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1

Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Blazars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report our recent discoveries of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in blazars time series data in X-ray and optical electromagnetic bands. Any such detection can give important clue of the location and nature of the processes of emission mechanism. In the case of radio-quiet AGN, the detected QPOs are very likely to be associated with the accretion disk. But in the case of blazars, it may be associated with jets in the high and outburst states, and in the low-state, it is probably associated with the accretion disk. In this brief review, I summarize the recent QPOs detections in blazars. There is one strong evidence of QPO detection in XMM-Newton time series data of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy RE J1034 +396 about which we will also discuss briefly.

Gupta, Alok C.

2014-12-01

2

Talbot effect of quasi-periodic grating.  

PubMed

Theoretic and experimental studies of the Talbot effect of quasi-periodic gratings are performed in this paper. The diffractions of periodic and quasi-periodic square aperture arrays in Fresnel fields are analyzed according to the scalar diffraction theory. The expressions of the diffraction intensities of two types of quasi-periodic gratings are deduced. Talbot images of the quasi-periodic gratings are predicted to appear at multiple certain distances. The quasi-periodic square aperture arrays are produced with the aid of a liquid crystal light modulator, and the self-images of the quasi-periodic gratings are measured successfully in the experiment. This study indicates that even a structure in short-range disorder may take on the self-imaging effect in a Fresnel field. PMID:23872752

Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Furui; Wang, Junhong; Teng, Shuyun

2013-07-20

3

Embedding of Analytic Quasi-Periodic Cocycles into Analytic Quasi-Periodic Linear Systems and its Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we prove that any analytic quasi-periodic cocycle close to constant is the Poincaré map of an analytic quasi-periodic linear system close to constant, which bridges both methods and results in quasi-periodic linear systems and cocycles. We also show that the almost reducibility of an analytic quasi-periodic linear system is equivalent to the almost reducibility of its corresponding Poincaré cocycle. By the local embedding theorem and the equivalence, we transfer the recent local almost reducibility results of quasi-periodic linear systems (Hou and You, in Invent Math 190:209-260, 2012) to quasi-periodic cocycles, and the global reducibility results of quasi-periodic cocycles (Avila, in Almost reducibility and absolute continuity, 2010; Avila et al., in Geom Funct Anal 21:1001-1019, 2011) to quasi-periodic linear systems. Finally, we give a positive answer to a question of Avila et al. (Geom Funct Anal 21:1001-1019, 2011) and use it to study point spectrum of long-range quasi-periodic operator with Liouvillean frequency. The embedding also holds for some nonlinear systems.

You, Jiangong; Zhou, Qi

2013-11-01

4

Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

Paccagnella, R., E-mail: roberto.paccagnella@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX and Istituto Gas Ionizzati del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Padova (Italy)

2014-03-15

5

Quasi-periodic solutions for modified Toda lattice equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a spectral problem and the Lenard operator pairs, we derive in this paper a modified Toda lattice hierarchy. The modified Toda lattice equation is first decomposed into systems of integrable ordinary differential equations. A hyper-elliptic Riemann surface and Abel–Jacobi coordinates are then introduced to linearize the associated flow, from which some quasi-periodic solutions of the modified Toda lattice

Y. C. Hon; E. G. Fan

2009-01-01

6

QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN LASCO CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEEDS  

SciTech Connect

Quasi-periodic oscillations in the speed profile of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the radial distance range 2-30 solar radii are studied. We considered the height-time data of the 307 CMEs recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) during 2005 January-March. In order to study the speed-distance profile of the CMEs, we have used only 116 events for which there are at least 10 height-time measurements made in the LASCO field of view. The instantaneous CME speed is estimated using a pair of height-time data points, providing the speed-distance profile. We found quasi-periodic patterns in at least 15 speed-distance profiles, where the speed amplitudes are larger than the speed errors. For these events we have determined the speed amplitude and period of oscillations. The periods of quasi-periodic oscillations are found in the range 48-240 minutes, tending to increase with height. The oscillations have similar properties as those reported by Krall et al., who interpreted them in terms of the flux-rope model. The nature of forces responsible for the motion of CMEs and their oscillations are discussed.

Shanmugaraju, A. [Department of Physics, Arul Anandar College, Karumathur-625 514 (India); Moon, Y.-J. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S. C. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Whaamdong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Umapathy, S. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai (India); Vrsnak, B., E-mail: shanmugaraju_a@yahoo.co, E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.k [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb (Croatia)

2010-01-01

7

Forced Oscillations in Fluid Tori and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations  

E-print Network

The kilo-Hertz Quasi--Periodic Oscillations in X-ray binaries could originate within the accretion flow, and be a signature of non--linear fluid oscillations and mode coupling in strong gravity. The possibility to decipher these systems will impact our knowledge of fundamental parameters such as the neutron star mass, radius, and spin. Thus they offer the possibility to constrain the nuclear equation of state and the rotation parameter of stellar--mass black holes. We review the general properties of these oscillations from a hydrodynamical point of view, when the accretion flow is subject to external perturbations and summarize recent results.

William H. Lee

2005-10-19

8

Quantum phase transitions in the quasi-periodic kicked rotor  

E-print Network

We present a microscopic theory of transport in quasi-periodically driven environments (`kicked rotors'), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of Planck's constant $\\tilde h$: for irrational values of $\\tilde h/(4\\pi)$ they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we derive the microscopic theory of the ensuing localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a `super-metal'. Signatures of the corresponding metal/super-metal transition are discussed.

Chushun Tian; Alexander Altland; Markus Garst

2011-01-17

9

Development of a Quasi-Periodic Undulator for the HLS  

E-print Network

China's first quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) has been developed for the Hefei Light Source (HLS). It uses a magnetic configuration with varied thicknesses of NdFeB blocks, based on the QPU of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Depression of 3rd harmonic radiation is significantly improved over the ESRF QPU, as deduced from the measured magnetic fields. A method of configuring shims of different geometries and sizes, based on a symmetric principle to correct multi-pole field integrals, was demonstrated.

Yang, Yufeng; Chen, Wan; Jia, Qika; Sun, Shuchen; Li, Zhiqiang

2014-01-01

10

Development of a quasi-periodic undulator for the HLS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China's first quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) has been developed for the Hefei Light Source (HLS). It uses a magnetic configuration with varied thicknesses of NdFeB blocks, which is based on the QPU of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The depression of 3rd harmonic radiation is significantly improved over the ESRF QPU, as deduced from the measured magnetic fields. A method of configuring shims of different geometries and sizes, based on a symmetric principle to correct multi-pole field integrals, is demonstrated.

Yang, Yu-Feng; Lu, Hui-Hua; Chen, Wan; Jia, Qi-Ka; Sun, Shu-Chen; Li, Zhi-Qiang

2014-07-01

11

Development of a Quasi-Periodic Undulator for the HLS  

E-print Network

China's first quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) has been developed for the Hefei Light Source (HLS). It uses a magnetic configuration with varied thicknesses of NdFeB blocks, based on the QPU of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Depression of 3rd harmonic radiation is significantly improved over the ESRF QPU, as deduced from the measured magnetic fields. A method of configuring shims of different geometries and sizes, based on a symmetric principle to correct multi-pole field integrals, was demonstrated.

Yufeng Yang; Huihua Lu; Wan Chen; Qika Jia; Shuchen Sun; Zhiqiang Li

2014-03-11

12

Quasi-periodic pulsations and diagnostics of flaring plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two approaches in the interpretation of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares are presented. The first presents flaring loops as resonators for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Leaky and non-leaky modes are discussed. The second approach is based on Alfvén's idea of the flaring loop as an equivalent electric circuit. This approach naturally explains high-quality pulsations. It is shown that coronal seismology provides an efficient diagnostic tool for flare plasma on the Sun, red dwarfs, and in giant flares on neutron stars.

Stepanov, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. V.

2014-12-01

13

Overall ultimate yield strength of a quasi-periodic masonry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this Note is the determination of the in-plane homogenized strength domain of a "quasi-periodic" masonry under the assumption of infinitely resistant blocks connected by cohesionless Mohr-Coulomb interfaces. This masonry is obtained by introducing a random perturbation on the horizontal width of the blocks of a periodic running bond masonry. It is found that in some non-trivial cases the strength domain coincides exactly with that of the initial periodic masonry. To cite this article: K. Sab, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

Sab, Karam

2009-08-01

14

Electrochemically assembled quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe two electrochemical self-assembly processes for producing highly ordered quasi-periodic arrays of quantum dots on a surface. The advantages of these techniques are: (i) they are `gentle' and do not cause radiation damage to nanostructures unlike beam lithography, (ii) they have high throughput and are amenable to mass production unlike direct-write lithography, (iii) structures can be delineated on non-planar substrates, and (iv) the techniques are potentially orders of magnitude cheaper to implement than conventional nanosynthesis. Samples produced by these techniques have been characterized by microscopy, optical and transport measurements, Auger and x-ray. These measurements reveal intriguing properties of the nanostructures. In this paper, we describe our initial results and show the promise of such techniques for low-cost and high-yield nanosynthesis.

Bandyopadhyay, S.; Miller, A. E.; Chang, H. C.; Banerjee, G.; Yuzhakov, V.; Yue, D.-F.; Ricker, R. E.; Jones, S.; Eastman, J. A.; Baugher, E.; Chandrasekhar, M.

1996-12-01

15

Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in a Solar Microwave Burst  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We studied a microwave burst that showed deep quasi-periodic pulsations using imaging observations at 17 and 34 GHz. Strongly modulated pul sations appear in radio images from the eastern end of a long loop an d in hard X-rays from the western end of the loop. Radio modulations are seen at the western end of the loop but at a level some 20 times weaker than at the eastern end; these radio modulations at the western end of the loop, like the hard X-ray modulations at the same locatio n, appear to lead the modulations at the eastern end by about 0.5 s, but all have the same period. The period of the modulation can be exp lained by MHD oscillations of the loop approximately 120" long connecting the sources.

Kundu, Mukul R.; Grechnev, V. V.; White, S. M.

2003-01-01

16

Peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with zigzag pattern in a CME-related Flare on 2005-01-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A microwave quasi-periodic pulsation with zigzag pattern (Z-QPP) in a solar flare on 2005-01-15 is observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Spectrometer in Huairou (SBRS/Huairou) at 1.10-1.34 GHz. The zigzag pulsation occurred just in the early rising phase of the flare with weakly right-handed circular polarization. Its period is only several decades millisecond. Particularly, before and after the pulsation, there are many spectral fine structures, such as zebra patterns, fibers, and millisecond spikes. The microwave Z-QPP can provide some kinematic information of the source region in the early rising phase of the flare, and the source width changes from ~1000 km to 3300 km, even if we have no imaging observations. The abundant spectral fine structures possibly reflect the dynamic features of non-thermal particles.

Tan, Baolin

2013-07-01

17

Omnidirectional reflection from Fibonacci quasi-periodic one-dimensional photonic crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that omnidirectional reflection (ODR) is possible from quasi-periodic isotropic dielectric stacks following a Fibonacci sequence (FS). The transition from truly periodic to fully quasi-periodic structure is investigated by building periodic structures having unit cells made of FS of order j. The number of periods required to achieve ODR decreases as j increases until only a single period is required at which the structure is fully quasi-periodic. As compared to the periodic case, for the quasi-periodic structure the spectral range is wider, the thickness of the single layers is smaller and the tolerance on the layer thicknesses is smaller.

Lusk, D.; Abdulhalim, I.; Placido, F.

2001-11-01

18

Bifurcations of quasi-periodic dynamics: torus breakdown  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study the dynamics of quasi-periodic bifurcations, we consider a system of two nonlinearly coupled oscillators using averaging, continuation and numerical bifurcation techniques. This relatively simple system displays considerable complexity. Assuming the internal resonance to be 1:2, we find a 2 ?-periodic solution which undergoes a supercritical Neimark-Sacker bifurcation, yielding a stable torus. Choosing a route in parameter space, we show by numerical bifurcation techniques how the torus gets destroyed by dynamical and topological changes in the involved manifolds (Krauskopf and Osinga in J Comput Phys 146:404-419, 1998). The 1:6 resonance turns out to be prominent in parameter space, and we detected a cascade of period doublings within the corresponding resonance tongue yielding a strange attractor. The phenomena agree with the Ruelle-Takens (Commun. Math. Phys. 20:167-192, 1971, Commun. Math. Phys. 23:343-344, 1971) scenario leading to strange attractors. Other periodic regimes are present in this system, and there is interesting evidence that two different regimes interact with each other, yielding yet another type of strange attractor. In this context, certain ?-periodic solutions emerge that are studied by continuation following the Poincaré-Lindstedt method using Mathieu functions; when the implicit function theorem breaks down, the analysis is supplemented by numerical bifurcation techniques.

Bakri, Taoufik; Verhulst, Ferdinand

2014-12-01

19

Quasi-periodic variations in Doppler velocities of H ? spicules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New series of CCD spectral observations of spicules were obtained using 53-cm Lyot coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory (Georgia) at 5500 km height above the solar limb on October 17, 2012 in H ? spectral line. The line-of-sight Doppler velocities of 34 spicules were measured with the cadence of 4.5 s and standard error equal to ±0.3 km/s. Life times of almost all measured spicules were 5-6 min (and longer), therefore they resemble the type I spicules. No short lived structures (similar to type II spicules) were identified during the time series neither inside nor outside the observed spicules. The Doppler velocity time series were processed using Lomb Periodogram Algorithm revealing 4 types of dominating period intervals centered around: 254 s, 136 s, 94 s and 65 s having confidence levels over 95 %. The oscillations with periods around 254 s can be caused by quasi-periodic rebound shocks after the propagation of photospheric pulses. The oscillations with periods around 136 s can be caused by the oscillation of spicules axis at the kink cut-off frequency in gravitationally stratified magnetic tubes. In this case, seismological estimations give the density scale height as 380-540 km for the kink wave speed of 70-100 km/s in spicules. Shorter period oscillations are probably caused by propagating kink waves in spicules.

Khutshishvili, E.; Kulidzanishvili, V.; Kvernadze, T.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Kakhiani, V.; Khutsishvili, D.; Sikharulidze, M.

2014-12-01

20

Omnidirectional reflection from Fibonacci quasi-periodic one-dimensional photonic crystal  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that omnidirectional reflection (ODR) is possible from quasi-periodic isotropic dielectric stacks following a Fibonacci sequence (FS). The transition from truly periodic to fully quasi-periodic structure is investigated by building periodic structures having unit cells made of FS of order j. The number of periods required to achieve ODR decreases as j increases until only a single period

D. Lusk; I. Abdulhalim; F. Placido

2001-01-01

21

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP  

E-print Network

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP F. Gabern1 `A. Jorba1 Abstract We make a local semi-analytical study of a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP particle near the triangular points of the Sun-Jupiter system. In order to perform this study, we use

Barcelona, Universitat de

22

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP  

E-print Network

Normal form for a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP F. Gabern 1 #18; A. Jorba 1 Abstract We make a local semi-analytical study of a quasi-periodic perturbation of the Sun-Jupiter RTBP of a small particle near the triangular points of the Sun-Jupiter system. In order to perform this study, we

Barcelona, Universitat de

23

Chaotic Oscillations via Quasi-Periodicity Caused by Applying External Modulation in Ionization Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamical behavior of nonlinear ionization waves excited in positive columns of glow discharge is investigated with external modulation. It is well known that competition of two frequencies leads the system into a state of chaotic motion via quasi-periodicity as mentioned in Ruelle and Takens scenario (D. Ruelle and F. Takens, Commun. Math. Phys. 20, 167 (1971)). Here, quasi-periodic route to

FUKUYAMA Takao; KOZAKOV Ruslan; TESTRICH Holger; WILKE Christian; KAWAI Yoshinobu

2004-01-01

24

Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

2014-08-01

25

New Anomalous Lieb-Robinson Bounds in Quasi-Periodic XY Chains  

E-print Network

We announce and sketch the rigorous proof of a new kind of anomalous (or sub-ballistic) Lieb-Robinson bound for an isotropic XY chain in a quasi-periodic transversal magnetic field. By "anomalous", we mean that the usual effective light cone defined by $|x|\\leq v|t|$ is replaced by the region $|x|\\leq v|t|^\\alpha$ for some $0law type if one replaces the quasi-periodic field by a random dimer field.

David Damanik; Marius Lemm; Milivoje Lukic; William Yessen

2014-08-28

26

THE SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC UPFLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION TIMESERIES  

SciTech Connect

Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances are frequently observed in coronal intensity image sequences. These disturbances have historically been interpreted as being the signature of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating into the corona. The detailed analysis of Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) timeseries observations of an active region (known to contain propagating disturbances) shows strongly correlated, quasi-periodic, oscillations in intensity, Doppler shift, and line width. No frequency doubling is visible in the latter. The enhancements in the moments of the line profile are generally accompanied by a faint, quasi-periodically occurring, excess emission at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the blue wing of coronal emission lines. The correspondence of quasi-periodic excess wing emission and the moments of the line profile indicates that repetitive high-velocity upflows are responsible for the oscillatory behavior observed. Furthermore, we show that the same quasi-periodic upflows can be directly identified in a simultaneous image sequence obtained by the Hinode X-Ray Telescope. These results are consistent with the recent assertion of De Pontieu and McIntosh that the wave interpretation of the data is not unique. Indeed, given that several instances are seen to propagate along the direction of the EIS slit that clearly shows in-phase, quasi-periodic variations of intensity, velocity, width (without frequency doubling), and blue wing enhanced emission, this data set would appear to provide a compelling example that upflows are more likely to be the main cause of the quasi-periodicities observed here, as such correspondences are hard to reconcile in the wave paradigm.

Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 8037 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: htian@ucar.edu, E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-02-01

27

Exciton photoluminescence in resonant quasi-periodic Thue-Morse quantum wells.  

PubMed

This Letter investigates exciton photoluminescence (PL) in resonant quasi-periodic Thue-Morse quantum wells (QWs). The results show that the PL properties of quasi-periodic Thue-Morse QWs are quite different from those of resonant Fibonacci QWs. The maximum and minimum PL intensities occur under the anti-Bragg and Bragg conditions, respectively. The maxima of the PL intensity gradually decline when the filling factor increases from 0.25 to 0.5. Accordingly, the squared electric field at the QWs decreases as the Thue-Morse QW deviates from the anti-Bragg condition. PMID:24487847

Hsueh, W J; Chang, C H; Lin, C T

2014-02-01

28

Pure Point Spectrum of the Floquet Hamiltonian for the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Under Time Quasi- Periodic Perturbations  

E-print Network

We prove that the $1-d$ quantum harmonic oscillator is stable under spatially localized, time quasi-periodic perturbations on a set of Diophantine frequencies of positive measure. This proves a conjecture raised by Enss-Veselic in their 1983 paper \\cite{EV} in the general quasi-periodic setting. The motivation of the present paper also comes from construction of quasi-periodic solutions for the corresponding nonlinear equation.

W. -M. Wang

2008-05-24

29

Non thermal small black holes  

E-print Network

In this chapter we review the current theoretical state of the art of small black holes at the LHC. We discuss the production mechanism for small non thermal black holes at the LHC and discuss new signatures due to a possible discrete mass spectrum of these black holes.

Xavier Calmet; Dionysios Fragkakis; Nina Gausmann

2012-01-21

30

Dominated splittings and the spectrum of quasi-periodic Jacobi operators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We prove that the resolvent set of any, possibly singular, quasi- periodic Jacobi operator is characterized as the set of all energies whose associated Jacobi cocycles induce a dominated splitting. This extends a well-known result by Johnson for Schrödinger operators.

Marx, C. A.

2014-12-01

31

Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and thermonuclear bursts from Terzan 5: A showcase of burning regimes  

E-print Network

We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480–2446, located in the globular cluster ...

Linares, M.

32

Dripping handrails and the quasi-periodic oscillations of the AM Herculis objects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

AM Her objects exhibit periodic, quasi-periodic, and aperiodic variability on timescales ranging from seconds to years. Here, we investigate a process for the production of aperiodic and quasi-periodic accretion rate fluctuations. We consider the nonlinear dynamical model known as the dripping handrail (DHR). The DHR, basically a model for certain types of spatially extended systems and loosely based on water condensing on and dripping off a handrail, has recently been used as a model for the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. Here, we show that (1) the DHR is a robust QPO generation process in that it leads to QPO production under a wide range of conditions and assumptions; (2) the phenomenology of the DHR is consistent with the observed aperiodic and quasi-periodic varibility of the AM Her QPO source VV Pup over timescales ranging from 16 ms to 20 s; and (3) a single DHR model can produce both broadband QPOs and features with quality Q greater than 20 as observed in several AM Her QPO sources.

Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Young, Karl; Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James N.; Wolff, Michael T.; Wood, Kent S.

1994-01-01

33

Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar hard X-ray and microwave flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For more than a decade, various studies have pointed out that hard X-ray and microwave time profiles of some solar flares show quasi-periodic fluctuations or pulsations. Nevertheless, it was not until recently that a flare displaying large amplitude quasi-periodic pulsations in X-rays and microwaves was observed with good spectral coverage and with a sufficient time resolution. The event occurred on June 7, 1980, at approximately 0312 UT, and exhibits seven intense pulses with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 8 seconds in microwaves, hard X-rays, and gamma-ray lines. On May 12, 1983, at approximately 0253 UT, another good example of this type of flare was observed both in hard X-rays and in microwaves. Temporal and spectral characteristics of this flare are compared with the event of June 7, 1980. In order to further explore these observational results and theoretical scenarios, a study of nine additional quasi-periodic events were incorporated with the results from the two flares described. Analysis of these events are briefly summarized.

Kosugi, Takeo; Kiplinger, Alan L.

1986-01-01

34

Quasi-periodic Green's functions of the Helmholtz and Laplace equations  

E-print Network

A classical problem of free-space Green's function $G_{0\\Lambda}$ representations of the Helmholtz equation is studied in various quasi-periodic cases, i.e., when an underlying periodicity is imposed in less dimensions than is the dimension of an embedding space. Exponentially convergent series for the free-space quasi-periodic $G_{0\\Lambda}$ and for the expansion coefficients $D_{L}$ of $G_{0\\Lambda}$ in the basis of regular (cylindrical in two dimensions and spherical in three dimension (3D)) waves, or lattice sums, are reviewed and new results for the case of a one-dimensional (1D) periodicity in 3D are derived. From a mathematical point of view, a derivation of exponentially convergent representations for Schl\\"{o}milch series of cylindrical and spherical Hankel functions of any integer order is accomplished. The quasi-periodic Green's functions of the Laplace equation are obtained from the corresponding representations of $G_{0\\Lambda}$ of the Helmholtz equation by taking the limit of the wave vector magnitude going to zero. The derivation of relevant results in the case of a 1D periodicity in 3D highlights the common part which is universally applicable to any of remaining quasi-periodic cases. The results obtained can be useful for numerical solution of boundary integral equations for potential flows in fluid mechanics, remote sensing of periodic surfaces, periodic gratings, in many contexts of simulating systems of charged particles, in molecular dynamics, for the description of quasi-periodic arrays of point interactions in quantum mechanics, and in various ab-initio first-principle multiple-scattering theories for the analysis of diffraction of classical and quantum waves.

Alexander Moroz

2006-02-08

35

Quasi-periodic Green's functions of the Helmholtz and Laplace equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A classical problem of free-space Green's function G0? representations of the Helmholtz equation is studied in various quasi-periodic cases, i.e., when an underlying periodicity is imposed in less dimensions than is the dimension of an embedding space. Exponentially convergent series for the free-space quasi-periodic G0? and for the expansion coefficients DL of G0? in the basis of regular (cylindrical in two dimensions and spherical in three dimension (3D)) waves, or lattice sums, are reviewed and new results for the case of a one-dimensional (1D) periodicity in 3D are derived. From a mathematical point of view, a derivation of exponentially convergent representations for Schlömilch series of cylindrical and spherical Hankel functions of any integer order is accomplished. Exponentially convergent series for G0? and lattice sums DL hold for any value of the Bloch momentum and allow G0? to be efficiently evaluated also in the periodicity plane. The quasi-periodic Green's functions of the Laplace equation are obtained from the corresponding representations of G0? of the Helmholtz equation by taking the limit of the wave vector magnitude going to zero. The derivation of relevant results in the case of a 1D periodicity in 3D highlights the common part which is universally applicable to any of remaining quasi-periodic cases. The results obtained can be useful for the numerical solution of boundary integral equations for potential flows in fluid mechanics, remote sensing of periodic surfaces, periodic gratings, and infinite arrays of resonators coupled to a waveguide, in many contexts of simulating systems of charged particles, in molecular dynamics, for the description of quasi-periodic arrays of point interactions in quantum mechanics, and in various ab initio first-principle multiple-scattering theories for the analysis of diffraction of classical and quantum waves.

Moroz, Alexander

2006-09-01

36

LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSIENT QUASI-PERIODIC RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

We report low-frequency observations of quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was ?5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ?0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ? 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ? 1.3 R{sub ?}) in the active region corona.

Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R., E-mail: sasikumar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

2013-09-20

37

The localization of light in a 2D quasi-periodic coherently prepared atomic medium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the localization of light in two-dimensional (2D) atomic systems. The system proposed in this paper is a resonant cold atomic ensemble with N configuration, which is coherently prepared by four pairs of control fields. Under the condition of the electromagnetically induced transparency, the propagation of the signal field is modelled as a system that is uniform along the propagating direction (z) but shows quasi-periodic structure on the transverse plane (x - y plane). Through numerical simulations, we find that the 2D quasi-periodic coherently prepared atomic medium can make the signal field anisotropic localized transversely during the propagation, and the localization direction can be manipulated by the phase of the control field.

Wang, C. F.; Cheng, J.; Chen, B.

2015-02-01

38

Narrowband DWDM filters based on Fibonacci-class quasi-periodic structures.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a narrowband DWDM filter structure, whose reflection band characteristics, meets the ITU-T standard. The proposed filter structure is based on Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures composed of multilayers with large index differences. Studying the effects of the optical and geometrical parameters of Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures on its filtering properties, we have realized that to achieve the ITU-T standard, we need to cascade two successive structures both with the same generation numbers j=4 and orders n=25 and apodized refractive indices. The apodization process helps to minimize the stop band sidelobes. We have also demonstrated that beside Fibonacci's order, n, the layers dimensions, and their refractive index ratios are the main design parameters. PMID:19547405

Golmohammadi, S; Moravvej-Farshi, M K; Rostami, A; Zarifkar, A

2007-08-20

39

Exact quasi-periodic solutions of the Konno-Oono equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the basis of the Lax matrix and elliptic variables, the Konno-Oono equations are decomposed into solvable ordinary differential equations. The Konno-Oono flows are straightened with the aid of the theory of algebraic curves and the Abel-Jacobi coordinates. The asymptotic properties of the meromorphic function at infinite points and its algebro-geometric characteristics are studied, from which exact quasi-periodic solutions of the Konno-Oono equations are obtained.

Guan, Liang; Geng, Xianguo; Li, Zhu

2014-07-01

40

Quasi-periodic variations of gamma-ray intensity in the atmosphere and atmospheric buoyancy waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-altitude balloons have been used to measure gamma rays with energies above 40 MeV in the stratosphere near the equator and at midlatitudes. Quasi-periodic fluctuations (QPF) of the gamma rays were observed which can be explained in terms of atmospheric buoyancy waves: in propagating, these waves modulate the amount of matter in the residual atmosphere above the instrument and thus

A. M. Galper; L. P. Gorbachev; L. V. Kurnosova; N. G. Leikov; B. I. Luchkov

1985-01-01

41

Evidence for quasi-periodic July drought in the Hudson Valley, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

July Palmer Drought Severity Indices1 (PDSI) have been reconstructed2 for the Hudson Valley region of New York State from the annual ring-width variations of local old trees. Using additional, subsequently developed tree-ring chronologies, we have developed a new July drought reconstruction that extends back to 1694. Variance spectra of the new PDSI series reveal statistically significant quasi-periodicities of 11.4 and

Edward R. Cook; Gordon C. Jacoby

1979-01-01

42

Temporal Super Resolution from a Single Quasi-periodic Image Sequence Based on Phase Registration  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper describes a method for temporal super resolution from a single quasi-periodic image sequence. A so-called reconstruction-based\\u000a method is applied to construct a one period image sequence with high frame-rate based on phase registration data in sub-frame\\u000a order among multiple periods of the image sequence. First, the periodic image sequence to be reconstructed is expressed as\\u000a a manifold in

Yasushi Makihara; Atsushi Mori; Yasushi Yagi

2010-01-01

43

Quasi-periodical components in the radial distributions of cosmologically remote objects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A statistical analysis of radial (line-of-sight) 1D-distributions of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) within the redshift interval 0.044 ? z ? 0.78 and Mg II absorption-line systems (0.37 ? z ? 2.28) is carried out. Power spectra and two-point radial correlation functions are calculated. It is found that both radial distributions of spectroscopic redshifts of 52 683 BCGs and 32 840 Mg II absorption systems incorporate similar quasi-periodical components relatively to the comoving distance. Significance of the components exceeds 4?-level and admits an increase ( ? 5?) for some broad subsamples. For the ? cold dark matter cosmological model the periodicities correspond to spatial comoving scales (98 ± 3) and (101 ± 2) h-1 Mpc, respectively. These quasi-periods turn out to be close to the characteristic scale (101 ± 6) h-1 Mpc of the quasi-periodical component obtained earlier for the radial distribution of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). On the other hand, the scales are close to the spatial scale corresponding to the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) revealed by many authors at the last decade. Fourier transform phases obtained for the BCGs and LRGs are found to be close, while the phases calculated for the Mg II absorption systems and LRGs are opposite. Discussions of the results in a context of the BAO and large-scale structure characteristic scales are outlined.

Ryabinkov, A. I.; Kaminker, A. D.

2014-05-01

44

Quasi-periodic Inward Shock Formations in the System of a Black Hole and an Accretion Disk and Application to Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Galactic Black Hole Candidates  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed 1.5-dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with a Kerr metric to construct a model for high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in microquasars. The simulations were performed assuming an initial accretion disk without viscosity rotating around a Kerr black hole at sub-Keplerian velocity (sub-Keplerian case), which induces various wave modes everywhere in the disk. We found that quasi-periodic inward shock waves

Seiichiro I. Aoki; Shinji Koide; Takahiro Kudoh; Kunji Nakayama; Kazunari Shibata

2004-01-01

45

Quasi-periodic behavior of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

The ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated in an unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. The one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. It is shown that ion temperature plays a critical role in the dynamics of quantum electron ion plasma, especially for arbitrary amplitude nonlinear waves. In the small amplitude region Korteweg-de Vries equation describes the solitonic nature of the waves. However, for arbitrary amplitude waves, in the fully nonlinear regime, the system exhibits possible existence of quasi-periodic behavior for small values of ion temperature.

Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India); Poria, Swarup [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta Kolkata-700009 (India); Narayan Ghosh, Uday [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University Santiniketan (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute Kolkata-700108 (India)

2012-05-15

46

Quasi-periodicities of the BL Lacertae Object PKS 2155-304  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have searched for periodicities in our VRIJHK photometry of PKS 2155-304, which covers the years 2005-2012. A peak of the Fourier spectrum with high significance is found at T ~ 315 days, confirming the recent findings by Zhang et al. The examination of the gamma-ray light curves from the Fermi archives yields a significant signal at ~2T, which, while nominally significant, involves data spanning only ~6T. Assuming a black hole mass of 109 M ?, the Keplerian distance corresponding to the quasi-period T is ~1016 cm, about 50 Schwarzschild radii.

Sandrinelli, A.; Covino, S.; Treves, A.

2014-09-01

47

Some quasi-periodic solutions to the Kadometsev-Petviashvili and modified Kadometsev-Petviashvili equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kadometsev-Petviashvili (KP) and modified KP (mKP) equations are retrieved from the first two soliton equations of coupled Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) hierarchy. Based on the nonlinearization of Lax pairs, the KP and mKP equations are ultimately reduced to integrable finite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems in view of the r-matrix theory. Finally, the resulting Hamiltonian flows are linearized in Abel-Jacobi coordinates, such that some specially explicit quasi-periodic solutions to the KP and mKP equations are synchronously given in terms of theta functions through the Jacobi inversion.

Chen, J.; Geng, X.

2006-04-01

48

A search for quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U/MXB 1735-44  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A search for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U/MXB 1735-44 was performed using Exosat observations during which the source was in a horizontal branch of the spectral hardness-intensity diagram for about 8 hr and in a normal branch type of behavior for about 46 hr. No QPOs or low-frequency noise was found in the horizontal branch state. It is suggested that this absence is due to either low luminosity or the fact that the companion in 1735-44 is a main-sequence star.

Penninx, Wim; Hasinger, Guenther; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan; Van Der Klis, Michiel

1989-01-01

49

THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices  

SciTech Connect

The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

Malyshev, K V [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-06-30

50

Application of the multiband kp-models to quantum transport in quasi-periodic crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the quantum transport of a particle in a crystal where the global three-dimensional translation symmetry is removed. Our analysis concerns solid state structures where the microscopic potential of the ions is no longer periodic. This includes materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds and abrupt junctions. The application of the kp multiband envelope function models to the description of the quantum mechanical motion in such a quasi-periodic structure is investigated. By using a spectral decomposition technique, we show that when the interatomic distance is asymptotically small, the particle probability density can be obtained by the envelope kp model with variable coefficients.

Morandi, O.

2014-12-01

51

Quasi-periodic synchronisation of self-modulation oscillations in a ring chip laser by an external periodic signal  

SciTech Connect

The synchronisation of periodic self-modulation oscillations in a ring Nd:YAG chip laser under an external periodic signal modulating the pump power has been experimentally investigated. A new quasi-periodic regime of synchronisation of self-modulation oscillations is found. The characteristic features of the behaviour of spectral and temporal structures of synchronised quasi-periodic oscillations with a change in the external signal frequency are studied. (control of laser radiation parameters)

Aulova, T V; Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N [D.V. Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-06-30

52

QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goegues, Ersin [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, Jonathan [The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra'anana 43537 (Israel); Vaughan, Simon [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finger, Mark H., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2013-05-01

53

GENERATION OF QUASI-PERIODIC WAVES AND FLOWS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY OSCILLATORY RECONNECTION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the long-term evolution of an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube emerging into a gravitationally stratified coronal hole environment and report on the resulting oscillations and outflows. We perform 2.5-dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations, generalizing the models of McLaughlin et al. and Murray et al. We find that the physical mechanism of oscillatory reconnection naturally generates quasi-periodic vertical outflows, with a transverse/swaying aspect. The vertical outflows consist of both a periodic aspect and evidence of a positively directed flow. The speed of the vertical outflow (20-60 km s{sup -1}) is comparable to those reported in the observational literature. We also perform a parametric study varying the magnetic strength of the buoyant flux tube and find a range of associated periodicities: 1.75-3.5 minutes. Thus, the mechanism of oscillatory reconnection may provide a physical explanation to some of the high-speed, quasi-periodic, transverse outflows/jets recently reported by a multitude of authors and instruments.

McLaughlin, J. A.; Verth, G. [School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R., E-mail: james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: gary.verth@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2012-04-10

54

Quasi-periodic Wiggles of Microwave Zebra Structures in a Solar Flare  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s-1. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A.; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua

2013-11-01

55

QUASI-PERIODIC FORMALDEHYDE MASER FLARES IN THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR OBJECT IRAS 18566+0408  

SciTech Connect

We report results of an extensive observational campaign of the 6 cm formaldehyde maser in the young massive stellar object IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20) conducted from 2002 to 2009. Using the Arecibo Telescope, the Very Large Array, and the Green Bank Telescope, we discovered quasi-periodic formaldehyde flares (P {approx} 237 days). Based on Arecibo observations, we also discovered correlated variability between formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) masers. The H{sub 2}CO and CH{sub 3}OH masers are not spatially coincident, as demonstrated by different line velocities and high angular resolution MERLIN observations. The flares could be caused by variations in the infrared radiation field, possibly modulated by periodic accretion onto a young binary system.

Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States); Hofner, P.; Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Richards, A. M. S. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Linz, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Olmi, L. [University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras, Physics Department, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Sewilo, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2010-07-10

56

Quasi-periodic oscillations in the Z source GX 5-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed study has been conducted of the time variability in the Z source GX 5-1 using Ginga, which observed the source in the horizontal and normal branches (HB, NB). Intensity-dependent HF, quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) were observed in the HB, in which the source flux varied by a factor of 1.9. The QPO frequency in this portion of the HB ranges from about 13 to 17 Hz; this is lower than previously observed in any Z source. The HF and LF QPO were simultaneously observed in the NB. The strength of both forms of QPO and the strength of the LF noise increase rapidly with increasing photon energy.

Lewin, Walter H. G.; Lubin, Lori M.; Tan, Jianmin; Van Der Klis, Michiel; Van Paradijs, Jan; Penninx, Wim; Dotani, Tadayasu; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

1992-01-01

57

Dwarf Nova Oscillations and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables I. Observations of VW Hyi  

E-print Network

From archived and recent high speed photometry of VW Hyi we find Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) occasionally present throughout outburst, evolving from 14.06 s period at maximum to > 40 s near the end of outburst. A relatively slow increase of period is followed by rapid increase and subsequent decrease. Quasi-periodic Oscillations (QPOs) are seen at periods of hundreds of seconds. For the first time, an evolution of QPO period is seen, steadily increasing during the final decline of an outburst. The occasional presence of two DNOs, separated in frequency by the QPO frequency, suggests reprocessing of the rotating DNO beam by a `wall' rotating progradely in the disc at the QPO period.

Woudt, P A; Woudt, Patrick A.; Warner, Brian

2002-01-01

58

Wideband absorption in fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A heterostructure containing a Fibonacci quasi-periodic layer and a resonant metal back reflector is proposed, which can realize wideband absorption. The Fibonacci layer is composed of graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials and isotropic media to obtain wideband absorption. To enhance absorption, an impedance-matching layer is put on top of the Fibonacci layer. It is shown to absorb roughly 90% of all available electromagnetic waves in an 11 terahertz absorption bandwidth for a transverse magnetic mode at normal angle incidence. The absorption bandwidth is affected by the reflection band gap. Compared with some previous designs, our proposed structure has a larger absorption bandwidth and higher absorption in the mid-infrared range. The results should be valuable in the design of infrared stealth and broadband optoelectronic devices.

Ning, Renxia; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, Haifeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Bian, Borui; Bao, Jie

2014-12-01

59

Singular Density of States Measure for Subshift and Quasi-Periodic Schrödinger Operators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simon's subshift conjecture states that for every aperiodic minimal subshift of Verblunsky coefficients, the common essential support of the associated measures has zero Lebesgue measure. We disprove this conjecture in this paper, both in the form stated and in the analogous formulation of it for discrete Schrödinger operators. In addition we prove a weak version of the conjecture in the Schrödinger setting. Namely, under some additional assumptions on the subshift, we show that the density of states measure, a natural measure associated with the operator family and whose topological support is equal to the spectrum, is singular. We also consider one-frequency quasi-periodic Schrödinger operators with continuous sampling functions and show that generically, the density of states measure is singular as well.

Avila, Artur; Damanik, David; Zhang, Zhenghe

2014-09-01

60

Ergodic theory and visualization. II. Harmonic mesochronic plots visualize (quasi)periodic sets  

E-print Network

We present a new method of analysis of measure-preserving dynamical systems, based on frequency analysis and ergodic theory, which extends our earlier work [1]. Our method employs the novel concept of harmonic time average [2], and is realized as a computational algorithms for visualization of periodic and quasi-periodic sets or arbitrary periodicity in the phase space. Besides identifying all periodic sets, our method is useful in detecting chaotic phase space regions with a good precision. The range of method's applicability is illustrated using well-known Chirikov standard map, while its full potential is presented by studying higher-dimensional measure-preserving systems, in particular Froeschl\\'e map and extended standard map.

Zoran Levnaji?; Igor Mezi?

2014-07-26

61

Quasi-periodic frequency fluctuations observed during coronal radio sounding experiments 1991-2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coronal radio sounding experiments were carried out using the dual-frequency signals of the spacecraft Ulysses, Galileo, Mars Express, Venus Express, and Rosetta. The change in differential frequency recorded at the NASA and ESA ground stations, a quantity sensitive only to the plasma along the radio ray path from spacecraft to receiver, has been analyzed in this work. This large volume of observational data provides evidence for the occasional presence of a quasi-periodic component (QPC) in the derived frequency fluctuation spectra. First seen in data from the Mars Express conjunction in 2004, further evidence for the QPC has now been found in data recorded at other solar conjunction opportunities from 1991 to 2009, thereby better defining the statistical characteristics of the QPC. The level of QPC spectral density is a factor of three higher than the expected power-law background level. The characteristic frequency of the spectral density maximum is roughly 4 mHz, corresponding to a QPC fluctuation period of about 4 min. The bandwidth of the spectral line is comparable to the maximum frequency. The QPC are observed at heliocentric distances between 3 and 40 solar radii, both in equatorial regions and at high heliolatitudes. The QPC is detected with an occurrence frequency of about 20% and is occasionally accompanied by its second harmonic. The most likely progenitors of the QPC are quasi-periodic electron density fluctuations associated with magnetosonic waves, which are generated locally from nonlinear interactions of 5-min band Alfvén waves propagating from the coronal base.

Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.; MEX, VEX, ROS Radio Science Team

2012-02-01

62

A Model for Backscattering from Quasi Periodic Corn Canopies at L-Band  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this study, a model for backscattering at L-band from a corn canopy is proposed. The canopy consists of a quasi-periodic distribution of stalks and a random distribution of leaves. The Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) is employed to calculate the single scattered return from the corn field. The new feature of the method is that the coherence of the stalks in the row direction is incorporated in the model in a systematic fashion. Since the wavelength is on the order of the distance between corn stalks in a row, grating lobe behavior is observed at certain azimuth angles of incidence. The results are compared with experimental values measured in Huntsville, Alabama in 1998. The mean field and the effective dielectric constant of the canopy are obtained by using the Foldy approximation. The stalks are placed in the effective medium in a two dimensional lattice to simulate the row structure of a corn field. In order to mimic a real corn field, a quasi-periodic stalk distribution is assumed where the stalks are given small random perturbations about their lattice locations. Corn leaves are also embedded in the effective medium and the backscattered field from the stalks and the leaves is computed. The backscattering coefficient is calculated and averaged over successive stalk position perturbations. It is assumed that soil erosion has smoothed the soil sufficiently so that it can be assumed flat. Corn field backscatter data was collected from cornfields during the Huntsville 98 experimental campaign held at Alabama A&M University Research Station, Huntsville, Alabama in 1998 using the NASA/GW truck mounted radar. Extensive ground truth data was collected. This included soil moisture measurements and corn plant architectural data to be used in the model. In particular, the distances between the stalks in a single row have been measured. The L-band radar backscatter data was collected for both H and V polarizations and for look angles of 15o and 45o over a two week period under varying soil moisture conditions. These measured backscattering values will be compared with the model backscattering values and a discussion of the results will be presented.

Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Zhao, Q.; O'Neill, P.

2010-01-01

63

Strong resonant tunneling, level repulsion and spectral type for one-dimensional adiabatic quasi-periodic Schrödinger operators  

E-print Network

In this paper, we consider one dimensional adiabatic quasi-periodic Schr\\"{o}dinger operators in the regime of strong resonant tunneling. We show the emergence of a level repulsion phenomenon which is seen to be very naturally related to the local spectral type of the operator: the more singular the spectrum, the weaker the repulsion.

Alexander Fedotov; Frédéric Klopp

2005-02-13

64

Dynamical Systems, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2002, 128 Rotation numbers for quasi-periodically forced monotone circle  

E-print Network

monotone circle maps J. STARK*, U. FEUDEL{, P. A. GLENDINNING{ and A. PIKOVSKY} * Centre for Nonlinear numbers have played a central role in the study of (unforced) monotone circle maps. In such a case Herman has proved that quasi-periodically forced circle maps also possess a well-de®ned rotation number

Pikovsky, Arkady

65

Periodic and Quasi -Periodic Motions of a Solar Sail Close to SL1 in the Earth -Sun System  

E-print Network

Periodic and Quasi - Periodic Motions of a Solar Sail Close to SL1 in the Earth - Sun System with the Sun - sail direction) the system has five equilibrium points. When we add the effect of the solar sail Abstract Solar sails are a proposed form of spacecraft propulsion using large membrane mirrors to propel

Barcelona, Universitat de

66

Optical properties of one-dimensional Fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene photonic crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a novel type of one-dimensional photonic crystal called Fibonacci quasi-periodic graphene photonic crystal (FGPC), in which the structure in each dielectric cell follows the Fibonacci sequence and the graphene monolayers are embedded between adjacent dielectric layers. The transmission properties of FGPC are investigated using transfer matrix method in detail. It is shown that both photonic band gap induced by graphene (GIBPG) and the Bragg gap exist in the structure. We study the band gaps of TE and TM waves at different incident angles or chemical potentials. It is found that the band gaps can be tuned via a gate voltage and GIBPG is almost omnidirectional and insensitive to the polarization. In order to investigate difference between the GIPBG and Bragg gap, we plot the electromagnetic field profiles inside FGPC for some critical frequencies. The propagation loss of the structure caused by absorption of graphene is researched in detail. Also, the passing bands of Fibonacci sequences of different orders and their splitting behavior at higher order are investigated.

Zhang, Yuping; Wu, Zhixin; Cao, Yanyan; Zhang, Huiyun

2015-03-01

67

Quasi-periodic oscillations discovered in the X-ray pulsar XTE J1858+034  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have discovered low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations at 0.11 Hz in the 221 s X-ray pulsar XTE J1858+034. Among about 30 known transient X-ray pulsars this is the sixth source in which QPOs have been observed. If the QPOs are produced because of inhomogeneities in the accretion disk at the magnetospheric boundary, the low frequency of the QPOs indicate a large magnetosphere for this pulsar. Both the Keplerian frequency model and the beat frequency model are applicable for production of QPOs in this source. The QPOs and regular pulsations are found to be stronger at higher energy which favours the beat frequency model. A detailed analysis, of the QPO feature as a function of pulse phase and energy will be presented which will help in firmly deciding one of the two alternatives for the QPO phenomenon. The spectrum is hard, consisting of two components, a cut-off power law and an iron fluorescence line.

Paul, B.; Rao, A. R.

1998-12-01

68

Detection of quasi-periodic processes in complex systems: how do we quantitatively describe their properties?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that in reality at least two general scenarios of data structuring are possible: (a) a self-similar (SS) scenario when the measured data form an SS structure and (b) a quasi-periodic (QP) scenario when the repeated (strongly correlated) data form random sequences that are almost periodic with respect to each other. In the second case it becomes possible to describe their behavior and express a part of their randomness quantitatively in terms of the deterministic amplitude-frequency response belonging to the generalized Prony spectrum. This possibility allows us to re-examine the conventional concept of measurements and opens a new way for the description of a wide set of different data. In particular, it concerns different complex systems when the ‘best-fit’ model pretending to be the description of the data measured is absent but the barest necessity of description of these data in terms of the reduced number of quantitative parameters exists. The possibilities of the proposed approach and detection algorithm of the QP processes were demonstrated on actual data: spectroscopic data recorded for pure water and acoustic data for a test hole. The suggested methodology allows revising the accepted classification of different incommensurable and self-affine spatial structures and finding accurate interpretation of the generalized Prony spectroscopy that includes the Fourier spectroscopy as a partial case.

Nigmatullin, Raoul R.; Khamzin, Airat A.; Tenreiro Machado, J.

2014-01-01

69

Drift-Free Position Estimation of Periodic or Quasi-Periodic Motion Using Inertial Sensors  

PubMed Central

Position sensing with inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes usually requires other aided sensors or prior knowledge of motion characteristics to remove position drift resulting from integration of acceleration or velocity so as to obtain accurate position estimation. A method based on analytical integration has previously been developed to obtain accurate position estimate of periodic or quasi-periodic motion from inertial sensors using prior knowledge of the motion but without using aided sensors. In this paper, a new method is proposed which employs linear filtering stage coupled with adaptive filtering stage to remove drift and attenuation. The prior knowledge of the motion the proposed method requires is only approximate band of frequencies of the motion. Existing adaptive filtering methods based on Fourier series such as weighted-frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), and band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) are modified to combine with the proposed method. To validate and compare the performance of the proposed method with the method based on analytical integration, simulation study is performed using periodic signals as well as real physiological tremor data, and real-time experiments are conducted using an ADXL-203 accelerometer. Results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed method outperforms the existing analytical integration method. PMID:22163935

Latt, Win Tun; Veluvolu, Kalyana Chakravarthy; Ang, Wei Tech

2011-01-01

70

Drift-free position estimation of periodic or quasi-periodic motion using inertial sensors.  

PubMed

Position sensing with inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes usually requires other aided sensors or prior knowledge of motion characteristics to remove position drift resulting from integration of acceleration or velocity so as to obtain accurate position estimation. A method based on analytical integration has previously been developed to obtain accurate position estimate of periodic or quasi-periodic motion from inertial sensors using prior knowledge of the motion but without using aided sensors. In this paper, a new method is proposed which employs linear filtering stage coupled with adaptive filtering stage to remove drift and attenuation. The prior knowledge of the motion the proposed method requires is only approximate band of frequencies of the motion. Existing adaptive filtering methods based on Fourier series such as weighted-frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), and band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) are modified to combine with the proposed method. To validate and compare the performance of the proposed method with the method based on analytical integration, simulation study is performed using periodic signals as well as real physiological tremor data, and real-time experiments are conducted using an ADXL-203 accelerometer. Results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed method outperforms the existing analytical integration method. PMID:22163935

Latt, Win Tun; Veluvolu, Kalyana Chakravarthy; Ang, Wei Tech

2011-01-01

71

ON THE NATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION PHASE LAGS IN BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES  

SciTech Connect

Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes (BHs). In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provide feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and time-delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its nonlinear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy-dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signals in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes on the nature of the power-law spectral component and its variability.

Shaposhnikov, Nikolai, E-mail: nikolai.v.shaposhnikov@nasa.gov, E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, CRESST/University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-06-20

72

Correlation between spectral state and quasi-periodic oscillation parameters in GX 5-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a series of seven Exosat observations, the bimodal spectral behavior and the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)/red noise properties of GX 5-1 show a strict correlation. In one of the two spectral states (characterized by a 'horizontal branch' in the hardness-intensity diagram), strong 20-40 Hz QPO and red noise below about 60 Hz were always present. In the other ('normal branch'), no QPO between 6 and 60 Hz or red noise above 1 Hz were detected, but there was an indication for weak QPO near 5 Hz. In both states 'very low frequency noise' (VLFN) is detected below 0.1 Hz which has a power-law shape and and which extends down to the lowest observed frequencies (0.0001 Hz). The VLFN is probably not directly related to the QPO. The results are compared to those on Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2 and it is concluded that, although all three sources show bimodal spectral and QPO/red noise behavior, there is a qualitative difference between GX 5-1 and Cyg X-2 on one hand and Sco X-1 on the other.

Van Der Klis, M.; Jansen, F.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.

1987-01-01

73

SUBMILLIMETER QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN MAGNETICALLY CHOKED ACCRETION FLOW MODELS OF SgrA*  

SciTech Connect

High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetically choked accretion flows around rapidly rotating black holes (BHs). We perform polarized radiative transfer calculations with the ASTRORAY code to explore the manifestations of these QPOs for SgrA*. We construct a simulation-based model of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and find model parameters by fitting the mean polarized source spectrum. The simulated QPOs have a total submillimeter flux amplitude up to 5% and a linearly polarized flux amplitude up to 2%. The oscillations reach high levels of significance 10{sigma}-30{sigma} and high-quality factors Q Almost-Equal-To 5. The oscillation period T Almost-Equal-To 100 M Almost-Equal-To 35 minutes corresponds to the rotation period of the BH magnetosphere that produces a trailing spiral in resolved disk images. The total flux signal is significant over noise for all tested frequencies 87 GHz, 230 GHz, and 857 GHz and inclination angles 10 Degree-Sign , 37 Degree-Sign , and 80 Degree-Sign . The non-detection in the 230 GHz SubMillimeter Array light curve is consistent with a low signal level and a low sampling rate. The presence of submillimeter QPOs in SgrA* will be better tested with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

Shcherbakov, Roman V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McKinney, Jonathan C., E-mail: roman@astro.umd.edu [Joint Space Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-09-10

74

Keck II spectroscopy of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations in Hercules X-1  

E-print Network

We present Keck II spectroscopy of an optical mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the lightcurve of the X-ray pulsar binary Her X-1. In the power spectrum it appears as `peaked noise', with a coherency $\\sim$2, a central frequency of 35 mHz and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5%. However, the dynamic power spectrum shows it to be an intermittent QPO, with a lifetime of $\\sim$hundred seconds, as expected if the lifetime of the orbiting material is equal to the thermal timescale of the inner disk. We have decomposed the spectral time series into constant and variable components and used blackbody fits to the resulting spectra to characterise the spectrum of the QPO variability and constrain possible production sites. We find that the spectrum of the QPO is best-fit by a small hot region, possibly the inner regions of the accretion disk, where the ballistic accretion stream impacts onto the disk. The lack of any excess power around the QPO frequency in the X-ray power spectrum, created using simultaneous lightcurves from XTE, implies that the QPO is not simply reprocessed X-ray variability.

K O'Brien; Keith Horne; B Boroson; M Still; R Gomer; JB Oke; P Boyd; S Vrtilek

2001-05-10

75

Quasi-periodic Fluctuations Detected in Mars Express Coronal Radio Sounding Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectral analysis of the high-quality dual-frequency data obtained with the radio sounding experiment MaRS on the ESA spacecraft Mars Express has revealed a quasi-periodic component (QPC) at heliocentric distances from 4 to 10 solar radii. The QPC typically appears as a broad maximum in the temporal frequency fluctuation spectrum centered at a frequency in the range 3.7 mHz

Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.; Tellmann, S.

2010-03-01

76

Discovery of High Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in 4u1915-05  

E-print Network

The type I X-ray burster and dipper 4U1915-05 (also known as XB1916-053) was monitored by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer between February and October, 1996. The source was observed in various spectral states; the highest luminosity state (LX ~ 1.5 10^37 ergs/s, 10 kpc, 1-20 keV) is associated with a soft spectrum, whereas for the lower luminosity state (down to ~5 10^36 ergs/s) the spectrum is significantly harder. Using the high time resolution data provided by the Proportional Counter Array (PCA), we have discovered High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (HFQPOs) in the persistent X-ray emission of 4U1915-05 while its luminosity was ~8 10^36 ergs/s. The QPO frequency ranges from 600 Hz up to ~1000 Hz, with typical Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) ~50-100 Hz and Root Mean Squared (RMS) values 15%. In addition, by using the ``shift and add'' technique, we have detected a twin HFQPO (5.5 sigma level) separated from the main peak by ~355 Hz. 4U1915-05 is the eighth Atoll source displaying simultaneous twi...

Barret, D; Olive, J F; Grindlay, J E; Bloser, P F; Swank, J H; Smale, A P

1998-01-01

77

On the modulation of low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in black-hole transients  

E-print Network

We studied the properties of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a sample of six black hole candidates (XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322, XTE J1859+226, 4U 1630-47,GX 339-4, XTE J1650-500) observed by the Rossi XTE satellite. We analyzed the relation between the full width half maximum and the frequency of all the narrow peaks detected in power density spectra where a type-C QPO is observed. Our goal was to understand the nature of the modulation of the signal by comparing the properties of different harmonic peaks in the power density spectrum. We find that for the sources in our sample the width of the fundamental and of the first harmonic are compatible with a frequency modulation, while that of the sub-harmonic is independent of frequency, possibly indicating the presence of an additional modulation in amplitude. We compare our results with those obtained earlier from GRS 1915+105 and XTE J1550-564.

Pawar, Devraj D; Shanthi, K; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Belloni, Tomaso

2015-01-01

78

Quasi-periodic components of solar microwave emission preceded CME's onset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of observations at the radio-astronomical station NIRFI "Zimenki" are examined. Pre-eruption manifestations can be detected over different time scales: from several days, which is typical to the evolution of active region in whole, to several hours and tens of minutes, which leads to the formation of conditions for CME initiation and propagation. Primarily this process is developed as wave motion. For example, a study of the evolution of radio emission in January 2005 discovered the growth of amplitude of long-period pulsations with a period of more than 20 minutes in centimetre solar radio emission three days before coronal mass ejections. During the time intervals of 25 to 15 minutes prior to CMEs registration the oscillations of substantially smaller period (t 6-22 s) occurred, which were apparently connected to waves in coronal loops. The obtained result is close to the results of other authors, based on the observations of solar radio emission with the high spatial resolution. Thus, it is shown that the use of patrol multi wave observational data with the high sensitivity and a sufficient time resolution is possible for the analysis of the quasi-periodic components of radio emission and their dynamics.

Sheyner, Olga; Fridman, Vladimir

79

Timing studies of X Persei and the discovery of its transient quasi-periodic oscillation feature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a timing analysis of X Persei (X Per) using observations made between 1998 and 2010 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and with the INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager (ISGRI). All pulse arrival times obtained from the RXTE-PCA observations are phase-connected and a timing solution is obtained using these arrival times. We update the long-term pulse frequency history of the source by measuring its pulse frequencies using RXTE-PCA and ISGRI data. From the RXTE-PCA data, the relation between the frequency derivative and X-ray flux suggests accretion via the companion's stellar wind. However, the detection of a transient quasi-periodic oscillation feature, peaking at ˜0.2 Hz, suggests the existence of an accretion disc. We find that double-break models fit the average power spectra well, which suggests that the source has at least two different accretion flow components dominating the overall flow. From the power spectrum of frequency derivatives, we measure a power-law index of ˜- 1, which implies that, on short time-scales, disc accretion dominates over noise, while on time-scales longer than the viscous time-scales, the noise dominates. From pulse profiles, we find a correlation between the pulse fraction and the count rate of the source.

Acuner, Z.; ?nam, S. Ç.; ?ahiner, ?.; Serim, M. M.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.

2014-10-01

80

Non-thermal cellular effects of ultrasound.  

PubMed Central

The cellular effects of ultrasound can be grouped into those which are predominantly thermal in origin and those which are, at least in part, non-thermal. Cellular effects of ultrasound generally acknowledged to be essentially non-thermal include changes associated with standing waves, acoustic streaming, microstreaming and cavitation; they have been demonstrated in vitro and may, in many instances, also occur in vivo. While some stimulate cell activity and can be exploited in ultrasonic therapy, others are potentially hazardous and must be avoided. Examples of experimentally-demonstrated cellular effects in which non-thermal, ultrasonically-induced events are involved are described, together with the mechanisms considered to be involved in producing them. The relevance of such effects to the safe and beneficial use of ultrasound in diagnosis and therapy is considered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6950755

Dyson, M.

1982-01-01

81

MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES  

SciTech Connect

We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. BOX 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cumming, A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Keek, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-04-01

82

Is Compton Cooling Sufficient to Explain Evolution of Observed Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Outburst Sources?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the ? parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak

2015-01-01

83

SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?  

SciTech Connect

High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

Barret, Didier, E-mail: didier.barret@irap.omp.eu [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

2013-06-10

84

Quasi-periodic perturbation of unimodal maps exhibiting an attracting 3-cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a class of smooth maps \\Phi:{T}\\times [0,1]\\to {T}\\times [0,1] of the form \\[ \\begin{eqnarray*} \\theta&\\mapsto \\theta+\\omega \\\\ x&\\mapsto c(\\theta)h(x) \\end{eqnarray*} \\] where h : [0, 1] ? [0, 1] is a unimodal map exhibiting an attracting periodic point of prime period 3, and ? is irrational ( {T}={R}/{Z} ). We show that the following phenomenon can occur for certain h and c:{T}\\to{R} : There exists a single measurable function \\psi:{T}\\to[0,1] whose graph attracts (exponentially fast) a.e. (\\theta,x)\\in {T}\\times [0,1] under forward iterations of the map ?. Moreover, the graph of ? is dense in a cylinder M\\subset {T}\\times [0,1] . Furthermore, for every integer n >= 1 there exists n distinct repelling continuous curves \\Gamma_k:(\\theta,\\phi_k(\\theta))_{\\theta\\in{T}} , all lying in M , such that ?(?k) = ?k+1 (k < n) and ?(?n) = ?1. We give concrete examples where both c(?) and h(x) are real-analytic, but in the analysis we only need that they are C1. In our setting the function c(?) will be very close to 1 for all ? outside a tiny interval; on the interval c(?) > 1 makes a small bump. Thus we cause the perturbation of h by rare quasi-periodic kicking. Research supported by grant KAW 2005.0098 from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and by grant 0906B from the Göran Gustafsson Foundation.

Bjerklöv, Kristian

2012-03-01

85

ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect

We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency {kappa} to the orbital frequency {Omega} the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches {Omega} + {kappa} and {Omega} to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio ({Omega} + {kappa})/({Omega}) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

Erkut, M. Hakan, E-mail: m.erkut@iku.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Istanbul Kueltuer University, Atakoey Campus, Bak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rkoey 34156, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-12-10

86

Multi-mode quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) of the electromagnetic radiation emitted in solar and stellar flares are often detected in microwave, white light, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. Mechanisms for QPP are intensively debated in the literature. Previous studies revealed that QPP may manifest non-linear, non-stationary and, perhaps, multi-modal processes operating in flares. Aims: We study QPP of the microwave emission generated in an X3.2-class solar flare on 14 May, 2013, observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), aiming to reveal signatures of the non-linear, non-stationary, and multi-modal processes in the signal. Methods: The NoRH correlation signal obtained at the 17 GHz intensity has a clear QPP pattern. The signal was analysed with the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) that allows one to determine its instant amplitude and frequency, and their time variation. Results: It was established that the QPP consists of at least three well-defined intrinsic modes, with the mean periods of 15, 45, and 100 s. All the modes have quasi-harmonic behaviour with different modulation patterns. The 100 s intrinsic mode is a decaying oscillation, with the decay time of 250 s. The 15 s intrinsic mode shows a similar behaviour, with the decay time of 90 s. The 45 s mode has a wave-train behaviour. Conclusions: Dynamical properties of detected intrinsic modes indicate that the 100 s and 15 s modes are likely to be associated with fundamental kink and sausage modes of the flaring loop, respectively. The 100 s oscillation could also be caused by the fundamental longitudinal mode, while this interpretation requires the plasma temperature of about 30 million K and hence is not likely. The 45 s mode could be the second standing harmonics of the kink mode.

Kolotkov, D. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.; Ratcliffe, H.; Shibasaki, K.

2015-02-01

87

Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event observed simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft enabled us to obtain high-resolution frequency-time spectrograms of the event close to the equatorial region over a large range of radial distances, while the measurements by the STAFF-SA instrument allowed us to perform a detailed wave analysis. Conjugate observations by the DEMETER spacecraft have been used to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the emissions. The analyzed QP event lasted as long as 5 h and it spanned over the L-shells from about 1.5 to 5.5. Simultaneous observations of the same event by DEMETER and Cluster show that the same QP modulation of the wave intensity is observed at the same time at very different locations in the inner magnetosphere. ULF magnetic field fluctuations with a period roughly comparable to, but somewhat larger than the period of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, suggesting these are likely to be related to the QP generation. Results of a detailed wave analysis show that the QP emissions detected by Cluster propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at higher geomagnetic latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N?Mec, F.; SantolíK, O.; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp....5S"> <span id="translatedtitle">A delayed oscillator model for the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> multidecadal variability of the NAO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wavelet analysis of the annual North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index back to 1659 reveals a significant frequency band at about 60 years. Recent NAO decadal variations, including the increasing trend during 1960-1990 and decreasing trend since the mid-1990s, can be well explained by the approximate 60-year cycle. This quasi 60-year oscillation of the NAO is realistically reproduced in a long-term control simulation with version 4 of the Community Climate System Model, and the possible mechanisms are further investigated. The positive NAO forces the strengthening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and induces a basin-wide uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming that corresponds to the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO). The SST field exhibits a delayed response to the preceding enhanced AMOC, and shows a pattern similar to the North Atlantic tripole (NAT), with SST warming in the northern North Atlantic and cooling in the southern part. This SST pattern (negative NAT phase) may lead to an atmospheric response that resembles the negative NAO phase, and subsequently the oscillation proceeds, but in the opposite sense. Based on these mechanisms, a simple delayed oscillator model is established to explain the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> multidecadal variability of the NAO. The magnitude of the NAO forcing of the AMOC/AMO and the time delay of the AMOC/AMO feedback are two key parameters of the delayed oscillator. For a given set of parameters, the quasi 60-year cycle of the NAO can be well predicted. This delayed oscillator model is useful for understanding of the oscillatory mechanism of the NAO, which has significant potential for decadal predictions as well as the interpretation of proxy data records.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Cheng; Li, Jianping; Jin, Fei-Fei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.432...10B"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations from GRS 1915+105</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the results of a systematic timing analysis of all archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bright black hole binary GRS 1915+105 in order to detect high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (HFQPOs). We produced power-density spectra in two energy bands and limited the analysis to the frequency range 30-1000 Hz. We found 51 peaks with a single-trial significance larger than 3?. As all but three have centroid frequencies that are distributed between 63 and 71 Hz, we consider most of them significant regardless of the number of trials involved. The average centroid frequency and full width at half-maximum are 67.3 ± 2.0 Hz and 4.4 ± 2.4 Hz, respectively. Their fractional rms varies between 0.4 and 2 per cent (total band detections) and between 0.5 and 3 per cent (hard band detections). As GRS 1915+105 shows large variability on time-scales longer than 1 s, we analysed the data in 16 s intervals and found that the detections are limited to a specific region in the colour-colour diagram, corresponding to state B of the source, when the energy spectrum is dominated by a bright accretion disc component. However, the rms spectrum of the HFQPO is very hard and does not show a flattening up to 40 keV, where the fractional rms reaches 11 per cent. We discuss our findings in terms of current proposed models and compare them with the results on other black hole binaries and neutron-star binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Belloni, T. M.; Altamirano, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21464645"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> PROPAGATING SIGNALS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: THE SIGNATURE OF MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OR HIGH-VELOCITY UPFLOWS?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since the discovery of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicities</span>. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discovered as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodically</span> varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission <span class="hlt">quasi-periodically</span> modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicities</span> observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: bdp@lmsal.co, E-mail: mscott@ucar.ed [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17411269"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase-rectified signal averaging for the detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicities</span> and the prediction of cardiovascular risk.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA) method as an efficient technique for the study of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in noisy, nonstationary signals. It allows the assessment of system dynamics despite phase resetting and noise and in relation with either increases or decreases of the considered signal. We employ the method to study the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicities</span> of the human heart rate based on long-term ECG recordings. The center deflection of the PRSA curve characterizes the average capacity of the heart to decelerate (or accelerate) the cardiac rhythm. It can be measured by a central wavelet coefficient which we denote as deceleration capacity (DC). We find that decreased DC is a more precise predictor of mortality in survivors of heart attack than left ventricular ejection fraction, the current "gold standard" risk predictor. In addition, we discuss the dependence of the DC parameter on age and on diabetes. PMID:17411269</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kantelhardt, Jan W; Bauer, Axel; Schumann, Aicko Y; Barthel, Petra; Schneider, Raphael; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567730"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING THE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH OBSERVATIONS IN THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. III. <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> VARIABILITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An observational test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variability observed in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of QPOs can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI observations of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging observations and the detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johannsen, Tim [Physics Department, University of Arizona, 1118 East 4th Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios, E-mail: timj@physics.arizona.edu, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52034849"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-resonance satellite rotations around the center of mass in a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> orbit in the restricted n-body problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Non-resonance satellite rotations around the center of mass in a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> orbit in the restricted n-body problem are discussed. The following asumptions are made: the ellipsoid of inertia of the satellite is close to sphere; the orbital motion of bodies and satellite is described by <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> functions of time. It is assumed that in spite of perturbations, the rotation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. S. Krasil'Nikov; E. E. Zakharova</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...569A..12N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a high-quality <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> rapidly propagating wave train using SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. We present a new event of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains observed in EUV wavebands that rapidly propagate away from an active region after a flare. Aims: We measured the parameters of a wave train observed on 7 December 2013 after an M1.2 flare, such as the phase speeds, periods and wavelengths, in relationship to the local coronal environment and the energy sources. Methods: We compared our observations with a numerical simulation of fast magnetoacoustic waves that undergo dispersive evolution and leakage in a coronal loop embedded in a potential magnetic field. Results: The wave train is observed to propagate as several arc-shaped intensity disturbances for almost half an hour, with a speed greater than 1000 km s-1 and a period of about 1 min. The wave train followed two different patterns of propagation, in accordance with the magnetic structure of the active region. The oscillatory signal is found to be of high-quality, i.e. there is a large number (10 or more) of subsequent wave fronts observed. The observations are found to be consistent with the numerical simulation of a fast wave train generated by a localised impulsive energy release. Conclusions: Transverse structuring in the corona can efficiently create and guide high-quality <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> propagating fast wave trains. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nisticò, G.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7242624"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Schroedinger operators in one dimension, absolutely continuous spectra, Bloch waves, and integrable Hamiltonian systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the first chapter, the eigenvalue problem for a periodic Schroedinger operator, Lf = (-d/sup 2//dx/sup 2/ + v)f = Ef, is viewed as a two-dimensional Hamiltonian system which is integrable in the sense of Arnold and Liouville. With the aid of the Floquet-BLoch theory, it is shown that such a system is conjugate to two harmonic oscillators with frequencies ..cap alpha.. and omega, being the rotation number for L and 2..pi../omega the period of the potential v. This picture is generalized in the second chapter, to <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> Schroedinger operators, L/sub epsilon/, with highly irrational frequencies (omega/sub 1/, ..., omega/sub d/), which are a small perturbation of periodic operators. In the last chapter, the absolutely continuous spectrum sigma/sub ac/ of a general <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> Schroedinger operators is considered. The Radon-Nikodym derivatives (with respect to Lebesgue measure) of the spectral measures are computed in terms of special independent eigensolutions existing for almost ever E in sigma/sub ac/. Finally, it is shown that weak Bloch waves always exist for almost ever E in sigma/sub ac/ and the question of the existence of genuine Bloch waves is turned into a regularity problem for a certain nonlinear partial differential equation on a d-dimensional torus.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chierchia, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Ap%26SS.343..511T"> <span id="translatedtitle">The mid-term and long-term solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles and the possible relationship with planetary motions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work investigates the solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles with multi-timescales and the possible relationships with planetary motions. The solar cycles are derived from long-term observations of the relative sunspot number and microwave emission at frequency of 2.80 GHz. A series of solar <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycles with multi-timescales are registered. These cycles can be classified into three classes: (1) the strong PLC (PLC is defined as the solar cycle with a period very close to the ones of some planetary motions, named as planetary-like cycle) which is related strongly with planetary motions, including nine periodic modes with relatively short period ( P<12 yr), and related to the motions of the inner planets and of Jupiter; (2) the weak PLC, which is related weakly to planetary motions, including two periodic modes with relatively long period ( P>12 yr), and possibly related to the motions of outer planets; (3) the non-PLC, for which so far there has been found no clear evidence to show the relationship with any planetary motions. Among the planets, Jupiter plays a key role in most periodic modes due to its sidereal motion or spring tidal motions associated with other planets. Among planetary motions, the spring tidal motion of the inner planets and of Jupiter dominates the formation of most PLCs. The relationships between multi-timescale solar periodic modes and the planetary motions will help us to understand the essential nature and prediction of solar activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, Baolin; Cheng, Zhuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611991N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Periodic motion of the magnetodisk as a cause of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variations in the Kronian magnetosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most of the parameters, which describe the magnetized plasma filling up the vast magnetosphere of Saturn exhibit periodic behavior. The fundamental period reflected in many magnetospheric phenomena is the rotational period of the planet, but the relationship is not at all trivial. In most cases decent periodic behavior can be found only for relatively short time intervals, and often even in these intervals abrupt phase-shifts occur and higher frequencies appear. Several sophisticated methods have been developed to filter out interfering fluctuations and find the basic periodicity and phase of the variations. Although these methods proved to be very useful, some information is inevitably lost in the process. This lost information can also be valuable; we found that from it one can (partially) reconstruct the spatial dependence of the plasma parameters. To recover this otherwise lost information we follow a different strategy to analyze the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variations of the plasma properties. We assume that the motion of the magnetodisk is periodic and that the observed <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variations are due to the interplay of this periodic motion and the effects governing the spatial dependence of the plasma parameters (F), especially their dependence on the distance (d) from the central sheet of the magnetodisk. We found that relatively simple F(d) functions are able to reproduce the observed complex temporal dependence of the plasma properties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nemeth, Zoltan; Szego, Karoly; Foldy, Lajos; Kivelson, Margaret; Jia, Xianzhe; Cowley, Stanley; Provan, Gabrielle; Thomsen, Michelle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1211.3344v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Twin peak <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations and the kinematics of orbital motion in a curved space-time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Twin peak high frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in the power spectra of Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), with either a black hole or a neutron star, have central frequencies that are typical of the orbital motion time-scale close to the compact object. Thus, twin HF QPOs might carry the fingerprint of physical effects in a strongly curved space-time. We study the azimuth phase \\phi(t) for orbital motion in the Schwarzschild metric and calculate the power spectra to check whether they display the features seen in the observed ones. We show that the timing of \\phi(t) on non-closed orbits can account for the observed twin peak HF QPOs. The uppermost couple of peaks in frequency has the lower peak that corresponds to the azimuthal frequency \</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Claudio Germanà</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MeScT..24e5305P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase identification of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> flow measured by particle image velocimetry with a low sampling rate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work mainly deals with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) time coefficient method used for extracting phase information from <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> flow. The mathematical equivalence between this method and the traditional cross-correlation method is firstly proved. A two-dimensional circular cylinder wake flow measured by time-resolved particle image velocimetry within a range of Reynolds numbers is then used to evaluate the reliability of this method. The effect of both the sampling rate and Reynolds number on the identification accuracy is finally discussed. It is found that the POD time coefficient method provides a convenient alternative for phase identification, whose feasibility in low-sampling-rate measurement has additional advantages for experimentalists.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, Chong; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Jinjun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998A%26A...337..815P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations discovered in the new X-ray pulsar XTE J1858+034</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of low frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations centered at 0.11 Hz in the newly discovered 221 s X-ray pulsar XTE J1858+034. Among about 30 known transient X-ray pulsars this is the sixth source in which QPOs have been observed. If the QPOs are produced because of inhomogeneities in the accretion disk at the magnetospheric boundary, the low frequency of the QPOs indicate a large magnetosphere for this pulsar. Both the Keplerian frequency model and the beat frequency model are applicable for production of QPOs in this source. The QPOs and regular pulsations are found to be stronger at higher energy which favours the beat frequency model. The magnetic field of the pulsar is calculated as a function of its distance. The energy spectrum is found to be very hard, consisting of two components, a cut-off power law and an iron fluorescence line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul, B.; Rao, A. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870043698&hterms=pulsation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dpulsation"> <span id="translatedtitle">A search for millisecond periodic and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of a Fourier analysis to detect fast periodic and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in the X-ray emission from the sources 4U 0614 + 091, 4U 1636 - 536, 4U 1735 - 44, 4U 1820 30, GX 5 - 1, GX 9 + 9, Ser X-1, and Cyg X-2 are presented. This search has been carried out for the first time in the soft energy band (0.2-2.0 keV), using data from the Einstein Observatory high resolution imager instrument. An approximate method of minimizing the decrease in search sensitivity produced by the Doppler shift of the pulse periods due to source orbital motion is discussed. No pulsations have been detected, and upper limits, which depend on the orbital parameters assumed for the sources, are set on the pulsed flux fraction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mereghetti, S.; Grindlay, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1412.3473v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing Gravity with <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations from accreting Black Holes: the Case of Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray flux emitted by accreting black holes, are associated to phenomena occurring near the horizon. Future very large area X-ray instruments will be able to measure QPO frequencies with very high precision, thus probing this strong-field region. By using the relativistic precession model, we show the way in which QPO frequencies could be used to test general relativity against those alternative theories of gravity which predict deviations from the classical theory in the strong-field regime. We consider one of the best motivated strong-curvature corrections to general relativity, namely the Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet theory, and show that a detection of QPOs with the expected sensitivity of the proposed ESA M-class mission LOFT would set the most stringent constraints on the parameter space of this theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrea Maselli; Leonardo Gualtieri; Paolo Pani; Luigi Stella; Valeria Ferrari</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120015660&hterms=star&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dstar"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 200-Second <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodicity</span> After the Tidal Disruption of a Star by a Dormant Black Hole</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supermassive black holes are known to exist at the center of most galaxies with sufficient stellar mass, In the local Universe, it is possible to infer their properties from the surrounding stars or gas. However, at high redshifts we require active, continuous accretion to infer the presence of the SMBHs, often coming in the form of long term accretion in active galactic nuclei. SMBHs can also capture and tidally disrupt stars orbiting nearby, resulting in bright flares from otherwise quiescent black holes. Here, we report on a approx.200-s X-ray <span class="hlt">quasi-periodicity</span> around a previously dormant SMBH located in the center of a galaxy at redshift z = 0.3534. This result may open the possibility of probing general relativity beyond our local Universe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reis, R. C.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Gueltkinm K.; Maitra, D.; King, A. L.; Strohmayer, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37.3648Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> pulsations of hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the 2003 May 29 solar flare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Growing <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations with a period of about 1 minute of hard X-ray (the anticoincidence system of spectrometer onboard INTEGRAL and the RHESSI) and microwave emissions (the NoRP) are clearly observed during the X1.2 solar flare on 2003 May 29. Ultraviolet images (the TRACE) show the sigmoid-to-arcade evolution of flaring active region consisted of the complex quadruple magnetic structure (the MDI/SOHO). This scenario is confirmed by the RHESSI hard X-ray images (30-100 keV): the sigmoid-to-arcade evolution occurred during the first pulsation in the course of magnetic reconnection. During the next pulsations hard X-ray mainly emitted by practically motionless point-like east source and multiple and non-stationary west ones which are along flare west ribbon. Summary distance between the magnetic inversion line and the both hard X-ray sources reveal its growth in the course of the flare development according to the standard model of eruptive flares. But we don't find clear correlations between that distance and hard X-ray emission intensity. Peak intensities of the both sources reveal the same <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations. We interpret the observed pulsations in term of modulation of charged particle acceleration process (say current sheet dynamical resizing) by MHD oscillations of eruptive flux rope. Although estimated (the MDI/SOHO) photospheric longitudinal magnetic field in hard X-ray sources is about 5 times greater than the necessary one for the Alfven wave period of about 1 minute in the active region we think that coronal magnetic field may satisfy the observed period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zimovets, Ivan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1014014"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fuel injector utilizing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma activation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://plasma.mem.drexel.edu/publications/documents/JAP.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">TOPICAL REVIEW: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure discharges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There has been considerable interest in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure discharges over the past decade due to the increased number of industrial applications. Diverse applications demand a solid physical and chemical understanding of the operational principals of such discharges. This paper focuses on the four most important and widely used varieties of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> discharges: corona, dielectric barrier, gliding arc and spark</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Fridman; A. Chirokov; A. Gutsol</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA51B1129L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherent Scatter Imaging Radar Observations: Insights Provided By a New Tool for Studies of Midlatitude Sporadic E and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Echo Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of the coherent scatter radar imaging technique has provided a unique new tool for studying the structure of plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. This in-beam or aperture synthesis technique was applied extensively in an experiment carried out in June and July 2002 on the island of St. Croix in the Caribbean in which the coherent scatter looked westward toward the island of Puerto Rico. In particular, the imaging radar instrumentation was used in conjunction with the Arecibo Observatory incoherent scatter radar to study the horizontal and vertical spatial structure in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echoes associated with sporadic E layers located over Puerto Rico. The imaging technique has provided new measurements with unprecedented resolution that show both the spatial structure and movement of the irregularities. The St. Croix observations show that the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> structures are localized in the vertical and horizontal directions. Although there is a slight preference for propagation along the northeast to southwest direction, other propagation directions also occur. Especially when viewed in the context of recent rocket and radar experiments, such as the SEEK 2 experiment that was carried out in Japan, the St. Croix data provide an important new perspective on the dynamics associated with the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echo structures. The types of measurements that can be provided by the imaging technique will be presented, and the observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> echo structures will be analyzed in the context of other recent rocket and radar experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larsen, M. F.; Hysell, D. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0112240v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photometry of the 1991 Superoutburst of EF Pegasi: Super-<span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations with Rapidly Decaying Periods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We observed the 1991 October outburst of EF Peg. Prominent superhumps with a period of 0.08705(1) d were observed, qualifying EF Peg as a being long-period SU UMa-type dwarf nova. The superhump period showed a monotonous decrease during the superoutburst, which makes a contrast to the virtually zero period change observed during the 1997 superoutburst of the same object. Large-amplitude, and highly coherent <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (super-QPOs) were observed on October 18, when superhumps were still growing in amplitude. Most strikingly, the QPOs showed a rapid decrease of the period from 18 m to 6.8 m within the 3.2-hr observing run. Such a rapid change in the period has not been observed in any class of QPOs in cataclysmic variables. We propose a hypothesis that the rapid decrease of the QPO period reflects the rapid removal of the angular momentum from an orbiting blob in the accretion disk, via the viscosity in a turbulent disk. A brief comparison is given with the QPOs in X-ray binaries, some of which are known to show a similar rapid decrease in the periods.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taichi Kato</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JAP...116i4903A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Fibonacci and periodic one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals of porous silicon: Experiment and simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A one-dimensional Fibonacci phononic crystal and a distributed Bragg reflector were constructed from porous silicon. The structures had the same number of layers and similar acoustic impedance mismatch, and were electrochemically etched in highly boron doped silicon wafers. The thickness of the individual layers in the stacks was approximately 2 ?m. Both types of hypersonic band gap structure were studied by direct measurement of the transmittance of longitudinal acoustic waves in the 0.1-2.6 GHz range. Acoustic band gaps deeper than 50 dB were detected in both structures. The experimental results were compared with model calculations employing the transfer matrix method. The acoustic properties of periodic and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> structures in which half-wave retarding bi-layers do not consist of two quarter-wave retarding layers are discussed. The strong correlation between width and depth of gaps in the transmission spectra is demonstrated. The dominant mechanisms of acoustic losses in porous multilayer structures are discussed. The elastic constants remain proportional over our range of porosity, and hence, the Grüneisen parameter is constant. This simplifies the expression for the porosity dependence of the Akhiezer damping.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aliev, Gazi N.; Goller, Bernhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950045762&hterms=wind+speed+average&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dwind%2Bspeed%2Baverage"> <span id="translatedtitle">A composite study of the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> subtropical wind maxima over the South Pacific during November 1984-April 1985</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A composite of 10 cases of zonal wind maxima at 200 hPa over the subtropical region stretching from Australia to the central Pacific is examined for the six-month period, November 1984-April 1985. This region is unique in that distinct westerly jets frequently form and propagate eastward at latitudes between 20 deg and 35 deg S in the summer season. Some statistical tests were applied and suggest that the flow patterns are <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, consisting of a tendency for new jet streaks to develop over the eastern Australian region approximately every one to two weeks. These jets then take about 10 days to propagate across the western Pacific before dissipating or, perhaps, moving toward higher latitudes. Their average propagation speed is approximately 4 m/s. An examination of the case-to-case variability of the jets provides additional evidence that they are significant features. A diagnosis of the trough/ridge systems at 200 and 850 hPa, together with calculations of the vertically integrated mean and shear kinetic energies suggests that baroclinic processes dominate in the entrance and center regions of the jet, whereas barotropic processes dominate in the exit and downstream regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ko, Ken-Chung; Vincent, Dayton G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.446.3516I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase-resolved spectroscopy of low-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in GRS 1915+105</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">X-ray radiation from black hole binary (BHB) systems regularly displays <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs). In principle, a number of suggested physical mechanisms can reproduce their power spectral properties, thus more powerful diagnostics which preserve phase are required to discern between different models. In this paper, we first find for two Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the BHB GRS 1915+105 that the QPO has a well-defined average waveform. That is, the phase difference and amplitude ratios between the first two harmonics vary tightly around a well-defined mean. This enables us to reconstruct QPO waveforms in each energy channel, in order to constrain QPO phase-resolved spectra. We fit these phase-resolved spectra across 16 phases with a model including Comptonization and reflection (Gaussian and smeared edge components) to find strong spectral pivoting and a modulation in the iron line equivalent width. The latter indicates the observed reflection fraction is changing throughout the QPO cycle. This points to a geometric QPO origin, although we note that the data presented here do not entirely rule out an alternative interpretation of variable disc ionization state. We also see tentative hints of modulations in the iron line centroid and width which, although not statistically significant, could result from a non-azimuthally symmetric QPO mechanism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ingram, Adam; van der Klis, Michiel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...790..150S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging Observation of <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Disturbances' Amplitudes Increasing with Height in the Polar Region of the Solar Corona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At present, there have been few extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations of spatial variations of the density perturbations due to the slow magnetoacoustic waves (SMWs) propagating along the solar coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, we present such observations taken from the polar region of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and investigate the amplitude of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> propagating disturbances that increase with height in the lower corona (0-9 Mm over the solar limb). We statistically determined the following parameters associated with the disturbances: pressure scale height, period, and wavelength in AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å channels. The scale height and wavelength are dependent of temperature, while the period is independent of temperature. The acoustic velocities inferred from the scale height highly correlate with the ratios of wavelength to period, i.e., phase speeds. They provide evidence that the propagating disturbances in the lower corona are likely SMWs and the spatial variations in EUV intensity in the polar region likely reflects the density compressional effect by the propagating SMWs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Shen, Y. D.; Priya, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...572A..79K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Super-spinning compact objects and models of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations observed in Galactic microquasars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have previously applied several models of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) to estimate the spin of the central Kerr black hole in the three Galactic microquasars, GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE J1550-564. Here we explore the alternative possibility that the central compact body is a super-spinning object (or a naked singularity) with the external space-time described by Kerr geometry with a dimensionless spin parameter a ? cJ/GM2> 1. We calculate the relevant spin intervals for a subset of HF QPO models considered in the previous study. Our analysis indicates that for all but one of the considered models there exists at least one interval of a> 1 that is compatible with constraints given by the ranges of the central compact object mass independently estimated for the three sources. For most of the models, the inferred values of a are several times higher than the extreme Kerr black hole value a = 1. These values may be too high since the spin of superspinars is often assumed to rapidly decrease due to accretion when a ? 1. In this context, we conclude that only the epicyclic and the Keplerian resonance model provides estimates that are compatible with the expectation of just a small deviation from a = 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotrlová, Andrea; Török, Gabriel; Šrámková, Eva; Stuchlík, Zden?k</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0408233v4"> <span id="translatedtitle">The applications of the MHD Alfven wave oscillation model for kHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we improve the previous work on the MHD Alfven wave oscillation model for the neutron star (NS) kHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs), and compare the model with the updated twin kHz QPO data. For the 17 NS X-ray sources with the simultaneously detected twin kHz QPO frequencies, the stellar mass M and radius R constraints are given by means of the derived parameter A in the model, which is associated with the averaged mass density of star as ${\\rm \\lan \\rho \\ran = 3M/(4\\pi R^{3}) \\simeq 2.4\\times 10^{14} (g/cm^{3}) (A/0.7)^{2}}$, and we also compare the M-R constraints with the star equations of states. Moreover, we also discuss the theoretical maximum kHz QPO frequency and maximum twin peak separation, and some expectations on SAX J1808.4-3658 are mentioned, such as its highest kHz QPO frequency $\\sim$~870 (Hz), which is about 1.4-1.5 times less than those of the other known kHz QPO sources. The estimated magnetic fields for both Z sources (about Eddington accretion rate $\\med$) and Atoll sources ($ 1% \\med$) are approximately $10^9$ G and $10^8$ G respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. M. Zhang; H. X. Yin; Y. H. Zhao; H. K. Chang; L. M. Song</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.442..521S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analytical model for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure in galaxy clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> pressure in the intracluster gas has been found ubiquitously in numerical simulations, and observed indirectly. In this paper we develop an analytical model for intracluster <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure in the virial region of relaxed clusters. We write down and solve a first-order differential equation describing the evolution of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity dispersion. This equation is based on insights gained from observations, numerical simulations, and theory of turbulence. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy is sourced, in a self-similar fashion, by the mass growth of clusters via mergers and accretion, and dissipates with a time-scale determined by the turnover time of the largest turbulence eddies. Our model predicts a radial profile of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure for relaxed clusters. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> fraction increases with radius, redshift, and cluster mass, in agreement with numerical simulations. The radial dependence is due to a rapid increase of the dissipation time-scale with radii, and the mass and redshift dependence comes from the mass growth history. Combing our model for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> fraction with the Komatsu-Seljak model for the total pressure, we obtain thermal pressure profiles, and compute the hydrostatic mass bias. We find typically 10 per cent bias for the hydrostatic mass enclosed within r500.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0709.4220v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission processes in massive binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, I present a general discussion of several astrophysical processes likely to play a role in the production of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in massive stars, with emphasis on massive binaries. Even though the discussion will start in the radio domain where the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission was first detected, the census of physical processes involved in the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from massive stars shows that many spectral domains are concerned, from the radio to the very high energies. First, the theoretical aspects of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from early-type stars will be addressed. The main topics that will be discussed are respectively the physics of individual stellar winds and their interaction in binary systems, the acceleration of relativistic electrons, the magnetic field of massive stars, and finally the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission processes relevant to the case of massive stars. Second, this general qualitative discussion will be followed by a more quantitative one, devoted to the most probable scenario where <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emitters are massive binaries. I will show how several stellar, wind and orbital parameters can be combined in order to make some semi-quantitative predictions on the high-energy counterpart to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission detected in the radio domain. These theoretical considerations will be followed by a census of results obtained so far, and related to this topic... (see paper for full abstract)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. De Becker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827868"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Aftertreatment of Particulates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas, S.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0104008v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the transition layer model of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in neutron star X-ray binarie</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compare the theoretical predictions of the transition layer model with some observational features of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star X-ray binaries. We found that the correlation between horizontal branch oscillation (HBO) frequencies and kilohertz (kHz) QPO frequencies, the difference between the low-frequency QPOs in atoll sources and HBOs in Z sources, and the correlation between the frequencies of low-frequency QPOs and break frequencies can be well explained by the transition layer model, provided the neutron star mass is around 1.4 solar mass and the angle between magnetosphere equator and accretion disk plane is around 6 degree. The observed decrease of peak separation between two kHz QPO frequencies with the increase of kHz QPO frequencies and the increase of QPO frequencies with the increase of inferred mass accretion rate are also consistent with the theoretical predictions of transition layer model. In addition, we derive a simple equation that can be adopted to estimate the angle ($\\delta$) between magnetosphere equator and accretion disk plane by use of the simultaneously observed QPO frequency data. We estimate these angles, in the range of 4 to 8 degrees, for five Z sources and two atoll sources. The nearly constant $\\delta$ value for each source, derived from the different sets of simultaneously observed QPO frequency data, provides a strong test of the theoretical model. Finally, we suggest that the similar transition layer oscillations may be also responsible for the observed QPOs in accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar and Galactic black hole candidates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xue-Bing Wu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22092460"> <span id="translatedtitle">FRACTIONAL AMPLITUDE OF KILOHERTZ <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATION FROM 4U 1728-34: EVIDENCE OF DECLINE AT HIGHER ENERGIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (kHz QPO) is an observationally robust high-frequency timing feature detected from neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). This feature can be very useful to probe the superdense core matter of neutron stars and the strong gravity regime. Although many models exist in the literature, the physical origin of kHz QPO is not known, and hence this feature cannot be used as a tool yet. The energy dependence of kHz QPO fractional rms amplitude is an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to understand the physical origin of this timing feature. It is known that the fractional rms amplitude increases with energy at lower energies. At higher energies, the amplitude is usually believed to saturate, although this is not established. We combine tens of lower kHz QPOs from a neutron star LMXB 4U 1728-34 in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Consequently, we, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, find a significant and systematic decrease of the fractional rms amplitude with energy at higher photon energies. Assuming an energy spectrum model, blackbody+powerlaw, we explore if the sinusoidal variation of a single spectral parameter can reproduce the above-mentioned fractional rms amplitude behavior. Our analysis suggests that the oscillation of any single blackbody parameter is favored over the oscillation of any single power-law parameter, in order to explain the measured amplitude behavior. We also find that the quality factor of a lower kHz QPO does not plausibly depend on photon energy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mukherjee, Arunava; Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: arunava@tifr.res.in, E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047913"> <span id="translatedtitle">TIME DELAYS IN <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApJ...580..423M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of the <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequencies of White Dwarf, Neutron Star, and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using data obtained in 1994 June and July with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer deep survey photometer and in 2001 January with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph, we investigate the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray oscillations of the dwarf nova SS Cyg in outburst. We find <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) at ?0~0.012 and ?1~0.13 Hz in the EUV flux and at ?0~0.0090, ?1~0.11, and possibly ?2~?0+?1~0.12 Hz in the soft X-ray flux. These data, combined with the optical data of Woudt & Warner for VW Hyi, extend the Psaltis, Belloni, & van der Klis ?high-?low correlation for neutron star and black hole low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) nearly 2 orders of magnitude in frequency, with ?low~0.08?high. This correlation identifies the high-frequency quasi-coherent oscillations (so-called dwarf nova oscillations) of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with the kilohertz QPOs of LMXBs and the low-frequency QPOs of CVs with the horizontal branch oscillations (or the broad noise component identified as such) of LMXBs. Assuming that the same mechanisms produce the QPOs in white dwarf, neutron star, and black hole binaries, we find that the data exclude the relativistic precession model and the magnetospheric and sonic-point beat-frequency models (as well as any model requiring the presence or absence of a stellar surface or magnetic field); more promising are models that interpret QPOs as manifestations of disk accretion onto any low magnetic field compact object.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mauche, Christopher W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036925"> <span id="translatedtitle">OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 2011 May 30, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/600023"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf Nova Oscillations and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations Extension of the Two-QPO Diagram of X-Ray Binaries, and a new kind of DNO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seventeen examples are given of Cataclysmic Variable (CV) stars possessing both Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations (QPOs). These form an extension of the X-Ray Two-QPO correlation to frequencies three orders of magnitude lower. We draw attention to the existence of a second type of DNO in CVs, which is probably caused by magnetically channelled accretion onto the white dwarf.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warner, B; Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0503078v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies in solar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy to hot flare plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CNSNS..19.4080N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> processes in repeated measurements: New approach for the fitting and clusterization of different data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many experimentalists were accustomed to think that any independent measurement forms a non-correlated measurement that depends weakly from others. We are trying to reconsider this conventional point of view and prove that similar measurements form a strongly-correlated sequence of random functions with memory. In other words, successive measurements "remember" each other at least their nearest neighbors. This observation and justification on real data help to fit the wide set of data based on the Prony's function. The Prony's decomposition follows from the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> (QP) properties of the measured functions and includes the Fourier transform as a partial case. New type of decomposition helps to obtain a specific amplitude-frequency response (AFR) of the measured (random) functions analyzed and each random function contains less number of the fitting parameters in comparison with its number of initial data points. Actually, the calculated AFR can be considered as the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS), which will be extremely useful in cases where the simple model pretending on description of the measured data is absent but vital necessity of their quantitative description is remained. These possibilities open a new way for clusterization of the initial data and new information that is contained in these data gives a chance for their detailed analysis. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements realized for empty resonator (pure noise data) and resonator containing a sample (CeO2 in our case) confirmed the existence of the QP processes in reality. But we think that the detection of the QP processes is a common feature of many repeated measurements and this new property of successive measurements can attract an attention of many experimentalists. To formulate some general conditions that help to identify and then detect the presence of some QP process in the repeated experimental measurements. To find a functional equation and its solution that yields the description of the identified QP process. To suggest some computing algorithm for fitting of the QP data to the analytical function that follows from the solution of the corresponding functional equation. The content of this paper is organized as follows. In the Section 2 we will try to find the answers on the problem posed in this introductory section. It contains also the mathematical description of the QP process and interpretation of the meaning of the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS). The GPS includes the conventional Fourier decomposition as a partial case. Section 3 contains the experimental details associated with receiving of the desired data. Section 4 includes some important details explaining specific features of application of general algorithm to concrete data. In Section 5 we summarize the results and outline the perspectives of this approach for quantitative description of time-dependent random data that are registered in different complex systems and experimental devices. Here we should notice that under the complex system we imply a system when a conventional model is absent[6]. Under simplicity of the acceptable model we imply the proper hypothesis ("best fit" model) containing minimal number of the fitting parameters that describes the behavior of the system considered quantitatively. The different approaches that exist in nowadays for description of these systems are collected in the recent review [7].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nigmatullin, R.; Rakhmatullin, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=209707"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Processing on Peanut Allergens.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Peanut allergy is on the rise, and the reason is still unclear. Previously, roasting by thermal method has been shown to increase the allergenic potency of peanuts. In this study, we determined if <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods, such as, pulsed electric fields (PEF) and pulsed UV lights (PUV) affect peanut all...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5067268"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma applications in air sterilization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary form only given. In our present study, we are constructing a physiochemical model of the oxidizing effects of the active chemical species generated by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma on the influenza A virus. The results of our model provides us with an estimate of the optimal dose of active species required to destroy varying concentrations of airborne influenza viruses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael J. Gallagher; Alexander Gutsol; A. Fridman; G. Friedman; A. Dolgopolsky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541790"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> regime of self-modulation oscillations with a periodic low-frequency envelope in a ring chip laser</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics of a ring chip Nd:YAG laser radiation in an external static magnetic field inducing an optical nonreciprocity of the resonator is studied experimentally. The amplitude and frequency nonreciprocities of the ring cavity induced by this magnetic field varied with moving the magnet with respect to the active element of the chip laser. A previously unknown <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> self-modulation lasing regime in which the self-modulation intensity oscillations of counterpropagating waves have an antiphase low-frequency envelope is found. The temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation are studied and the conditions of the appearance of this lasing regime are determined. (lasers)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aulova, T V; Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N [D.V. Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...798L...5Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Universal Scaling of the 3:2 Twin-peak <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillation Frequencies With Black Hole Mass and Spin Revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss further observational support of an idea formulated a decade ago by Abramowicz, Klu?niak, McClintock and Remillard. They demonstrated that the 3:2 pairs of frequencies of the twin-peak black hole (BH) high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) scale inversely with the BH masses and that the scaling covers the entire range from stellar to supermassive BHs. For this reason, they believed that the QPOs may be used for accurate measurements of masses and spins of BHs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhou, Xin-Lin; Yuan, Weimin; Pan, Hai-Wu; Liu, Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1311.5297v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraining <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> and Thermal properties of Dark Matter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM) abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to DM, reheating temperature, and the DM mass and interaction rate with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially) with the primordial bath or remain <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism, also independent of the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. S. Bhupal Dev; Anupam Mazumdar; Saleh Qutub</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22837529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heterogeneous reactions in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma flue gas desulfurization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper demonstrates that the main reaction mechanism of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by pulsed corona discharge or electron beam, which generates <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas (NTP), is heterogeneous. The experimental results in this paper suggest that the main reactions in FGD by NTP are activated reactions in liquid phase. According to Huie’s mechanism, it is considered that the ionic radical SO-3</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruinian Li; Keping Yan; Jinsong Miao; Xiaoli Wu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014FrP.....2...26D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraining <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> and Thermal properties of Dark Matter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM) abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially) with the primordial bath or remain <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dev, Bhupal; Mazumdar, Anupam; Qutub, Saleh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910019793&hterms=harmonic+wave+analysis+corona&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dharmonic%2Bwave%2Banalysis%2Bcorona"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corona: Coordinated research on <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes in astrophysics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several problems in astrophysics are examined where departures from purely thermal behavior are expected to produce effects which are detectable by a variety of NASA satellites. The problems identified as worthy of study include coronal heating in stars, deposition of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle energy in stars from external sources, and turbulence in atmospheres and winds of stars. The progress in solving these problems is summarized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mullan, Dermott J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567675"> <span id="translatedtitle">STUDYING FREQUENCY RELATIONSHIPS OF KILOHERTZ <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS FOR 4U 1636-53 AND Sco X-1: OBSERVATIONS CONFRONT THEORIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By fitting the frequencies of simultaneous lower and upper kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (kHz QPOs) in two prototype neutron star (NS) QPO sources (4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1), we test the predictive power of all currently proposed QPO models. Models predict a linear, power law, or other relationship between the two frequencies. We found that for plausible NS parameters (mass and angular momentum), no model can satisfactorily reproduce the data, leading to very large chi-square values in our fittings. For both 4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1, this is largely due to the fact that the data significantly differ from a linear relationship. Some models perform relatively better but still have their own problems. Such a detailed comparison of data from models enables identification of routes for improving those models further.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin Yongfeng [Physics Department and Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Boutelier, Martin; Barret, Didier [Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Zhang Shuangnan, E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing 100049 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.440.3011O"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2:3:6 <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation structure in GRS 1915+105 and cubic subharmonics in the context of relativistic discoseismology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a simple toy model to explain the 2:3:6 <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) structure in GRS 1915+105 and, more generally, the 2:3 QPO structure in XTE J1550-564, GRO J1655-40 and H1743-322. The model exploits the onset of subharmonics in the context of discoseismology. We suggest that the observed frequencies may be the consequence of a resonance between a fundamental g mode and an unobservable p wave. The results include the prediction that, as better data become available, a QPO with a frequency of twice the higher twin frequency and a large quality factor will be observed in twin peak sources, as it might already have been observed in the especially active GRS 1915+105.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ortega-Rodríguez, M.; Solís-Sánchez, H.; López-Barquero, V.; Matamoros-Alvarado, B.; Venegas-Li, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1405.7373v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Histories and Implications for Structure Formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> post-inflationary history with a late-time matter domination period prior to BBN. Such a cosmology could arise naturally in the well-motivated moduli scenario in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY) -- in particular in models of Split-SUSY. Sub-horizon dark matter perturbations grow linearly during the matter dominated phase before reheating and can lead to an enhancement in the growth of substructure on small scales, even in the presence of dark matter annihilations. This suggests that a new scale (the horizon size at reheating) could be important for determining the primordial matter power spectrum. However, we find that in many <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> models free-streaming effects or kinetic decoupling after reheating can completely erase the enhancement leading to small-scale structures. In particular, in the moduli scenario with wino or higgsino dark matter we find that the dark matter particles produced from moduli decays would thermalize with radiation and kinetically decouple below the reheating temperature. Thus, the growth of dark matter perturbations is not sustained, and the predictions for the matter power spectrum are similar to a standard thermal history. We comment on possible exceptions, but these appear difficult to realize within standard moduli scenarios. We conclude that although enhanced structure does not provide a new probe for investigating the cosmic dark ages within these models, it does suggest that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> histories offer a robust alternative to a strictly thermal post-inflationary history.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">JiJi Fan; Ogan Ozsoy; Scott Watson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950024364&hterms=solar+flare&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Bflare"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studying the thermal/<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> crossover in solar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwartz, R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/937309"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission from early-type stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Massive, early-type stars deposit energy and momentum in the interstellar medium through dense, supersonic winds. These objects are one of the most important sources of ionising radiation and chemical enrichment in the Galaxy. The physical conditions in the winds give rise to thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission, detectable from radio to gamma rays. In this report the relevant radiation processes will be described and studies on particular systems will be presented, discussing the information provided by multifrequency observations. Future steps aiming at understanding the stellar wind phenomenon as a whole will be outlined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benaglia, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1501.02597v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> quantum channels as a thermodynamical resource</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility to extract work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a \\emph{collapse engine} could in principle generate is extremely low.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miguel Navascués; Luis Pedro García-Pintos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16083121"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanism of NO reduction with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma has been proved to be an effective and competitive technology for removing NO in flue gas since 1970. In this paper, the NO reduction mechanism of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reaction in NO/N2/O2 system was investigated using the method of spectral analysis and quantum chemistry. By the establishment of NO reduction and gas discharge plasma emission spectrum measuring system, the NO reduction results, gas discharge emission spectra of NO/N2/O2 and pure N2 were obtained, and then the model of molecular orbit of N2 either in ground state or its excited state was worked out using the method of molecular orbit Ab initio in Self-Consistent Field (SCF). It was found that NO reduction in NO/N2 gas discharge plasma was achieved mainly through a series of fast elementary reactions and the N(E6) at excited state was the base for NO reduction. PMID:16083121</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Gang; Yu, Qi; Jiang, Yan-Long; Zeng, Ke-Si; Gu, Fan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0703135v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Equilibrium States of Closed Bipartite Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate a two-level system in resonant contact with a larger environment. The environment typically is in a canonical state with a given temperature initially. Depending on the precise spectral structure of the environment and the type of coupling between both systems, the smaller part may relax to a canonical state with the same temperature as the environment (i.e. thermal relaxation) or to some other quasi equilibrium state (<span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> relaxation). The type of the (quasi) equilibrium state can be related to the distribution of certain properties of the energy eigenvectors of the total system. We examine these distributions for several abstract and concrete (spin environment) Hamiltonian systems, the significant aspect of these distributions can be related to the relative strength of local and interaction parts of the Hamiltonian.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harry Schmidt; Guenter Mahler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhST..131a4017P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma on gas cleansing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma technologies are an interesting complement or alternative, for some conventional systems used for gas pollution control (i.e. wet scrubbers and catalytic converters) because they are able to remove simultaneously several gas pollutants, with quite good efficiency at a relatively low-energy consumption. In this work, a dielectric barrier discharge was used to remove nitric oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from a mixture of air and water vapor. A chemical model was developed to obtain a toxic gas removal mechanism and to observe the behavior of the species in the plasma. The influence of water vapor addition on the toxic gases removal efficiency is also investigated. Several experimental parameters such as power, frequency, initial concentration of NOx and SO2 were tested and analyzed. Results of numerical simulation demonstrated good agreement with experimental data of the removal process achieving about 95% of efficiency removal of toxic gases studied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pacheco, M.; Pacheco, J.; Moreno, H.; Santana, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1281.1692R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Simulation of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Food Preservation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0003210v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in low mass X-ray binary sources and their relation with the neutron star magnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Starting from the observation that kilohertz <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> Oscillations (kHz QPO) occur in a very narrow range of X-ray luminosities in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries, we try to link the kHz QPO observability to variations of the neutron star magnetospheric radius, in response to changing mass inflow rate. At low luminosities, the drop off of kHz QPOs activity may be explained by the onset of the centrifugal barrier, when the magnetospheric radius reaches the corotation radius. At the opposite side, at higher luminosities, the magnetospheric radius may reach the neutron star and the vanishing of the magnetosphere may led to the stopping of the kHz QPOs activity. If we apply these constraints, the magnetic fields of atoll (B ~ 0.3-1 10^8 G for Aql X-1) and Z (B ~ 1-8 10^8 G for Cyg X-2) sources can be derived. These limits naturally apply in the framework of beat frequency models but can also work in the case of general relativistic models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sergio Campana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.8162.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in solar and stellar flares: re-evaluating their nature in the context of power-law flare Fourier spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra, also referred to as 'red' noise processes, are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPP is needed. Here we adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/LYRA, Fermi/GBM, Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required in order to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately descri...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inglis, A R; Dominique, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0208212v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Low and High Frequency Correlation in <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations Among White Dwarfs, Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We interpret the correlation over five orders of magnitude between high frequency and low frequency in a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPO) found by Psaltis, Belloni & van der Klis (1999) for black hole (BH), neutron star (NS) systems and then extended by Mauche (2002) to white dwarf (WD) binaries. We argue that the observed correlation is a natural consequence of the Keplerian disk flow adjustment to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object. In the framework of the transition layer model the high frequency is related to the Keplerian frequency at the outer (adjustment) radius and the low frequency is related to the magnetoacoustic oscillation (MA) frequency. Using a relation between the MA frequency the magnetic and gas pressure and the density and the hydrostatic equilibrium condition in the disk we infer a linear correlation the Keplerian frequency and the MA frequency. We estimate the magnetic field strength near the TL outer radius for BHs NSs and WDs. The fact that the observed high-low frequency correlation over five orders of magnitude is valid for BHs, NSs, and down to WDs strongly rules out relativistic models for QPO phenomena. We come to the conclusion that the QPOs observations indicate the adjustment of the geometrically thin disk to sub-Keplerian motion near the central object. This effect is a common feature for a wide class of systems, starting from white dwarf binaries up to black hole binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Titarchuk; Kent Wood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.446.3926A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation in the ultraluminous X-ray source IC 342 X-1: XMM-Newton results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) at 642 mHz in an XMM-Newton observation of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) IC 342 X-1. The QPO has a centroid at ?QPO = 642 ± 20 mHz, a coherence factor Q = 11.6 and an amplitude (rms) of 4.1 per cent with significance of 3.6?. The energy dependence study shows that the QPO is stronger in the energy range 0.3-5.0 keV. A subsequent observation (6 d later) does not show any signature of the QPO in the power-density spectrum. The broad-band energy spectra (0.3-40.0 keV) obtained by quasi-simultaneous observations of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be described well by an absorbed diskbb plus cutoffpl model. The best-fitting spectral parameters are power-law index (?) ˜ 1.1, cut-off energy (Ec) ˜ 7.9 keV and disc temperature (kTin) ˜ 0.33 keV where the QPO is detected. The unabsorbed bolometric luminosity is ˜5.34 × 1039 erg s-1. Comparing this with the well-known X-ray binary GRS 1915+105, our results are consistent with the mass of the compact object in IC 342 X-1 being in the range ˜20-65 M?. We discuss the possible implications of our results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Agrawal, V. K.; Nandi, Anuj</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CoTPh..62..245T"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Wave Solutions and Asymptotic Analysis to a (3+1)-Dimensional Generalized Kadomtsev—Petviashvili Equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, a (3+1)-dimensional generalized Kadomtsev—Petviashvili (GKP) equation is investigated, which can be used to describe many nonlinear phenomena in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Based on the generalized Bell's polynomials, we succinctly construct the Hirota's bilinear equation to the GKP equation. By virtue of multidimensional Riemann theta functions, a lucid and straightforward way is presented to explicitly construct multiperiodic Riemann theta function periodic waves (<span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> waves) for the (3+1)-dimensional GKP equation. Interestingly, the one-periodic waves are well-known cnoidal waves, which are considered as one-dimensional models of periodic waves. The two-periodic waves are a direct generalization of one-periodic waves, their surface pattern is two-dimensional that they have two independent spatial periods in two independent horizontal directions. Finally, we analyze asymptotic behavior of the multiperiodic periodic waves, and rigorously present the relationships between the periodic waves and soliton solutions by a limiting procedure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tian, Shou-Fu; Ma, Pan-Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...616..463I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7 Second <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on 2003 January 6, while the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) was also monitoring the source. Using the RXTE Proportional Counter Array data set between 2002 December 3 and 2003 January 29, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4+/-0.9)×10-13 Hz s-1, respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC PN light curve, we found <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude of ~6.6%. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power-law component with high-energy cutoff and the ~6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with blackbody emission with kT~1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius of ~0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star surface as the source of the blackbody emission. The flux of the iron emission line at ~6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">?nam, S. Ç.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0402221v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7s <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on January 6, 2003, while RXTE was monitoring the source. Using RXTE-PCA dataset between December 3, 2002 and January 29, 2003, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be $354.7940\\pm0.0008$ s and $(7.4\\pm0.9)\\times10^{-13}$Hz s$^{-1}$ respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC-PN lightcurve, we found <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude $\\sim $6.6 %. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogenuities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power law component with high energy cutoff and $\\sim6.4$ keV fluorescent iron emission line (Baykal et al., 2002), we discovered a soft component consistent with a blackbody emission with ${\\rm{kT}}\\sim1.9$keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius $\\sim 0.3$ km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star surface as the source of blackbody emission. The flux of the iron emission line at $\\sim 6.42$ keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. C. Inam; A. Baykal; J. Swank; M. J. Stark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0104421v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">A detailed study of the 5 Hz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in the bright X-ray transient and black-hole candidate GRS 1739-278</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a detailed study of the 5 Hz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) recently discovered in the bright X-ray transient and black-hole candidate GRS 1739-278 (Borozdin & Trudolyubov 2000) during a Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observation taken on 1996 March 31. In total 6.6 ksec of on-source data were obtained, divided in two data sets of 3.4 and 3.2 ksec which were separated by 2.6 ksec. The 5 Hz QPO was only present during the second data set. The QPO increased in strength from below 2% rms amplitude for photon energies below 4 keV to ~5% rms amplitude for energies above 10 keV. The soft QPO photons (below 5 keV) lagged the hard ones (above 10 keV) by almost 1.5 radian. Besides the QPO fundamental, its first overtone was detected. The strength of the overtone increased with photon energy (from <2% rms below 5 keV to ~8% rms above 10 keV). Although the limited statistics did not allow for an accurate determination of the lags of the first overtone, indications are that also for this QPO the soft photons lagged the hard ones. When the 5 Hz QPO was not detected (i.e., during the first part of the observation), a broad noise component was found for photon energies below 10 keV but it became almost a true QPO (with a Q value of ~1.9) above that energy, with a frequency of ~3 Hz. Its hard photons preceded the soft ones in a way reminiscent of the 5 Hz QPO, strongly suggesting that both features are physically related. We discuss our finding in the frame work of low-frequency QPOs and their properties in BHCs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rudy Wijnands; Mariano Mendez; Jon M. Miller; Jeroen Homan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167785"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVIDENCE FOR <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> X-RAY DIPS FROM AN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BINARY MOTION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from long-term ( Almost-Equal-To 1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span>, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 {+-} 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 {+-} 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination {approx}>70 Degree-Sign . We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: dheeraj@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010228&hterms=second+fast&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsecond%2Bfast"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Fast-mode Wave Trains Within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO-AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first unambiguous detection of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances greater than approximately solar radius/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 kilometers per second decelerating to approximately 650 kilometers per second. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by approximately 50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ApJ...699..305H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability Timescales in the M87 Jet: Signatures of E 2 Losses, Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in HST-1, and the Site of TeV Flaring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the variability timescales in the jet of M87 with two goals. The first is to use the rise times and decay times in the radio, ultraviolet, and X-ray light curves of HST-1 to constrain the source size and the energy loss mechanisms affecting the relativistic electron distributions. HST-1 is the first jet knot clearly resolved from the nuclear emission by Chandra and is the site of the huge flare of 2005. We find clear evidence for a frequency-dependent decrease in the synchrotron flux being consistent with E 2 energy losses. Assuming that this behavior is predominantly caused by synchrotron cooling, we estimate a value of 0.6 mG for the average magnetic field strength of the HST-1 emission region, a value consistent with previous estimates of the equipartition field. In the process of analyzing the first derivative of the X-ray light curve of HST-1, we discovered a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation which was most obvious in 2003 and 2004 prior to the major flare in 2005. The four cycles observed have a period of order six months. The second goal is to search for evidence of differences between the X-ray variability timescales of HST-1 and the unresolved nuclear region (diameter <0farcs6). These features, separated by more than 60 pc, are the two chief contenders for the origin of the TeV variable emissions observed by H.E.S.S. in 2005 and by MAGIC and VERITAS in 2008. The X-ray variability of the nucleus appears to be at least twice as rapid as that of the HST-1 knot. However, the shortest nuclear variability timescale we can measure from the Chandra data (<=20 days) is still significantly longer than the shortest TeV variability of M87 reported by the H.E.S.S. and MAGIC telescopes (1-2 days).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, D. E.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, ?ukasz; Biretta, J. A.; Perlman, E. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120012493&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> X-ray Dips from an ULX: Implications for the Binary Motion and the Orbital Inclination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from long-term X-ray (0.3-8.0 keY) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy-dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days the amplitude of which decreases during the second half of the light curve and (3) energy spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data, possibly due to a change in the ionization state of the circumbinary material. We interpret the X-ray modulations in the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination low-mass X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk (similar to the phenomenon of dipping LMXBs), this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination approx > 60 deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040182471&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7s <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on January 6, 2003, while RXTE was monitoring the source. Using RXTE-PCA dataset between December 3, 2002 and January 29, 2003, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -13) Hz/s respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC-PN lightcurve, we found <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude approx. 6.6 %. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power law component with high energy cutoff and approx. 6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with a blackbody emission with kT approx. 1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius approx. 0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star approx. 6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inam, S. C.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130014487&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence For <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span>, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0003243v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Disappearance of Kilohertz <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations at a High Mass Accretion Rate in Low-Mass X-ray Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For all sources in which the phenomenon of kilo-Hertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (kHz QPO) is observed, the QPOs disappear abruptly when the inferred mass accretion rate exceeds a certain threshold. Although the threshold cannot at present be accurately determined (or even quantified) observationally, it is clearly higher for bright Z sources than for faint atoll sources. Here we propose that the observational manifestation of kHz QPOs {\\em requires} direct interaction between the neutron star magnetosphere and the Keplerian accretion disk and that the cessation of kHz QPOs at high accretion rate is due to the lack of such an interact when the Keplerian disk terminates at the last stable orbit and yet the magnetosphere is pushed farther inward. The threshold is therefore dependent of the magnetic field strength -- the stronger the magnetic field the higher the threshold. This is certainly in agreement with the atoll/Z paradigm, but we argue that it is also generally true, even for individual sources within each (atoll or Z) category. For atoll sources, the kHz QPOs also seem to vanish at low accretion rate. Perhaps the ``disengagement'' between the magnetosphere and the Keplerian disk also takes place under such circumstances, because of, for instance, the presence of quasi-spherical advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) close to the neutron star. Unfortunately, in this case, the estimation of the accretion rate threshold would require a knowledge of the physical mechanisms that cause the disengagement. If the ADAF is responsible, the threshold is likely dependent of the magnetic field of the neutron star.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei Cui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22270915"> <span id="translatedtitle">A SPECTRAL STUDY OF THE RAPID TRANSITIONS OF TYPE-B <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS IN THE BLACK HOLE TRANSIENT XTE J1859+226</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fast transitions of type-B and type-A <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) are rarely found, and they are observed at the peak of the outburst in black hole transient (BHT) sources. The associated spectral variations during such events are crucial to understand the origin and location of such QPOs in the accretion disk. During the 1999 outburst of XTE J1859+226, on four occasions a rapid transition of type-B/A QPOs was noted. We performed broadband spectral analysis on these four observations to unveil the responsible spectral parameter causing the rapid transitions. After invoking simple spectral models, it was observed that disk parameters were consistently varying along with disk and power-law fluxes, and almost no change was noted in the power-law index parameter. Though using a complex physical model showed consistent results, the spectral parameter variations across the transitions were not significant. It was observed that the type-B QPO was always associated with an inner disk front which is closer to the BH. In one observation, a type-A QPO appeared as the source count rate suddenly dropped, and the power-law index as well as disk normalization parameter considerably changed during this transition. The spectral changes in this particular observation were similar to the changes observed in XTE J1817-330, indicating a common underlying mechanism. We have also examined a similar observation of BHT source GX 339-4, where a sudden transition of a type-A/B QPO was noted. Similar spectral study again revealed that the disk parameters were changing. We discuss the results in the framework of a truncated disk model and conclude that the movement of the coupled inner disk-corona region is responsible for such rapid transitions of type-B QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, A. R., E-mail: astrosriram@yahoo.co.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047646"> <span id="translatedtitle">LOW-FREQUENCY (11 mHz) OSCILLATIONS IN H1743-322: A NEW CLASS OF BLACK HOLE <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) at {approx}11 mHz in two RXTE and one Chandra observations of the black hole candidate H1743-322. The QPO is observed only at the beginning of the 2010 and 2011 outbursts at similar hard color and intensity, suggestive of an accretion state dependence for the QPO. Although its frequency appears to be correlated with X-ray intensity on timescales of a day, in successive outbursts eight months apart, we measure a QPO frequency that differs by less than Almost-Equal-To 2.2 mHz while the intensity had changed significantly. We show that this {approx}11 mHz QPO is different from the so-called Type C QPOs seen in black holes and that the mechanisms that produce the two flavors of variability are most probably independent. After comparing this QPO with other variability phenomena seen in accreting black holes and neutron stars, we conclude that it best resembles the so-called 1 Hz QPOs seen in dipping neutron star systems, although having a significantly lower (1-2 orders of magnitude) frequency. If confirmed, H1743-322 is the first black hole showing this type of variability. Given the unusual characteristics and the hard-state dependence of the {approx}11 mHz QPO, we also speculate whether these oscillations could instead be related to the radio jets observed in H1743-322. A systematic search for this type of low-frequency QPOs in similar systems is needed to test this speculation. In any case, it remains unexplained why these QPOs have only been seen in the last two outbursts of H1743-322.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute, 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Strohmayer, T., E-mail: d.altamirano@uva.nl [Astrophysics Science Division, Mail Code 662, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010423&hterms=black+hole&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dblack%2Bhole"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...798..108I"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares: Re-evaluating their Nature in the Context of Power-law Flare Fourier Spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ? 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApJ...577L..23T"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Low and High Frequency Correlation in <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillations among White Dwarf, Neutron Star, and Black Hole Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We interpret the correlation over 5 orders of magnitude between high frequency ?high and low frequency ?low in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) found by Psaltis, Belloni, & van der Klis for black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) systems and then extended by Mauche to white dwarf (WD) binaries. The observed correlation strongly constrains theoretical models and provides clues to understanding the nature of the QPO phenomena at large. We argue that the observed correlation is a natural consequence of the Keplerian disk flow adjustment to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object that ultimately leads to the formation of the sub-Keplerian transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary (the star surface for the NS and WD and the horizon for the BH). In the frameworks of the TL model, ?high is related to the Keplerian frequency at the outer (adjustment) radius ?K, and ?low is related to the magnetoacoustic oscillation frequency ?MA. Using a relation between ?MA, the magnetic and gas pressure, and the density and the hydrostatic equilibrium condition in the disk, we infer a linear correlation between ?K and ?MA. Identification of ?high, ?low with ?K, ?MA, respectively, leads us to the determination of H/rout=1.5×10-2 and ?=0.1 (where H is the half-width of the disk and ? is a ratio of magnetic pressure to gas pressure). We estimate the magnetic field strength near the TL outer radius for BHs, NSs, and WDs. The fact that the observed high-low frequency correlation over 5 orders of magnitude is valid for BHs, NSs, and down to WDs strongly rules out relativistic models for QPO phenomena. We come to the conclusion that the QPO observations indicate the adjustment of the geometrically thin disk to sub-Keplerian motion near the central object. This effect is a common feature for a wide class of systems, starting from WD binaries up to BH binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Wood, Kent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/36/33/75/PDF/khacef2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chemistry and Plasma Processing (2009) 12" DOI : 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2 #12;2 nCOH 2 m nOnHHC 22mn1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MNRAS.344L...1L"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the importance of searching for oscillations of the Jovian inner radiation belt with a <span class="hlt">quasi-period</span> of 40 minutes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft discovered <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> bursts of relativistic electrons and of radio emissions with ~40-min period (QP-40) from the south polar direction of Jupiter in 1992 February. Such polar QP-40 burst activities were found to correlate well with arrivals of high-speed solar winds at Jupiter. We advance the physical scenario that the inner radiation belt (IRB) within a distance of ~2-3 RJ (where RJ is the radius of Jupiter), where relativistic electrons are known to be trapped using the diagnostics of synchrotron emissions, can execute global QP-40 magnetoinertial oscillations excited by arrivals of high-speed solar winds at the Jovian magnetosphere. Modulated by such QP-40 IRB oscillations, relativistic electrons trapped in the IRB may escape from the magnetic circumpolar regions during a certain phase of each 40-min period to form circumpolar QP-40 relativistic electron bursts. Highly beamed synchrotron emissions from such QP-40 burst electrons with small pitch angles relative to Jovian magnetic fields at ~30-40 RJ give rise to QP-40 radio bursts with typical frequencies <~0.2 MHz. We predict that the synchrotron brightness of the IRB should vary on QP-40 time-scales upon arrivals of high-speed solar winds with estimated magnitudes >~0.1 Jy, detectable by existing ground-based radio telescopes. The recent discovery of ~45-min pulsations of Jupiter's north polar X-ray hot spot by the High-Resolution Camera (HRC) of the Chandra spacecraft provides strong supporting circumstantial evidence that the IRB neighborhood did oscillate with QP-40 time-scales. Using the real-time solar wind data from the spacecraft Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we show here that such QP-40 pulsations of Jupiter's north polar X-ray hot spot did in fact coincide with the arrival of high-speed solar wind at Jupiter. We note also that properly sampled data of simultaneous far-ultraviolet images of auroral ovals obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope imaging spectrograph (HST-STIS) would have contained QP-40 oscillatory signatures. Based on our theoretical analysis, we offer several predictions that can be tested by further spacecraft and ground-based telescope observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lou, Yu-Qing; Zheng, Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.V13D..04P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupling Between Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer - A Mechanism for <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Variations in CO2 Discharges from Deep Underground Sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leakage of CO2 from underground sources is of interest in connection with volcanic hazards assessment, and with the integrity and safety of geologic disposal reservoirs for CO2 that have been proposed as a means for mitigating global warming from atmospheric emissions. Underground accumulations of CO2, whether naturally occurring or man-made, store vast amounts of compressional energy. At subsurface temperature and pressure conditions, CO2 is always buoyant relative to aqueous fluids, and its upward migration may conceivably give rise to a self-enhancing runaway release due to decompression and the much lower viscosity as compared to water. Natural occurrences of CO2 have been implicated in hydrothermal eruptions, and may be capable of causing "pneumatic" eruptions that are not powered by thermal energy. We have performed numerical simulations of CO2 release through fracture zones and faults in order to determine under what conditions, if any, a self-enhancing, eruptive release may be possible. Our simulations include coupling between multiphase fluid flow and associated heat transfer effects, and accurately represent the thermophysical properties of CO2 in sub-critical (liquid or gaseous) and supercritical conditions, as well as transitions between different phase compositions, and phase partitioning between CO2-rich and aqueous phases. The behavior of rising CO2 plumes is found to be strongly affected by heat transfer effects. As supercritical CO2 migrates upward it cools due to expansion. Much stronger cooling may arise from boiling of liquid CO2 that may occur after temperatures and pressures drop below critical values (Tcrit = 31.04 deg-C, Pcrit = 73.82 bar). Our simulations of CO2 migration up a fault zone produce <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> cycling of thermodynamic conditions and substantial variations of CO2 fluxes discharged at the land surface on a time scale of order 1 year. This behavior is explained in terms of an interplay between multiphase flow in the fault zone and conductive heat exchange with surrounding country rock of low permeability. CO2 upflow rates are reduced by heat transfer limitations, which give rise to substantial increase in fluid density as temperatures decline. A better understanding of natural hydrothermal and pneumatic eruptions is necessary in order that the effectiveness and safety of geologic disposal systems for CO2 may be evaluated. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pruess, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2694600"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Electromagnetic Radiation Damage to Lens Epithelium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5ºC for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat. PMID:19517034</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bormusov, Elvira; P.Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008POBeo..84..405N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in flammable gas mixtures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations for charged particles (electrons, positive and negative ions), and with the electric circuit equation. The electric circuit comprises power supply, ballast resistor connected in series with the discharge and capacity. Rate coefficients for electron-assisted reactions were calculated from solving the two-term spherical harmonic expansion of the Boltzmann equation. Such an approach allows us to describe influence of thermal chemistry reactions (burning) on the discharge characteristics. Results of comparison between the discharge and thermal ignition effects for mixtures of hydrogen or ethylene with dry air will be reported. Effects of acceleration of ignition by discharge plasma will be analyzed. In particular, the role of singlet oxygen produced effectively in the discharge in ignition speeding up will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040182332&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma approximates 2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a converging flow into the BH). In the TL model for the corona, the QPO frequency V(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency V(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and v(sub low) is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency v(sub MA) . The observed correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also suggest a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50788702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of different types of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma treatment of mammalian cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary form only given. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma is now being widely developed for various clinical applications, e.g. cancer treatment, blood coagulation and tissue sterilization. However, the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma on mammalian cells are still unclear. In this paper we investigate the effects of the plasma on mammalian cells. One of the most critical of such effects could be DNA damage,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Kalghatgi; C. Kelly; E. Cerchar; A. Fridman; J. Azizkhan-Clifford; G. Friedman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://parikh.ucdavis.edu/pages/publications/Publications_pdf/mmm_parikh_Navrotsky_2004.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials Atul N of the microporous materials was comparable to or better than for materials derived by thermal calcination Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Zeolite; Structure directing agent; Calcination; Ultraviolet</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parikh, Atul N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/5303"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma - Nanometer TiO2 Photocatalysis for Formaldehyde Decomposition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-nanometer TiO2 photocatalysis, the techniques of photocatalysis and plasma are combined, and do not need ultraviolet light. It can make use of some kinds of energy in the process of decomposing, while at the same time producing...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Q.; Feng, G.; Guang, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18833251"> <span id="translatedtitle">EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas for processing and other applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Françoise Massines</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...787..123H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetic Electron Propagation in the Decay Phase of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Flare Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhD...44A0301N"> <span id="translatedtitle">EDITORIAL: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This special issue is based on the symposium on <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma-generated reactive species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than conventional thermochemical reactions, leading to non-equilibrium product distribution or creating unconventional reaction pathways. When <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma is combined with catalysts, a synergistic effect is frequently observed. Such unique properties of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma are expected to contribute excellent control over process parameters that meet the need for energy saving, environment protection, and material preservation. This special issue consists of eleven peer-reviewed papers including two invited publications. Professors Alexander Fridman and Alexander Rabinovich from Drexel University, and Dr Gutsol from the Chevron Energy Technology Company present a critical review of various industry-oriented practical plasma fuel conversion processes. Professor Richard Mallinson from University of Oklahoma describes his recent project on E85 (85%-ethanol/15%-gasoline) upgrading using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and catalyst hybrid reactor, and highlights the synergistic effect on fuel conversion processes. Other papers focus on plasma/catalyst hybrid reactions for methane dry (CO2) reforming, plasma synthesis of carbon suboxide polymer from CO, the gas-to-liquid (GTL) process using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-combined micro-chemical reactor, and molecular beam characterization of plasma-generated reactive species. Much research regarding plasma catalysis is ongoing worldwide, but there is plenty of room for further development of plasma fuel processing, which could eventually provide a viable and flexible solution in future energy and material use. Finally, we would like to thank all symposium participants for their active discussion. We appreciate the sponsorship of the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. We express special thanks to the program chair of the Fuel Chemistry Division, Professor Chang-jun Liu at Tianjin University, for his dedication to the success of the symposium. We particularly express our appreciation to the Editorial Board of Journal </p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......128L"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas on selected mammalian cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we built a simple transfection device consisting of a straight glass capillary tube and a plastic support. Using three different gases and five different capillary diameters, we were able to relate the transfection efficiency to the dynamic pressure of the gas exiting the capillary tube. Finally, even though transfection of cells seem to depend more on the mechanical forces exerted by the gas flow than on the effects of the plasma, other applications of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in the field of medicine are in development. However, published studies have focused on only the positive effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas, neglecting the potentially induced adverse effects. Therefore, we studied if damage could be caused in cells following an indirect (APGD-t) or a direct (parallel electrodes DBD) plasma treatment. We found that a low power direct plasma treatment caused oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Both plasma sources were shown to produce DNA double-strand breaks but no lipid peroxidation. Also, the sequencing of plasma-treated naked plasmid DNA introduced in electrocompetent bacteria showed no evidence of mutations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leduc, Mathieu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70025915"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slightly thermal springs and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMSH21B1516R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Importance of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Pressures in the Heliosheath: Towards New Methods of Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The in-situ plasma measurements when Voyager 2 crossed the termination shock into the heliosheath revealed that only ~20% of the downstream pressure resided in the thermal ion population at energies << 1 keV. The LECP ion measurements > 30 keV at both VGRs 1 and 2 implied a partial pressure ?P~0.02pPa that accounted for another ~15% of the total pressure. Adding in the missing 70% of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure, the total <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure at the VGRs must be P~0.12pPa. Consensus estimates of the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) are near B~0.25nT which gives a hydrostatic magnetic pressure B2/2?0~0.25pPa. Cassini/INCA all-sky images of 5-44keV ENAs from the heliosheath [Krimigis et al., this session] show that neither VGR1 nor VGR2 is in the direction of maximum ENA emission. Consequently, it is possible that the pressure of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> protons in the heliosheath is comparable to the hydrostatic pressure of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) that confines the heliosheath. An immediate corollary is that we will not understand the physics of the heliosheath until we find ways of quantitatively describing the dynamics of pressures produced by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ion populations. Present MHD theories and simulations simply do not capture these essential dynamical processes. We point out that the magnetospheric communities studying the dynamics of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ion injections (with plasma beta>1) at Earth and Saturn revealed by ENA imaging have been making significant progress in a quite similar problem. We offer some possible approaches for the quantitative analysis of the heliosheath, based on the magnetospheric experience.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roelof, E. C.; Gruntman, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; McComas, D. J.; Funsten, H. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371401"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropic Transport of Electrons in a Novel FET Channel with Chains of InGaAs Nano-Islands Embedded along <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Multi-Atomic Steps on Vicinal (111)B GaAs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied electron transport in n-AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction FET channels, in which chains of InGaAs nano-islands are embedded along <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> steps. By using two samples, conductance G{sub para}(V{sub g}) parallel to the steps and G{sub perp}(V{sub g}) perpendicular to them were measured at 80 K as functions of gate voltage V{sub g}. At sufficiently high V{sub g}, G{sub para} at 80 K is several times as high as G{sub perp}, which manifests the anisotropic two-dimensional transport of electrons. When V{sub g} is reduced to -0.7 V, G{sub perp} almost vanishes, while {sub Gpara} stays sizable unless V{sub g} is set below -0.8 V. These results indicate that 'inter-chain' barriers play stronger roles than 'intra-chain' barriers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akiyama, Y.; Kawazu, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); IIS, University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Noda, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakaki, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); IIS, University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.05406.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dark Matter Production Mechanisms with a <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Cosmological History - A Classification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We perform a comprehensive study of models of dark matter (DM) in a Universe with a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> cosmological history, i.e with a phase of pressure-less matter domination before the onset of big-bang nucleosynethesis (BBN). Such cosmological histories are generically predicted by UV completions that contain gravitationally coupled scalar fields (moduli). We classify the different production mechanisms for DM in this framework, generalizing previous works by considering a wide range of DM masses/couplings and allowing for DM to be in equilibrium with a "dark" sector. We identify four distinct parametric regimes for the production of relic DM, and derive accurate semi-analytic approximations for the DM relic abundance. Our results are particularly relevant for supersymmetric theories, in which the standard <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span> produced DM candidates are disfavored by indirect detection constraints. We also comment on experimental signals in this framework, focusing on novel effects involving the power spectrum of DM de...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, Gordon L; Nelson, Brent D; Zheng, Bob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/212753"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in atmospheric-pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Recent laboratory-scale experiments show that the electron beam method is remarkably more energy efficient than competing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma techniques based on pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge plasma. Preliminary cost analysis based on these data also show that the electron beam method may be cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1588..191C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet with dielectric barrier configuration in nitrogen and argon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is advantageous in generating <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure, as it avoids transition to thermal arc and dispenses with costly vacuum system. It has found useful applications in treating heat-sensitive materials such as plastics and living tissue. In this work, the discharge formed between the Pyrex glass layer and the ground electrode is extruded through a nozzle to form the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet. The DBD characteristics were investigated in terms of charge transferred and mean power dissipated per cycle when operated in nitrogen and argon at various flow rates and applied voltages. These characteristics were then correlated to the dimension of the plasma jet. The mean power dissipated in the DBD was below 7 W giving an efficiency of 17 %. The length of the plasma jet was greatly limited to below 1 cm due to the configuration of the DBD system and nozzle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choo, C. Y.; Chin, O. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0806.0228v3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Study of a Propagating <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ESASP.477..191V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact polarization as a diagnostic for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particles in solar flares</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations of linear polarization of lines (mainly H?) during solar flares have been reported. The orientation (predominantly radial) and magnitude of the H? polarization (about 5%) suggest an interpretation as impact polarization by low energy (<200 keV) <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> protons, which are not accessible by more direct diagnostic observations, such as hard X-rays (for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons) or gamma-ray lines (for high energy protons, above a few MeV) which will be observed by the HESSI spacecraft, soon to be launched by NASA. Impact polarization observations could thus provide useful complementary data for the study of accelerated particles in flares. However, observations in a single line such as H? can give at best an order of magnitude estimate of the accelerated protons number flux, so multiline polarimetric observations, as can be done by the franco-italian THEMIS telescope, are highly desirable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vogt, E.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Hénoux, J.-C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18568096"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher-order solution of an electron-acoustic solitary waves with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Higher-order nonlinearity and dispersion to nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied using the reductive perturbation method in an unmagnetized collisionless plasma consisting of a cold electron fluid and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hot electrons and stationary ions. Beside the KdV equation obtained from the lowest order of perturbation, a linear inhomogeneous (KdV-type) equation accounting for the higher-order nonlinearity and dispersion is derived. A</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. K. El-Shewy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110010267&hterms=non+luminous+object&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dnon%2Bluminous%2Bobject"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Swift BAT Perspective on <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The search for diffuse <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22967722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Catalytic formation of ammonia: a lattice gas <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The catalytic formation of ammonia synthesis through dimers N2 and H2 has been studied through Monte-Carlo simulation via a model based on lattice gas <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism, which involves the precursor motion of H2 molecule. The most interesting feature of this model is it yields a steady reactive window, which is separated by continuous and discontinuous irreversible phase transitions. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. M Khan; N Ahmad; E. V Albano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6708775"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> specialists</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/5v32122xx3271451.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in Ultraviolet Light Technology for <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Processing of Liquid Foods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A negative, public reaction is growing over the addition of chemical preservatives to liquid foods and beverages to extend\\u000a their shelf life and to protect against foodborne pathogens. As a physical method, ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation has\\u000a a positive consumer image and is of interest to the food industry as a low cost <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> method of preservation. Recent\\u000a advances in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tatiana Koutchma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120012018&hterms=distribution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Ddistribution"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result fro m many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity of 19-22 km/s in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find thai velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities measured.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20726811"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dust-acoustic Solitary Waves in Dusty Plasma with <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present research paper, characteristics of dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasma are studied. The dust charge is treated as variable. KdV equation has been derived using reductive perturbation method. The effect of relative number density, relative ion temperature, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> parameter and variable charge has been numerically studied for possibility of both type of dust-acoustic solitary waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saini, Nareshpal Singh; Gill, Tarsem Singh [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Kaur, Harvinder [Department of Physics, Khalsa College, Amritsar-143002 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0806.2306v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission from massive YSOs. Exploring the spectrum at high energies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal radio and X-ray emission has been traditionally associated with the formation of stars. However, in recent years, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation from massive star forming regions has been detected. Synchrotron radio emission and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-rays from the outflows of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) provide evidence of the presence of relativistic particles in these sources. In YSOs, the acceleration of particles is likely produced where the thermal jet impacts on the surrounding medium and a shock wave is formed. Thus, particles might be accelerated up to relativistic energies through a Fermi-I type mechanism. Relativistic electrons and protons can interact with thermal particles and photons, producing then gamma-rays. These energetic photons could be detected by the new generation of instruments, making massive YSOs a new population of gamma-ray surces. In the present contribution we briefly describe some massive star forming regions from which <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission has been detected. In addition, we present a general model for high-energy radiation from the massive YSOs embedded in these regions. We take into account both leptonic and hadronic interactions of particles accelerated at the termination points of the collimated outflows ejected from the protostar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anabella T. Araudo; Gustavo E. Romero; Valenti Bosch-Ramon; Josep M. Paredes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22011812"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> EMISSIONS FROM COOL CORES HEATED BY COSMIC RAYS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions from cool cores in galaxy clusters. We adopted a recent model in which cosmic rays (CRs) prevail in the cores and stably heat them through CR streaming. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions come from the interaction between CR protons and intracluster medium (ICM). Comparison between the theoretical predictions and radio observations shows that the overall CR spectra must be steep, and most of the CRs in the cores are low-energy CRs. Assuming that the CRs are injected through active galactic nucleus activities, we study the nature of the shocks that are responsible for the CR acceleration. The steep CR spectra are likely to reflect the fact that the shocks travel in hot ICM with fairly small Mach numbers. We also study the dependence on the CR streaming velocity. The results indicate that synchrotron emissions from secondary electrons should be observed as radio mini-halos in the cores. In particular, low-frequency observations (e.g., LOFAR) are promising. However, the steepness of the spectra makes it difficult to detect <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from the cores. The low-energy CRs may be heating optical filaments observed in the cores.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Theory Centre, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4256026"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Possible Application in Wound Healing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25489414"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3258292"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE) for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation without muscle contraction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE). A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> tissue ablation that eliminates muscle contractions seen in IRE treatments performed with unipolar electric pulses. Therefore, it has the potential to be performed clinically without the administration of paralytic agents. PMID:22104372</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/91015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Control of VOCs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of real estate. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGinness, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/619909"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf Nova Oscillations and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables: III. A New Kind of Dwarf Nova Oscillation, and Further Examples of the Similarities to X-Ray Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present measurements of the periods of Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations (QPOs) in Cataclysmic Variable stars (CVs), many culled from published literature, but also others newly observed (in VZ Pyx, CR Boo, OY Car, Z Cha, AQ Eri, TU Men, HX Peg, CN Ori, V893 Sco, WX Hyi and EC2117-54). These provide data for 26 systems. We show that in general P_QPO ~ 15 P_DNO and that the correlation for CVs extends by three orders of magnitude lower in frequency the similar relationship found for X-Ray binaries. In addition, we have found that there is a second type of DNO, previously overlooked, which have periods ~ 4 times those of the regular DNOs (As well as those mined from publications, we have observed them in VW Hyi, OY Car, AQ Eri, V803 Cen, CR Boo, VZ Pyx, HX Peg and EC2117-54). Often both types of DNO coexist. Unlike the standard DNOs, the periods of the new type, which we refer to as longer period DNOs (lpDNOs), are relatively insensitive to accretion luminosity and can even appea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warner, B; Pretorius, M L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1174238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability Timescales in the M87 Jet: Signatures of E-Squared Losses, Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Quasi-period</span> in HST-1, and the Site of TeV Flaring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the variability timescales in the jet of M87 with two goals. The first is to use the rise times and decay times in the radio, ultraviolet and X-ray lightcurves of HST-1 to constrain the source size and the energy loss mechanisms affecting the relativistic electron distributions. HST-1 is the first jet knot clearly resolved from the nuclear emission by Chandra and is the site of the huge flare of 2005. We find clear evidence for a frequency-dependent decrease in the synchrotron flux being consistent with E-squared energy losses. Assuming that this behavior is predominantly caused by synchrotron cooling, we estimate a value of 0.6 mG for the average magnetic field strength of the HST-1 emission region, a value consistent with previous estimates of the equipartition field. In the process of analyzing the first derivative of the X-ray light curve of HST-1, we discovered a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation which was most obvious in 2003 and 2004 prior to the major flare in 2005. The four cycles observed ha...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, D E; Stawarz, Lukasz; Biretta, J A; Perlman, E S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990A%26A...229..504A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of micro-flaring and secular and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> variations in dMe flare stars. IV - Harmonic analysis of YZ Canis Minoris and a possible connection with the Ionson-Mullan hypothesis of coronal heating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Periodograms of U-band photometric data have been examined to search for "time signatures" in YZ Canis Minoris down to periods of about 6 seconds. <span class="hlt">Quasi-periods</span> are found at 7.1, 15.4, 33.2 and 92.9 s. From harmonic analysis the fundamental frequencies, 46.3 mHz (21.6s period) and 35.8 mHz (27.9 s) and 10.8 mHz (92.9 s), and several overtones and found. The 7.1-s "time signature" appears to be superposed overtones of these fundamentals. The 15.4-s "time signature" is very close to the 5th overtone of 10.8 mHz. Similarities with other dM4.5e stars, e.g. AT Microscopii (with "time signatures" 13.2 and 7.9 s), may be explicable in terms of a few such close fundamental frequencies. These fundamental frequencies and their overtones may have a bearing on the Ionson-Mullan hypothesis that coronal-heating is coupled to convective motion in late-type stars, and they are important new parameters possibly related to the flaring mechanism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, A. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...793..129H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intermittency and Lifetime of the 625 Hz <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Oscillation in the 2004 Hyperflare from the Magnetar SGR 1806-20 as Evidence for Magnetic Coupling between the Crust and the Core</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ~100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ~625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ~0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Levin, Yuri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445.3659L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a correlation between the frequency of the mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations and the neutron-star temperature in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We detected millihertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in an XMM-Newton observation of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53. These QPOs have been interpreted as marginally stable burning on the neutron-star surface. At the beginning of the observation the QPO was at around 8 mHz, together with a possible second harmonic. About 12 ks into the observation a type I X-ray burst occurred and the QPO disappeared; the QPO reappeared ˜25 ks after the burst and it was present until the end of the observation. We divided the observation into four segments to study the evolution of the spectral properties of the source during intervals with and without mHz QPO. We find that the temperature of the neutron-star surface increases from the QPO segment to the non-QPO segment, and vice versa. We also find a strong correlation between the frequency of the mHz QPO and the temperature of a blackbody component in the energy spectrum representing the temperature of neutron-star surface. Our results are consistent with previous results that the frequency of the mHz QPO depends on the variation of the heat flux from the neutron-star crust, and therefore supports the suggestion that the observed QPO frequency drifts could be caused by the cooling of deeper layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780045895&hterms=stroboscope&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dstroboscope"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visualization of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> unsteady flows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A self-synchronizing schlieren flow visualization technique has been developed to study unsteady periodic flows which may result from aeroelastic effects. The technique allows the experimentalist to stroboscopically 'freeze' the streak line pattern at any phase in one period of the motion by driving the schlieren light source with an electronically processed synchronizing signal that is derived by measuring a periodic flow variable with a convenient sensor. Results for the visualization of the near-wake behind an oscillating airfoil at low speeds which show an ordered series of discrete vortices and a curious short-wave-length wake disturbance are examined. Results are also presented for edge tone sound generation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kadlec, R. A.; Davis, S. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22127161"> <span id="translatedtitle">UBIQUITOUS <span class="hlt">NON-THERMALS</span> IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v{sub 2}(K{sub e} )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v{sub 2} {identical_to} w(15/8K{sub e} ){sup 1/4} will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally K{sub e} (s) {<=} 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of K{sub e} along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> regime K{sub e} > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scudder, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 54420 (United States); Karimabadi, H., E-mail: jack-scudder@uiowa.edu [SciberQuest, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/972295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) processor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036905"> <span id="translatedtitle">RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> FLARE CHARACTERISTICS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles Mones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ICRC....4.2385S"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Understanding of the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Radiation from the Crab Nebula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Crab nebula is the most extensively studied supernova remnant, which is powered by its pulsar. The remnant radation is <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> in nature measured over 20 decades in energy from radio to highenergy gamma rays. The propagation of electrons in the remnant has been studied in detail and the elecrons in the present epoch could explain the observed radiation over the entire energ domain. It is found that there are two kinds of accelerated spectrum that are required and we discuss some the conseqences.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephens, S. Alfred; Streitmatter, R. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PASJ...61.1099D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Hard X-Ray Emission from the Galactic Center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyse new results of Chandra and Suzaku Observatories which found a flux of hard X-ray emission from the compact region around Sgr A* (r ˜ 100 pc). We suppose that this emission is generated by accretion processes onto the central supermassive blackhole when an unbound part of captured stars obtains an additional momentum. As a result a flux of subrelativistic protons is generated near the galactic center which heats the background plasma up to temperatures about 6-10 keV and produces by inverse bremsstrahlung a flux of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission in the energy range above 10 keV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dogiel, Vladimir A.; Chernyshov, Dmitrii O.; Yuasa, Takayuki; Prokhorov, Dmitrii; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Bamba, Aya; Inoue, Hajime; Ko, Chung-Ming; Kokubun, Motohide; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0910.2150.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is the ultra-fast transformation of bismuth <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transient state of femtosecond laser excited bismuth has been studied by various groups with time-resolved optical, x-ray, and electron probes at the deposited energy density from below through up to several times the equilibrium enthalpy of melting. However, the interpretations of the experimental results are controversial: the optical probes reveal the absence of transition to the melting phase while the authors of x-ray and electron diffraction experiments claim the observation of ultrafast <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> melting. The presented analysis, based on temperature dependence of bismuth optical properties, unequivocally shows a purely thermal nature of all the observed fs-laser induced transformations in bismuth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gamaly, E G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012A%26A...539A.101S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from ? Carinae's blast wave of 1843</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV < E < 100 GeV) ?-ray emission in the direction of ? Carinae has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE and Fermi satellites. This emission has been interpreted either in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars or in the very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 "great eruption". Archival Chandra data has been reanalysed to search for signatures of particle acceleration in ? Carinae's blast wave. No shell-like structure could be detected in hard X-rays and a limit has been placed on the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission from the shell. The time dependence of the target radiation field of the Homunculus is used to develop a single zone model for the blast wave. Attempting to reconcile the X-ray limit with the HE ?-ray emission using this model leads to a very hard electron injection spectrum dN/dE ? E - ? with ? < 1.8, harder than the canonical value expected from diffusive shock acceleration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Skilton, J. L.; Domainko, W.; Hinton, J. A.; Jones, D. I.; Ohm, S.; Urquhart, J. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10158017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preradiation studies for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mock, R.C. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1666300"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Observed Correlation Between Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent observations by the $Fermi$ Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> components in the prompt photon spectra of some Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> $\\gamma$-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, $E_{\\rm p}$ and $kT$, of these two components are correlated via the relation $E_{\\rm p} \\propto T^{\\alpha}$ which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of index $\\alpha$ indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burgess, J Michael; Ryde, Felix; Veres, Peter; Meszaros, Peter; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; Iyyani, Shabnam; Goldstein, Adam; Axelsson, Magnus; Baring, Matthew G; Bhat, P N; Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Xiong, Shaolin; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin; Zhu, Sylvia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhD...46H5401M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we investigate the influences of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mileti?, M.; Mojsilovi?, S.; Oki? ?or?evi?, I.; Maleti?, D.; Pua?, N.; Lazovi?, S.; Malovi?, G.; Milenkovi?, P.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj; Bugarski, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...790...98L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PSST...23d3001D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma is a key component in gas lasers, microelectronics, medical applications, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and others. A specific feature of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). This sensitivity is due to complex deformations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape induced by variations in electric field strength, electron and ion number densities and gas excitation degree. Particular attention in this article is paid to mechanisms of instabilities based on non-linearity of plasma properties for specific conditions: gas composition, steady-state and decaying plasma produced by the electron beam, or by an electric current pulse. The following effects are analyzed: the negative differential electron conductivity; the absolute negative electron mobility; the stepwise changes of plasma properties induced by the EEDF bi-stability; thermo-current instability and the constriction of the glow discharge column in rare gases. Some of these effects were observed experimentally and some of them were theoretically predicted and still wait for experimental confirmation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47V5202D"> <span id="translatedtitle">A parametric study of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles from a chlorinated precursor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) synthesized in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) are anticipated as a non-toxic and inexpensive Si source for important applications. This study examines the crystallinity, yield, and size distribution of Si NPs in terms of specific energy input (SEI) for 2.5–65?J?cm?3 and the H2/SiCl4 ratio (1–10). The particle growth mechanism is discussed comprehensively. Atomic hydrogen (H) production using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma is the primary important step for SiCl4 dechlorination at low temperatures. The Si NP yield increases with SEI (plasma power divided by total gas flow) because SiCl4 conversion increases with energy fed into the unit volume of the feed gas. At low SEI, Si NPs were mostly in amorphous material because of insufficient plasma heating. A maximum yield of 50?wt% was obtained when SEI = 10?J?cm?3 (H2/SiCl4 = 10) with a crystal fraction of about 1%. Increased SEI is necessary to improve crystal fraction, but excessive SEI decreases the NP yield remarkably. The NP yield losses correspond to increasing NP-free thin film growth on the reactor wall. Mass spectrometry shows that SiCl4 is highly decomposed with greater SEI. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) increases as a by-product. At higher SEI, particle nucleation and subsequent growth are suppressed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ding, Yi; Yamada, Riku; Gresback, Ryan; Zhou, Shu; Pi, Xiaodong; Nozaki, Tomohiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014xru..confE.300P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from bowshocks produced by runaway stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing throughout the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds, can produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high energy photons by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. We present a new insight in the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission treatment by introducing new approaches, new formulae and exploring the computational method to search for sistematic errors, and we also test its feasibility. We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock (López-Santiago et al. 2012), and BD+43º3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission. From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43º3654, which explains its non detection in X-rays by Terada et al. (2012).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pereira, V.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; López-Santiago, J.; De Castro, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3491894"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma Causes p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) consists of a huge amount of biologically active particles, whereas its temperature is close to ambient. This combination allows one to use NTP as a perspective tool for solving different biomedical tasks, including antitumor therapy. The treatment of tumor cells with NTP caused dose-dependent effects, such as growth arrest and apoptosis. However, while the outcome of NTP treatment has been established, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between NTP and eukaryotic cells have not been thoroughly studied thus far. In this work, the mechanisms and the type of death of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells upon application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> argon plasma were studied. The effect of NTP on the major stress-activated protein p53 was investigated. The results demonstrate that the viability of HCT116 cells upon plasma treatment is dependent on the functional p53 protein. NTP treatment caused an increase in the intracellular concentration of p53 and the induction of the p53-controlled regulon. The p53-dependent accumulation of active proapoptotic caspase-3 was shown in NTP-treated cells. The study was the first to demonstrate that treatment of human colon carcinoma cells with NTP results in p53-dependent apoptosis. The results obtained contribute to our understanding of the applicability of NTP in antitumor therapy. PMID:23150806</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tuhvatulin, A.I.; Sysolyatina, E.V.; Scheblyakov, D.V.; Logunov, D.Yu.; Vasiliev, M.M.; Yurova, M.A.; Danilova, M.A.; Petrov, O.F.; Naroditsky, B.S.; Morfill, G.E.; Grigoriev, A.I.; Fortov, V.E.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Ermolaeva, S.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.117.1873R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of ultrashort pulsed laser radiation induced <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation of graphite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the dependence of a laser radiation induced ablation process of graphite on the applied pulse duration of ultrashort pulsed laser radiation smaller than 4 ps. The emerging so-called <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation process of graphite has been confirmed to be capable to physically separate ultrathin graphitic layers from the surface of pristine graphite bulk crystal. This allows the deposition of ablated graphitic flakes on a substrate in the vicinity of the target. The observed ablation threshold determined at different pulse durations shows a modulation, which we ascribe to lattice motions along the c axis that are theoretically predicted to induce the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation process. In a simple approach, the ablation threshold can be described as a function of the energy penetration depth and the absorption of the applied ultrashort pulsed laser radiation. Based on the analysis of the pulse duration dependence of those two determining factors and the assumption of an invariant ablation process, we are able to reproduce the pulse duration dependence of the ablation threshold. Furthermore, the observed pulse duration dependences confirm the assumption of a fast material specific response of graphite target subsequent to optical excitation within the first 2 ps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reininghaus, M.; Kalupka, C.; Faley, O.; Holtum, T.; Finger, J.; Stampfer, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AAS...21333207H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability Timescales in the M87 Jet: Signatures of E Squared Losses, Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Quasi-period</span> in HST-1, and the Site of TeV Flaring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the variability timescales in the jet of M87 with two goals. The first is to use the rise times and decay times in the radio, ultraviolet and X-ray lightcurves of HST-1 to constrain the source size and the energy loss mechanisms affecting the relativistic electron distributions. We find clear evidence for a frequency-dependent decrease in the synchrotron flux being consistent with E squared energy losses (i.e. synchrotron and inverse Compton). Assuming that these result predominantly from synchrotron cooling, we derive a value of 1 mG for the average magnetic field strength of the HST-1 emission region, a value consistent with previous estimates of the equipartition field. In the process of analyzing the first derivative of the X-ray light curve of HST-1, we discovered a <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation which was most obvious in 2003 and 2004 prior to the major flare. The four cycles observed have a period of order 6 months. The second goal is to search for evidence of differences in the X-ray variability timescales of the unresolved nuclear region (diameter < 0.6") and of HST-1, the first jet knot clearly resolved by Chandra. These features, separated by more than 60 pc, are the two chief contenders for the origin of the TeV variable emissions observed by HESS in 2005 and by MAGIC and VERITAS in 2008. The X-ray variability of the nucleus appears to be at least twice more rapid than that of HST-1. However, the shortest nuclear ariability timescale we can claim from the Chandra data (<=20 days) is still significantly longer than the shortest TeV variability of M87 reported by the HESS and MAGIC telescopes (1-2 days). Work at SAO was supported by NASA grants GO7-8119X and GO8-9116X.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, D. E.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167135"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NuPhS.256..117A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> processes in non-standard accelerators: protostellar jets and runaway stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In addition to efficient particle accelerators in the Galaxy, such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae, other sources can accelerate particles up to very high energies. We present the case of protostellar jets and runaway stars, where strong shocks act upon electrons and protons through a diffusive process. The detection of synchrotron radio emission from these sources indicates that at least electrons are accelerated in these systems. If protons are accelerated as well, both population of relativistic particles can produce high-energy radiation through a variety of processes. We show results from models of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission, from radio to gamma rays, in these kind of sources. High-energy photons from both protostellar jets and massive runaways might be detectable with the current facilities in the GeV domain, or by the forthcoming Cherenkov arrays. A clear detection would prove that young stars are also cosmic ray accelerators.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Araudo, Anabella T.; del Valle, M. Victoria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1754883"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> influence of a weak microwave on nerve fiber activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a short selective review of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> weak microwave field impact on a nerve fiber. The published results of recent experiments are reviewed and analyzed. The theory of the authors is presented, according to which there are strongly pronounced resonances in the range of about 30-300 GHz associated with the excitation of ultrasonic vibrations in the membrane as a result of interactions with the microwave radiation. These forced vibrations create acoustic pressure, which may lead to the redistribution of the protein transmembrane channels, thus changing the threshold of the action potential excitation in the axons of the neural network. The problem of surface charge on the bilayer lipid membrane of the nerve fiber is discussed. Various experiments for observing the effects considered are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shneider, M N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22975253"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abatement of mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a catalytic <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Total oxidation of mixture of dilute volatile organic compounds was carried out in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor with various transition metal oxide catalysts integrated in-plasma. The experimental results indicated the best removal efficiencies in the presence of metal oxide catalysts, especially MnO(x), whose activity was further improved with AgO(x) deposition. It was confirmed water vapor improves the efficiency of the plasma reactor, probably due to the formation of hydroxyl species, whereas, in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface may lead to nascent oxygen. It may be concluded that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma approach is beneficial for the removal of mixture of volatile organic compounds than individual VOCs, probably due to the formation of reactive intermediates like aldehydes, peroxides, etc. PMID:22975253</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karuppiah, J; Reddy, E Linga; Reddy, P Manoj Kumar; Ramaraju, B; Karvembu, R; Subrahmanyam, Ch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4195462"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23954717"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of dimethyl sulfide by the combination of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and biological process.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A bench scale system integrated with a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) and a biotricking filtration (BTF) unit for the treatment of gases containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was investigated. DMS removal efficiency in the integrated system was up to 96%. Bacterial communities in the BTF were assessed by PCR-DGGE, which play the dominant role in the biological processes of metabolism, sulfur oxidation, sulfate-reducing and carbon oxidation. The addition of ozone from NTP made microbial community in BTF more complicated and active for DMS removal. The NTP oxidize DMS to simple compounds such as methanol and carbonyl sulfide; the intermediate organic products and DMS are further oxidized to sulfate, carbon dioxide, water vapors by biological degradation. These results show that NTP-BTF is achievable and open new possibilities for applying the integrated with NTP and BTF to odour gas treatment. PMID:23954717</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei, Z S; Li, H Q; He, J C; Ye, Q H; Huang, Q R; Luo, Y W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECAM1009L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22113399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dust-acoustic shock formation in dusty plasmas with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the nonlinear Burgers equation in the presence of the dust charge fluctuation is derived and the shock-like solution is determined. It is well known that in order to have a monotonic or oscillatory shock wave, a source of dissipation is needed. By using the experimental data reported in the laboratory observation of self-excited dust-acoustic shock waves [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 115002 (2009)], it is shown that dust charge fluctuation can be considered as a candidate for the source of dissipation needed for the dust-acoustic shock formation. By examining the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions on dust-acoustic shock's characteristics, a possible theoretical explanation for the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment is proposed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......149R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raitt, Brittany J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22130036"> <span id="translatedtitle">Differential sensitivity of lymphocyte subpopulations to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasmas can possibly be used for several applications in particular in medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to living tissues and cells, e.g., to induce apoptosis and growth arrest in tumour cells or to improve wound healing. However, detailed investigations of plasma-cell interactions are strongly needed. It is not yet clear whether plasmas will be useful in stimulating immune cells to change their behaviour or function. Therefore, this study focused on the influence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma on cell surface molecules of rat spleen mononuclear cells (MNC) as first important step to gain insight into plasma-immune cells interactions. Rat spleen MNC were treated with plasma by surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air or argon. Lymphocyte subpopulations and expression of L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? expression on T-cells were analysed by flow cytometry 1-48 h after plasma treatment. Plasma changed the ratio of T- and B-cells in favour of B-cells. Of the T-cells the helper T-cells were reduced while cytotoxic T-cells were less affected. L-selectin expressing T-cells were significantly reduced already 1h after plasma treatment and that of ICAM-1(+) and LFA-1?(+)T-cells only after 4h. These effects were time dependent and less dramatic when using DBD/argon plasma. In conclusion, different lymphocyte subpopulations show different sensitivity to plasma. Adhesion molecules as L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? are down regulated by plasma. Whether these results can be used to modify lymphocyte homing or to activate MNC for different applications remains to be clarified. PMID:22130036</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haertel, Beate; Volkmann, Frauke; von Woedtke, Thomas; Lindequist, Ulrike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/195785"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric-pressure air streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Each of these methods can be implemented in many ways. There are many types of electrical discharge reactors, the variants depending on the electrode configuration and electrical power supply (pulsed, AC or DC). Two of the more extensively investigated types of discharge reactors are based on the pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge. Recently, compact low-energy (<200 keV) electron accelerators have been developed to meet the requirements of industrial applications such as crosslinking of polymer materials, curing of solvent-free coatings, and drying of printing inks. Special materials have also been developed to make the window thin and rugged. Some of these compact electron beam sources are already commercially available and could be utilized for many pollution control applications. In this paper we will present a comparative assessment of various nonthermal plasma reactors. The thrust of our work has been two-fold: (1) to understand the scalability of various <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to identify the byproducts to ensure that the effluent gases from the processor are either benign or much easier and less expensive to dispose of compared to the original pollutants. We will present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor and various types of electrical discharge reactors. We have used these reactors to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCS. We have studied the effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070022510&hterms=Black+Holes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2522Black%2BHoles%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gamma-ray Spectral Characteristics of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission from Three Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cygnus X-1 and the gamma-ray transients GROJ0422+32 and GROJ1719-24 displayed similar spectral properties when they underwent transitions between the high and low gamma-ray (30 keV to few MeV) intensity states. When these sources were in the high (gamma)-ray intensity state ((gamma)2, for Cygnus X-l), their spectra featured two components: a Comptonized shape below 200-300 keV with a soft power-law tail (photon index >= 3) that extended to 1 MeV or beyond. When the sources were in the low-intensity state ((gamma)0, for Cygnus X-l), the Comptonized spectral shape below 200 keV typically vanished and the entire spectrum from 30 keV to 1 MeV can be characterized by a single power law with a relatively harder photon index 2-2.7. Consequently the high- and low-intensity gamma-ray spectra intersect, generally in the 400 KeV - 1 MeV range, in contrast to the spectral pivoting seen previously at lower (10 keV) energies. The presence of the power-law component in both the high- and low-intensity gammaray spectra strongly suggests that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> process is likely to be at work in both the high and the low-intensity situations. We have suggested a possible scenario (Ling & Wheaton, 2003), by combining the ADAF model of Esin et al. (1998) with a separate jet region that produces the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> gamma-ray emission, and which explains the state transitions. Such a scenario will be discussed in the context of the observational evidence, summarized above, from the database produced by EBOP, JPL's BATSE earth occultation analysis system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ling, James C.; Wheaton, William A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AAS...198.1001E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Signatures in Low State Spectra of Black Hole X-Ray Transients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many transient and persistent Black Hole X-ray Binaries (BHXBs) show characteristic state transitions between low/hard and high/soft spectral states. A typical low/hard state X-ray spectrum, as seen for example in Cyg X-1 and GRO J0422+32, is a power-law with a photon index of order 1.4-1.6 and an exponential cutoff with a characteristic e-folding energy ~ 100 keV. These spectra are generally interpreted as emission from hot thermal plasma modeled either as an accretion disk corona, or as a hot accretion flow inside a truncated thin disk. We show that low state spectra of three transient BHXBs, XTE J1118+480, XTE J1550-564, and 4U1630-47, do not show the characteristic hard X-ray turnover. The absence of the turnover is difficult to understand in the context of the thermal Comptonization models, and argues for the presence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in these systems. We propose that a typical hard power-law spectrum can be produced both in the (thermal) accretion flow or in the (<span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>) jet (as suggested by Fender et al. 2000). The strength of the jet emission relative to that from the accretion flow (and therefore whether we observe the thermal cutoff in the spectrum or not) can depend on several parameters, e.g. inclination of the jet with respect to the binary and the observer, mass accretion rate, accretion flow configuration. This work was supported by Chandra Postdoctoral Fellowship grant #PF8-10002 awarded by the Chandra X-Ray Center, which is operated by the SAO for NASA under contract NAS8-39073, and by a CASS Postdoctoral Fellowship.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Esin, A. A.; Tomsick, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515193"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> DNA damage of cancer cells using near-infrared irradiation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously, we reported that near-infrared irradiation that simulates solar near-infrared irradiation with pre- and parallel-irradiational cooling can <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span> induce cytocidal effects in cancer cells. To explore these effects, we assessed cell viability, DNA damage response pathways, and the percentage of mitotic cancer cells after near-infrared treatment. Further, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of near-infrared irradiation compared with doxorubicin in xenografts in nude mice by measuring tumor volume and assessing protein phosphorylation by immunoblot analysis. The cell viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells was significantly decreased after three rounds of near-infrared irradiation at 20 J/cm(2). Apoptotic cells were observed in near-infrared treated cells. Moreover, near-infrared treatment increased the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at Ser(1981), H2AX at Ser(139), Chk1 at Ser(317), structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) 1 at Ser(966), and p53 at Ser(15) in A549 cells compared with control. Notably, near-infrared treatment induced the formation of nucleic foci of ?H2AX. The percentage of mitotic A549 cells, as measured by histone H3 phosphorylation, decreased significantly after three rounds of near-infrared irradiation at 20 J/cm(2). Both near-infrared and doxorubicin inhibited the tumor growth of MDA-MB435 melanoma cell xenografts in nude mice and increased the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(15), Chk1 at Ser(317), SMC1 at Ser(966), and H2AX at Ser(139) compared with control mice. These results indicate that near-infrared irradiation can <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span> induce cytocidal effects in cancer cells as a result of activation of the DNA damage response pathway. The near-infrared irradiation schedule used here reduces discomfort and side effects. Therefore, this strategy may have potential application in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22515193</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanaka, Yohei; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nakayama, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3432087"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Atmospheric Pressure <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacteria exist, in most environments, as complex, organised communities of sessile cells embedded within a matrix of self-produced, hydrated extracellular polymeric substances known as biofilms. Bacterial biofilms represent a ubiquitous and predominant cause of both chronic infections and infections associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and prostheses. Such infections typically exhibit significantly enhanced tolerance to antimicrobial, biocidal and immunological challenge. This renders them difficult, sometimes impossible, to treat using conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Effective alternative approaches for prevention and eradication of biofilm associated chronic and device-associated infections are therefore urgently required. Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas are gaining increasing attention as a potential approach for the eradication and control of bacterial infection and contamination. To date, however, the majority of studies have been conducted with reference to planktonic bacteria and rather less attention has been directed towards bacteria in the biofilm mode of growth. In this study, the activity of a kilohertz-driven atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet, operated in a helium oxygen mixture, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro biofilms was evaluated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exhibit marked susceptibility to exposure of the plasma jet effluent, following even relatively short (?10?s s) exposure times. Manipulation of plasma operating conditions, for example, plasma operating frequency, had a significant effect on the bacterial inactivation rate. Survival curves exhibit a rapid decline in the number of surviving cells in the first 60 seconds followed by slower rate of cell number reduction. Excellent anti-biofilm activity of the plasma jet was also demonstrated by both confocal scanning laser microscopy and metabolism of the tetrazolium salt, XTT, a measure of bactericidal activity. PMID:22952948</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y.; Algwari, Qais Th.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; O'Connell, Deborah; Gilmore, Brendan F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37.3066S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long term <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission of solar flares and the Neupert effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations of hard (Anti-Coincidence System of Spectrometer on INTEGRAL (ACS SPI), ˜150 keV) and soft (GOES 1-8 A) X-ray emission as well as microwave emission (15.5 GHz) during the solar flare of 2005 September 7 and 2006 December 6 and 13 are analyzed. Timeprofiles of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission of these flares provide evidence of complex behavior of the solar chromosphere and corona during more than one hour after flare onsets, including several acts of energy release and particle acceleration. In a case the first two flares the Neupert effect is observed for the most intensive peak of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission, but not during the soft X-ray decay phase, when the hard X-ray and microwave emission is still well above background. At that time the hard X-ray intensity is considerably less in comparison with the main peak, but the microwave intensity doesn't change significantly. Observations of the long-term hard X-ray emission during the 2006 December 13 event were complicated due to fast arrival of relativistic solar protons, but the Neupert effect was not observed even for the main peak. For the comparable intensities of the microwave emission on December 6 and 13, the maximum hard X-ray intensity on December 13 was depressed by about one order. These facts point out on emission from low density medium and small precipitation to more dense layers during the time, when the Neupert effect is not valid, i.e. emission from the coronal trap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Struminsky, Alexei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21304887"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: the Importance of a Joint LOFAR/Simbol-X View</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources ('halos' and 'relics') related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferrari, C. [UNSA, CNRS UMR 6202 Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014HEAD...1410607N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hot Flow Model for Low Luminosity AGNs and Black Hole Binaries: the Role and Origin of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optically thin, two-temperature accretion flows are widely considered as a relevant accretion mode below ~0.01 LEdd in AGNs as well as in X-ray binaries. We study spectral formation in such flows using a refined model with a fully general relativistic description of both the radiative (leptonic and hadronic) and hydrodynamic processes, and with an exact treatment of global Comptonization. We point out that basic properties of two-temperature flows determine the relative strengths of the synchrotron radiation of thermal electrons and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons from charged-pion decay, in a manner consistent with observations. In AGNs, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> synchrotron dominates the seed photon input down to ~10-5 LEdd and it allows to explain the X-ray spectral index-Eddington ratio relation as well as the cut-off energies measured in the best-studied AGNs; the (standard) model with the thermal synchrotron being the main source of seed photons does not agree with these observations. For stellar-mass black holes, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons from hadronic processes become important only above ~0.01 LEdd (and may be relevant for the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> tails observed in luminous hard states of Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4) and we find that the thermal synchrotron provides a sufficient seed photon flux to explain observations of black hole transients below ~0.01 LEdd. We also note that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> acceleration processes in hot flows are constrained by comparisons of the predicted gamma-ray fluxes (from neutral pion decay) with Fermi-LAT upper limits. For NGC 4151, it limits the energy content in the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component of proton distribution to at most 1 per cent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niedzwiecki, Andrzej; Xie, Fu-Guo; Stepnik, Agnieszka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21612232"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas with positive and negative dust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_12 div --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078877"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span>, pulsed electric field cell ablation: A novel tool for regenerative medicine and scarless skin regeneration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High voltage, short pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ablation method, in which defined PEF irreversibly destabilize cell membranes, while preserving other tissue components such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present report, we show that PEF ablated rat skin retains its microvascular blood supply and ECM structure. Complete regeneration of epidermis, hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and the panniculus carnosusis observed two months after the ablation. Our results clearly indicate that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> PEF has the potential to be a powerful and novel tool for scarless tissue regeneration. PMID:24999487</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Bohr, Stefan; Mihm, Martin C.; Austen, William G.; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T.; Yarmush, Martin L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22251439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron and ion distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir; Baraz, Rasoul [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22140151"> <span id="translatedtitle">ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: dheeraj@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140011109&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Nature of the mHz X-ray <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21326172"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Alternative to Waste Incineration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=40751"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTERIM GUIDELINES FOR THE DISPOSAL/DESTRUCTION OF PCBS AND PCB ITEMS BY <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> METHODS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is an interim resource and guideline document to help EPA regional offices implement the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) regulations (40 CFR 761) for using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods of destroying/disposing of PCBs. The report describes and evaluates various alternative chemic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1501.03118.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets have rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense clumps. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission. We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> luminosity in gamma rays. The available <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy from jet-obstacle interaction...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bosch-Ramon, V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/61/71/41/PDF/Lebouvier_Exhaust_gas_fuel_reforming_Energy_Fuels2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">to the reforming of Diesel fuel with Diesel engine exhaust gas using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma torch for NOx trap and Fuels 25, 3 (2011) 1034-1044" DOI : 10.1021/ef101674r #12;2 Diesel engine exhaust gas are reported-heptane as surrogate molecule for Diesel fuel. Two compositions of synthetic Diesel engine exhaust gas, corresponding</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/215850"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21576690"> <span id="translatedtitle">RE-ACCELERATION OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PARTICLES AT WEAK COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of the pre-existing as well as freshly injected populations of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, cosmic-ray (CR) particles at weak cosmological shocks. Assuming simple models for thermal leakage injection and Alfvenic drift, we derive analytic, time-dependent solutions for the two populations of CRs accelerated in the test-particle regime. We then compare them with the results from kinetic DSA simulations for shock waves that are expected to form in intracluster media and cluster outskirts in the course of large-scale structure formation. We show that the test-particle solutions provide a good approximation for the pressure and spectrum of CRs accelerated at these weak shocks. Since the injection is extremely inefficient at weak shocks, the pre-existing CR population dominates over the injected population. If the pressure due to pre-existing CR protons is about 5% of the gas thermal pressure in the upstream flow, the downstream CR pressure can absorb typically a few to 10% of the shock ram pressure at shocks with a Mach number M {approx}< 3, yet the re-acceleration of CR electrons can result in a substantial synchrotron emission behind the shock. The enhancement in synchrotron radiation across the shock is estimated to be about a few to several for M {approx} 1.5 and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} for M {approx} 3, depending on the detail model parameters. The implication of our findings for observed bright radio relics is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21565371"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> RADIO EMITTER HD 93250 RESOLVED BY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As the brightest O-type X-ray source in the Carina nebula, HD 93250 (O4 III(fc)) is X-ray overluminous for its spectral type and has an unusually hard X-ray spectrum. Two different scenarios have been invoked to explain its X-ray properties: wind-wind interaction and magnetic wind confinement. Yet, HD 93250 shows absolutely constant radial velocities over timescales of years suggesting either a single star, a binary system seen pole-on view or a very long period, and/or highly eccentric system. Using the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer, we resolved HD 93250 as a close pair with similar components. We measured a near-infrared flux ratio of 0.8 {+-} 0.1 and a separation of (1.5 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -3} arcsec. At the distance of Carina, this corresponds to a projected physical distance of 3.5 AU. While a quantitative investigation would require a full characterization of the orbit, the binary nature of HD 93250 allows us to qualitatively explain both its X-ray flux and hardness and its <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emission in the framework of a colliding wind scenario. We also discuss various observational biases. We show that, due to line blending of two similar spectral components, HD 93250 could have a period as short as 1 to several years despite the lack of measurable radial velocity variations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sana, H.; De Koter, A. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Le Bouquin, J.-B. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble (France); De Becker, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique, Liege University, Allee du 6 Aout 17, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Berger, J.-P.; Merand, A., E-mail: h.sana@uva.nl [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO), Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vascular smooth muscle cells ablation with endovascular <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> irreversible electroporation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose Using fundamental principles of electroporation and mathematical analyses of temperature and electrical fields of blood vessels we developed an endovascular ablation approach - <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> irreversible electroporation (NTIRE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of endovascular NTIRE on blood vessels. Material and Methods Specially made endovascular devices with four electrodes on top of inflatable balloons were used to apply electroporation pulses. Finite element simulations were used to characterize NTIRE protocols that will not induce thermal damage to treated tissues. Right iliac arteries of eight rabbits were treated with 90 NTIRE pulses. Angiograms were preformed before and after the procedures. Arterial specimens were harvested at 7 and 35 days. Evaluation included Hematoxylin & Eosin, elastic Von Giessen, and Masson’s Trichrome stains. Immunohistochemistry of selected slides included smooth muscle actin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, von willebrand factor and S-100 antigen. Results At 7 days, all NTIRE-treated arterial segments displayed complete, transmural ablation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). At 35 days, similar damage to VSMC was noted. In most cases, elastic lamina remained intact and endothelial layer regenerated. Occasional mural inflammation and cartilaginous metaplasia were noted. After five weeks there was no evidence of significant VSMC proliferation, with the dominant process being wall fibrosis with regenerated endothelium. Conclusions NTIRE can be applied in an endovascular approach. It efficiently ablates vessel wall within seconds and with no damage to extra-cellular structures. NTIRE has possible applications in many fields of clinical cardiology, including arterial restenosis and cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20933436</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maor, Elad; Ivorra, Antoni; Mitchell, James J.; Rubinsky, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RAA....14..285Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emissions from accreting X-ray binary pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emissions from cascade processes in accreting X-ray binary pulsars. In the framework of the magnetospheric gap model, we consider three photon fields, which are respectively from the polar cap of a pulsar, its surrounding accretion disk and a massive companion star with a circumstellar disk, to shield the gap. The gap-accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons emit high-energy photons via curvature radiation and an inverse Compton scattering process, in which part of these high-energy photons absorbed by interactions with the surrounding photon fields can facilitate the following electromagnetic cascades. We first carry out numerical calculations of the cascade processes in order to obtain the predicted emission spectra. As an example, we subsequently apply this model to reproduce observations of LS I +61° 303. We find that the results can fit observations ranging from hard X-ray to ?-ray bands. In particular, they can explain the spectral cutoff feature at a few GeV. Finally, we suggest that the emissions detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope from X-ray binary pulsars originate in the magnetosphere region of the pulsar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Jian-Fu; Jin, Hui; Dong, Ai-Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0810.0035v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> radiation from molecular clouds illuminated by cosmic rays from nearby supernova remnants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Molecular clouds are expected to emit <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radiation due to cosmic ray interactions in the dense magnetized gas. Such emission is amplified if a cloud is located close to an accelerator of cosmic rays and if cosmic rays can leave the accelerator and diffusively reach the cloud. We consider the situation in which a molecular cloud is located in the proximity of a supernova remnant which is accelerating cosmic rays and gradually releasing them into the interstellar medium. We calculate the multiwavelength spectrum from radio to gamma rays which emerges from the cloud as the result of cosmic ray interactions. The total energy output is dominated by the gamma ray emission, which can exceed the emission from other bands by an order of magnitude or more. This suggests that some of the unidentified TeV sources detected so far, with no obvious or very weak counterpart in other wavelengths, might be associated with clouds illuminated by cosmic rays coming from a nearby source.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefano Gabici; Sabrina Casanova; Felix A. Aharonian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/16711"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct chemical oxidation: a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> technology for the destruction of organic wastes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment and chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992, and is applicable to the destruction of virtually all solid or liquid organics, including: chlorosolvents, oils and greases, detergents, organic-contaminated soils or sludges, explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and PCB's. [1-15] The process normally operates at 80-100 C, a heating requirement which increases the difficulty of surface decontamination of large objects or, for example, treatment of a wide area contaminated soil site. The driver for DCO work in FY98 was thus to investigate the use of catalysts to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technology for organics destruction at temperatures closer to ambient. In addition, DCO is at a sufficiently mature stage of development that technology transfer to a commercial entity was a logical next step, and was thus included in FY98 tasks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balazs, G.B.; Cooper, J. F.; Lewis, P. R.; Adamson, M. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PMB....56..951G"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vivo <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 °C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golberg, A.; Laufer, S.; Rabinowitch, H. D.; Rubinsky, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22355583"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> hot electrons ultrafastly generating hot optical phonons in graphite.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigation of the non-equilibrium dynamics after an impulsive impact provides insights into couplings among various excitations. A two-temperature model (TTM) is often a starting point to understand the coupled dynamics of electrons and lattice vibrations: the optical pulse primarily raises the electronic temperature T(el) while leaving the lattice temperature T(l) low; subsequently the hot electrons heat up the lattice until T(el) = T(l) is reached. This temporal hierarchy owes to the assumption that the electron-electron scattering rate is much larger than the electron-phonon scattering rate. We report herein that the TTM scheme is seriously invalidated in semimetal graphite. Time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TrPES) of graphite reveals that fingerprints of coupled optical phonons (COPs) occur from the initial moments where T(el) is still not definable. Our study shows that ultrafast-and-efficient phonon generations occur beyond the TTM scheme, presumably associated to the long duration of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons in graphite. PMID:22355583</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishida, Y; Togashi, T; Yamamoto, K; Tanaka, M; Taniuchi, T; Kiss, T; Nakajima, M; Suemoto, T; Shin, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MRE.....2a5019C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single-step <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma synthesis of 3C-SiC nanoparticles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a scalable, single-step, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma synthesis technique for the growth of sub-5 nm, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) coated 3C-SiC nanoparticles (NPs). In a tubular flow reactor, we first nucleate and grow c-Si NPs upstream in a SiH4/Ar plasma. These c-Si NPs are then transported by gas flow to a downstream C2H2/Ar plasma, and carburized in-flight by carbon-containing radicals and ions to 3C-SiC NPs. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicate an NP size of ?4 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms that the c-Si NPs are completely carburized to 3C-SiC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows that the surface of the 3C-SiC NPs is coated with a-C:H with some alkenyl termination, which can facilitate further solution-based surface functionalization for biomedical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; de Peuter, Koen; Ghodes, Jacob A.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan; Stradins, Paul; Agarwal, Sumit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PPCF...56d5007W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time dependent evolution of RF-generated <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle distributions in fusion plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe fully self-consistent time-dependent simulations of radio frequency (RF) generated ion distributions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and RF-generated electron distributions in the lower hybrid range of frequencies using combined Fokker-Planck and full wave electromagnetic field solvers. In each regime, the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle distributions have been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to compare with diagnostic measurements from experiment, thus providing validation of the simulation capability. The computational intensive simulations require multiple full wave code runs that iterate with a Fokker-Planck code. We will discuss advanced algorithms that have been implemented to accelerate both the massively parallel full wave simulations as well as the iteration with the distribution code. A vector extrapolation method (Sidi A 2008 Comput. Math. Appl. 56) that permits Jacobian-free acceleration of the traditional fixed point iteration technique is used to reduce the number of iterations needed between the distribution and wave codes to converge to self-consistency. The computational burden of the parallel full wave codes has been reduced by using a more efficient two level parallel decomposition that improves the strong scaling of the codes and reduces the communication overhead.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, J. C.; Bader, A.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lee, J.-P.; Schmidt, A.; D'Azevedo, E.; Faust, I.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0904.3773v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mirage in the Sky: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Dark Matter, Gravitino Problem, and Cosmic Ray Anomalies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent anomalies in cosmic rays could be due to dark matter annihilation in our galaxy. In order to get the required large cross-section to explain the data while still obtaining the right relic density, we rely on a non standard thermal history between dark matter freeze-out and Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). We show that through a reheating phase from the decay of a heavy moduli or even the gravitino, we can produce the right relic density of dark matter if its self-annihilation cross-section is large enough. In addition to fitting the recent data, this scenario solves the cosmological moduli and gravitino problems. We illustrate this mechanism with a specific example in the context of U(1)_{B-L} extended MSSM where supersymmetry is broken via mirage mediation. These string motivated models naturally contain heavy moduli decaying to the gravitino, whose subsequent decay to the LSP can reheat the universe at a low temperature. The right-handed sneutrino and the B-L gaugino can both be viable dark matter candidates with large cross-section. They are leptophilic because of B-L charges. We also show that it is possible to distinguish the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> from the thermal scenario (using Sommerfeld enhancement) in direct detection experiments for certain regions of parameter space.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhaskar Dutta; Louis Leblond; Kuver Sinha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECAM1012R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antitumor action of <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The presentation deals with the assessment on two <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PPCF...51l4002M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physics and applications of atmospheric <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air plasma with reference to environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since air is a natural part of our environment, special attention is given to the study of plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure and their applications. This fact promoted the study of electrical conduction in air-like mixtures, i.e. mixtures containing an electronegative gas component. If the ionization growth is not limited its temporal evolution leads to spark formation, i.e. a thermal plasma of several thousand kelvins in a quasi-local thermodynamic equilibrium state. But before reaching such a thermal state, a plasma sets up where the electrons increase their energy characterized by an electron temperature Te much higher than that of heavy species T or T+ for the ions. Since the plasma is no longer characterized by only one temperature T, it is said to be in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) state. Practical ways are listed to prevent electron ionization from going beyond the NTP states. Much understanding of such NTP may be gathered from the study of the simple paradigmatic case of a discharge induced between a sharp positively stressed point electrode facing a grounded negative plane electrode. Some physical properties will be gathered from such configurations and links underlined between these properties and some associated applications, mostly environmental. Aerosol filtration and electrostatic precipitators, pollution control by removal of hazardous species contained in flue gas exhaust, sterilization applications for medical purposes and triggering fuel combustion in vehicle motors are among such applications nowadays.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marode, E.; Djermoune, D.; Dessante, P.; Deniset, C.; Ségur, P.; Bastien, F.; Bourdon, A.; Laux, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAP...114j4701S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> mechanism of weak microwave fields influence on neurons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mechanism of weak microwave field impact on a nerve fiber is proposed. It is shown that in the range of about 30-300 GHz, there are strongly pronounced resonances associated with the excitation of ultrasonic vibrations in the membrane as a result of interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The viscous dissipation limits the resonances and results in their broadening. These forced vibrations create acoustic pressure, which may lead to the redistribution of the protein transmembrane channels, and thus changing the threshold of the action potential excitation in the axons of the neural network. The influence of the electromagnetic microwave radiation on various specific areas of myelin nerve fibers was analyzed: the nodes of Ranvier, and the initial segment—the area between the neuron hillock and the first part of the axon covered with the myelin layer. It was shown that the initial segment is the most sensitive area of the myelined neurons from which the action potential normally starts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23229278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of palm oil refinery wastewaters by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gliding electric discharge in humid air is a source of activated species forming (e.g. (•)OH, (•)NO and their derivatives H2O2, ONO2H and NO3H) which are present in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure. These species are able to degrade organic pollutants in palm oil refinery wastewaters (PORW). The increase in acidity (pH decrease), conductivity and total dissolved solids (TDS) and the decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) of PORW samples exposed to the discharge are reported. More than 50% TOC abatement is obtained for 15 min treatment in batch conditions with a laboratory reactor. The organic pollutants of PORW, i.e. mainly fatty acids are degraded according to a pseudo first-order reaction (k*?=?0.06 min(-1)). Post discharge reactions are also observed after having switched off the discharge, which suggests that the pseudo first-order (k???0.05 min(-1)) degradation reactions should be attributed to the diffusion of soluble reactive species, e.g. H2O2 and ONOOH in the liquid target. PMID:23229278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mountapmbeme-Kouotou, P; Laminsi, S; Acayanka, E; Brisset, J-L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1403.2437v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> signatures of the Unruh effect in Casimir-Polder forces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that Casimir-Polder forces between two relativistic uniformly accelerated atoms exhibit a transition from the short distance thermal-like behavior predicted by the Unruh effect, to a long distance <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> behavior, associated with the breakdown of a local inertial description of the system. This phenomenology extends the Unruh thermal response detected by a single accelerated observer to an accelerated spatially extended system of two particles, and we identify the characteristic length scale for this crossover with the inverse of the proper acceleration of the two atoms. Our results are derived separating at fourth order in perturbation theory the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction field to the Casimir-Polder interaction between two atoms moving in two generic stationary trajectories separated by a constant distance, and linearly coupled to a scalar field. The field can be assumed in its vacuum state or at finite temperature, resulting in a general method for the computation of Casimir-Polder forces in stationary regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Marino; A. Noto; R. Passante</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22215418"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVIDENCE OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Geomo.228..526D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genesis of folia in a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> epigenic cave (Matanzas, Cuba)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Folia are an unusual speleothem type resembling inverted cups or bracket fungi. The mechanism of folia formation is not fully understood and is the subject of an ongoing debate. This study focuses on an occurrence of folia present in Santa Catalina Cave, a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> epigenic cave located close to Matanzas (Cuba). The sedimentology, morphology, petrology, permeability and geochemistry of these folia have been studied to gain new insight on the processes leading to their development. It is concluded that folia in Santa Catalina Cave formed at the top of a fluctuating water body, through CO2-degassing or evaporation, which may have been enhanced by the proximity to cave entrances. Two observations strongly support our conclusions. (1) When compared to other subaqueous speleothems (e.g. cave clouds) present in the same rooms, folia occur exclusively within a limited vertical interval that likely represents an ancient water level. Folia occur together with calcite rafts and tower cones that developed, respectively, on top of and below the water level. This suggests that a fluctuating interface is required for folia formation. (2) The measured permeability of the folia is too high to trap gas bubbles. Thus, in contrast to what has been proposed in other studies, trapped bubbles of CO2 cannot be invoked as the key factor determining the genesis and morphology of folia in this subaqueous environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D'Angeli, Ilenia Maria; De Waele, Jo; Melendres, Osmany Ceballo; Tisato, Nicola; Sauro, Francesco; Gonzales, Esteban Ruben Grau; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Torriani, Stefano; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22534704M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The impact of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons on resolved black hole accretion disk images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent developments in radio astronomy (in particular, the Event Horizon Telescope) allow us for the first time to resolve length scales around the Milky Way's Sgr A* comparable to the event horizon radius. These observations are opening up new opportunities to study strong gravity and accretion physics in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole. However, the processes governing black hole accretion are not well understood. In particular, the electron thermodynamics in black hole accretion disks remain mysterious, and current models vary significantly from each other. The impact of these differences between current electron thermodynamics models on results obtained from EHT images is not well understood. Thus, in this work, we explore the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons on black hole images and radio spectra in the context of both semi-analytic and numerical models of accretion flows. Using general relativistic ray-tracing and radiative transfer code, we simulate images of the accretion disk around Sgr A* and compare our simulations to observed radio data. We estimate the range of electron energy distribution functions permissible by the data. In so doing, we also explore the range and variety of black hole images obtained by varying the distribution function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mao, Shengkai; Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E.697D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small Amplitude Electron Acoustic Solitons in a Magnetoplasma with <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An important characteristic of space plasmas is their ability to sustain a great variety of wave phenomena. Such plasma waves are detected in space with the frequency ranging from few millihertz to several tens of kilohertz. The nonlinear evolutions of these waveforms are interpreted as electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic solitary waves. There have been several studies on solitary waves that are based on models using the Boltzmann distribution function for electrons/ions. However, in space plasmas, a population of superthermal electrons, where the particle distributions may deviate from the Maxwellian can exist. We have studied the small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in four component plasma consisting of nonthermal hot electrons, fluid cold electrons, beam electrons and ions is studied. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing nonlinear evolution of electron acoustic solitons is derived. The effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermality</span>, beam electron velocity and temperature, obliquity on electron acoustic solitary structures are investigated in detail. These theoretical results on solitary potential structures will be used to model satellite observations in the various regions of the Earth’s magnetosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Devanandhan, Selvaraj; Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Singh, Satyavir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/00/12/65/PDF/Bulgakov-APA.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ccsd-00001265(version1):10Mar2004 Applied Physics A (2004) accepted Silicon clusters produced by femtosecond laser ablation: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission and</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">by femtosecond laser ablation: <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> emission and gas-phase condensation Alexander V. Bulgakov Institute is an example of a complex interplay of thermal and ultrafast, <span class="hlt">non</span>- <span class="hlt">thermal</span> processes involved to ablation [1, 2+ n (up to n = 10) have been produced by femtosecond laser ablation of bulk silicon in vacuum</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Nanos...5.7825J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Functionalization of nanomaterials by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti3+ ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing.A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti3+ ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01889j</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0906.4765v3"> <span id="translatedtitle">PAMELA Satellite Data as a Signal of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Wino LSP Dark Matter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite data is accumulating that suggests and constrains dark matter physics. We argue there is a very well motivated theoretical preexisting framework consistent with dark matter annihilation being observed by the PAMELA satellite detector. The dark matter is (mainly) the neutral W boson superpartner, the wino with mass below 200 GeV. Using the program GALPROP we study the annihilation products and backgrounds together. Antimatter and gammas from annihilating winos contribute below this energy. We explain why PAMELA data does not imply no antiproton signal was observed by PAMELA or earlier experiments, and explain why the antiproton analysis was misunderstood by earlier papers. Wino annihilation does not describe the Fermi e+ + e- data (except partially below ~ 100 GeV). At higher energies we expect astrophysical mechanisms, and we simply parameterize them so the combination can describe all the data. We emphasize several predictions for satellite data to test the wino interpretation, particularly the turndown of the positron and antiproton spectra above 100 GeV. Most other interpretations require a large rise in the positron rates above 100 GeV. We focus on studying this well-motivated and long predicted wino interpretation, rather than comparisons with other interpretations. We emphasize that interpretations also depend very strongly on assumptions about the cosmological history of the universe, and on propagation of antiprotons and positrons in the galaxy. The winos PAMELA is observing arose from some <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> sources such as moduli decay rather than a universe that cooled in thermal equilibrium after the big bang. Then it is appropriate to normalize the wino density to the local relic density, and no "boost factors" are needed to obtain the reported PAMELA rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon Kane; Ran Lu; Scott Watson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JPhD...38.....M"> <span id="translatedtitle">EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas for processing and other applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for surface treatment, thin film coating, sterilization, decontamination, etc. Many interesting questions have arisen that are related to both fundamental and applied research in this field. Many concern the generation of a large volume discharge which remains stable and uniform at atmospheric pressure. At this pressure, depending on the experimental conditions, either streamer or Townsend breakdown may occur. They respectively lead to micro-discharges or to one large radius discharge, Townsend or glow. However, the complexity arises from the formation of large radius streamers due to avalanche coupling and from the constriction of the glow discharge due to too low a current. Another difficulty is to visually distinguish many micro-discharges from one large radius discharge. Other questions relate to key chemical reactions in the plasma and at the surface. Experimental characterization and modelling also need to be developed to answer these questions. This cluster collects up-to-date research results related to the understanding of different discharges working at atmospheric pressure and the application to polymer surface activation and thin film coating. It presents different solutions for generating and sustaining diffuse discharges at atmospheric pressure. DC, low-frequency and radio-frequency excitations are considered in noble gases, nitrogen or air. Two specific methods developed to understand the transition from Townsend to streamer breakdown are also presented. They are based on the cross-correlation spectroscopy and an electrical model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Massines, Françoise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0510701v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40851221"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pulsatory</span> magma supply to a phonolite lava lake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A few lava lakes, like that at Erebus volcano, Antarctica, have been continuously active for decades, reaching a steady-state. We report spectroscopic and thermal observations from Erebus that reveal remarkable, phase-locked cycles of lava lake convection and gas plume composition. We argue that the observed fluctuations in gas ratios, including the SO2\\/CO2 content in the plume, identify two end-member contributions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clive Oppenheimer; Alexandra S. Lomakina; Philip R. Kyle; Nick G. Kingsbury; Marie Boichu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1710871"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron acceleration to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energies in low Mach number (Msolar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M=3. We find that about 15 percent of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p~2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12498880"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chandra discovery of extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission in 3C 207 and the spectrum of the relativistic electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the Chandra discovery of large scale <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission features in the double lobed SSRL quasar 3C 207 (z=0.684). These are: a diffuse emission well correlated with the western radio lobe, a bright one sided jet whose structure coincides with that of the eastern radio jet and an X-ray source at the tip of the jet coincident with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Brunetti; M. Bondi; A. Comastri; G. Setti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53134738"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shu-Min Yin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23831925"> <span id="translatedtitle">Functionalization of nanomaterials by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti(3+) ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing. PMID:23831925</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21579989"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span>, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO EMISSION FROM Cyg OB2 no. 5: A WIND-COLLISION REGION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The radio emission from the well-studied massive stellar system Cyg OB2 no. 5 is known to fluctuate with a period of 6.7 years between a low-flux state, when the emission is entirely of free-free origin, and a high-flux state, when an additional <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component (of hitherto unknown nature) appears. In this paper, we demonstrate that the radio flux of that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> component is steady on timescales of hours and that its morphology is arc-like. This shows that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission results from the collision between the strong wind driven by the known contact binary in the system and that of an unseen companion on a somewhat eccentric orbit with a 6.7 year period and a 5-10 mas semimajor axis. Together with the previously reported wind-collision region located about 0.''8 to the northeast of the contact binary, so far Cyg OB2 no. 5 appears to be the only multiple system known to harbor two radio-imaged wind-collision regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ortiz-Leon, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio A. [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Mioduszewski, Amy J., E-mail: g.ortiz@crya.unam.mx [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book..445K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Plasma System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <100 ppm (MA) after 24 h. The PK-2 carbon monoxide levels were <20 ppm (air) and <400 ppm (MA) after 24 h. Treatments showed reductions in spores of greater than 6 log10 after 24 h. Reductions were maintained without additional re-growth at 72 h. These results indicate that the PK-1 and PK-2 systems have the capacity to reduce Bacillus subtilis spores in an in-package ionization process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22093785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kewitz, T. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Sperka, J. [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22086408"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21612231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas with positive and negative dust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41148568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of selected combinations of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processing technologies on the quality of an apple and cranberry juice blend</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A blend of apple and cranberry juice was processed by a combination of a light-based technology (ultraviolet light (UV) (5.3J\\/cm2) or high intensity light pulses (HILP) (3.3J\\/cm2) in combination with pulsed electric fields (PEF) (34kV\\/cm, 18Hz, 93?s) or manothermosonication (MTS) (5bar, 43°C, 750W, 20kHz). Selected physical and chemical attributes were evaluated pre- and post-processing, and the sensory attributes of <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Irene M. Caminiti; Francesco Noci; Arantxa Muñoz; Paul Whyte; Desmond J. Morgan; Denis A. Cronin; James G. Lyng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1977065"> <span id="translatedtitle">New option for solving the climatic problems with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> laser driven boron fusion and ultrahigh magnetic fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In contrast to the broad stream of sustainable developments on fusion energy, new aspects are developed now by applying ultra-short, ultra-powerful laser pulses in a plasma-block ignition scheme by avoiding the well known difficulties of thermal-pressure instabilities and losses through using electro-dynamic <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> energy conversion. A further advantage is given by the new 10 kilo-Tesla magnetic fields for fusion of uncompressed proton-boron fuel which avoids problems of dangerous nuclear radiation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hora, Heinrich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........12O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary focus of this research is to investigate <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of keeping the liquid surface clean and the distortion of information by the interference of equilibrium dense vapor above the liquid. By using the liquid jet technique the ejection of ions from surface of micron sized liquid can be adequately probed with a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The photoionization of pure water and aqueous solutions of NaOH, NaCl and HCl is presented in Chapter 4. The aim of this investigation was to provide a fundamental understanding of the structure of water/vacuum interfaces. In Chapter 5, the ejection of ions from salt solutions containing divalent cations is also presented. The goal of the experiment was to figure out the solvation structure and reaction dynamics of divalent metal ions, M2+ on the surface of aqueous solution. A lot of work has been done in the gas phase either by a pickup-type cluster source or by collision induced dissociation of ejected ions from electrospray. For the first time the direct monitoring of ions ejected from liquid into gas phase is explored. Possible ejection mechanisms for the ejection of cations are discussed extensively in both Chapters 4 and 5. The results presented in this thesis is a combination of experiments performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which includes experiments on ice and micro-jet respectively. The results in Chapters 2 and 3 have been submitted to the Journal of Chemical Physics and the Journal of Physical Chemistry respectively. It is important to note that the data presented in Chapter 3 was originally taken by Dr Janine Herring-Captain as part of her thesis work. It is also presented in this thesis due to effort in analyzing the data and preparation of the submitted manuscript. Chapter 4 and 5 represents papers which will also be submitted for publication in the open scientific literature. All the work leading to the results presented in these two chapters were done during my visit to PNNL and I would like to acknowledge that the instrumentation and data acquisition were done in collaboration with Nikolai Pet</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olanrewaju, Babajide O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3865311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell Death Induced on Cell Cultures and Nude Mouse Skin by <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span>, Nanosecond-Pulsed Generated Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions. PMID:24358244</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bousquet, Guilhem; Gapihan, Guillaume; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Rousseau, Antoine; Janin, Anne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002STIN...0276305O"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Search for Evidence of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37A/B</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ADP grant NAG5-9211 entitled 'A Search for Evidence of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37 A/B' was not used to support an analysis of the ASCA data for these two remnants because the ASCA mission ended before the remnants were observed. The grant was used to support similar research on two remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N132D and N 103B. An analysis of the Chandra data for these two remnants exhibits some evidence of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission from small regions in the remnants. The X-ray spectra for these regions can not be adequately described by a single thermal X-ray emission model. However, if an X-ray synchrotron component is also included, the spectral data can be well described by the model and the values of the fit parameters are consistent with the values expected. These results were presented at the 199th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society. In summary, the grant has enabled us to strengthen the evidence that supernova remnants outside our Galaxy can also accelerate electrons to very-high energies. The results of this analysis will be published soon in the Astrophysical Journal,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oliversen, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4049833"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012pbdm.book..215Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reviews our recent research results of using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.447L...1H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> superbubble in IC 10: the generation of cosmic ray electrons caught in the act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Superbubbles are crucial for stellar feedback, with supposedly high (of the order of 10 per cent) thermalization rates. We combined multiband radio continuum observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) with Effelsberg data to study the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> superbubble (NSB) in IC 10, a starburst dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. Thermal emission was subtracted using a combination of Balmer H? and VLA 32 GHz continuum maps. The bubble's <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> spectrum between 1.5 and 8.8 GHz displays curvature and can be well fitted with a standard model of an ageing cosmic ray electron population. With a derived equipartition magnetic field strength of 44 ± 8 ?G, and measuring the radiation energy density from Spitzer MIPS maps as 5 ± 1 × 10-11 erg cm-3, we determine, based on the spectral curvature, a spectral age of the bubble of 1.0 ± 0.3 Myr. Analysis of the LITTLE THINGS H I data cube shows an expanding H I hole with 100 pc diameter and a dynamical age 3.8 ± 0.3 Myr, centred to within 16 pc on IC 10 X-1, a massive stellar mass black hole (M > 23 M?). The results are consistent with the expected evolution for a superbubble with a few massive stars, where a very energetic event like a Type Ic supernova/hypernova has taken place about 1 Myr ago. We discuss alternatives to this interpretation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Krause, Martin G. H.; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Rau, Urvashi; Rupen, Michael P.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Chy?y, Krzysztof T.; Kitchener, Ged</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3499413"> <span id="translatedtitle">Absence of synergistic enhancement of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of ultrasound on cell killing induced by ionizing radiation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study was performed to elucidate the role of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects (cavitation and direct effects) of ultrasound, in simultaneous combination with X-irradiation on the cytotoxicity of mouse L cells. Firstly, mouse L cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound (1 MHz continuous wave, spatial peak temporal average intensity; 3.7 W/cm2) simultaneously at 37 degrees C under O2 or Ar saturated conditions to examine the cavitational effect of ultrasound. Secondly, cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound at 37 degrees C under N2O saturated conditions, which suppresses the cavitation, to examine the direct effects of ultrasound. The cavitational effect under O2 and Ar saturated conditions induced an exponential decrease in cell survival, and resulted in an additive effect on cell killing with the combination of X-rays and ultrasound. The direct effect in the N2O conditions induced no cell killing and did not modify the cell killing induced by X-rays. These results suggested that the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of ultrasound did not interact synergistically with X-rays for cell killing. PMID:3499413</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kondo, T; Kano, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24358244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2) for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2) for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2) for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions. PMID:24358244</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duval, Arnaud; Marinov, Ilya; Bousquet, Guilhem; Gapihan, Guillaume; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M; Rousseau, Antoine; Janin, Anne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997rxte.prop20256D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of the Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emissions in the X-Ray Spectrum of Kepler's Supernova Remnant.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The XTE/PCA instrument, with its large efficiency and wide energy range, offers an unique opportunity to observe the high energy X-ray emission of Kepler's supernova remnant. Previous observations in the 0.1-10 keV range (EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, GINGA, ROSAT and ASCA) have favored non-equilibrium ionization reverse shock models. A very high temperature (24 keV) is predicted in the shocked interstellar medium by these models. Observation of this high energy component will put strong constraints on the SN type and SNR evolution. The other major objective is to seek for an X-ray synchrotron emission in addition to the thermally produced X-rays. The observational goal for XTE PCA is thus to determine both these thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> contributions in the Kepler's high energy spectrum.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Decourchelle, Anne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT........27Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric pressure capillary <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), and other by-product's may also form, including ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and decomposed hydrocarbons. Several organic compounds, such as BTEX, ethylene, n-heptane, isooctane, methanol and NH3, were tested in an AP-CNTP system. Parametric experiments were carried out by varying plasma discharge power, flowrates, and initial concentrations. The degradation efficiency varied depending on the chemical nature of the compounds. A plasmochemical kinetic model was derived for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and n-heptane.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yin, Shu-Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...01..083H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boltzmann equation for non-equilibrium particles and its application to <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> dark matter production</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider a scalar field (called ?) which is very weakly coupled to thermal bath, and study the evolution of its number density. We use the Boltzmann equation derived from the Kadanoff-Baym equations, assuming that the degrees of freedom in the thermal bath are well described as "quasi-particles." When the widths of quasi-particles are negligible, the evolution of the number density of ? is well governed by a simple Boltzmann equation, which contains production rates and distribution functions both evaluated with dispersion relations of quasi-particles with thermal masses. We pay particular attention to the case that dark matter is <span class="hlt">non-thermally</span> produced by the decay of particles in thermal bath, to which the above mentioned formalism is applicable. When the effects of thermal bath are properly included, the relic abundance of dark matter may change by O(10-100%) compared to the result without taking account of thermal effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hamaguchi, Koichi; Moroi, Takeo; Mukaida, Kyohei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ph/0701266v4"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> right-handed sneutrino dark matter and the Omega_DM/Omega_b problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We argue that the superpartner of the Dirac right-handed neutrino is a prime candidate for dark matter created from a 'mattergenesis' mechanism. We show that due to the smallness of the Yukawa couplings, a right-handed sneutrino density created in the early Universe would not be erased by annihilations, which remain out of thermal equilibrium. It would also not be drowned by a later, additional production of right-handed sneutrinos, as the relic density of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> right-handed sneutrinos is found to be generally negligible compared to the observed dark matter density. Mild constraints on sneutrino masses and trilinear SUSY-breaking couplings are obtained. Possible mattergenesis scenarios are also mentioned</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Veronique Page</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984PhDT........25H"> <span id="translatedtitle">A system for the assessment of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of ultrasound on cells at liquid nitrogen temperatures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A system with which to study <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of ultrasound on cells was developed and built. Isolated human red blood cell membranes (ghosts) were irradiated in this system by ultrasound ranging in frequency from 3 to 7 MHz, intensity from 2 to 24 mW/sq cm, and durations of 30 and 60 minutes. Cryopreserved ghosts were cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and placed in a dewar or liquid nitrogen for ensonification. Acoustic characteristics of liquid nitrogen were investigated, and parameters such as the sound velocity, absorption and piezo-optic coefficient were determined. In addition, performances of transducers in liquid nitrogen were characterized and irradiating intensities quantified. The ghosts, prepared in both a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution and in a solution containing Dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), were analyzed using disc electrophoresis so that the resulting protein band structures of the irradiated membranes could be compared with control membranes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Himberger, D. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CPL...607...15T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigate the microscopic properties and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effect of the electrolyte solution under microwave irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NMD) simulations are performed to investigate the microscopic properties and the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effect of microwave irradiation on NaCl electrolyte solution at different temperatures using the SPC/E model. The electromagnetic wave propagates in the z-axis direction with a frequency of 2.45 GHz, and the intensity of the E/H field is 3.4 × 104 V/m. The results indicate that as the concentration of the electrolyte solution increased, the electrical conductivity gradually increased, but the hydrogen bonds number and the coordination number decreased. In addition, the change of conductivity decreases with the increase of temperature when electromagnetic field is applied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tian, Wen-Yan; Huang, Ka-Ma; Yang, Li-Jun; Guo, Yi-Na; Liu, Feng-Hai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21920702W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Searching For <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-rays In The Brightest X-ray And Radio Galaxy Clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relativistic electrons generating large-scale radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters must also produce inverse Compton (IC) emission at X-ray energies, a measurement of which can yield a cluster's volume-averaged magnetic field strength B. However, unambiguous IC detections in these clusters are rare at best and complicated by challenging observational limitations. To mitigate these difficulties, we extract spatially coincident spectra at soft and hard energies from the XMM-Newton EPIC and Swift BAT detectors, respectively, to search for <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> excesses above clusters' thermal emission. In a sample of the brightest X-ray clusters, drawn from HIFLUGCS, we fail to find convincing evidence for an excess in any of the clusters, either individually or when their spectra are stacked. The subset of clusters with the strongest <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> indication, however, are those hosting radio halos and/or relics, which are also the clusters expected to have IC tails. From this subsample of 9 clusters, we expand our sample to include those with the 30 brightest halos and relics. We stack their spectra to search for stronger statistical evidence of IC emission at hard X-ray energies, which constrains the typical average value of B in these clusters. On top of institutional funding, we acknowledge support from NASA-funded Suzaku and XMM-Newton grants, as well as the NASA Postdoctoral Program for funding DRW. Also, this work would not be possible without the hard work of the entire Swift BAT survey team, who we heartily thank.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wik, Daniel R.; Sarazin, C.; Zhang, Y.; Baumgartner, W.; Mushotzky, R.; Tueller, J.; Clarke, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49220907"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combined effect of selected <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> technologies on Escherichia coli and Pichia fermentans inactivation in an apple and cranberry juice blend and on product shelf life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The combination of novel, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> technologies for preservation purposes is a recent trend in food processing research. In the present study, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> hurdles such as ultraviolet light (UV) (5.3J\\/cm2), high intensity light pulses (HILP) (3.3J\\/cm2), pulsed electric fields (PEF) (34kV\\/cm, 18Hz, 93?s) or manothermosonication (MTS) (4bar, 43°C, 750W, 20kHz) were examined. The objective was to establish the potential of these</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. Palgan; I. M. Caminiti; A. Muñoz; F. Noci; P. Whyte; D. J. Morgan; D. A. Cronin; J. G. Lyng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0208314v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of the helium resonance lines in the solar atmosphere by suprathermal electron excitation I: <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> transport of helium ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Models of the solar transition region made from lines other than those of helium cannot account for the strength of the helium lines. However, the collisional excitation rates of the helium resonance lines are unusually sensitive to the energy of the exciting electrons. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> motions in the transition region could drive slowly-ionizing helium ions rapidly through the steep temperature gradient, exposing them to excitation by electrons characteristic of higher temperatures than those describing their ionization state. We present the results of calculations which use a more physical representation of the lifetimes of the ground states of He I and He II than was adopted in earlier work on this process. New emission measure distributions are used to calculate the temperature variation with height. The results show that <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions can lead to enhancements of the He I and He II resonance line intensities by factors that are comparable with those required. Excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions would reduce the effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> transport. The effects of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> motions are more consistent with the observed spatial distribution of helium emission than are those of excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions alone. In particular, they account better for the observed line intensity ratio I(537.0 A)/I(584.3 A), and its variation with location.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. R. Smith; C. Jordan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...799L..12D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why is <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Line Broadening of Spectral Lines in the Lower Transition Region of the Sun Independent of Spatial Resolution?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spectral observations of the solar transition region (TR) and corona show broadening of spectral lines beyond what is expected from thermal and instrumental broadening. The remaining <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> broadening is significant (5–30 km s?1) and correlated with intensity. Here we study spectra of the TR Si iv 1403 Å line obtained at high resolution with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We find that the large improvement in spatial resolution (0.?33) of IRIS compared to previous spectrographs (2?) does not resolve the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> line broadening which, in most regions, remains at pre-IRIS levels of about 20 km s?1. This invariance to spatial resolution indicates that the processes behind the broadening occur along the line-of-sight (LOS) and/or on spatial scales (perpendicular to the LOS) smaller than 250 km. Both effects appear to play a role. Comparison with IRIS chromospheric observations shows that, in regions where the LOS is more parallel to the field, magneto-acoustic shocks driven from below impact the TR and can lead to significant <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> line broadening. This scenario is supported by MHD simulations. While these do not show enough <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> line broadening, they do reproduce the long-known puzzling correlation between <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> line broadening and intensity. This correlation is caused by the shocks, but only if non-equilibrium ionization is taken into account. In regions where the LOS is more perpendicular to the field, the prevalence of small-scale twist is likely to play a significant role in explaining the invariance and correlation with intensity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Pontieu, B.; McIntosh, S.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; Peter, H.; Pereira, T. M. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22808213"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inactivation of Candida biofilms by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and its enhancement for fungistatic effect of antifungal drugs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the antifungal effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O(2) (2%) plasma microjet (PMJ) was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs). Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2-6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical ((•)OH), superoxide anion radical ((•)O(2) (-)) and singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O(2) (2%) plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma. PMID:22808213</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Yi; Yu, Shuang; Sun, Peng; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Li, Ruoyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3393702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inactivation of Candida Biofilms by <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma and Its Enhancement for Fungistatic Effect of Antifungal Drugs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the antifungal effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O2 (2%) plasma microjet (PMJ) was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs). Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2–6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical (•OH), superoxide anion radical (•O2-) and singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O2 (2%) plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma. PMID:22808213</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Peng; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Li, Ruoyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and UV-light for removal of odour from sludge treatment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) systems can be used for abatement of odour nuisances. Odour reductions are achieved by radical-initiated oxidation and dust collection in the plasma reactor. For some emissions a sequence of NTP followed by UV-light can improve the odour reduction further. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of NTP technology combined with UV-light towards odour emissions from sludge treatment. Air from a pilot sludge dryer was treated with a pilot NTP and a UV unit. The effect of using an acid scrubber upstream the NTP system was also tested. Thermal desorption gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to analyse samples taken from the inlet and the outlet of the NTP system. The TD-GC/MS used was also equipped with a sniffing port that made it possible to record odour-active compounds eluting from the column. Relative amounts of odour-active compounds in the inlet and the outlet flow from the NTP system were compared. Bag samples from inlet and outlet were also separately analysed by an external lab and by two operators using a one-man olfactometer, a modified NasalRanger(TM). These results indicated a significant odour removal efficiency of 70-90% depending on the settings and combinations of abatement equipment. PMID:22907448</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andersen, K B; Feilberg, A; Beukes, J A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47w5402L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air atmospheric pressure plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24513449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance evaluation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in simulated flue gas at 110°C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg(0) was oxidized and 20.5?gkJ(-1) of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9JL(-1). A maximal Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O2, H2O, SO2, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N2 metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg(0) oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. PMID:24513449</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Jiang, Yuze; Wang, Tiecheng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22097593"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma etching of F:SnO2 for thin film photovoltaics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thin film based photovoltaic systems offer significant advantage over wafer based technologies enabling the use of low cost, large area substrates such as glass, greatly facilitating the construction and integration of large modules. The viability of such systems has advanced in recent years, with researchers striving to optimise performance through the development of materials and cell design. One way to improve efficiency is to texture the interface between the TCO and the absorber layer to maximise scattering over the appropriate wavelength range, with nanometre scale features such as pyramids being reported as giving high scatter. These textures may be achieved by advanced growth processes, such as CVD, post growth etching or a combination of both. In this work, textured F:SnO2 films produced by APCVD were favourably modified using a remote, <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span>, atmospheric plasma to activate a selective dry etch process resulting in significantly enhanced topography. Uniform treatment of the samples was achieved by translation of the samples below the plasma head. Advantages of this approach, compared to competitive technologies such as wet chemical processes, are the relatively low power consumption and ease of scalability and retroprocess integration. The modified structures were studied using AFM, SEM and EDAX, with the observed topography controlled by process variables. Optical properties were assessed along with Hall measurements. PMID:22097593</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodgkinson, J L; Thomson, M; Cook, I; Sheel, D W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19348341"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compatibility studies of promethazine hydrochloride with tablet excipients by means of thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The compatibility of promethazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with various tableting excipients has been investigated by isothermal stress testing (IST) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms of PMZ and each of the excipients investigated were compared with their corresponding physical mixtures (1:1) for evaluation. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) data was used to corroborate the results of DSC and IST. A preliminary sustained release tablet formulation of the drug, prepared using compatible excipients, was stored under accelerated storage conditions (40 degrees C/75% RH) and analyzed for stability, drug release and bioadhesion characteristics for up to 3 months. Based on DSC results alone, drug-excipient interactions were observed with Pearlitol SD200, lactose monohydrate and zinc stearate. Chromatographic analysis of the stressed binary mixture (stored at 55 degrees C for 3 weeks) containing PMZ-lactose monohydrate showed brown discoloration indicating potential interaction. However, stressed physical mixtures of PMZ-Pearlitol SD200 and PMZ-zinc stearate indicated compatibility as opposed to the thermal analysis. The tablet formulation was found to be very stable after 3 months of storage at accelerated stability conditions. Also, the release profiles and bioadhesive properties were found to be unaltered. Thus, both thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> methods were utilized to successfully evaluate the compatibility of excipients with PMZ and the tablet formulation was found to be stable. PMID:19348341</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thumma, S; Repka, M A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Background Fluid on the Efficiency of Inactivating Yeast with <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric Pressure Plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media) on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose) were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH.) produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment) can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media. PMID:23799081</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryu, Young-Hyo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jin-Young; Shim, Gun-Bo; Uhm, Han-Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20017624"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> effect of weak intensity millimeter waves on physicochemical properties of water and water solutions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The comparative study of the effects of 5.8 mW/cm(2) Millimeter Waves (MMW) and near Infrared (IR) irradiation on thermal properties, specific adsorption rate (SAR), specific electrical conductivity (SEC) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content of distilled water (DW), and physiological solutions (PS) was performed. The thermal effect of MMW irradiation appeared only after the first minute of irradiation, while the IR heating started from the first minute of irradiation. The heat fusion of frozen MMW-treated DW and PS was significantly less than sham and IR-treated DW and PS. MMW irradiation had time-dependent elevation effect on water SEC and SAR, which was accompanied by the increase of H(2)O(2) formation in it. We suggest that the MMW-induced vibration of water dipole molecules caused the <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> changes of physicochemical properties of DW and PS, which promote the formation of H(2)O(2) in water. PMID:20017624</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ayrapetyan, Gayane; Hayrapetyan, Hovik; Dadasyan, Erna; Barseghyan, Sedrak; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Mikayelyan, Erazik; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827866"> <span id="translatedtitle">NO{sub X} REDUCTION BEHAVIOR OF ALUMINA AND ZEOLITE CATALYSTS IN COMBINATION WITH <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lean burn gasoline and diesel engines provide improved fuel economy when compared to engines operating under stoichiometric fuel/air conditions. At the same time, lean burn and diesel engines present a problem for emission control. Because they operate under oxidizing conditions, the conventional three-way catalyst is not effective in NOx reduction [1,2]. In addition, the wide temperature range of automobile exhaust gases present a challenge for catalyst design. The temperature of exhaust gases from a light duty diesel engine can vary from 150 to 500 C, depending on the operating conditions. To date, a catalyst that operates with high NOx conversion efficiency over the entire operating range has not been found. <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> plasma assisted catalysis has been shown to be a promising technology for NOx reduction in lean burn and diesel exhaust gases [3,4]. The approach exploited in this paper is to use a plasma in combination with several catalysts, each of which are active over unique temperature ranges. It was reported in the literature, that the one of the essential roles of plasma treatment is to oxidize NO to easier reducible NO2 [7]. In this contribution, the other important function of plasma treatment, namely partial oxidation of propylene, will be demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panov, A.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25308660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of electricity on anthocyanin degradation during ohmic heating of jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) juice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of electricity on anthocyanin degradation during ohmic heating of jaboticaba juice. For this, temperature profiles during conventional and ohmic heating processes were matched, and the degradation kinetics of anthocyanins were compared at temperatures ranging from 70 to 90°C. The monomeric anthocyanin content was quantified by UV-Visible spectroscopy using the pH-differential method. Anthocyanin degradation was fitted to a first-order model. The rate constants ranged from 1.7 to 7.5 × 10(-3)min(-1) and from 1.8 to 7.6 × 10(-3)min(-1) for ohmic and conventional heating, respectively. The analysis of variance (?=0.05) showed no significant differences between rate constants of the ohmic and conventional heating at the same temperatures. All kinetic and thermodynamic parameters evaluated showed similar values for both technologies. These results indicate that the presence of the oscillating electric field did not affect the degradation rates of anthocyanins during ohmic heating. PMID:25308660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Gurak, Poliana Deyse; Schmitz, Frederico; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SoPh..281..749Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> "Burst-on-Tail" of Long-Duration Solar Event on 26 October 2003</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations of a rare long-duration solar event of GOES class X1.2 from 26 October 2003 are presented. This event showed a pronounced burst of hard X-ray and microwave emission, which was extremely delayed (> 60 min) with respect to the main impulsive phase and did not have any significant response visible in soft X-ray emission. We refer to this phenomenon as a "burst-on-tail". Based on TRACE observations of the growing flare arcade and some simplified estimation, we explain why a reaction of active region plasma to accelerated electrons may change drastically over time. We suggest that, during the "burst-on-tail", <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons were injected into magnetic loops of larger spatial scale than during the impulsive phase bursts, thus resulting in much smaller values of plasma temperature and emission measure in their coronal volume, and hence little soft X-ray flux. The nature of the long gap between the main impulsive phase and the "burst-on-tail" is, however, still an open question.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zimovets, I.; Struminsky, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16129557"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the treatment of particulate matter from gasoline engine exhaust using <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A plasma reactor with catalysts was used to treat exhaust gas from a gasoline engine in order to decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. The effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) of the dielectric discharges on the removal of PM from the exhaust gas was investigated experimentally. The removal efficiency of PM was based on the concentration difference in PM for particle diameters ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 microm as measured by a particle counter. Several factors affecting PM conversion, including the density of plasma energy, reaction temperature, flow rate of exhaust gas, were investigated in the experiment. The results indicate that PM removal efficiency ranged approximately from 25 to 57% and increased with increasing energy input in the reactor, reaction temperature and residence time of the exhaust gas in the reactor. Enhanced removal of the PM was achieved by filling the discharge gap of the reactor with Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst pellets. In addition, the removal of unburned hydrocarbons was studied. Finally, available approaches for PM conversion were analyzed involving the interactions between discharge and catalytic reactions. PMID:16129557</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ye, Dan; Gao, Dengshan; Yu, Gang; Shen, Xianglin; Gu, Fan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070018790&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Variability in NGC 5408 X-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of quasiperiodic variability in the 0.2 - 10 keV X-ray flux from the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1. The average power spectrum of all EPIC-pn data reveals a strong 20 mHz QPO with an average amplitude (rms) of 9%, and a coherence, Q identical with nu(sub 0)/sigma approximately equal to 6. In a 33 ksec time interval when the 20 mHz QPO is strongest we also find evidence for a 2nd QPO peak at 15 mHz, the first indication for a close pair of QPOs in a ULX source. Interestingly, the frequency ratio of this QPO pair is inconsistent with 3:2 at the 3 sigma level, but is consistent with a 4:3 ratio. A powerlaw noise component with slope near 1.5 is also present below 0.1 Hz with evidence for a break to a flatter slope at about 3 mHz. The source shows substantial broadband variability, with a total amplitude (rms) of about 30% in the 0.1 - 100 mHz frequency band, and there is strong energy dependence to the variability. The power spectrum of hard X-ray photons (greater than 2 keV) shows a "classic" flat-topped continuum breaking to a power law with index 1.5 - 2. Both the break and 20 mHz QPO are detected in the hard band, and the 20 mHz QPO is essentially at the break. The QPO is both strong and narrow in this band, having an amplitude (rms) of 15%, and Q approx. equal to 25. The energy spectrum is well fit by three components, a "cool" disk with kT = 0.15 keV, a steep power law with index 2.56, and a thermal plasma at kT = 0.87 keV. The disk, power law, and thermal plasma components contribute 35, 60, and 5% of the 0.3 - 10 keV flux, respectively. Both the timing and spectral properties of NGC 5408 X-1 are strikingly reminiscent of Galactic black hole systems at high inferred accretion rates, but with its characteristic frequencies (QPO and break frequencies) scaled down by a factor of 10 - 100. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of models for ULXs, and their implications for the object's mass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa; Soria, Roberto; Uttley, Phil; Cropper, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ipparco.roma1.infn.it/pagine/deposito/1999/ipparcoi.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motions from Hipparchus to Kolmogorov Giovanni Gallavotti</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and quanti- tative meaning that was summarized in all its surprising rigor and power in the Almagest with angular velocities 1, . . . , n that is, implicitly, in use in the Almagest, but following contem- porary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roma "La Sapienza", Università di</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ipparco.roma1.infn.it/pagine/deposito/1999/ipparcoi.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motions from Hipparchus to Kolmogorov. Giovanni Gallavotti</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">that was summarized in all its surprising rigor and power in the Almagest of Ptolemy (#24;100-175 d.C.). 5{7 We thus that is, implicitly, in use in the Almagest, but following the ter- minology of contemporary mathematics</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roma "La Sapienza", Università di</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> 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href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ma.utexas.edu/mp_arc/c/99/99-244.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motions from Hipparchus to Kolmogorov. Giovanni Gallavotti</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">that was summarized in all its surprising rigor and power in the Almagest of Ptolemy (¸100­175 d.C.). 5--7 We thus that is, implicitly, in use in the Almagest, but following the ter­ minology of contemporary mathematics</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014xru..confE.143M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations: Energy Dependent Time-lags</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a a generic model for alternating lags in QPO harmonics where variations in the photon spectrum are caused by oscillations in two parameters that characterize the spectrum. The model assumes that variations in one of the parameters are linearly driven by variations in the other after a time delay. We show that alternating lags will be observed for a range of time delays. We have further developed a phenomenological model based on this generic one that can explain the amplitude and phase lag variation with energy of the fundamental and the next three harmonics of the 67 mHz QPO observed in GRS 1915+105. The phenomenological model also predicts the variation of the Bicoherence phase with energy, which can be checked by further analysis of the observational data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Misra, R.; Mandal, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25420027"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air), to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in cellular activity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that this treatment leads to improved osseointegration in vitro. PMID:25420027</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seo, Hye Yeon; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Choi, Yu-Ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ...66....2Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-rays from the Galactic supernova remnant G348.5+0.1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on Suzaku results of the two distinct regions in the Galactic supernova remnant G348.5+0.1: extended thermal X-rays ("soft diffuse") at the north-east region and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-rays (CXOU J171419.8-383023) at the north-west region. The X-ray spectrum of the soft diffuse X-rays can be fitted with neither an ionization equilibrium nor a non-equilibrium (ionizing) plasma model, leaving saw- tooth residuals in the 1.5-3 keV energy band. The residual structures can be produced when free electrons are recombined to the K-shells of highly ionized Mg and Si ions. In fact, the X-ray spectrum is nicely fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model. We propose a scenario whereby the plasma in a nearly fully ionized state at high temperature quickly changed to a recombining phase due to selective cooling of electrons to a lower temperature of ˜ 0.5 keV. The spectrum of CXOU J171419.8-383023 is well explained by a simple power-law model with a photon index of 1.9, nearly equal to the typical value for pulsar wind nebulae. Since the distance is estimated to be the same as that of the soft diffuse radiation, we infer that both the soft diffuse X-rays and CXOU J171419.8-383023 are associated with the same object, SNR G348.5+0.1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamauchi, Shigeo; Minami, Sari; Ota, Naomi; Koyama, Katsuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24613643"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects of pulsed ultrasound irradiation on the development of disuse muscle atrophy in rat gastrocnemius muscle.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examined the effects of therapeutic pulsed ultrasound (US) on the development of disuse muscle atrophy in rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into control, immobilization (Im), sham US, and US groups. In the Im, sham US and US groups, the bilateral ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for a 4-wk period. The pulsed US (frequency, 1 MHz; intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2); pulsed mode 1:4; 15 min) was irradiated to the gastrocnemius muscle in the US group over a 4-wk immobilization period. The pulsed US irradiation delivered only <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effects to the muscle. In conjunction with US irradiation, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected subcutaneously to label the nuclei of proliferating satellite cells 1 h before each pulsed US irradiation. Immobilization resulted in significant decreases in the mean diameters of type I, IIA and IIB muscle fibers of the gastrocnemius muscle in the Im, sham US and US groups compared with the control group. However, the degrees of muscle fiber atrophy for all types were significantly lower in the US group compared with the Im and sham US groups. Although the number of capillaries and the concentrations of insulin-like growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor did not change in the muscle, the number of BrdU-positive nuclei in the muscle was significantly increased by pulsed US irradiation in the US group. The results of this study suggest that pulsed US irradiation inhibits the development of disuse muscle atrophy partly via activation of satellite cells. PMID:24613643</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsumoto, Yoko; Nakano, Jiro; Oga, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hideki; Honda, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0707.3301v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulse Profiles, Spectra and Polarization Characteristics of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emissions from the Crab-Like Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission mechanism of the Crab-like pulsars with both a two-dimensional electrodynamical study and a three-dimensional model. We investigate the emission process in the outer gap accelerator. In the two-dimensional electrodynamical study, we solve the Poisson equation of the accelerating electric field in the outer gap and the equation of motion of the primary particles with the synchrotron and the curvature radiation process and the pair-creation process. We show a solved gap structure which produces a consistent gamma-ray spectrum with EGRET observation. Based on the two-dimensional model, we conduct a three-dimensional emission model to calculate the synchrotron and the inverse-Compton processes of the secondary pairs produced outside the outer gap. We calculate the pulse profiles, the phase-resolved spectra and the polarization characteristics in optical to $\\gamma$-ray bands to compare the observation of the Crab pulsar and PSR B0540-69. For the Crab pulsar, we find that the outer gap geometry extending from near the stellar surface to near the light cylinder produces a complex morphology change of the pulse profiles as a function of the photon energy. This predicted morphology change is quite similar with that of the observations. The calculated phase-resolved spectra are consistent with the data through optical to the $\\gamma$-ray bands. We demonstrate that the 10$\\sim$20 % of the polarization degree in the optical emissions from the Crab pulsar and the Vela pulsar are explained by the synchrotron emissions with the particle gyration motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Takata; H. -K. Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55871067"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher-order growth rate of instability of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén and ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The higher-order growth rate of instability for obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén and ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma have been obtained by the multiple-scale perturbation expansion method developed by Allen and Rowlands (1993). The growth rate of instability is obtained correct to order k2, where k is the wave number of a long-wavelength plane-wave perturbation. The corresponding lowest-order stability</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anup Bandyopadhyay; K. P. Das</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19454589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion-acoustic solitons and double-layers in a plasma consisting of positive and negative ions with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this research paper, the authors have studied the properties of ion-acoustic solitons and double-layers in a plasma consisting of warm positive and negative ions with different concentration of masses, charged states and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> electrons using small amplitude approximation. Reductive perturbation method is used to derive KdV and m-KdV equations. Existence of ion-acoustic solitons and double-layer is explored over a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. S. Gill; P. Bala; H. Kaur; N. S. Saini; S. Bansal; J. Kaur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22133881"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE LOCATION OF <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Building/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hara, Hirohisa, E-mail: l.harra@ucl.ac.uk [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0308109v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffuse <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-ray Emission: Evidence for Cosmic-ray Acceleration at the Shock Front in IC1262</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the first localization of diffuse, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, X-ray emission from a nearby galaxy cluster. Using Chandra data, we have isolated a diffuse <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray component with a photon index, Gamma_ X = 2.21 +0.14 -0.15 and a flux of 9.5 +1.1 -2.5 x 10^-5 photons cm^-2 s^-1 keV^-1 at 1 keV, that extends from ~1'.5 to ~2'.5 to the south of the X-ray flux peak. Comparison to simulations implies that the diffuse <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission is produced by primary electrons, accelerated at shocks to relativistic velocities. Using these results and the flux and hardness maps produced with data from the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, we conclude that a smaller subclump coming from the north merged with IC1262. The offset of the cD galaxy from the X-ray peak and large peculiar velocity indicate that the subclump's impact parameter was to the west and on the near side of IC1262.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel S. Hudson; Mark J. Henriksen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAP...113w3302T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A2?+(?=0,1)?X2?(?? =0) at 308 nm and A2?+(?=0,1)?X2?(?? =1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p5P?3s5S0 at 777.41 nm, and 3p3P?3s3S0 at 844.6 nm, N2(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C3?u?B3?g in the range of 300-450 nm and N2+(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B2?u+?X2?g+(?? =0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p3P0?2s3S at 388.8 nm, 3p1P0? 2s1S at 501.6 nm, 3d3D?2p3P0 at 587.6 nm, 3d1D?2p1P0 at 667.8 nm, 3s3S1?2p3P0 at 706.5 nm, 3s1S0?2p1P0 at 728.1 nm, and H? transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 ± 25 K and 340 ± 25 K and it increases to 320 ± 25 K and 360 ± 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. Additionally, the vibrational temperatures range from 2200 ± 100 K and 2500 ± 100 K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhL.103t3701K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle L6 cells and insulin secretion in pancreatic hamster-insulinoma-transfected cells by application of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Type-II diabetes Mellitus is characterized by defects in insulin action on peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and pancreatic beta cells. Since the skeletal muscle accounts for approximately 75% of insulin-stimulated glucose-uptake in our body, impaired insulin secretion from defected beta cell plays a major role in the afflicted glucose homoeostasis. It was shown that the intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide level was increased by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>-plasma treatment in ambient air. These increased intracellular reactive species may enhance glucose uptake and insulin secretion through the activation of intracellular calcium (Ca+) and cAMP production.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, Naresh; Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/350825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span>, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooper, J.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300297"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Cheng, Cheng, E-mail: chengcheng@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: chengcheng@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020039528&hterms=ph&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dph"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observations of the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> X-ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G347.3-0.5</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">G347.3-0.5 (ALEX J1713.7-3946) is a member of the new class of shell-type Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) that feature <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> components to their X-ray emission. We have analyzed the X-ray spectrum of this SNR over a broad energy range (0.5 to 30 key) using archived data from observations made with two satellites, the R6ntgensatellit (ROSA I) and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), along with data from our own observations made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Using a combination of the models EQUIL and SRCUT to fit thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission, respectively, from this SNR, we find evidence for a modest thermal component to G347.30.5's diffuse emission with a corresponding energy of kT approx. = 1.4 key. We also obtain an estimate of 70 Texas for the maximum energy of the cosmic-ray electrons that, have been accelerated by this SNR.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pannuti, Thomas G.; Allen, Glenn E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/908311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Method and system for the combination of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22303812"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modified Korteweg–de Vries equation in a negative ion rich hot adiabatic dusty plasma with <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ion and trapped electron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this report, the investigation of the properties of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave propagation in an adiabatic dusty plasma including the effect of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> ions and trapped electrons is presented. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the modified Korteweg–de Vries (mK-dV) equation for dust acoustic solitary waves in a homogeneous, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma whose constituents are electrons, singly charged positive ions, singly charged negative ions, and massive charged dust particles. The stationary analytical solution of the mK-dV equation is numerically analyzed and where the effect of various dusty plasma constituents DA solitary wave propagation is taken into account. It is observed that both the ions in dusty plasma play as a key role for the formation of both rarefactive as well as the compressive DA solitary waves and also the ion concentration controls the transformation of negative to positive potentials of the waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adhikary, N. C., E-mail: nirab-iasst@yahoo.co.in [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Deka, M. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Tepesia, Sonapur, Assam (India); Dev, A. N. [Department of Science and Humanities, College of Science and Technology, Rinchending, Phuentsholing (Bhutan); Department of Mathematics, R. G. Baruah College, Guwahati 781025, Assam (India); Sarmah, J. [Department of Mathematics, R. G. Baruah College, Guwahati 781025, Assam (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3493438"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preferential induction of apoptotic cell death in melanoma cells as compared with normal keratinocytes using a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma torch</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selective induction of apoptosis in melanoma cells is optimal for therapeutic development. To achieve this goal, a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> helium plasma torch was modified for use on cultured cells in a temperature-controlled environment. Melanoma cells were targeted with this torch (1) in parallel cultures with keratinocytes, (2) in co-culture with keratinocytes and (3) in a soft agar matrix. Melanoma cells displayed high sensitivity to reactive oxygen species generated by the torch and showed a 6-fold increase in cell death compared with keratinocytes. The extent of cell death was compared between melanoma cells and normal human keratinocytes in both short-term (5 min) co-culture experiments and longer assessments of apoptotic cell death (18–24 h). Following a 10 sec plasma exposure there was a 4.9-fold increase in the cell death of melanoma vs. keratinocytes as measured after 24 h at the target site of the plasma beam. When the treatment time was increased to 30 sec, a 98% cell death was reported for melanoma cells, which was 6-fold greater than the extent of cell death in keratinocytes. Our observations further indicate that this preferential cell death is largely due to apoptosis.. In addition, we report that this <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma torch kills melanoma cells growing in soft agar, suggesting that the plasma torch is capable of inducing melanoma cell death in 3D settings. We demonstrate that the presence of gap junctions may increase the area of cell death, likely due to the “bystander effect” of passing apoptotic signals between cells. Our findings provide a basis for further development of this non-invasive plasma torch as a potential treatment for melanoma. PMID:22895073</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zucker, Shoshanna N.; Zirnheld, Jennifer; Bagati, Archis; DiSanto, Thomas M.; Des Soye, Benjamin; Wawrzyniak, Joseph A.; Etemadi, Kasra; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Berezney, Ronald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23827815"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet light and ultrasound as <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatments for the inactivation of microorganisms in fresh ready-to-eat foods.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of two <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> disinfection processes, Ultraviolet light (UV 254 nm) and Ultrasound (US) on the inactivation of bacteria and color in two freshly cut produces (lettuce and strawberry) were investigated. The main scope of this work was to study the efficacy of UV and US on the decontamination of inoculated lettuce and strawberries with a cocktail of four bacteria, Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of lettuce with UV reduced significantly the population of E. coli, L. innocua, S. Enteritidis and S. aureus by 1.75, 1.27, 1.39 and 1.21 log CFU/g, respectively. Furthermore, more than a 2-log CFU/g reduction of E. coli and S. Enteritidis was achieved with US. In strawberries, UV treatment reduced bacteria only by 1-1.4 log CFU/g. The maximum reductions of microorganisms, observed in strawberries after treatment with US, were 3.04, 2.41, 5.52 and 6.12 log CFU/g for E. coli, S. aureus, S. Enteritidis and L. innocua, respectively. Treatment with UV and US, for time periods (up to 45 min) did not significantly (p>0.05) change the color of lettuce or strawberry. Treatment with UV and US reduced the numbers of selected inoculated bacteria on lettuce and strawberries, which could be good alternatives to other traditional and commonly used technologies such as chlorine and hydrogen peroxide solutions for fresh produce industry. These results suggest that UV and US might be promising, <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> and environmental friendly disinfection technologies for freshly cut produce. PMID:23827815</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Birmpa, Angeliki; Sfika, Vasiliki; Vantarakis, Apostolos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...791...23K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impulsive Energy Release and <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission in a Confined M4.0 Flare Triggered by Rapidly Evolving Magnetic Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph observations enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index (?) ~ 3. Another <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structures in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and outer core regions of magnetic loop systems while the overlying loop configuration remained unaltered. Combined observations in HXR, (E)UV, and H? provide support for flare models involving the interaction of coronal loops. The magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager reveal emergence of magnetic flux that began ~five hr before the flare. However, the more crucial changes in the photospheric magnetic flux occurred about one minute prior to the flare onset with opposite polarity magnetic transients appearing at the early flare location within the inner core region. The spectral, temporal, and spatial properties of magnetic transients suggest that the sudden changes in the small-scale magnetic field have likely triggered the flare by destabilizing the highly sheared pre-flare magnetic configuration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kushwaha, Upendra; Joshi, Bhuwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Veronig, Astrid; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Mathew, S. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/334238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reactions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) leading to the formation of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas (NTPs). White paper for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) (Compliance Project CP-1038: Development of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma reactor technology for control of atmospheric emissions)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SERDP Compliance Project CP-1038 (Development of <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasma Reactor Technology for Control of Atmospheric Emissions) has been commissioned to evaluate and develop <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) reactor technology, a form of low-temperature plasma chemical processing, for Department of Defense (DoD) applications. The primary emphasis is on the control of emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), with a secondary emphasis on hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission control (primarily volatile organic compounds--VOCs). In this white paper, as a SERDP-requested deliverable, the authors will verify the NO{sub x} removal reactions in NTPs, especially those converging on nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) as a primary reaction product. The benefit of making HNO{sub 3} as a primary terminal de-NO{sub x} product is that it can be easily neutralized by relatively simple caustic (base) scrubbers--although the economics of scrubber systems needs to be compared with the conversion to particles that can be filtered or precipitated. Jet engines also emit a significant amount of SO{sub x} in their exhaust; NTPs also remove SO{sub x} and actually do it more effectively in combination with NO{sub x}. This will not be dealt with in this particular white paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miziolek, A.W.; Nusca, M.J. [Army Research Lab., Watertown, MA (United States); Chang, J.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Herron, J.T. [National Inst. for Standards and Technology (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-08-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=18856"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF PROPOSED ELECTRIC-DISCHARGE <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PLASMA FIELD-PILOT DEMONSTRATION UNITS FOR NOX REMOVAL IN JET-ENGINE EXHAUST: WHITE PAPER FOR SERDP PROJECT CP-1038</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This project is currently evaluating <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) technologies for treating jet-engine exhaust arising from DoD test facilities. In the past, some economic analyses for NTP de-NOx have shown that it is not economical, compared to other techniques. The main reasons fo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...781..107K"> <span id="translatedtitle">First Hard X-Ray Detection of the <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Emission around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies with NuSTAR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K? line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, JaeSub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1662K"> <span id="translatedtitle">First hard X-ray detection of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Kalpha line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 1 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krivonos, Roman; Mori, Kaya; Craig, William; Tomsick, John; Hailey, Chuck; Boggs, Steven; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William; Hong, Jaesub; Bauer, Franz; Baganoff, Frederick; Barriere, Nicolas; Bodaghee, Arash; Christensen, Finn; Grefenstette, Brian; Madsen, Kristin; Nynka, Melania</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22333606K"> <span id="translatedtitle">First hard X-ray detection of the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K_alpha line emission at $6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 1 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the $6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, J.; Bauer, F. E.; Baganoff, F. K.; Barriere, N.; Bodaghee, A.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Grefenstette, B.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Hong, J.; Madsen, K.; Mori, K.; Nynka, M.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0711.4686v3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure in early type galaxy atmospheres: A comparison of X-ray and optical potential profiles in M87 and NGC1399</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compare the gravitational potential profiles of the elliptical galaxies NGC 4486 (M87) and NGC 1399 (the central galaxy in the Fornax cluster) derived from X-ray and optical data. This comparison suggests that the combined contribution of cosmic rays, magnetic fields and micro-turbulence to the pressure is ~10% of the gas thermal pressure in the cores of NGC 1399 and M87, although the uncertainties in our model assumptions (e.g., spherical symmetry) are sufficiently large that the contribution could be consistent with zero. In the absence of any other form of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure support, these upper bounds translate into upper limits on the magnetic field of ~10-20 muG at a distance of 1'-2' from the centers of NGC1399 and M87. We show that these results are consistent with the current paradigm of cool cluster cores, based on the assumption that AGN activity regulates the thermal state of the gas by injecting energy into the intra-cluster medium. The limit of ~10-20% on the energy density in the form of relativistic protons applies not only to the current state of the gas, but essentially to the entire history of the intra-cluster medium, provided that cosmic ray protons evolve adiabatically and that their spatial diffusion is suppressed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Churazov; W. Forman; A. Vikhlinin; S. Tremaine; O. Gerhard; C. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhD...46P5401N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of extra- and intracellular OH radical generation, cancer cell injury, and apoptosis induced by a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, we investigated the effects of a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric-pressure plasma jet inducing extracellular and intracellular OH radical generation as well as cell injury and apoptosis for the cultured human breast cancer cells. Increased OH radical generation in the extracellular culture medium (liquid phase) was observed with increased irradiation time, distance to the liquid surface, and voltage. From the voltage-response relationships for two breast cancer cell lines (invasive MDA-MB-231 cells and non-invasive MCF-7 cells) and normal breast cells (HMEC), the half-maximal effective peak-to-peak voltage (EV50) values were 16.7 ± 0.3 kV, 15.0 ± 0.4 kV and 11.2 ± 0.7 kV for MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and HMEC cells, respectively. This indicated that there was almost no selective cancer cell injury induced by plasma jet irradiation under these conditions. Compared with control condition without a plasma jet, intracellular OH radical accumulation and apoptotic cells were observed with a plasma jet using conditions that induced injury to 50% of cells irrespective of the cancer cell line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Imamura, Masatoshi; Yamahara, Takayuki; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Nobuaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E7589K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Induced apoptosis in melanocytes cancer cell and oxidation in biomolecules through deuterium oxide generated from atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-jets (APPJ) are being for the cancer treatment. However, APPJ still has drawbacks such as efficiency and rise in temperature after treatment. So, in this work, a synergetic agent D2O vapour is attached to APPJ which not only increase the efficiency of plasma source against cancer treatment, but also controlled the temperature during the treatment. OD generated by the combination of D2O + N2 plasma helped in enhancing the efficiency of APPJ. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signalling cascade. Additionally, we observed that plasma induces ROS, which activated MAPK p38 and inhibits p42/p44 MAPK, leading to cancer cell death. We have also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and then analysed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes. Further, we confirmed the formation of OD/OH simultaneously in the solution using optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the simultaneous generation of D2O2/H2O2 was detected by the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy and density measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, Naresh; Attri, Pankaj; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Jinsung; Choi, Eun Ha; Uhm, Han Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22275697"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species, rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N{sub 2}(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N{sub 2}(C-B,0-0) and N{sub 2}(B-X,0-0) as well as measured current, the electron density, which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission, reaches a maximum value of 5.6?×?10{sup 20}/m{sup 3}.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Cheng, Cheng, E-mail: chengcheng@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: chengcheng@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25534001"> <span id="translatedtitle">Induced apoptosis in melanocytes cancer cell and oxidation in biomolecules through deuterium oxide generated from atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-jets (APPJ) are being for the cancer treatment. However, APPJ still has drawbacks such as efficiency and rise in temperature after treatment. So, in this work, a synergetic agent D2O vapour is attached to APPJ which not only increase the efficiency of plasma source against cancer treatment, but also controlled the temperature during the treatment. OD generated by the combination of D2O + N2 plasma helped in enhancing the efficiency of APPJ. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signalling cascade. Additionally, we observed that plasma induces ROS, which activated MAPK p38 and inhibits p42/p44 MAPK, leading to cancer cell death. We have also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and then analysed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes. Further, we confirmed the formation of OD/OH simultaneously in the solution using optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the simultaneous generation of D2O2/H2O2 was detected by the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy and density measurements. PMID:25534001</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, Naresh; Attri, Pankaj; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Jinsung; Choi, Eun Ha; Uhm, Han Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...799..175S"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Detailed Study of <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> X-Ray Properties and Interstellar Gas toward the ?-Ray Supernova Remnant RX J1713.7–3946</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have carried out a spectral analysis of the Suzaku X-ray data in the 0.4-12 keV range toward the shell-type very high-energy ?-ray supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7–3946. The aims of this analysis are to estimate detailed X-rays spectral properties at a high angular resolution up to 2 arcmin and to compare them with the interstellar gas. The X-ray spectrum is <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> and used to calculate absorbing column density, photon index, and absorption-corrected X-ray flux. The photon index varies significantly from 2.1 to 2.9. It is shown that the X-ray intensity is well correlated with the photon index, especially in the west region, with a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The X-ray intensity tends to increase with the averaged interstellar gas density while the dispersion is relatively large. The hardest spectra, with photon indexes of less than 2.4, are found outside of the central 10 arcmin of the SNR, from the north to the southeast (~430 arcmin2) and from the southwest to the northwest (~150 arcmin2). The former region shows low interstellar gas density, while the latter shows high interstellar gas density. We present a discussion of possible scenarios that explain the distribution of the photon index and its relationship with the interstellar gas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sano, H.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Sato, J.; Horachi, H.; Kuwahara, T.; Torii, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Tanaka, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Inoue, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Inutsuka, S.; Kawamura, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Tachihara, K.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Acero, F.; Fukui, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3530450"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of a <span class="hlt">Non</span> <span class="hlt">Thermal</span> Plasma Treatment Alone or in Combination with Gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc Orthotopic Pancreatic Carcinoma Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by <span class="hlt">non</span> <span class="hlt">thermal</span> plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties. PMID:23300736</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140017106&hterms=ghost&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dghost"> <span id="translatedtitle">First Hard X-Ray Detection of the <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Emission Around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies With NuSTAR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K(alpha) line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario. Key words: cosmic rays - Galaxy: center - ISM: general - X-rays: individual (Arches cluster)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, JaeSub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4274518"> <span id="translatedtitle">Induced apoptosis in melanocytes cancer cell and oxidation in biomolecules through deuterium oxide generated from atmospheric pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma jet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, atmospheric-pressure <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma-jets (APPJ) are being for the cancer treatment. However, APPJ still has drawbacks such as efficiency and rise in temperature after treatment. So, in this work, a synergetic agent D2O vapour is attached to APPJ which not only increase the efficiency of plasma source against cancer treatment, but also controlled the temperature during the treatment. OD generated by the combination of D2O + N2 plasma helped in enhancing the efficiency of APPJ. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signalling cascade. Additionally, we observed that plasma induces ROS, which activated MAPK p38 and inhibits p42/p44 MAPK, leading to cancer cell death. We have also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and then analysed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes. Further, we confirmed the formation of OD/OH simultaneously in the solution using optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the simultaneous generation of D2O2/H2O2 was detected by the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy and density measurements. PMID:25534001</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, Naresh; Attri, Pankaj; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Choi, Jinsung; Choi, Eun Ha; Uhm, Han Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25255308"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antibacterial and physical effects of modified chitosan based-coating containing nanoemulsion of mandarin essential oil and three <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatments against Listeria innocua in green beans.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The antimicrobial activity against Listeria innocua of three different combined <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> treatments, along with the impact on color and texture on green bean samples, was evaluated. In this study a bioactive coating formulation based on modified chitosan containing 0.05% nanoemulsion of mandarin essential oil was tested in combination with ?-irradiation, UV-C and ozonated water treatments, and the results in terms of antimicrobial activity, color and texture changes, were evaluated during 14 days storage. The combined coating and ?-irradiation treatment gave promising results, showing 3.3 log CFU/g initial microbial reduction, and exhibiting a strong synergistic antimicrobial effect. The treatment based on UV-C and coating formulation allowed a 3 log CFU/g reduction of initial L. innocua population on samples, showing a good residual antimicrobial activity and preventing loss of firmness and color changes during storage. The combined treatment of coating and ozonated water did not show any synergistic or additive antimicrobial effect, but they showed an impact on firmness and color. In conclusion UV-C and ?-irradiation treatments, in combination with the bioactive coating, represent an effective approach to control the growth of L. innocua on vegetable foods. PMID:25255308</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Severino, Renato; Vu, Khanh Dang; Donsì, Francesco; Salmieri, Stephane; Ferrari, Giovanna; Lacroix, Monique</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22252167"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron–proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States) [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 (United States); Navarro, Roberto [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SoPh..tmp....8H"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Study of the Coronal <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Velocity in Polar Regions During the Rise from Solar Minimum to Solar Maximum in Cycle 24</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the changes in coronal <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> velocity (V nt) measurements at the poles from solar minimum to solar maximum using Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. We find that although the intensity in the corona at the poles does tend to increase with the cycle, there are no significant changes in the V nt values. The locations of enhanced V nt values measured do not always have a counterpart in intensity, and they are sometimes located in weak emission regions. Unipolar magnetic streams, created through diffusion of the following polarity of the decaying active regions, slowly progress towards the poles. These streams are expected to be related to magnetic nulls as locations that indicate an increased likelihood for magnetic reconnection to occur. Through global potential field source-surface modelling, we determine how the number of nulls varied during the cycle and find that those that lie at < 1.1 solar radii vary significantly. We search for a correlation between the variation of the magnetic nulls and the V nt values, as it may be expected that with an increasing number of nulls, the V nt values in the corona increase as well. There is no correlation with the V nt values, however. This indicates that the magnetic structures that create the enhanced V nt behaviour are small-scale features and hence not easily measurable at the poles. Because they do not change during the solar cycle, they are likely to be created by a local dynamo. The variation of the upper range of V nt is reduced, which highlights that strongly dynamic behaviour is reduced as the solar maximum approaches. This is likely to be due to the reduced area of the polar coronal hole, which allows fewer opportunities for reconnection to occur between open and closed magnetic fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harra, L.; Baker, D.; Edwards, S. J.; Hara, H.; Howe, R.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24667444"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma inhibits thyroid papillary cancer cell invasion via cytoskeletal modulation, altered MMP-2/-9/uPA activity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is defined as a partially or completely ionized gas that includes a mixture of electrons and ions. Advances in plasma physics have made it possible to use <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. However, previous studies have focused mainly on apoptotic cancer cell death mediated by NTP as a potential cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of NTP on invasion or metastasis, as well as the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-migration and anti-invasion properties in human thyroid papillary cancer cell lines (BHP10-3 and TPC1). Wound healing, pull-down, and Transwell assays demonstrated that NTP reduced cell migration and invasion. In addition, NTP induced morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements, as detected by scanning electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. We also examined matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity using gelatin zymography, uPA assays and RT-PCR. FAK, Src, and paxillin expression was detected using Western blot analyses and immunocytochemistry. NTP decreased FAK, Src, and paxillin expression as well as MMP/uPA activity. In conclusion, NTP inhibited the invasion and metastasis of BHP10-3 and TPC1 cells by decreasing MMP-2/-9 and uPA activities and rearranging the cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the FAK/Src complex. These findings suggest novel actions for NTP and may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies for locally invasive and metastatic cancers. PMID:24667444</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Kang Il; Seo, Seong Jin; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo; Moon, Eunpyo; Lee, Keunho; Kim, Chul-Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080040741&hterms=supernova&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dsupernova"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku Observations of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> X-Ray Emission from the Middle-Aged Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results from X-ray analysis of a Galactic middle-aged supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 which is bright and largely extended in X-ray wavelengths, showing a clear circular shape (radius approx.50'). Using the Suzaku satellite, we observed this SNR in three pointings; partially covering the northwestern (NW) rim, the eastern (E) rim, and the central portion of this SNR. In the NW rim and the central portion, we confirm that the X-ray spectra consist of soft and hard-tail emission, while in the E rim we find no significant hard-tail emission. The soft emission is well fitted by either a one-component or two-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) model. In the NW and E rims, a one-component (the swept-up interstellar medium) NEI model well represents the soft emission. On the other hand, in the central portion, a two-component (the interstellar medium and the metal-rich ejecta) NEI model fits the soft emission better than the one-component NEI model from a statistical point of view. The relative abundances in the ejecta component suggest that G156.2+5.7 is a remnant from a core-collapse SN explosion whose progenitor mass is less than 15 Solar Mass. The origin of the hard-tail emission detected in the NW rim and the central portion of the SNR is highly likely <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons. In the NW rim, the relativistic electrons seems to be accelerated by a forward shock with a slow velocity of APPROX.500 km/sec.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965425"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Inhibits Thyroid Papillary Cancer Cell Invasion via Cytoskeletal Modulation, Altered MMP-2/-9/uPA Activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is defined as a partially or completely ionized gas that includes a mixture of electrons and ions. Advances in plasma physics have made it possible to use <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. However, previous studies have focused mainly on apoptotic cancer cell death mediated by NTP as a potential cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of NTP on invasion or metastasis, as well as the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-migration and anti-invasion properties in human thyroid papillary cancer cell lines (BHP10-3 and TPC1). Wound healing, pull-down, and Transwell assays demonstrated that NTP reduced cell migration and invasion. In addition, NTP induced morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements, as detected by scanning electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. We also examined matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity using gelatin zymography, uPA assays and RT-PCR. FAK, Src, and paxillin expression was detected using Western blot analyses and immunocytochemistry. NTP decreased FAK, Src, and paxillin expression as well as MMP/uPA activity. In conclusion, NTP inhibited the invasion and metastasis of BHP10-3 and TPC1 cells by decreasing MMP-2/-9 and uPA activities and rearranging the cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the FAK/Src complex. These findings suggest novel actions for NTP and may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies for locally invasive and metastatic cancers. PMID:24667444</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Kang Il; Seo, Seong Jin; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo; Moon, Eunpyo; Lee, Keunho; Kim, Chul-Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a 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showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140017820&hterms=plasma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dplasma"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Higher-Order Modes on the Electromagnetic Whistler-Cyclotron Wave Fluctuations of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the beta(sub e) increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron-proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vinas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jamie A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPS...257..364E"> <span id="translatedtitle">The beneficial use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma in synthesis of Ni/Al2O3-MgO nanocatalyst used in hydrogen production from reforming of CH4/CO2 greenhouse gases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In our continuing effort to investigate the effect of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma on CH4/CO2 reforming catalysts, Ni/Al2O3-MgO nanocatalyst is investigated. The impregnated and plasma treated nanocatalysts are characterized using XRD, FESEM, TEM, EDX Dot-Mapping, BET, TG-DTG, XPS and FTIR techniques. XRD patterns show high dispersion and strong interaction of active phase. FESEM images display smaller particle size and a narrow particle size distribution for plasma treated sample. According to the BET analysis, the calculated surface area of plasma treated sample is 11% higher. TEM images show particles of active phase are fairly small and well-dispersed as a result of plasma treatment. XPS and EDX analysis reveal better dispersion of active phase as a result of plasma treatment. In addition to better structural and physicochemical properties, the Ni/Al2O3-MgO nanocatalyst which treated by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma has higher activity and significant anti-coke properties in the CH4/CO2 reforming reaction at 550-850 °C temperature range using a mixture of CH4:CO2 = 0.5-2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Estifaee, Pooya; Haghighi, Mohammad; Babaluo, Ali Akbar; Rahemi, Nader; Jafari, Mahdi Fallah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/40434"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of fixed separation in <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> and aperiodic, unsteady, two-dimensional flows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study asses the kinematic theory of fixed separation in unsteady, two-dimensional flows that has been proposed by Haller (2004). Experimental investigations were conducted that utilized the rotor-oscillator flow to ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Helu, Moneer Mohammad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1992-THESIS-A243"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> nature of wall slip for molten plastics in large amplitude oscillatory shear</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">similar stress waves for an experimental-grade of molten polyurethane (PU) using a sliding plate rheometer with a local shear stress transducer. They showed both shear stress versus shear rate loops and phase plane plots that did not repeat themselves...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian, David Warren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.uni-bielefeld.de/baake/ps/padic16.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limit(<span class="hlt">quasi)periodic</span> point sets as quasicrystals with padic internal spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and project sets (or model sets) can now be seen to hold in great generality. Up to now, however, no attempt­generated point sets and tilings, e.g. the chair or the sphinx tiling [22]. They are limit­periodic structures</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baake, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22050842"> <span id="translatedtitle">Construction of 2D <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> Rauzy tiling by similarity transformation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new approach to constructing self-similar fractal tilings is proposed based on the construction of semigroups generated by a finite set of similarity transformations. The Rauzy tiling-a 2D analog of 1D Fibonacci tiling generated by the golden mean-is used as an example to illustrate this approach. It is shown that the Rauzy torus development and the elementary fractal boundary of Rauzy tiling can be constructed in the form of a set of centers of similarity semigroups generated by two and three similarity transformations, respectively. A centrosymmetric tiling, locally dual to the Rauzy tiling, is constructed for the first time and its parameterization is developed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhuravlev, V. G.; Maleev, A. V., E-mail: andr_mal@mail.ru [Vladimir State Humanitarian University (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMSM22A..07L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multipoint observations of <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> substorms associated with ULF pulsations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using auroral images from the IMAGE WIC instrument, geomagnetic data from various ground stations, and geosynchronous particle data, we have identified six consecutive substorms separated by about 45 min to 1.6 hr on November 8, 2000. Most of these substorms are of small to medium size and occurred under a weakly northward IMF condition: IMF Bz was near zero to about +5 nT prior to each substorm. IMF By was also weak, being within about ¢®¨ú3 nT. Most interestingly, we have found that for most of the substorms, about 10-15 min period ULF pulsation begins to amplify prior to each onset and tends to decline near the time of onset. The pulsation features are clearly seen at auroral zone and some higher latitude stations of the CANOPUS magnetic network when they cover morning side MLT regions. Similar features are also seen in the GOES magnetic field observations in similar MLT regions. For the first two substorms, the IMAGE magnetic network stations were at postnoon MLT regions and indicated similar ULF pulsation features. The SuperDARN data show that for most of the substorms, the ionospheric convection within the polar cap shows high-amplitude oscillations with a period of about 15 min that tend to amplify prior to onset and to decline after the onset. Based on the results, we will discuss the possible association between substorm triggering and convection associated with large-amplitude ULF pulsations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, D.; Lyons, L.; Zou, S.; Kim, K.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Weygand, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/283892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limit(<span class="hlt">quasi)periodic</span> point sets as quasicrystals with p-adic internal spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Model sets (or cut and project sets) provide a familiar and commonly used method of constructing and studying nonperiodic point sets. Here we extend this method to situations where the internal spaces are no longer Euclidean, but instead spaces with p-adic topologies or even with mixed Euclidean\\/p-adic topologies. We show that a number of well known tilings precisely fit this</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Baake; Robert V. Moody; Martin Schlottmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21546951"> <span id="translatedtitle">A low-dimensional model system for <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> plasma perturbations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Larger scale plasma instabilities not leading to an immediate termination of a discharge often result in periodic nonlinear perturbations of the plasma. A minimal possible model is formulated for description of the system with drive and relaxation processes which have different time scales. The model is based on two equations: the first being responsible for the relaxation dynamics and the second for the drive. The model can be generalized to describe the pellet injection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Constantinescu, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Craiova, Association Euratom-MECI (Romania); Dumbrajs, O. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Association Euratom-UL (Latvia); Igochine, V.; Lackner, K.; Meyer-Spasche, R.; Zohm, H. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030032994&hterms=orosz&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dorosz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Energy Frequency <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of accreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fields. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of simultaneous millisecond x-ray timing and spectral observations carried out with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) to perform the x-ray timing and one of the satellites Asca, BeppoSAX, or Chandra to perform x-ray spectral measurements. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to include imaging of X-ray jets from binaries and the study of extragalactic X-ray binaries. Significant progress was made over the past year.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Kaaret, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1537468"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the development of instability of the black hole-torus systems and <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the numerical study of dynamical instability of a pressure-supported relativistic torus, rotating around the black hole with a constant specific angular momentum on a fixed space-time background, in case of perturbation by a matter coming from the outer boundary. Two dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamical equations are solved at equatorial plane using the HRSCS to study the effect of perturbation on the stable systems. We have found that the perturbed torus creates an instability which causes the gas falling into the black hole in a certain dynamical time. All the models indicate an oscillating torus with certain frequency around their instant equilibrium. The dynamic of accreted torus varies with the size of initial stable torus, black hole spin and other variables, such as Mach number, sound speed, initial radius of the torus etc., but not their instability. The precessing torus not only effects the gravitational radiation, but also generates it. On the other hand, the mass accretion rat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Donmez, Orhan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JFM...191..111S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic intensity of the <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in fully developed turbulent shear layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Turbulent shear layers generated from a common splitter plate as well as from a half-frame screen are investigated experimentally in the developing regime and in the asymptotic regime. The phase-averaged means with time delay of velocity fluctuations are analyzed in terms of Fourier modes in the frequency domain to give both the amplitude and frequency of the local fundamental mode due to the presence of the large-scale organized motion. The amplitudes of both the streamwise and the transverse components tend to relax to asymptotic values that are independent of the velocity ratio as well as the shear-layer apparatus. The Strouhal number, defined as fL/U(a), where f is the local fundamental mode frequency, L is the shear-layer width, and U(a) is the average convection velocity of the structures, is found to be initially dependent on the local Reynolds number. In the asymptotic regime, the orientation of the large-scale structures is tilted backward toward the higher-speed side in all cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sirivat, Anuvat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.dartmouth.edu/~ahb/papers/fdsqp.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A FAST DIRECT SOLVER FOR <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> SCATTERING A. GILLMAN, A. BARNETT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">the design of gratings for high-power lasers [6], thin-film solar cells [4] and absorbers [39], process periodizing scheme that is robust for all incident angles, including Wood's anomalies, based upon the free [4] or solar absorber design [39]) solutions are needed at many incident angles and/or frequencies</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barnett, Alex</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RAA....14..933Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillation and color behavior of blazar PKS 2155-304</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PKS 2155-304 is a well studied BL Lac object in the southern sky. The historical optical data during different periods have been collected and compiled. Light curves spanning 35 yr have been constructed. The R-band light curve has been analyzed by means of three methods: the epoch folding method, the Jurkevich method and the discrete correlation function method. It is derived that there is an evident periodic component of 317 d (i.e. 0.87 yr) superposed on a long-term trend with large-amplitude variation in the light curve. The variability of this source is accompanied by a slight color variation, and the brightness and color index are correlated with each other. On a long-term time scale, PKS 2155-304 exhibits a tendency of bluer-when-brighter, which means the spectrum becomes flatter when the source brightens.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Bing-Kai; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Dai, Ben-Zhong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://nanoscience.bu.edu/papers/Dal_Negro_OE_2008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> distribution of plasmon modes in two-dimensional Fibonacci arrays of metal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides," Nat nanoparticles: the influence of size, shape and dielectric environment," J. Phys. Chem. B, 107 668 (2003). 7. M. L. Brongersma, J. W. Hartman, and H. A. Atwater, "Electromagnetic energy transfer and switching</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM53C2232L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> (~mHz) dayside auroral brightennings associated with high-speed solar wind</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been reported that dayside auroral pulsations of a few mHz frequency can occur when variations of solar wind dynamic pressure at the same frequency appear. Magnetospheric compression/decompression is attributed to the auroral pulsations. Here we report another type of dayside auroral pulsations not associated with solar wind dynamic pressure changes by using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. From one periodic (~2 - 8 mHz) auroral event that occurred on February 8, 2000, it is found that the auroral enhancements covered most of the day (~05 - 16 MLT) sector and did not show a latitudinal dependence. Based on in situ particle data from DMSP SSJ/4, the brightennings were associated mainly with enhanced particle precipitations from the central plasma sheet (i.e., diffuse aurora). There was no geomagnetic pulsation on the ground and in the dawn sector of the magnetosheath as indicated by the Geotail measurements. While the auroral pulsations occurred during high solar wind speed (> 600 km/s), they commenced when the interplanetary magnetic field turned northward, suggesting the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability being a source of the pulsations. We will present detail analysis results and discuss other possible mechanisms in the context of current theories.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liou, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www-pw.physics.uiowa.edu/~dag/publications/2004_SimultaneousObservationsOfJovianQuasiperiodicRadioEmissionsByTheGalileoAndCassiniSpacecraft_JGR.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous observations of Jovian <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> radio emissions by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">. Zarka2 Received 30 September 2003; revised 16 January 2004; accepted 23 February 2004; published 29 June: Hospodarsky, G. B., W. S. Kurth, B. Cecconi, D. A. Gurnett, M. L. Kaiser, M. D. Desch, and P. Zarka (2004</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurnett, Donald A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18565426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decomposition of certain nonlinear evolution equations and their <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> solutions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new 2+1-dimensional nonlinear evolution equation is proposed. With the help of the known 1+1-dimensional soliton equations, this new 2+1-dimensional evolution equation and the modified Kadomtsev–Petviashvili equation are separated into compatible Hamiltonian systems of ordinary differential equations. Using the generating function flow method, the involutivity and the functional independence of the integrals are proved. The Abel–Jacobi coordinates are introduced to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H.-H. Dai; Xianguo Geng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/240345m2643vw151.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> solutions to the Kadometsev-Petviashvili andmodified Kadometsev-Petviashvili equations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">.  The Kadometsev-Petviashvili (KP) and\\u000a modified KP (mKP) equations are retrieved from the first\\u000a two soliton equations of coupled Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) hierarchy.\\u000a Based on the nonlinearization of Lax pairs, the KP and mKP equations are ultimately\\u000a reduced to integrable finite-dimensional Hamiltonian\\u000a systems in view of the r-matrix theory. Finally,\\u000a the resulting Hamiltonian flows are linearized in Abel-Jacobi coordinates, such that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Chen; X. Geng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApJ...571L.137K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can Any ``Invariants'' Be Revealed in <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Phenomena Observed from Scorpius X-1?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a large number of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations of Scorpius X-1, we present a detailed investigation of the transition layer and relativistic precession models (TLM and RPM, respectively). These models predict the existence of the invariant quantities: an inclination angle ? of the magnetospheric axis with the normal to the disk for the TLM and a neutron star (NS) mass MNS for the RPM. Theoretical predictions of both models are tested, and their self-consistency is checked. We establish the following: (1) The inferred ?-value is 5.56d+/-0.09d. Correlation of the ?-values with the horizontal-branch oscillation (HBO) frequency is rather weak. (2) There is a strong correlation between an inferred MNS and the HBO frequency in the RPM frameworks. (3) We infer MNS for different assumptions regarding the relations between the HBO frequency ?HBO and the nodal frequency ?nod. We find that the inferred MNS=2.7+/-0.1 Msolar cannot be consistent with any equation of state of NS matter. We conclude that the RPM fails to describe the data while the TLM seems to be compatible.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuznetsov, Sergey; Titarchuk, Lev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24486404"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma induces apoptosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Involvement of DNA-damage-triggering sub-G(1) arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent advances in physics have made possible the use of <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP induces death of various cancer cell types, thus offering a promising alternative treatment, the mechanism of its therapeutic effect is little understood. In this study, we report for the first time that NTP led to apoptotic cell death in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interestingly, NTP induced a sub-G(1) arrest in p53 wild-type OSCCs, but not in p53-mutated OSCCs. In addition, NTP increased the expression levels of ATM, p53 (Ser 15, 20 and 46), p21, and cyclin D1. A comet assay, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry of ?H2AX suggested that NTP-induced apoptosis and sub-G(1) arrest were associated with DNA damage and the ATM/p53 signaling pathway in SCC25 cells. Moreover, ATM knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effect of NTP on cell death, sub-G(1) arrest and related signals. Taken together, these results indicate that NTP induced apoptotic cell death in p53 wild-type OSCCs through a novel mechanism involving DNA damage and triggering of sub-G(1) arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP in OSCC. PMID:24486404</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Kang Il; Seo, Seong Jin; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo; Moon, Eunpyo; Baek, Seung Jae; Lee, Keunho; Kim, Chul-Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/06_18_2010_im15GtrFFA_06_18_2010_4"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lava Sampling: Thermal and <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This image shows an HVO geologist sampling the lava that was seeping out of the interior of the rootless shield. The lava was placed in a bucket of water to quench the sample. The top frame is a normal photograph, while the bottom frame is a thermal image taken within a fraction of a second of the p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/325747"> <span id="translatedtitle">Economic assessment of proposed electric-discharge <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma field-pilot demonstration units for NO{sub x} removal in jet-engine exhaust: White paper for SERDP Project CP-1038</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This project is currently evaluating <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma (NTP) technologies for treating jet-engine exhaust arising from DoD test facilities. In the past, some economic analyses for NTP de-NO{sub x} have shown that it is not economical, compared to other techniques. The main reasons for this conclusion was that the previous analyses examined stand-alone, or less mature electrical-discharge reactors, or electron-beam based systems that incorporated both chemical additives and quite expensive electron accelerators. Also, in contrast to more recent developments, both the discharge and electron-beam techniques of the past did not extensively incorporate methods to increase the yields of active NO{sub x}-decomposing species. In an earlier White paper and a Project Report, the authors have analyzed the costs of more mature NTP systems incorporating chemical additives and new-concept NTP technologies for jet-engine emissions control and have shown lower exhaust-gas treatment costs for NTP systems compared to baseline standard de-NO{sub x} technologies like Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) combined with a wet scrubber or SCR combined with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). In this paper, the authors will examine their most-promising candidate NTP reactor systems for a field-pilot demonstration on jet-engine exhaust and discuss the economic analyses for these hybrid units, which show that the economics of the proposed candidate systems are more favorable than earlier NTP reactor economic-assessment conclusions for NO{sub x} removal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosocha, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chang, J.S.; Urashima, Kuniko; Kim, S.J. [McMaster Univ. (Canada); Miziolek, A.W. [Army Research Lab. (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...758...74B"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-Ray Surveys. I. The Influence of Feedback, <span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> Pressure, and Cluster Shapes on Y-M Scaling Relations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The utility of large Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys for determining cosmological parameters from cluster abundances is limited by the theoretical uncertainties in the integrated SZ-flux-to-mass relation, Y-M. We explore how <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure and the anisotropic shape of the gas distribution of the intracluster medium (ICM) impacts Y-M scaling using a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the cosmic web. We contrast results for models with different treatments of entropy injection and transport, varying radiative cooling, star formation and accompanying supernova feedback, cosmic rays, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that the gas kinetic-to-thermal pressure ratio, P kin/P th, from internal bulk motions depends on the cluster mass, and increases in the outer-cluster due to enhanced substructure, as does the asphericity of the ICM gas. With only a ~5%-10% correction to projected (observable) ellipticities, we can infer the three-dimensional ellipticities. Our simulated Y-M slope roughly follows the self-similar prediction, except for a steepening due to a deficit of gas in lower mass clusters at low redshift in our AGN feedback simulations. AGN feedback enhances the overall Y-M scatter, from ~11% to ~13% (z = 0) and to ~15% (z = 1), a reflection of the accretion history variations due to cluster merging. If we split the cluster system into lower, middle, and upper bands of both P kin/P th and long-to-short axis ratio, we find a ~10% effect on Y-M. Identifying observable second parameters related to internal bulk flows and anisotropy for cluster selection to minimize Y-M scatter in a "fundamental plane" would allow tighter cosmological parameter constraints.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Battaglia, N.; Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22086550"> <span id="translatedtitle">ON THE CLUSTER PHYSICS OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH AND X-RAY SURVEYS. I. THE INFLUENCE OF FEEDBACK, <span class="hlt">NON-THERMAL</span> PRESSURE, AND CLUSTER SHAPES ON Y-M SCALING RELATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The utility of large Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys for determining cosmological parameters from cluster abundances is limited by the theoretical uncertainties in the integrated SZ-flux-to-mass relation, Y-M. We explore how <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> pressure and the anisotropic shape of the gas distribution of the intracluster medium (ICM) impacts Y-M scaling using a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the cosmic web. We contrast results for models with different treatments of entropy injection and transport, varying radiative cooling, star formation and accompanying supernova feedback, cosmic rays, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that the gas kinetic-to-thermal pressure ratio, P {sub kin}/P {sub th}, from internal bulk motions depends on the cluster mass, and increases in the outer-cluster due to enhanced substructure, as does the asphericity of the ICM gas. With only a {approx}5%-10% correction to projected (observable) ellipticities, we can infer the three-dimensional ellipticities. Our simulated Y-M slope roughly follows the self-similar prediction, except for a steepening due to a deficit of gas in lower mass clusters at low redshift in our AGN feedback simulations. AGN feedback enhances the overall Y-M scatter, from {approx}11% to {approx}13% (z = 0) and to {approx}15% (z = 1), a reflection of the accretion history variations due to cluster merging. If we split the cluster system into lower, middle, and upper bands of both P {sub kin}/P {sub th} and long-to-short axis ratio, we find a {approx}10% effect on Y-M. Identifying observable second parameters related to internal bulk flows and anisotropy for cluster selection to minimize Y-M scatter in a 'fundamental plane' would allow tighter cosmological parameter constraints.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Battaglia, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0710.5057v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf nova oscillations and <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in cataclysmic variables -- VI. Spin rates, propellering, and coherence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine published observations of dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs) on the rise and decline of outbursts and show that their rates of change are in reasonable agreement with those predicted from the magnetic accretion model. We find evidence for propellering in the late stages of outburst of several dwarf novae, as shown by reductions in EUVE fluxes and from rapid increases of the DNO periods. Reanalysis of DNOs observed in TY PsA, which had particularly large amplitudes, shows that the apparent loss of coherence during late decline is better described as a regular switching between two nearby periods. It is partly this and the rapid deceleration in some systems that make the DNOs harder to detect. We suggest that the 28.95 s periodicity in WZ Sge, which has long been a puzzle, is caused by heated regions in the disc, just beyond the corotation radius, which are a consequence of magnetic coupling between the primary and gas in the accretion disc. This leads to a possible new interpretation of the `longer period DNOs' (lpDNOs) commonly observed in dwarf novae and nova-like variables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian Warner; Magaretha L. Pretorius</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53773899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the No-hair Theorem with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum. III. <span class="hlt">Quasi-periodic</span> Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An observational test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tim Johannsen; Dimitrios Psaltis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70018622"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beach-ridge development in Lake Michigan: Shoreline behavior in response to <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> lake-level events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strandplains of arcuate beach ridges are common in coastal embayments in parts of the Great Lakes. Similarities in beach-ridge development and geomorphology are recognizable in many of the embayments in the Lake Michigan basin despite differences in size and shape, available sediment type and supply, predepositional slope and topography, and hydrographic regime between the embayments. These similarities are primarily a product of three scales of quasiperiodic lake-level variation ranging in time from 30 to 600 years and in water level change from 0.5 to 3.7 m. The interaction of these three lake-level variations can be represented on a Curray (1964) diagram (rate of water level change versus rate of sediment supply). The position of any shoreline on the diagram and the type of behavior the shoreline is experiencing is a product of the interaction of the three variations. Two large Strandplains of late Holocene beach ridges occur at opposite ends of Lake Michigan (Toleston Beach and Thompson embayment). The two areas exhibit similar patterns of beach-ridge development for the past 2600 calendar years. That is, both areas form beach ridges about every 30 years. Groups of 4 to 6 beach ridges reflect a longer-term lake-level variation of about 150 years. Only during the largest variation of about 600 years in duration do the two areas differ. The rise to the 1700 cal yr B.P. high caused the erosion of beach ridges back to 2800 cal yrs B.P. in northern Lake Michigan. In southern Lake Michigan, no erosion occurred during this lake level high. Differences in shoreline development between the two areas are related to the rate of sediment supply to the shorelines. As the sediment sink for the southern half of Lake Michigan, the southern strandplain received a greater sediment flux than the northern strandplain during the latter part of the late Holocene and produced a continuous record of beach-ridge development. ?? 1995 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, T.A.; Baedke, S.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/549271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf Nova Oscillations and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables II. A Low Inertia Magnetic Accretor Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Dwarf Nova Oscillations observed in Cataclysmic Variable (CV) stars are interpreted in the context of a Low Inertia Accretor model, in which accretion on to an equatorial belt of the white dwarf primary causes the belt to vary its angular velocity. The rapid deceleration phase is attributed to propellering. Evidence that temporary expulsion rather than accretion of gas occurs during this phase is obtained from the large drop in EUV flux. We show that the QPOs are most probably caused by a vertical thickening of the disc, moving as a travelling wave near the inner edge of the disc. This alternately obscures and `reflects' radiation from the central source, and is visible even in quite low inclination systems. A possible excitation mechanism, caused by winding up and reconnection of magnetic field lines, is proposed. We apply the model, deduced largely from VW Hyi observations, to re-interpret observations of SS Cyg, OY Car, UX UMa, V2051 Oph, V436 Cen and WZ Sge. In the last of these we demonstrate the exi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warner, B; Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18187316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of strange Axiom A attractors near <span class="hlt">quasi</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> flows on T m , m≧3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that by a small C 2 (resp. C ?) perturbation of a quasiperiodic flow on the 3-torus (resp. the m-torus, m>3), one can produce strange Axiom A attractors. Ancillary results and physical interpretation are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Newhouse; D. Ruelle; F. Takens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060013336&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comprehensive Analysis of RXTE Data from Cyg X-1. Spectral Index-<span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency-Luminosity Correlations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present timing and spectral analysis of approx. 2.2 Ms of Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) archival data from Cyg X-1. Using the generic Comptonization model we reveal that the spectrum of Cyg X-1 consists of three components: a thermal seed photon spectrum, a Comptonized part of the seed photon spectrum and the iron line. We find a strong correlation between 0.1-20 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power-law index. Presence of two spectral phases (states) are clearly seen in the data when the spectral indices saturate at low and high values of QPO frequencies. This saturation effect was discovered earlier in a number of black hole candidate (BHC) sources and now we strongly confirm this phenomenon in Cyg X-1. In the soft state this index- QPO frequency correlation shows a saturation of the photon index Gamma approx. 2.1 at high values of the low frequency upsilon(sub L). The saturation level of Gamma approx. 2.1 is the lowest value found yet in BHCs. The bolometric luminosity does not show clear correlation with the index. We also show that Fe K(sub alpha) emission line strength (equivalent width, EW) correlates with the QPO frequency. EW increases from 200 eV in the low/hard state to 1.5 keV in the high/soft state. The revealed observational correlations allow us to propose a scenario for the spectral transition and iron line formation which occur in BHC sources. We also present the spectral state (the power-law index) evolution for eight years of Cyg X-1 observations by RXTE.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120016328&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherence Effects in L-Band Active and Passive Remote Sensing of <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Corn Canopies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to their highly random nature, vegetation canopies can be modeled using the incoherent transport theory for active and passive remote sensing applications. Agricultural vegetation canopies however are generally more structured than natural vegetation. The inherent row structure in agricultural canopies induces coherence effects disregarded by the transport theory. The objective of this study is to demonstrate, via Monte-Carlo simulations, these coherence effects on L-band scattering and thermal emission from corn canopies consisting of only stalks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utku, Cuneyt; Lang, Roger H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21448847"> <span id="translatedtitle">RT-2 DETECTION OF <span class="hlt">QUASI-PERIODIC</span> PULSATIONS IN THE 2009 JULY 5 SOLAR HARD X-RAY FLARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of an analysis of hard X-ray observations of the C2.7 solar flare detected by the RT-2 experiment on board the Coronas-Photon satellite. We detect hard X-ray pulsations at periods of {approx}12 s and {approx}15 s. We find a marginal evidence for a decrease in period with time. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the RHESSI satellite. We present a spectral analysis and measure the spectral parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rao, A. R.; Malkar, J. P.; Hingar, M. K.; Agrawal, V. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Chakrabarti, S. K. [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Nandi, A. [Space Science Division, ISRO Head Quarters, New Bel Road, Bangalore 560 231 (India); Debnath, D.; Kotoch, T. B. [Indian Center for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata 700 084 (India); Chidambaram, T. R.; Vinod, P.; Sreekumar, S. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, VRC, Thiruvananthapuram 695 022 (India); Kotov, Y. D.; Buslov, A. S.; Yurov, V. N.; Tyshkevich, V. G.; Arkhangelskij, A. I.; Zyatkov, R. A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Begum, S. Shaheda; Manoharan, P. K., E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.i [Radio Astronomy Center, Ooty 643 001 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26529329"> <span id="translatedtitle">Periodic, <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> and chaotic vibrations of a rub-impact rotor system supported on oil film bearings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vibration characteristics of a rub-impact rotor system supported on oil film bearings are investigated. Oil film forces are obtained from the short bearing approximation. Elastic impact and the Coulomb type of frictional relationship are assumed in the analysis. A nonlinear mathematical model with piecewise linear stiffness is used. Rotating speed, the system damping and unbalance are used as control parameters</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fulei Chu; Zhengsong Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3211004"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparative Kinetic Study and Microwaves <span class="hlt">Non-Thermal</span> Effects on the Formation of Poly(amic acid) 4,4?-(Hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic Anhydride (6FDA) and 4,4?-(Hexafluoroisopropylidene)bis(p-phenyleneoxy)dianiline (BAPHF). Reaction Activated by Microwave, Ultrasound and Conventional Heating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Green chemistry is the design of chemical processes that reduce or eliminate negative environmental impacts. The use and production of chemicals involve the reduction of waste products, non-toxic components, and improved efficiency. Green chemistry applies innovative scientific solutions in the use of new reagents, catalysts and non-classical modes of activation such as ultrasounds or microwaves. Kinetic behavior and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> effect of poly(amic acid) synthesized from (6FDA) dianhydride and (BAPHF) diamine in a low microwave absorbing p-dioxane solvent at low temperature of 30, 50, 70 °C were studied, under conventional heating (CH), microwave (MW) and ultrasound irradiation (US). Results show that the polycondensation rate decreases (MW > US > CH) and that the increased rates observed with US and MW are due to decreased activation energies of the Arrhenius equation. Rate constant for a chemical process activated by conventional heating declines proportionally as the induction time increases, however, this behavior is not observed under microwave and ultrasound activation. We can say that in addition to the thermal microwave effect, a <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> microwave effect is present in the system. PMID:22072913</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tellez, Hugo Mendoza; Alquisira, Joaquín Palacios; Alonso, Carlos Rius; Cortés, José Guadalupe López; Toledano, Cecilio Alvarez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920065394&hterms=phenomenology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dphenomenology"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neptune's <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0102007v10"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biological Effects of Microwaves: Thermal and <span class="hlt">nonThermal</span> Mechanisms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For about fifty years, it has been reported that microwave electromagnetic radiation (EMR) had effects on humans which could not be explained by detectible heating of tissue. Auditory responses to radar have been the best known of these phenomena. To account for microwave hearing, many studies in the literature have adopted a rate-of-heating hypothesis advanced by Foster and Finch in 1974. We show here that theoretical and experimental studies supporting this hypothesis are weaker than usually assumed. We develop a simple framework of understanding of EMR that may be used to explain microwave hearing as a nonthermal, nonacoustic effect. We then extend this approach to other contexts, pointing out several fundamental misconceptions confounding the field. EMR, especially wide-band EMR, primarily must have a nonthermal effect on living tissue before conversion to heat. Auditory and tactile sensations, central neurological disability, and blood pressure loss caused by EMR have been documented. Except microwave hearing, parameters of irradiation causing such effects have not been explored adequately and remain unknown. There appears not to be any forensic methodology to prove the cause of harm at nonthermal levels.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Michael Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53944068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biological Effects of Microwaves: Thermal and <span class="hlt">nonThermal</span> Mechanisms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For about fifty years, it has been reported that microwave electromagnetic radiation (EMR) had effects on humans which could not be explained by detectible heating of tissue. Auditory responses to radar have been the best known of these phenomena. To account for microwave hearing, many studies in the literature have adopted a rate-of-heating hypothesis advanced by Foster and Finch in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Michael Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.buergerwelle.de/pdf/jmw_bio_effects_emr_v4_0.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biological Effects of Microwaves: Thermal and <span class="hlt">nonThermal</span> Mechanisms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For about fifty years, it has been reported that microwave electromagnetic\\u000aradiation (EMR) had effects on humans which could not be explained by\\u000adetectible heating of tissue. Auditory responses to radar have been the best\\u000aknown of these phenomena. To account for microwave hearing, many studies in the\\u000aliterature have adopted a rate-of-heating hypothesis advanced by Foster and\\u000aFinch in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Michael Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14887880"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> melting in semiconductors measured at femtosecond resolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy has revealed new classes of physical, chemical and biological reactions, in which directed, deterministic motions of atoms have a key role. This contrasts with the random, diffusive motion of atoms across activation barriers that typically determines kinetic rates on slower timescales. An example of these new processes is the ultrafast melting of semiconductors, which is believed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Rousse; C. Rischel; S. Fourmaux; I. Uschmann; S. Sebban; G. Grillon; Ph. Balcou; E. Förster; J. P. Geindre; P. Audebert; J. C. Gauthier; D. Hulin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0101038v7"> <span id="translatedtitle">Existence Proof of <span class="hlt">nonThermal</span> Vacuum Radiation from Acceleration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A proof is developed from first principles, independent of general relativity and of thermodynamics, that there exists a threshold acceleration above which radiation (real particle creation) from the vacuum must occur. The radiation is not expected to follow a Planckian distribution. PACS Codes: 03.65.Bz 04.70.-s 26.35.+c</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Michael Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9711142v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transonic Magnetic Slim Accretion Disks and kilo-Hertz <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillations in Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The inner regions of accretion disks of weakly magnetized neutron stars are affected by general relativity and stellar magnetic fields. Even for field strengths sufficiently small so that there is no well-defined magnetosphere surrounding the neutron star, there is still a region in the disk where magnetic field stress plays an important dynamical role. We construct magnetic slim disk models appropriate for neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) which incorporate both effects (GR and magnetic fields). The B-field--disk interaction is treated in a phenomenological manner, allowing for both closed and open field configurations. We show that even for surface magnetic fields as weak as $10^7-10^8$ G, the sonic point of the accretion flow can be significantly modified from the pure GR value (near $6M$). We derive an approximate analytical expression for the sonic radius and show that it mainly depends on the surface field strength $B_0$ and mass accretion rate $\\dot M$ through the ratio $b^2\\propto B_0^2/\\dot M$. The sonic radius thus obtained approaches the usual Alfven radius for high $b^2$, and asymptotes to $6M$ as $b^2\\to 0$. We therefore suggest that for neutron stars in LMXBs, the distinction between the disk sonic radius and the magnetospheric radius may not exist. We apply our theoretical results to the kHz QPOs observed in the X-ray fluxes of LMXBs. If these QPOs are associated with the orbital frequency at the inner radius of the disk, then the QPO frequencies and their correlation with mass accretion rate can provide useful constraints on the nature of the magnetic field -- disk interactions as well as on the structure of magnetic fields in LMXBs. Current observational data may suggest that the magnetic fields in LMXBs have complex topology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dong Lai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-02-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0405360v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard state, steep power-law (soft) state and in transition between these states. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT ~ 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma~1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (kT~5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma~2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Titarchuk; Ralph Fiorito</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53871354"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability Timescales in the M87 Jet: Signatures of E 2 Losses, Discovery of a <span class="hlt">Quasi</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in HST-1, and the Site of TeV Flaring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the variability timescales in the jet of M87 with two goals. The first is to use the rise times and decay times in the radio, ultraviolet, and X-ray light curves of HST-1 to constrain the source size and the energy loss mechanisms affecting the relativistic electron distributions. HST-1 is the first jet knot clearly resolved from the nuclear</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. E. Harris; C. C. Cheung; Lukasz Stawarz; J. A. Biretta; E. S. Perlman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050136663&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">How to Distinguish Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray Binaries? Spectral Index and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have revealed strong correlations between 1-10 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources when seen in the low/hard state, the steep power-law (soft) state, and in transition between these states. In the soft state these index-QPO frequency correlations show a saturation of the photon index GAMMA approximately equal to 2.7 at high values of the low frequency nu(sub L). This saturation effect was previously identified as a black hole signature. In this paper we argue that this saturation does not occur, at least for one neutron star (NS) source 4U 1728-34, for which the index GAMMA monotonically increases with nu(sub L) to the values of 6 and higher. We base this conclusion on our analysis of approximately 1.5 Msec of RXTE archival data for 4U 1728-34. We reveal the spectral evolution of the Comptonized blackbody spectra when the source transitions from the hard to soft states. The hard state spectrum is a typical thermal Comptonization spectrum of the soft photons which originate in the disk and the NS outer photospheric layers. The hard state photon index is GAMMA approximately 2. The soft state spectrum consists of two blackbody components which are only slightly Comptonized. Thus we can claim (as expected from theory) that in NS sources thermal equilibrium is established for the soft state. To the contrary in BH sources, the equilibrium is never established due to the presence of the BH horizon. The emergent BH spectrum, even in the high/soft state, has a power law component. We also identify the low QPO frequency nu(sub L) as a fundamental frequency of the quasi-spherical component of the transition layer (presumably related to the corona and the NS and disk magnetic closed field lines). The lower frequency nu(sub SL) is identified as the frequency of oscillations of a quasi-cylindrical configuration of the TL (presumably related to the NS and disk magnetic open field lines). We also show that the presence of Fe K(sub alpha), emission-line strengths, QPOs, and the link between them does not depend on radio flux in 4U 1728-34.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nickolai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040079819&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH. In the TL model for corona the QPO frequency vnu(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency nu(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and nu(sub low) is related to the TL s normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency nu(sub MA). The observed correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also suggest a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013A%26A...552A..10S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations: possible high-precision determination of black hole and neutron star spin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. Using known frequencies of the twin-peak high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HF QPOs) and known mass of the central black hole, the black-hole dimensionless spin a can be determined by assuming a concrete version of the resonance model. However, a wide range of observationally limited values of the black hole mass implies low precision of the spin estimates. Aims: We discuss the possibility of higher precision for the black hole spin a measurements in the framework of a multi-resonance model inspired by observations of more than two HF QPOs in the black hole systems, which are expected to occur at two (or more) different radii of the accretion disc. This framework is also applied in a modified form to the neutron star systems. Methods: We determine the spin and mass dependence of the twin-peak frequencies with a general rational ratio n:m, assuming a non-linear resonance of oscillations with the epicyclic and Keplerian frequencies or their combinations. In the multi-resonant model, the twin-peak resonances are combined properly to give the observed frequency set. For the black hole systems we focus on the special case of duplex frequencies, when the top, bottom, or mixed frequency is common at two different radii where the resonances occur giving triple frequency sets. Results: The sets of triple frequency ratios and the related spin a are given. The resonances are considered up to n = 5 since excitation of higher order resonances is improbable. The strong resonance model for "magic" values of the black hole spin means that two (or more) versions of resonance could occur at the same radius, allowing cooperative effects between the resonances. For neutron star systems we introduce a resonant switch model that assumes switching of oscillatory modes at resonant points. Conclusions: In the case of doubled twin-peak HF QPOs excited at two different radii with common top, bottom, or mixed frequency, the black hole spin a is given by the triple frequency ratio set. The spin is determined precisely, but not uniquely, because the same frequency set could correspond to more than one concrete spin a. The black hole mass is given by the magnitude of the observed frequencies. The resonant switch model puts relevant limits on the mass and spin of neutron stars, and we expect a strong increase in the fitting procedure precision when different twin oscillatory modes are applied to data in the vicinity of different resonant points. We expect the multi-resonance model to be applicable to data from the planned LOFT or similar X-ray satellite observatory. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stuchlík, Z.; Kotrlová, A.; Török, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1305.3552.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations: possible high-precision determination of black hole and neutron star spin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using known frequencies of the twin-peak high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HF QPOs) and known mass of the central black hole, the black-hole dimensionless spin can be determined by assuming a concrete version of the resonance model. However, a wide range of observationally limited values of the black hole mass implies low precision of the spin estimates. We discuss the possibility of higher precision of the black hole spin measurements in the framework of a multi-resonance model inspired by observations of more than two HF QPOs in the black hole systems, which are expected to occur at two (or more) different radii of the accretion disc. For the black hole systems we focus on the special case of duplex frequencies, when the top, bottom, or mixed frequency is common at two different radii where the resonances occur giving triple frequency sets. The sets of triple frequency ratios and the related spin are given. The strong resonance model for "magic" values of the black hole spin means that two (or more...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stuchlik, Zdenek; Torok, Gabriel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pks.mpg.de/~hskokos/Citations/P1_citations.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">R.1) Celletti A.: 2010, "Stability and Chaos in Celestial Mechanics", Springer-Verlag. R.2) Celletti A.: 2010, "Regular and Chaotic Dynamics of Periodic and <span class="hlt">Quasi-Periodic</span> Motions", in "Space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and resonances around L4 in the elliptic restricted three-body problem", Cel. Mech. Dyn. Astron., 104, 145-158. R in the Planetary System", in "The Solar System Beyond Neptune", eds. Barucci M. A., Boehnhardt H. Cruikshank D. P</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Skokos, Charalampos "Haris"</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RMxAC..44..109D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time lags of the kilohertz <span class="hlt">quasi-periodic</span> oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied the time lags and the coherence of the X-ray light curves of the neutron star low mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53. These quantities are frequency-dependent measures of the time or phase delay and of the degree of linear correlation between two X-ray light curves in two different energies bands; they encode information about the size and geometry of the medium that produces them.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Avellar, M. G. B.; Méndez, M.; Sanna, A.; Horvath, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=235037"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> processing of apple cider: storage quality under equivalent process conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three processing techniques: heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet light (UV) were optimized to achieve a similar 6 log reduction of inoculated Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider. PEF treatment at 23 kV/cm for a total treatment time of 150 us at 48C, UV exposure for 51 s at 15C and heat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21514950"> <span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of antibiotics in water by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma treatment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The decomposition of three ?-lactam antibiotics (amoxicillin, oxacillin and ampicillin) in aqueous solution was investigated using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in coaxial configuration. Solutions of concentration 100 mg/L were made to flow as a film over the surface of the inner electrode of the plasma reactor, so the discharge was generated at the gas-liquid interface. The electrical discharge was operated in pulsed regime, at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, in oxygen. Amoxicillin was degraded after 10 min plasma treatment, while the other two antibiotics required about 30 min for decomposition. The evolution of the degradation process was continuously followed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyses. PMID:21514950</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magureanu, M; Piroi, D; Mandache, N B; David, V; Medvedovici, A; Bradu, C; Parvulescu, V I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24790936"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toluene oxidation by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma combined with palladium catalysts.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation of toluene in air was investigated using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) combined with a Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. When using only plasma, rather low selectivity toward CO2 was obtained: 32-35%. By filling the DBD reactor with Pd/Al2O3 catalyst the CO2 selectivity was significantly enhanced (80-90%), however, a large amount of toluene was desorbed from the catalyst when the discharge was operated. By filling a quarter of the discharge gap with catalyst and placing the rest of the catalyst downstream of the plasma reactor, an important increase of CO2 selectivity (~75%) and a 15% increase in toluene conversion were achieved as compared to the results with plasma alone. The catalyst exhibited a very good stability in this reaction. PMID:24790936</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magureanu, Monica; Dobrin, Daniela; Mandache, Nicolae B; Cojocaru, Bogdan; Parvulescu, Vasile I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ExFl...54.1467B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of a circular cylinder wake to a symmetric actuation by <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> plasma discharges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the flow past a circular cylinder is manipulated by two plasma discharges placed on both sides of the model (at ±50°). A parametric investigation by force balance is conducted to define the sensitivity of the flow field to unsteady perturbations imparted by plasma actuators (dielectric barrier discharge) at 15.6 m/s ( Re D = 40,000). Effects of simple sinusoidal waveform, burst modulation and amplitude modulation are compared for low-frequency excitations. Regardless of the excitation mode, the cylinder experiences a large increase in the drag coefficient. The larger drag increase is observed for excitation related to the lock-on regime. Fast PIV measurements and triple decomposition by proper orthogonal decomposition are performed to extract the dynamical changes in the cylinder wake and to discriminate the control effects on the coherent and fluctuating turbulence. As expected, the control principally acts on the coherent flow structures. When forced, the vortices form closer to the base of the cylinder regardless of the actuation mode. This results in the drag increase observed by force measurements. The effectiveness of burst modulation is also due to the suppression of irregular shedding that is observed in the natural flow sequence and to a high level of correlation between the upper and lower vortex shedding. Finally, flow visualizations indicate that similar results can be obtained at higher Reynolds number ( Re D = 128,000, 50 m/s).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benard, N.; Moreau, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27696807"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpenetrating plasma shells: near-equipartition magnetic field generation and <span class="hlt">non-thermal</span> particle acceleration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic electromagnetic\\u000arelativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the collision of two\\u000ainterpenetrating plasma shells. The highly accurate plasma-kinetic\\u000a\\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. O. Silva; R. A. Fonseca; J. W. Tonge; J. M. Dawson; W. B. Mori; M. V. Medvedev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/423045"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Non-thermal</span> interactions between high-strength microwave fields and ceramics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous claims have been made of observations that microwave heating of ceramics promotes faster processing or solid state reaction rates than in conventional furnace heating. Explanations for these observations, as well as the observations themselves, have caused some controversy since there is no verifiable theoretical explanation. Issues of sample temperature measurement also