non-thermal mechanism of weak microwave fields influence on neurons" [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 104701 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    This comment is directly related to previously published work [M. N. Shneider and M. Pekker, J. Appl. Phys. 114, 104701 (2013)], in which we outlined the effect of a non-thermal mechanism of microwave radiation on the activity of neural tissue. In this note, we provide more realistic estimates of the longitudinal sound velocity in the lipid membranes and the corresponding estimates of the microwave resonance frequencies.

  7. Study of Photoluminescence from Amorphous and Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticles Synthesized using a Non-Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Prateek

    High photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields reported from amorphous (a-Si) and crystalline (c-Si) nanoparticles have opened up lots of possibilities for use of silicon in optical applications such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), photonics and solar cells with added processing and cost benefits. However, the PL response and the mechanisms behind it are highly dependent on the matrix in which the nanoparticles are grown and on the growth method. While, the bottom-up approach for deposition of free standing nanoparticles seem to be perfectly suited for large area deposition for LED and solar cell applications, the dominant growth techniques (laser ablation and pyrolysis) have been shown to suffer from limitations in control over size distribution of nanoparticles and the requirement of equipment capable of withstanding high temperature. This led to the exploration of plasma based synthesis methods in this work. Towards this effort, the development and automation of a novel tool "Anny" for synthesis of silicon nanoparticles using non-thermal plasma chamber is reported. These nanoparticles are then accelerated due to choked flow through a nozzle leading to substrate independent deposition. The nanoparticle properties are characterized against precursor gas flow rates and RF power to identify the optimum growth conditions for a stable, continuous deposition. It is found that amorphous nanoparticles offer a wide variety of chamber conditions for growth with a high throughput, stable plasma for continuous, long term operations. The quantum confinement model for crystalline and spatial confinement models for amorphous nanoparticles in our size regime (6-8nm) are suggested for free standing nanoparticles and we report a high PL output from well passivated amorphous nanoparticles. The PL output and its dependence on stability of surface hydrogen passivation is explored using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is shown that the amorphous nanoparticles have a better and more stable passivation compared to crystalline nanoparticles grown under similar conditions. Hence, we show a-Si nanoparticles as exciting alternatives for optical applications to c-Si nanoparticles.

  8. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Kewitz, T.; Šperka, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2012-01-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas. PMID:23126765

  9. Mantle-driven geodynamo features - accounting for non-thermal lower mantle features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Amit, H.

    2011-12-01

    Lower mantle heterogeneity responsible for spatial variations of the CMB heat flux could control long term geodynamo properties such as deviations from axial symmetry in the magnetic field and the core flow, frequency of geomagnetic reversals and anisotropic growth of the inner core. In this context, a classical interpretation of tomographic mapping of the lowermost mantle is to correlate linearly seismic velocities to heat flux anomalies. This implicitly assumes that temperature alone controls the tomographic anomalies. In addition, the limited spatial resolution of tomographic images precludes modeling sharp CMB heat flux structures.. There has been growing evidence however that non-thermal origins are also be expected for seismic velocity anomalies: the three main additional control parameters are (i) compositional anomalies possibly associated to the existence of a deep denser layer, (ii) the phase transition in magnesium perovskite believed to occur in the lowermost mantle and (iii) the possible presence of partial melts. Numerical models of mantle dynamics have illustrated how the first two parameters could distort the linear relationship between shear wave velocity anomalies and CMB heat flux (Nakagawa and Tackley, 2008). In this presentation we will consider the effect of such alternative interpretations of seismic velocity anomalies in order to prescribe CMB heat flux as an outer boundary for dynamo simulations. We first focus on the influence of post-perovskite. Taking into account this complexity could result in an improved agreement between the long term average properties of simulated dynamos and geophysical observations, including the Atlantic/Pacific hemispherical dichotomy in core flow activity, the single intense paleomagnetic field structure in the southern hemisphere, and possibly degree 1 dominant mode of inner-core seismic heterogeneity. We then account for sharp anomalies that are not resolved by the global tomographic probe. For instance, Ultra Low Velocity Zones (ULVZs) have been identified by dedicated seismic tools that cannot be observed by global tomographic models. These are likely associated to the hottest regions in the lowermost mantle. We thus model anomalies of the CMB heat flux where narrow ridges with low heat flux are juxtaposed to a large scale degree 2 pattern which represents the dominant component of tomographic observations. We find that hot ridges located with a large-scale positive heat flux anomaly to the east produce a time-average narrow elongated upwelling which acts as a flow barrier at the top of the core and results in intensified low-latitudes magnetic flux patches. This is found to have a clear signature on the meridional component of the thermal wind balance. Based on the lower mantle seismic tomography pattern, time average intense geomagnetic flux patches are expected below east Asia and Oceania and below the Americas.

  10. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.

    The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <100 ppm (MA) after 24 h. The PK-2 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <400 ppm (MA) after 24 h. Treatments showed reductions in spores of greater than 6 log10 after 24 h. Reductions were maintained without additional re-growth at 72 h. These results indicate that the PK-1 and PK-2 systems have the capacity to reduce Bacillus subtilis spores in an in-package ionization process.

  11. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Kewitz, T.; Šperka, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2012-10-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

  12. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

  13. Functionalization of nanomaterials by non-thermal large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho

    2013-09-01

    A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the non-thermal APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti(3+) ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of non-thermal APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing. PMID:23831925

  14. Linear and nonlinear obliquely propagating ion-acoustic waves in magnetized negative ion plasma with non-thermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Jain, S. K.; Jain

    2013-10-01

    Ion-acoustic solitons in magnetized low-? plasma consisting of warm adiabatic positive and negative ions and non-thermal electrons have been studied. The reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the system, which admits an obliquely propagating soliton solution. It is found that due to the presence of finite ion temperature there exist two modes of propagation, namely fast and slow ion-acoustic modes. In the case of slow-mode if the ratio of temperature to mass of positive ion species is lower (higher) than the negative ion species, then there exist compressive (rarefactive) ion-acoustic solitons. It is also found that in the case of slow mode, on increasing the non-thermal parameter (?) the amplitude of the compressive (rarefactive) soliton decreases (increases). In fast ion-acoustic mode the nature and characteristics of solitons depend on negative ion concentration. Numerical investigation in case of fast mode reveals that on increasing ?, the amplitude of compressive (rarefactive) soliton increases (decreases). The width of solitons increases with an increase in non-thermal parameters in both the modes for compressive as well as rarefactive solitons. There exists a value of critical negative ion concentration (? c ), at which both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitons appear as described by modified KdV soliton. The value of ? c decreases with increase in ?.

  15. Evaluation of a non-thermal plasma needle to eliminate ex vivo biofilms in root canals of extracted human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Schaudinn, C; Jaramillo, D; Freire, M O; Sedghizadeh, P P; Nguyen, A; Webster, P; Costerton, J W; Jiang, C

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy of a non-thermal plasma (NTP) at atmospheric pressure on ex vivo biofilm in root canals of extracted teeth. Methodology Intra-canal contents from three teeth with root canal infections were collected, pooled, and grown in thirty-five microCT-mapped root canals of extracted and instrumented human teeth. One group of teeth was treated with NTP, another with 6% NaOCl, and one set was left untreated. The intra-canal contents from twenty-seven teeth (nine teeth in each group) were plated on agar and colony forming units were determined. Parametric test of one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze statistical significance. The remaining teeth were cut open, stained with LIVE/DEAD® and examined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results The untreated root canals were covered with biofilm of varying thickness. The treatment with the non-thermal plasma decreased the number of viable bacteria in these biofilms by one order of magnitude, while the NaOCl control achieved a reduction of more than four magnitudes. Both the NTP and the NaOCl treatment results were significantly different from the negative control (P< 0.05). Conclusion The non-thermal plasma displayed antimicrobial activity against endodontic biofilms in root canals, but was not as effective as the use of 6 % NaOCl. PMID:23480318

  16. Computational studies on ECE spectrum for ITER, in the presence of a small fraction of non-thermals and radial resolution evolution for oblique view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, P. V.; Ghai, Yashika; Pandya, Hitesh K.; Singh, Amit K.; Begam, A. M.; Vasu, P.

    2015-03-01

    In tokamaks, the temperature measurement using different techniques like Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE), Thomson scattering etc. shows differences because of various phenomena. The physical reasons for this are not entirely understood. Thus to have comprehensive understanding of these difference, the contribution from each phenomenon needs to be individually understood. The phenomenon affecting radial temperature profile measurement includes harmonics overlap, relativistic down shifting, presence of non-thermals etc. For ITER like plasma, radial temperature profiles can be obtained from the first harmonics ordinary (O) mode or second harmonic extra-ordinary(X) mode of ECE spectrum. It is possible that, higher harmonics produced from the non-thermals can be relativistically downshifted to second harmonics and results a deviation in the measured temperature profile. We performed a parametric study on the effect of non-thermal electrons on measured ECE temperature for ITER scenario-2. All the numerical calculations reported in this paper are performed using NOTEC computer code which is capable of handling non-thermal populations. After proper validation of numerical methods using normal electron population (without non-thermals) a parametric study with non-thermals is performed. In the parametric study radial locations of non-thermals, energy of non-thermals and fraction of non-thermals are considered. This study is initially performed for normal view and later extended in to oblique views. The range of deviation of temperature over the examined parametric regime as well as the possible physical reasons will be presented. The effect of parallel component of non-thermal energy is also examined. Finally results of one set of study for oblique view (where the detector is not exactly normal to the magnetic field) with non-thermal electrons are also presented. In ITER apart from an Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) detector placed normal to magnetic field an oblique view detector is planned to grab information about non-thermal electrons. Usefulness of such an additional detector for a better radial resolution is examined. The differences in the ECE spectrum from a tokamak plasma between a direct LOS (normal to toroidal magnetic field) and a slightly oblique LOS have been modelled. A typical ITER tokamak scenario has been chosen in this study. The intensities of radiation, as observable from the low-field side, covering the first harmonic O-mode spectral frequencies 105-230 GHz have been compared. The physical reasons for the code-predicted results, regarding the differences between the direct and oblique spectra, are elucidated. Finally, signatures of the presence of non-thermals from a comparison of normal view and oblique view are also examined.

  17. NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Harra, L. K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2012-11-10

    We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

  18. Reformation of hydrocarbons using non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure: discharge characteristics and associated nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Arun; Gopi, Supin; Saha, Debajyoti

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the atmospheric non-thermal plasma generated in a hydrocarbon reforming system. Here, discharge is excited in a typically designed electrode configuration and has been carried out with four different combination pairs of electrodes. The plasma discharge is attained by applying high ac (pulsed) voltages between electrodes. The voltage-current characteristics have been studied in the system with respect to different electrode materials such as steel (SS304), copper and nickel. A Langmuir probe is used to measure fluctuations in the ion saturation region with all electrode configurations. The Hilbert transform technique and empirical mode decomposition have been used to understand the nonlinear dynamics of the fluctuation signals.

  19. Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Pillay, S. R.

    2011-11-29

    Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

  20. Non-thermal processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Babajide O.

    The primary focus of this research is to investigate non-thermal processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of keeping the liquid surface clean and the distortion of information by the interference of equilibrium dense vapor above the liquid. By using the liquid jet technique the ejection of ions from surface of micron sized liquid can be adequately probed with a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The photoionization of pure water and aqueous solutions of NaOH, NaCl and HCl is presented in Chapter 4. The aim of this investigation was to provide a fundamental understanding of the structure of water/vacuum interfaces. In Chapter 5, the ejection of ions from salt solutions containing divalent cations is also presented. The goal of the experiment was to figure out the solvation structure and reaction dynamics of divalent metal ions, M2+ on the surface of aqueous solution. A lot of work has been done in the gas phase either by a pickup-type cluster source or by collision induced dissociation of ejected ions from electrospray. For the first time the direct monitoring of ions ejected from liquid into gas phase is explored. Possible ejection mechanisms for the ejection of cations are discussed extensively in both Chapters 4 and 5. The results presented in this thesis is a combination of experiments performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which includes experiments on ice and micro-jet respectively. The results in Chapters 2 and 3 have been submitted to the Journal of Chemical Physics and the Journal of Physical Chemistry respectively. It is important to note that the data presented in Chapter 3 was originally taken by Dr Janine Herring-Captain as part of her thesis work. It is also presented in this thesis due to effort in analyzing the data and preparation of the submitted manuscript. Chapter 4 and 5 represents papers which will also be submitted for publication in the open scientific literature. All the work leading to the results presented in these two chapters were done during my visit to PNNL and I would like to acknowledge that the instrumentation and data acquisition were done in collaboration with Nikolai Petrik and Greg Kimmel.